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2010 Facilities Master Plan - Vol. 1 & 2Volume 1: Project Overview Facilities Master Plan Final Report &EBRUARY  Architects Design Group, Inc. 7INTER0ARK&ORT-YERS &LORIDA Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Volume I: Project Overview Final Report – February 17, 2010 INDEX Executive Summary Section 1: City Overview • City Organization Chart 1.1 Population Growth and Impact 1.2 Facility Utilization and Organizational Needs Assessment 1.3 Spatial Needs Summary 1.4 Trends Affecting City Services Section 2: Existing City Facilities • Facility Sites: Location Map 2.1 Facility Inventory 2.2 Facility Conditions Assessment Section 3: Citywide Evaluation Criteria 3.1 Facility Security 3.2 Regulatory Compliance 3.3 Sustainability 3.4 Information Technology 3.5 Survivability Section 4: Facilities Master Plan • Considerations 4.1 Development Alternatives 4.2 Recommendations Section 5: Capital Improvement Program • Considerations C.I.P. Summary C.I.P. Project Details Section 6: Funding Opportunities and Budget Considerations February 17, 2010 Mr. David Womacks Director, Public Works City of Oakland Park 3801 NE 5th Avenue Oakland Park, FL 33334 Re: Facilities Master Plan: Final Report City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07/1.02 Dear Mr. Womacks: Enclosed is the Final Report for the Facilities Master Plan, as adopted by the City Commission on February 17, 2010. The project was undertaken as a multi-task process, beginning in May 2008 with two concurrent tasks: 1.) the survey and assessment of existing city facilities conditions, capacity, and space utilization, and 2.) the analysis of the space and facility requirements of various City departments. These tasks were concluded in January of 2009, and are included in this report. An element of the facilities assessment, the “Citywide ADA Study” was submitted on January 26, 2009. Subsequent to these tasks, ADG has prepared preliminary recommendations to include development alternatives for existing facilities, proposed future facilities, and a Capital Improvement Program with a phased approach to implementation and funding priorities. Input from City staff throughout this process and a presentation at a May 2009 Commission Workshop provided the Consultant further direction in preparing recommendations that support the City’s Strategic Plan initiatives. It is important to note that master planning is necessarily a fluid process. The Facilities Master Plan has evolved over the past two years in an attempt to adjust to and keep pace with the current volatile economic climate and the City’s refinement of budget priorities, internal re-organization and staffing, and the completion of facility upgrades and the re-location of departmental staff. Conditions can and will continue to change, and it is recommended that the Plan and Capital Improvements Program outlined in this Report be re-visited annually to assess progress, make modifications to adjust to current economic and demographic conditions, and refine the implementation strategy. Facilities Master Plan: Executive Summary City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Executive Summary, 02-17-10- p. 2 Elements and/or issues investigated in the study that we wish to bring to the attention of the City Commission and Administrative Staff are summarized as follows: The Future of Oakland Park: Population Growth and Impact In many important aspects, the relationship between population and levels of service is closely related. Future needs are largely based upon population growth projections and demographic changes, as these relate to the City’s provision of services and the potential need for new or enlarged facilities and increased staffing levels. Conversely technology and increased efficiency in the delivery of services will have an impact upon municipal personnel, and may mitigate the need for expansion related to future service requirements. Recent forecast data has reduced previous population estimates for the 2005 baseline, and has adjusted future population totals to reflect slower growth rates than previously factored. However, long-range planning efforts do need to anticipate that growth will resume once Florida and the nation’s economy stabilizes. What is significant to consider is the way in which the City will grow. As Broward County is approaching a “build-out” scenario, the pattern of growth is expected to result in higher densities. In particular, municipalities in the eastern region of the County, such as Oakland Park, are expected to see the majority of that growth. Supporting that growth pattern, adopted future land uses for the City include increased density in existing residential areas, in addition to changes of use from commercial to mixed use with additional residential units at high density. The established goals of the City’s adopted CRA Master Plan further encourage mixed use and transit oriented development, to support affordable housing initiatives, higher density residential development, and pedestrian oriented amenities. Future planned development that puts less emphasis on serving the out-migration patterns of a commuting work force, will likewise put greater demands on specific City services as well. The following population growth chart for Broward County has been updated for revised forecast data published by Broward County Planning Services Division (BPSD) in July 2009. Population forecasts for 2010 into the future are on the whole 6-8% less than BPSD’s previous forecast data published in 2005. In contrast, the population chart for the City is based upon the most recent forecast data from March 2007. It may be anticipated that similar modifications to these forecasts will apply. Facilities Master Plan: Executive Summary City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Executive Summary, 02-17-10- p. 3 Broward County PopulationThis chart reflects the census population of Broward County and its growth for the period of 1930 to 2030 with projections for the years 2006, 2010, 2020, and 2030 based on July 2009 forecast data. The chart reflects forecasts which account for the beginning of a decline in the average annual population growth in the period from 2000-2005, with a sharp decline in the period from 2005-2010. Forecasts project growth beginning in 2010, but at a rate less than half that of decades previous to 2000. This chart does not reflect seasonal population which has a direct impact upon services provided by government entities. Facilities Master Plan: Executive Summary City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Executive Summary, 02-17-10- p. 4 City of Oakland Park Population This chart reflects the census population of the City of Oakland Park for the period of 1930 to 2030 with projections for the years 2006, 2010, 2020, and 2030 based upon March 2007 forecast data. More recent forecast data in July 2009 for Broward County projects a decline in growth in the period from 2000-2010, and a growth rate half that of previous decades for the period from 2010-2030. A similar decline in population in the City from 2000-2010 is yet to be confirmed with the upcoming 2010 Census, and it may be anticipated that the City’ annual growth rate beyond 2010 will be likewise slower than previous forecasts. Facilities Master Plan: Executive Summary City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Executive Summary, 02-17-10- p. 5 These population forecasts and future growth trends support the conclusion that the pattern of City and County growth will continue to be the primary factor in predicating service levels. We believe that the careful monitoring of both population growth forecasts and “trends” as discussed in this report are in the best interests of the City of Oakland Park as either factor has the ability to significantly affect the proposed Capital Improvement Program, both with respect to project size as well as project priority. Facility Utilization and Spatial Needs Assessment The master plan process involved an analysis of the City’s growth and the anticipated impact on facilities. As the economic recession has evolved through the course of this study, forecast data as previously discussed, has been revised. Moreover, the wave of foreclosures and other effects of the economic downturn are readily observable. In response, the conclusions of this report are based upon revised time frames which include a five year window for “current” need, and future need projections at longer intervals for 2020 and 2030. In this regard, the current recession offers time to “catch-up” to fulfill current needs. However, in relation to the master planning process, it is important to note that historically economic recessions are a short-term phenomenon, and should not defer the need to focus on long-term goals. In preparing the Spatial Needs Assessment, a multi-task methodology was employed, which included the distribution of a Space Needs questionnaire to designated department personnel, followed by interviews and facility tours to assess the current space utilization. The evaluation, including staff review and consensus, was completed in January 2009. Thus, the current needs have been analyzed based upon the recommended space requirements for a facility to accommodate the staffing levels as budgeted for the 2009 fiscal year. The Spatial Needs Assessment serves to provide recommended facility areas to meet the current and future needs for each department. As is exhibited in the following Spatial Needs Summary, most existing City facilities do not have the effective functional area that is recommended for the operations of these departments. The City has, for many years, accommodated its spatial needs by adding personnel and services into existing spaces and areas taken over from other departments. In many respects this can be identified as a “Band-Aid” approach that has offered, at best, temporary relief to overcrowding of facilities and other functional deficiencies. The comparison between spatial need (2010-14) and what is currently available illustrates the magnitude of the problem. Facilities Master Plan: Executive Summary City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Executive Summary, 02-17-10- p. 6 Spatial Needs Summary 1 Cumulative totals 2 Approximate existing office area allocated at City Hall for the City Manager, Finance, City Clerk, Human Resources, and ITS. 3 Existing area noted is the area allocated for Engineering/Community Development at the New Municipal Building. 4 A Space Needs Assessment for BSO future needs is excluded from the scope of this report, existing area carried forward as future need. 5 Combined facility area for administrative and crew functions of both Administration and Operations Divisions. (Unconditioned facility area and yard space for maintenance and storage functions is excluded from this summary table). 6 Combined facility area for administrative and crew functions of both Parks & Leisure Services and Parks Division. (Unconditioned facility area and yard space for maintenance and storage functions is excluded from this summary table). Department Existing Facility Area 2009 (estimated gross square feet) Spatial Requirements (in gross square feet) Current Need 2010-14 Future Need1 2020 Future Need1 2030 City Administration 8,1022 13,098 13,678 14,458 Engineering/Community Development 8,5683 9,182 9,542 10,952 Police/Broward Sheriff Office 17,289 17,2894 17,2894 17,2894 Fire Rescue 20,473 32,834 34,548 38,318 Public Works5 8,500 14,250 16,600 17,750 Parks and Leisure6 4,500 10,057 10,401 11,249 Total 67,432 96,710 102,058 110,016 Facilities Master Plan: Executive Summary City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Executive Summary, 02-17-10- p. 7 Facilities Conditions Assessment The city facilities surveyed under the scope of this study are of varying age and condition, and many can be generally characterized as having been extended beyond their useful life with only minimal renovation and routine maintenance. Most of the existing buildings were originally constructed 20-40 years ago often for entirely different functional purposes, and subsequently have undergone a series of modifications and “piece-meal” additions that have tended to compromise their functionality. Significant issues that were observed are noted as follows: 1. As indicated by their age, the majority of the buildings are not built to current Florida Building Code and depending upon the level of renovation that may be desired, could require significant investment to upgrade to current codes. This factor alone may substantiate that the construction of a new facility is more economically feasible. 2. Although the City is implementing a plan, all buildings are observed to be non-ADA compliant to varying degrees, failing to meet either Federal or State ADA requirements for accessibility. 3. Critical facilities do not meet currently recommended enhanced building requirements for survivability, or design requirements as would be mandated by current Florida Building Code. 4. All buildings surveyed, including new renovations, are unsprinklered. State Life Safety Codes, such as NFPA 1, could mandate the retrofit of certain facilities with sprinkler systems, particularly if undergoing a renovation. 5. Facilities are overcrowded, with equipment and storage boxes compromising functional work areas and in some instances, stored in egress paths, a violation of life safety codes. 6. There are visible signs of moisture penetration in several buildings as a result of leaks, inappropriate construction, or deferred maintenance. 7. Many facilities have poorly sealed windows and doors, the source of significant heat and moisture gains and conditioned air loss. In summary, many of the existing structures, accommodating critically important functions, are sub-standard and non-compliant with current codes. Their continued utilization, in their present condition, poses specific risks to the City. As an example, the penetration of moisture into the building interior has Facilities Master Plan: Executive Summary City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Executive Summary, 02-17-10- p. 8 the potential of creating air quality issues. This is an important and critical issue, as air quality is typically a product of mold and mildew found in unobserved areas, such as ceiling cavities, behind wall coverings, etc. Furthermore, the conditions of many of these aging facilities pose additional burden upon maintenance requirements, and are generally more costly to operate due to their inherent energy inefficiency. These observations point to a set of evaluation criteria which was considered as an element of the conditions assessment. In support of the City’s Strategic Plan, citywide criteria addressed in this report include security, regulatory compliance, sustainability, information technology, and survivability. Planning for the Present and Future: Capital Improvements Program The aim of the Facilities Master Plan and Capital Improvement Program (C.I.P.) is to permit and encourage a pragmatic approach to current and future development of the City’s properties. In addition to factors previously discussed regarding space needs and the assessment of facility conditions, the proposed future development of properties has been considered with regards to Future Land Use, the CRA Master Plan, and the recommendations of the Recreation and Parks Master Plan, adopted October 2009. The Facilities Master Plan is guided in the near term (5 year horizon) by one of the City’s seven “Strategic Performance Areas”: Financial Stability and Sustainability. The annual operations and maintenance budget is impacted both by the quantity of facilities, as well as the condition of those facilities. Guiding the recommendations in this Plan is the premise of a “sustainable, consolidated, fiscally conservative” approach to managing the City’s facility needs. The “Near Term Plan” also borrows from the City’s overall business plan strategy to “reshape, automate, resize for excellence” (R.A.R.E.). The operations and maintenance costs of the existing facilities inventory may be mitigated in 4 ways: 1.) consolidate personnel and services at appropriate facilities to reduce the citywide facility area 2.) vacate and cease maintenance of under-utilized and defunct facilities which have exceeded their useful life 3.) sell or lease viable properties, and/or maintain properties at nominal operational expense to hold for future development Facilities Master Plan: Executive Summary City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Executive Summary, 02-17-10- p. 9 4.) upgrade and repair facilities which will be utilized into the foreseeable future, to reduce annual maintenance expenditures and operation costs These strategies are a primary consideration in the proposed Development Alternatives for many of the City properties. For some properties, long-term goals and objectives are of more significance, and may include the master planning and redevelopment of properties with expanded or new facilities. Importantly, these long range “master plans” also serve to guide the decisions related to investing in interim renovations. C.I.P. Strategy The goal which forms the basis of the proposed 5-Year C.I.P. is to phase out the inventory of older facilities which are generally deficient in space needs, more costly to operate and maintain, have cited ADA non-compliant issues, and are not feasible for renovation especially if upgrades are required to meet current building codes. Rather than implement costly renovations, funds are to be allocated towards future new and replacement facilities. This in turn increases the overall inventory of new, modernized facilities which will meet current and future functional and space needs, be compliant with current applicable codes, and meet standards for energy efficient construction, to realize lower operational costs and nominal maintenance in the initial years of the new building’s life cycle (offsetting other capital expenditures). As summarized in the table below, 74% of the City’s 2009 gross facility area consists of facilities that have been constructed (or undergone major renovation) prior to 2005. The original construction of many of these facilities dates back 40+ years, and in some cases was followed by major renovations 20+ years ago. In consideration that major building elements such as HVAC equipment and the roof (15 -20 year life expectancy) may be nearing the point of replacement, further renovation of such a facility may not be warranted. As previously state, upon further analysis of the facility’s functional utilization, existing conditions, and operations and maintenance costs, funding required for a major renovation is often not economically viable. Facilities Master Plan: Executive Summary City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Executive Summary, 02-17-10- p. 10 Facility Inventory Summary The proposed 5-Year C.I.P. immediately benefits from a reduction of the facility inventory accomplished in 2009: a 20% decrease in gross facility area (GFA) due to the re-location of Engineering & Community Development and the Broward Sheriff Office to the New Municipal Building, and the subsequent re-location of the Active Adults program to the Collins Community Center. This resulted in 3 vacated facility properties: 250 NE 33 Street, Public Safety Building, and the City Annex (lease terminated). By the conclusion of the 5-Year C.I.P. in 2014, the proposed C.I.P. program projects a nearly 50/50 ratio of pre and post-2005 construction GFA, accomplished in part by a small overall net reduction of facility inventory. By 2020/2030, the proposed C.I.P. program will result in an 86% GFA of post-2005 construction/renovation, or otherwise stated, 86% of the city’s facility inventory will be no more than 15-25 years old. An even more aggressive goal towards a 100% replacement/major renovation of the facility inventory by 2020/2030 may be adopted. The C.I.P. program also proposes an increase in the total citywide gross facility area by 2020/2030, in response to meeting the projected future need. While this will impact the operations budget proportionately, it is important to note that this additional facility area will be in the category of new, modernized facilities which will be more efficient to operate and maintain. Inventory: Age of Facility Citywide Facility Area (estimated gross square feet) Existing 2008/09 Current 2010 Proposed 5-Year 2010-2014 Proposed Future 2020/2030 Pre-2005 Construction/Major Renovation 110,292 89,269 77,280 26,855 Post-2005 Construction/Major Renovation 39,488 39,488 68,688 167,288 Total Citywide Facility Area 149,780 128,757 145,968 194,143 Facilities Master Plan: Executive Summary City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Executive Summary, 02-17-10- p. 11 Proposed Project Priorities and Recommendations An effective Capital Improvement Program will require consensus on the strategic prioritization of projects, to utilize available funding to strike a balance between improvements required for essential City operations and capital improvements towards meeting the City’s future needs. In evaluating the information and conclusions as presented in this report, and in consideration of the current economic uncertainty, we recommend for consideration the following priorities (in no order of preference) to guide the near term and long term capital improvements to be considered in the Facilities C.I.P. for the City of Oakland Park. Phase I: Near Term (5-10 year) 1. Cost Containment and Maintenance • Close vacated and underutilized facilities, assess opportunities to lease viable properties to maintain the facility at no cost (and potentially generate revenue), and hold property for future redevelopment. • Implement an annual assessment for maintenance of city-owned parking facilities, and assess the feasibility of implementing a metered parking system. 2. City-Wide Upgrades and Maintenance of Core Facilities • Adopt a ten year plan to stabilize and repair those facilities to remain in use for the foreseeable future (beyond 5 years), to accomplish mandated code issues, extend the useful life, and achieve reductions in operation costs, specifically to address the following criteria: 1. Security (implement citywide system) 2. Regulatory Compliance: Life Safety and ADA compliance 3. Energy Efficiency (equipment, fixtures, and building envelope performance) 4. Information Technology (implement citywide upgrades) 5. Survivability (as required for critical facilities) 3. Facility Improvements for ADA Compliance • Adopt a five year plan to achieve citywide ADA compliance as prioritized, in coordination with proposed capital improvements. Facilities Master Plan: Executive Summary City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Executive Summary, 02-17-10- p. 12 Phase II: Long Term Growth and Planning (2020/2030) 4. Public Works Complex Replacement Facility • Construct a new consolidated Public Works Complex for the Administration and Operations Divisions at the Municipal Services site. 5. New Parks & Leisure Facilities • Central Community Center • Library replacement (coordinate with the Recreation and Cultural C.I.P.) 6. Replace Fire Rescue Facilities / New EOC • A separate study is recommended to assess the future citywide needs that will establish the long range plans for the effective allocation of facilities and resources. Land acquisition may be a required element. 7. Replace City Hall • Construct new City Hall at current location or future site to be determined, pending the future development and goals of the CRA Local Activity Center 8. Parking Facilities and Future Transit Oriented Development • Transit oriented development and other elements of the CRA master plan may require future funding for parking facilities. Available land for Park-and-Ride and similar amenities to serve mass-transit hubs is currently lacking. Upon further definition of the goals and implementation strategy to meet future parking needs, a program to establish funding is to be integrated into the C.I.P. Land acquisition will also require long-range planning. These recommendations are also in recognition of the City Commission’s policy direction to focus on both the maintenance of public safety and the preservation of “brick and mortar” core services. It is important to note that available funding will influence to a great degree the actual phased implementation of the proposed capital improvements, and what is most essential is to distinguish between the near term and long term objectives. Facilities Master Plan: Executive Summary City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Executive Summary, 02-17-10- p. 13 General Recommendations to Support Project Priorities 1. Facility Planning – Long Term Goals • It is recommended that the City adopt a facility design “mission statement” that all new facilities be planned to be efficiently and cost effectively designed, that they be planned to accommodate future expansion, and that they are as flexible as possible in order to meet the changing needs in the future and maximize the useful life of the building. 2. Energy Management and Conservation Technologies • It is recommended that the City adopt a policy to integrate energy management and conservation technologies into new construction and proposed renovations. 3. Capital Improvement Program • It is recommended that the City adopt a defined C.I.P. plan and put into place appropriate funding that will be of sufficient magnitude as to fund the noted facilities and selected development options. The implementation of a land acquisition strategy will be critical to meet future facility needs. 4. Funding Strategy: • It is recommended that the City establish a “City Funding Committee,” whose goal and/or mission statement is to identify and establish funding methodologies for the improvements and new facilities that are identified within the adopted C.I.P. This Committee should meet on a regularly scheduled basis, identify funding opportunities, seek appropriate grants and pursue alternative funding. Potential Funding Sources ADG recently hosted a Public Facilities Funding Seminar to explore various methods for Florida Cities and Counties to fund projects similar to those in the proposed C.I.P. for Oakland Park. The current economic climate of deteriorating revenue sources make this a very challenging time for civic leaders. There is no single “silver bullet” that makes these projects feasible. Rather, it is the leveraging of incremental opportunities and creative thinking that can make continued municipal facility construction possible. Facilities Master Plan: Executive Summary City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Executive Summary, 02-17-10- p. 14 All sources for potential grants should be explored by the City, as well as other potential sources of revenue such as existing bond issues that may be reaching maturity. It is also important that the City prioritize select “infrastructure” and energy efficiency improvement projects which may be eligible for funding by Federal economic stimulus programs, especially those intended to produce jobs. In consideration of the financial challenges to the City’s established funding strategy, it is anticipated that major capital improvement projects (such as the proposed community center and municipal facilities) may be offered to the voters, at the appropriate time, for approval by general obligation bonds. Conclusion There have been numerous individuals who have been generous of their time in helping us to accumulate information, test potential solutions, provide guidance and arrive at conclusions when such was warranted. In particular, we would like to acknowledge and express our sincere appreciation to the following individuals: John Stunson - City Manager Horace McHugh - Assistant City Manager Ken Resor – Assistant Director, Public Works Harvey Rambarath - Assistant Director, Engineering & Community Development John Perez - Project Manager, Engineering & Community Development Marlon Lobban – Civil Engineer II, Engineering & Community Development Rick Buckeye - Senior Planner, Engineering & Community Development Ray Lubomski - Assistant to the City Manager, CRA Director Janette Smith - City Clerk Lynn McCaffrey - Director, Human Resources Vivienne Kedroe-Lake - Director, Information Systems Dane Vose - GIS Services, Information Systems Jenna LaFleur - Director, Parks & Leisure Services Brian Pagliaro - Assistant Director, Parks & Leisure Services Don Widing - Fire Chief Jim Henson - Assistant Fire Chief Rick LaCerra - Sergeant, District 12 Broward Sheriff Office Facilities Master Plan: Executive Summary City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Executive Summary, 02-17-10- p. 15 We also express our appreciation to yourself and all City Staff, who assisted ADG in all aspects of this study. Their in-depth awareness of City issues and elements of this study have been very much appreciated. We are hopeful that this document provides a comprehensive assessment of the citywide facility issues and needs, and will aid decision makers in the successful implementation of a Facilities Capital Improvements Program to meet the City’s current challenges and future goals. Kevin Ratigan, AIA, LEED AP Amy Nowacki, AIA, LEED AP Senior Vice-President Project Architect Architects Design Group, Inc. Winter Park | Fort Myers, Florida Section 1: City Overview Engineering & Community Dev. Parks & Leisure Services Public Works Fire Rescue Police (BSO Contract) City Clerk Financial Services Information Technology Services Human Resources Public & Intergovernmental Relations City Attorney Advisory Boards City Commission Citizens of Oakland Park Assistant City Manager City Manager Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 1: City Overview p.1 Section 1: City Overview The facility study began in 2008 with an Inventory and Conditions Assessment of citywide facilities utilized for the operations of the following City Departments: • City Administrative Departments Office of the City Manager City Clerk Financial Services Human Resources Information Technology Services • Engineering / Community Development Engineering and Construction Building and Permitting Planning and Zoning Code Enforcement • Police / Broward Sheriff Office • Fire Rescue • Public Works Administration Municipal Services Division Operations Division • Parks & Leisure Services Administration and Recreational Programs Parks Division Library Division Concurrently, a spatial needs assessment for the departments (excluding Police) was prepared by ADG to aid in evaluating the adequacy and current utilization of these existing facilities to meet the functional needs of the occupants in the near term (2010-2014) and future (2020 / 2030). In many important aspects, the relationship between population and levels of service is closely related. Future needs are largely based upon population growth projections and demographic changes, as these relate to the City’s provision of services and the potential need for new or enlarged facilities and increased staffing levels. Conversely technology and increased efficiency in the delivery of services will have an impact upon municipal personnel, and may result in decreases in staffing and facility area needs. However, in considering projections for future population growth, and growth in the pattern of higher densities both in the City and County, the need to plan for the expansion and modernization of facilities remains. Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 1: City Overview p.2 1.1 The Future of Oakland Park: Population Growth and Impact Since the inception of this study in early 2008, economic conditions have continued to impact population forecast models. The most recent forecasts for Broward County’s average annual percentage of growth for the period of 2010-2035 report a 6-8% decrease from what was previously forecast in 2005 (Broward County Planning Services Division: Broward-by-the-Numbers, No.57; July 2009). While in decades previous to 2000, Broward County’s average annual percentage of growth ranged from 2-3%, the period from 2000-2005 is forecast as a decline to 1.44%, with an even sharper decline in 2005-2010 to .37%. The July 2009 report forecasts modest growth in future years, with an average annual growth rate ranging from 1.18% for the period from 2010-2015, to .75% by 2035. Population forecasts for the City of Oakland Park have not been published since 2007, but it may be anticipated that annual growth rates will follow that of the County. The 2010 Census data will assist in providing historical data for the past decade, and a new baseline upon which to model annual growth. Broward’s growth has historically been due to migration patterns, and this will continue to be of the greatest impact upon future growth. Consequently, small changes in patterns of in- and out-migration are of huge impact. In-migration accounted for the exponential growth of the 1970’s and 1990’s. The past decade from 2000-2010 saw a reduction in the net migration and population growth to the lowest levels in 60 years. This was the result of decreased in-migration due to rising housing costs in the early part of the decade, followed by increased out-migration due to declining job opportunities and the recession of the latter years of the decade. Conversely, as a result of the recession, moving forward beyond 2010 low housing costs may spur a wave of in-migration, which is the basis for the forecasted growth. As with past recessions, it is not expected that this recession will have an impact on long-term in-migration patterns. While the future annual growth of the County as a whole is expected to increase more slowly than previous forecasts, municipalities in the eastern region of the County, such as Oakland Park, are expected to see most of that growth. The County is approaching a “build-out” scenario, and increases in the number of households and household size, to occupy former vacant (seasonal) units, is becoming the pattern of future population growth, rather than the increase of new construction and housing inventory of the past decade. Supporting that growth pattern, adopted future land uses include increased density in existing residential areas, in addition to changes of use from commercial to mixed use with additional residential units at high density. The established goals of the City’s adopted CRA Master Plan further encourage mixed use and transit oriented development, to support affordable housing initiatives, higher Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 1: City Overview p.3 density residential development, and pedestrian oriented amenities. Future planned development that puts less emphasis on serving the out-migration patterns of a commuting work force, will likewise put greater demands on specific City services as well. Broward County PopulationThis chart reflects the census population of Broward County and its growth for the period of 1930 to 2030 with projections for the years 2006, 2010, 2020, and 2030 based on July 2009 forecast data. The chart reflects forecasts which account for the beginning of a decline in the average annual population growth in the period from 2000-2005, with a sharp decline in the period from 2005-2010. Forecasts project growth beginning in 2010, but at a rate less than half that of decades previous to 2000. This chart does not reflect seasonal population which has a direct impact upon services provided by government entities. Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 1: City Overview p.4 City of Oakland Park Population This chart reflects the census population of the City of Oakland Park for the period of 1930 to 2030 with projections for the years 2006, 2010, 2020, and 2030 based upon March 2007 forecast data. More recent forecast data in July 2009 for Broward County projects a decline in growth in the period from 2000-2010, and a growth rate half that of previous decades for the period from 2010-2030. A similar decline in population in the City from 2000-2010 is yet to be confirmed with the upcoming 2010 Census, and it may be anticipated that the City’ annual growth rate beyond 2010 will be likewise slower than previous forecasts. Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 1: City Overview p.5 City services must also respond to changing demographics of a primarily “aging in place” population. Population forecasts by age show a modest increase in all age groups, with the exception of the “Baby Boomer Generation” (45-64) in which growth will slow until the beginnings of a decline starting in 2020 as they enter the growing 65+ age group. The largest and most mobile group, ages 19-44, accounts for almost half of the population, and will likely be most impacted by the outcome of the recession. Declining housing costs and an anticipated rebounding job market in the next decade may contribute to a return of a predominantly in-migration pattern of this age group. These population forecasts and future growth trends support the conclusion that the pattern of City and County growth will continue to be the primary factor in predicating service levels. We believe that the careful monitoring of both population growth forecasts and “trends” is in the best interests of the City of Oakland Park as either factor has the ability to significantly affect the proposed Capital Improvement Program, both with respect to project size as well as project priority. Additionally, local municipalities may be pressed to provide services due to budget shortfalls at the State level. It is an unfortunate “truism” that State Government, as a result of reduced tax revenue, has transferred the responsibility to provide services from State Agencies to Counties and Cities, in many instances, without the provision of funds to provide these services. Often, these are “un-funded mandates”, in effect a transfer of services that must be provided, but without a State commitment of appropriate funding sources. 1.2 Facility Utilization and Organizational Needs Assessment In preparing the Spatial Needs Assessment, a multi-task methodology was employed, which included the distribution of a Space Needs questionnaire to designated department personnel, followed by interviews and facility tours. The evaluation, including staff review and consensus, was completed in January 2009. Thus, the current needs have been analyzed based upon the recommended space requirements for a facility to accommodate the staffing levels as budgeted for the 2009 fiscal year. The spatial needs analysis provides recommended facility areas to meet the current and future needs for each department. Since the commencement of this study in early 2008, the economic and demographic climate has changed considerably, and forecast models for population growth since the 2000 Census have been adjusted, generally beginning in forecast year 2005. As population is one factor that relates to the Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 1: City Overview p.6 provision of City services and a department’s spatial needs for operations, this decline in growth may in part mitigate the need for facility expansion to meet current needs in the near term. Directly related, declining revenue and the consolidation of programs and services also factors into projections for facility spatial needs. In response to this forestalled growth, current need, as utilized for the purposes of this study, is identified as space need that is projected for the short term (5 years: 2010–2014) and which should be considered as the minimum threshold to be provided as the basis of a 5-Year Capital Improvement Program. Future needs have been projected out much further, to 2020 and 2030, and are the basis for establishing a long-range Master Plan and Capital Improvement Program for the City’s future. Space Needs Standards The Space Needs Assessment and subsequent design process benefits from a standardized approach to space planning and space allocation. Over a period of twenty years, ADG has been collecting, testing, and refining standards for the allocation of space within a given facility type. The recommended space standards reflect the consensus of various City, County, State and Federal agencies. The standards ensure the functional use of space to accommodate furniture and equipment, and serve only as a guide to the design process, as economies of space may be achieved by variations in layout and configuration. Space Needs Standards: Sample illustration of the recommended standard configuration for an Executive Secretary work station. Space Needs Standards: Sample illustration of the recommended standard configuration for a small Executive Office. Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 1: City Overview p.7 Need vs. Existing Facilities The full Spatial Needs Assessment is submitted as part of this “Second” Draft Report under separate cover as Volume II. In conclusion, the following Spatial Needs Summary illustrates that most existing City facilities do not have the effective functional area that is recommended for the operations of these departments. The City has, for many years, accommodated its spatial needs by adding additional personnel and services into existing spaces and areas taken over from other departments. In many respects this can be identified as a “Band-Aid” approach that has offered, at best, temporary relief to ongoing overcrowding of facilities. The comparison between spatial need (2010-14) and what is currently available illustrates the magnitude of the problem. The re-organization of the Engineering and Community Development divisions as one department in 2008-09 has effectively consolidated these divisions, providing for the current space needs at the recently completed New Municipal Building (5399 N. Dixie Blvd.). Additionally, Fire Prevention and City Clerk record storage is accommodated on the first floor of the new facility, vacating space to meet current needs in the respective existing facilities. BSO has also re-located to the new facility’s second floor (with first floor lobby and processing areas), where more adequate space is provided to meet current needs. However, it is observed that there is no potential for any projected future growth (2020/2030), other than to displace an adjacent departmental area. Subsequently, the re-location of the Building Division to this new facility in 2009 vacated space at City Hall, which is currently being utilized as interim Parks and Leisure Administration offices. With the first floor of City Hall at full occupancy, there is not an opportunity to meet current space needs for the ITS department, or for the expressed need to expand and reconfigure the Commission Chambers. Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 1: City Overview p.8 1.3 Spatial Needs Summary In summary, the following schedule compares the existing facility area as of January 2009 to the recommended facility area for the current operational needs of each department, and the needs for future growth. 1 Cumulative totals 2 Approximate existing office area allocated at City Hall for the City Manager, Finance, City Clerk, Human Resources, and ITS. 3 Existing area noted is the area allocated for Engineering/Community Development at the New Municipal Building. 4 A Space Needs Assessment for BSO future needs is excluded from the scope of this report, existing area carried forward as future need. 5 Combined facility area for administrative and crew functions of both Administration and Operations Divisions. ( Facility area and yard space for maintenance and storage functions is excluded from this summary table). 6 Combined facility area for administrative and crew functions of both Parks & Leisure Services and Parks Division. (Unconditioned facility area and yard space for maintenance and storage functions is excluded from this summary table). Department Existing Facility Area 2009 (estimated gross square feet) Spatial Requirements (in gross square feet) Current Need 2010-14 Future Need1 2020 Future Need1 2030 City Administration 8,1022 13,098 13,678 14,458 Engineering/Community Development 8,5683 9,182 9,542 10,952 Police/Broward Sheriff Office 17,289 17,2894 17,2894 17,2894 Fire Rescue 20,473 32,834 34,548 38,318 Public Works5 8,500 14,250 16,600 17,750 Parks and Leisure6 4,500 10,057 10,401 11,249 Total 67,432 96,710 102,058 110,016 Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 1: City Overview p.9 1.4 Trends Affecting City Services The consideration of spatial need is driven by a variety of factors, such as population growth, generation of new or enhanced City Services, and operational or management trends. It is important to note that these “trends” may result in the need to provide additional services, irrespective of the impact of population growth. Our overview of several jurisdictions throughout Florida and the United States provides an insight into those future trends that may impact upon the City in the foreseeable future. Examples include: 1.4.1 A “Paper-less” System The City continues to implement processes and initiatives towards a “paper-less” environment in all aspects of administration and operations. The implementation of electronic agenda systems and webcasting, virtual record management systems, bill-paying, payroll, and finance documentation (accounting, purchasing, budget documentation) have served to streamline operations and further green initiatives through the reduction of paper waste, as well as reducing record storage space needs. Additionally, such technological initiatives and process improvements are being employed to achieve reductions in staff hours, enabling a more efficient work flow, and serving to increase the capabilities of current staff to meet future needs. All of these resultant factors have a direct impact on spatial need. As profound as these changes have been in terms of information gathering, recording and dissemination, the future will continue to bring changes that are as equally dramatic. 1.4.2 Flexibility of Space Spaces within facilities need to be changeable without major cost and to have sufficient flexibility for different systems and technology that evolve in the future. This flexibility also allows for future growth. There has long been debate relative to the utilization of open-space planning concepts. While private offices are mandated for certain discrete work functions, there are also appropriate uses Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 1: City Overview p.10 of less private work environments. There is a direct relationship to both cost and space flexibility, which in buildings of moderate to large size can result in substantial savings or costs, depending upon the decision that is made. Perhaps the greatest advantage to open space systems is the premise of space flexibility and the ability to easily accommodate future change. Meeting rooms, as an example, continue to be tested in terms of their ability to accommodate changing information systems. The use of sophisticated computer and video conferencing systems is the type of improvement that will permit spaces to have modifiable characteristics. 1.4.3 Regionalism/Satellite Facilities Despite current economic times, the population of the City of Oakland Park is anticipated to resume population growth beyond the next 5-year horizon. As population density increases, it becomes more difficult to effectively provide services to geographically diverse populations. Many jurisdictions have elected to provide satellite facilities. This may, in the future, be a consideration in regards to the Law Enforcement (BSO) and Fire Rescue Department functions. The need to provide services to a larger community is an important consideration in the overview of total City Spatial Needs. 1.4.4 Diversity Requirements The changing population demographic will continue to modify the way communities obtain and provide services. Demographics for Oakland Park indicate a culturally diverse citizenry, and a largely “aging in place” population. As the population matures, future years will see a growing 65+ age group and a declining 45-64 age group. Fluctuations in the 19-44 age group will be most dependent on the outcome of the recession. These demographics clearly have an impact upon City functions, and in particular Parks and Leisure level of service requirements, as noted in the Parks and Open Space Master Plan Study (adopted in October 2009). Section 2: Existing City Facilities The City of Oakland Park Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 2: Existing City Facilities – p.i Section 2: Existing City Facilities - Survey and Documentation Catalogued on the following pages is an inventory of City facilities which have been surveyed under the scope of this Citywide Facility Study. The survey included the visual inspection of these facilities, with regards to providing a preliminary overview of the condition and quality of the properties, general appearance, and serviceability of the facility for the intended use and occupancy. More specifically, conditions that may be noted include visually obvious structural and mechanical concerns. However, it is important to note that the survey of facilities was conducted as an architectural review, not an in depth engineering evaluation. In some instances, this report may recommend further investigative testing work or evaluation. Notably, most facilities show evidence of prior roof damage and water intrusion, and a citywide roof assessment is one such recommendation for further evaluation in conclusion of this report. Specific facilities are also called out for further mechanical equipment assessment, in consideration of both indoor air quality and energy efficiency improvements. In evaluating the existing facility conditions, specific technical considerations and citywide criteria were assessed as part of the survey: • Security • Regulatory (life safety and building code, accessibility requirements) • Sustainability (energy and water conservation and efficiency standards) • Information Technology • Survivability (storm hardening for critical facilities) As an element of the Facility Survey, an in depth evaluation for compliance with Florida Accessibility Code was completed in 2008. The “Citywide ADA Study” was submitted January 26, 2009. ADG Project No. 791-07 Building Name Site Address 1. renovations in 1969, 19911. City Hall 3650 NE 12th Avenue 1963 0.78 14,120 22. vacated in 20092.(Engineering/Active Adults)250 NE 33rd Street 1979 1.14 5,920 13.(City Hall Annex)2901 E.Oakland Park Blvd n/a n/a 1,400 14. vacated in 20094.(Public Safety Building)301 NE 38th Street 1984 2.46 13,103 15. Fire Station #87 2100 NW 39th Street 1982 1.20 7,699 2 6. Fire Station #9 301 NE 38th Street 1967 -- 6,750 17. Fire Station #20 4721 NW 9th Avenue 1968 0.38 5,100 18. Municipal Services 3801 NE 5th Avenue 1965 3.46 3,172 1 9. Municipal Services Garage 3815 NE 5th Avenue 1965 -- 4,844 110. administration building10. Public Works Operations 5100 NE 12th Terrace1967 5.00 2,025 111. renovations in 200011. Collins Community Center3900 NE 3rd Avenue 1971 1.55 6,942 112. Wimberly Fields 4000 NE 3rd Avenue 1971 8.60 619 1 Citywide Facility Study: Volume I 3. leased office space, vacated in 200912. restrooms, storage, concession standCity of Oakland Park2.1: Facility Inventory 2008-2009Section 2: Existing City Facilities age bldg areasiteacreage# storiesCity of Oakland Park Facilities 6. co-located with Public Safety Building 5. includes approx. 600 SF storage at second floor8. Public Works Administration office area 7. leased to City for Fire Dept. use General NotesFinal Report – February 17, 2010 Section 2: Existing City Facilities - p. 1 ADG Project No. 791-07 Building Name Site Address Citywide Facility Study: Volume I City of Oakland Park2.1: Facility Inventory 2008-2009Section 2: Existing City Facilities age bldg areasiteacreage# storiesCity of Oakland Park Facilities General Notes13. Dillon Tennis Center 4091 NE 5th Avenue 1971 2.49 321 112. restrooms, storage14. Stevens Fieldhouse3881 NE 6th Avenue1968 3.95 1,782 1pavilion300 15. re-located in 198715. Pioneer House 3860 NE 6th Ave 1920 0.28 600 1 16. pavilion16. Carter Woodson Park 3490 NE 3rd Avenue -- 1.87 200 117. renovations in 1980, 200917. Spiher Recreation Center 1246 NE 37th Street 1975 1.15 4,386 118. renovations in 1972, 198718. Library 1298 NE 37th Street 1963 0.55 13,471 119. date of new renovations19. Downtown Center -A 1098 NE 40th Court 2009 0.30 5,480 120. Downtown Center -B 1101 NE 40th Court -- 0.80 13,000 221,22. total facility acreage21. NAG Community Center: A 250 NE 56th Court 2008 1.09 1,750 1 22. NAG Community Center: B 250 NE 56th Court -- -- 3,285 1 23. leased23. N.E. High School Fieldhouse 750 NE 56th Street -- -- 616 2 13. estimated date, renovations in 2009-1020. first floor area, floor 2 build-out variesFinal Report – February 17, 2010 Section 2: Existing City Facilities - p. 2 ADG Project No. 791-07 Building Name Site Address Citywide Facility Study: Volume I City of Oakland Park2.1: Facility Inventory 2008-2009Section 2: Existing City Facilities age bldg areasiteacreage# storiesCity of Oakland Park Facilities General Notes 24. Royal Palm Park 33.68 1pavilion 4100 NW 17th Avenue 1998 637 restroom 1701 NW 38th Street 2005 500 25. restrooms25. Dog Park 931 NW 38th Street 2005 2.26 500 126. pavilion, restrooms26. Lakeside Sandpine Preserve 2820 NW 27th Avenue 2005 5.62 400 1 27. New Municipal Building 5399 N Dixie Highway 1.83 30,858 2 28. Parking Lot West Prospect Road -- 1.50 -- --at Andrews Avenue29. Parking Lot East Prospect Road -- 1.40 -- --at Andrews Avenue30. Parking Lot 3900 NE 6 Ave. -- 0.61 -- -- TOTAL CITY-WIDE FACILITY AREA 149,780 2008/09*27. *new interior build-out flr 1&2, exterior renovationsFinal Report – February 17, 2010 Section 2: Existing City Facilities - p. 3 Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 2: Existing Facilities – p. 4 2.2 Existing City Facilities: Conditions Assessment An Inventory and Conditions Assessment was completed in 2008, to provide a preliminary overview of the current conditions and utilization of the buildings and properties. Documented in this section are notable conditions with regards to the conditions and quality of the building, visually obvious structural or mechanical concerns, and capacity appropriateness. Additionally, facilities were assessed with regards to citywide evaluation criteria, as will be discussed further in Section 3. Issues regarding accessibility are documented in the “Citywide ADA Study”, submitted on January 26, 2009. It is important to note that this is an architectural review, and not an in-depth engineering evaluation. Since the completion of this survey in 2008, some facilities have undergone renovation or change of use, as will be commented upon for clarification. City Administration 1. City Hall Building renovations in 1990 adapted the original police and fire station into the present City Hall. Conditions noted which merit consideration include the following: The building lacks many features that are necessary for a facility of its type: a fire sprinkler system, access security system, and emergency generator. Additionally, the building is not a hardened structure. The age of the original structure and subsequent renovations pre-date current code requirements, in particular with regards to wind load criteria. Adaptive re-use of the original construction has also left behind some inherent limitations. Former jail cells of solid masonry construction limit the ability for interior remodeling, as does the generator room construction which is not large enough for the installation of a new generator of appropriate capacity, and related equipment. Recently installed plug-in capability is available for utilizing a portable generator, but generally this arrangement is recommended as a back-up to a facility’s permanent generator. Video surveillance of public areas is indicated, but access controls, such as a proximity card system, are not in place to monitor perimeter security or interdepartmental security. The public lobby sign-in desk is currently not staffed, and a visitor may freely access offices on both floors. General appearances indicate routine maintenance. Office areas appear overcrowded with record storage and office equipment, lacking auxiliary areas to accommodate these needs and enable a better utilization of personal work space. This will be alleviated by record storage space available at the New Municipal Building in 2009. 3. City Annex This facility’s lease was terminated upon the re-location of Code Enforcement offices to the New Municipal Building in 2009. City Hall first floor lobby first floor lobby Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 2: Existing Facilities – p. 5 City Hall: Billing Office City Hall: Building Department (2008) The Billing Office area is crowded by record storage, and lacks a work area for copy equipment. A small back office is shared by 2 personnel, limiting optimal work space. The Cashiers office (occupied by the Treasurer) is utilized primarily for record storage, and desk work area is limited, and the former ADA service window to the lobby is walled off. Building Department offices formerly located at City Hall included Permitting and Planning & Zoning. Pictured here are work areas cluttered by record storage, which in some cases presents an obstruction to egress routes. Service counter for permits and other business are open, lacking any security or privacy screening such as a transaction window. Office space and record storage needs have since been addressed by the internal re-structuring of the Engineering and Community Development Department, and re-location to new offices at the New Municipal Building in 2009. Parks & Leisure Administration has since moved into this space. Private restroom at building department office area is in need of modernization. service counter Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 2: Existing Facilities – p. 6 City Hall: Information Services The first floor employee break room was recently renovated and is a valuable staff amenity. Information Services has adapted to the given area with compromises to work flow and equipment needs. The Director’s office is detached from staff, separated by a building egress corridor. This corridor also is being utilized for the IT Department’s copy machine, and provides a mail area and Clerk record vault access. Storage of boxes and equipment compromises appropriate utilization of available space. The server room is at capacity with its current main frame layout, and the configuration does not provide the required service access to the servers. UPS equipment at the adjoining room is not serviceable due to room size, and is not provided with on-line emergency power. Server and UPS equipment rooms are not provided with dedicated HVAC systems, and are supplied by the main building HVAC and a supplemental through wall unit. Additionally lacking is a fire suppression system at the server room. City Hall: Break Room, floor 1 copy work space for ITS at egress corridor server room UPS equipment Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 2: Existing Facilities – p. 7 City Hall: Human Resources City Hall: Commission Chambers Human Resources offices were re-furbished with new workstations and office furnishings in 2004. However, the open office layout of the HR Generalists work stations does not provide acoustic privacy. Record storage clutters some areas, but is being mitigated by the transition to electronic record systems. A transaction window has since been provided at the reception desk to address security and privacy requirements. Commission Chambers generally are in need of modernization, to address appearances and update technology, as well as address code requirements such as accessibility at the dias. Accessory areas are minimal, including a space shared as a conference room and AV equipment booth. Private restroom facilities for the Commission’s use are not convenient to the chambers. The chambers are not large enough for Town Hall meetings, or other community meetings with high public attendance. lobby entrance to Commission Chambers Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 2: Existing Facilities – p. 8 City Hall: City Clerk City Hall: Financial Services City Clerk offices were refurbished in 2004 with new workstations and furnishings. Record storage needs will be alleviated by the ongoing implementation of electronic document systems, and new record storage space at the New Municipal Building. The transition to an electronic format for Commission meetings will also require less work space for assembling documents (currently deficient). Financial Services also has been upgraded with workstations and furnishings in 2004. Record storage will likewise be re-located to the New Municipal Building, alleviating crowded conditions at work spaces. Electronic documentation systems are being implemented and will assist in mitigating future needs. Vault file storage crowding office areas Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 2: Existing Facilities – p. 9 City Hall: Floor 2 auxiliary areas Auxiliary areas on the second floor are generally in fair condition. The copy machine for use by the City Manager’s administrative support is accommodated in the public corridor area, as an area for a dedicated workspace is not available. Stained ceiling tiles at various locations on the first and second floor indicate outdoor moisture penetration or potential HVAC or plumbing leaks. Records and observed conditions indicate that the HVAC system is near the end of its serviceable life, and would benefit from a replacement of equipment to optimize efficiency. General provisions for building access have been improved by recent streetscape renovations at 12th Avenue. Public and employee parking is adequate for daily business, and includes site parking behind the building, parking at 12th Avenue, and additional parking for employees at a lot across NE 37 Street. Overflow parking for community meetings is available at adjacent City properties and 12th Avenue. City Hall: General Conditions Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 2: Existing Facilities – p. 10 Engineering & Community Development Police / Broward Sheriff Office (BSO) 27. New Municipal Building The building was constructed in 1974 as commercial office space. Construction is concrete masonry and steel frame structure, composite deck floor, bar joist framing at the roof, and lightweight insulated composite roof deck and membrane roofing. The building is not a hardened facility, and the original structure was engineered prior to today’s more rigorous building codes. Although it survived the 2005 hurricane season, the building suffered significant damage to the roof and interiors (prior to the City’s acquisition). Latent moisture damage was observed during construction, and addressed as part of the scope of the City’s renovations. The City’s renovation included exterior window and door replacement, upgraded HVAC systems, energy efficiency features such as lighting controls, and a new generator with above ground diesel tank. The existing second floor office layout has been adapted for the BSO offices, presenting some limitations on internal staff organization and future needs. The first floor renovations re-configured the space to provide a public lobby and booking area for BSO, City Clerk record storage, Fire Prevention offices, a multi-purposed conference room, and consolidated offices for Engineering & Community Development. The first floor is designed at full capacity for the current space needs. Survivability criteria addressed by the renovations include impact windows with storm shutters to provide a second level of redundancy. At the second floor rear of the building, existing windows were not replaced and the storm shutters are the only level of protection. It is noted that the generator is not in a protected enclosure, although bollards provide some protection from vehicle damage. Anticipated parking inadequacies and site access issues have since been addressed by the City, to reconcile the needs of the co-located services. Progress photos during the City’s renovation follow. The facility was completed and occupied by the close of 2009. New Municipal Building: Existing Conditions 2008 Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 2: Existing Facilities – p. 11 New Municipal Building: Renovations (progress photos, February 2009) multi-purpose conference space Broward Sheriff Offices Engineering & Community Development Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 2: Existing Facilities – p. 12 Fire Rescue 5. Fire Station #87 6. Fire Station #9 7. Fire Station #20 Although the City’s fire rescue facilities have weathered recent storm events, they are not constructed as hardened facilities, as their design and construction pre-dates the more rigorous building codes currently mandated (post 1992 Hurricane Andrew). Hurricane shutters are utilized to protect openings, as windows are not impact-rated. Overhead doors that are not impact rated are also a weak link. All three stations are equipped with emergency generators in good working order, although it is noted that the generator at FS#20 is outdoors in an unprotected area. With regards to post-event serviceability, Fire Stations #87 is located adjacent to a stormwater canal, although it is reported that flooding has not historically been a problem. Roof systems are aging, and an independent citywide roof assessment has been recommended. Water damage is evident at ceilings and exterior cladding, indicating that water intrusion has been an ongoing problem. Membrane roof systems at FS#9 and FS#20 in particular require ongoing maintenance. Critical building systems for fire rescue facilities that were notably absent include access security, fire sprinklers, and lightning protection. Site security is nominal at FS#87 and FS#9, and absent at FS#20. Exterior doors utilize sub-standard hardware with pushbutton key pad access or keyed locks. Extensive corrosion of the hardware, door, and frame was noted at all stations. Also noted at all facilities, a public lobby which is secured to prevent unauthorized access to personnel areas is not provided. Current NFPA code mandates that facilities of this type be sprinklered. These systems are absent, although all fire stations are hard-wired with fire and smoke alarm systems. All stations have adapted crew quarters to accommodate co-ed habitation. Former open bunk rooms have been retrofitted to private rooms with floor-ceiling partition systems, and a women’s bathroom or shared unisex private bathroom arrangement is provided. Fire stations are two bay (FS#20 is 4 bay, but only 2 have overhead clearance) and indoor apparatus storage space is limited. Three bay stations are typical for departments of similar size. Bay space is not available to house reserve apparatus, which is temporarily in storage at the Downtown Center. Auxiliary storage areas for gear, supplies, and equipment are at capacity or not available, and often require space within the apparatus bay or storage in other inappropriate areas. FS#87 is the only station with decontamination facilities. Bunker gear storage rooms at FS#87 and FS#9 lack exterior exhaust, and gear is stored within the bay at FS#20 where it is exposed to diesel exhaust. All stations were retrofitted with an exhaust emissions filtering system, although monoxide detection systems are not provided. HVAC rooftop equipment was replaced in 2005 at FS#87, but observed interior conditions at FS#9 and FS#20 indicate that equipment should be assessed for replacement. Specific observations at each facility are noted on the following pages. Fire Rescue Facilities Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 2: Existing Facilities – p. 13 Fire Station #87: Site security is nominal, with gated vehicle access at a 4’ perimeter chainlink fence (6’ fencing is provided adjacent to canal). The public reception lobby is open to administrative work areas, lacking any transaction window or other physical separation for security and privacy. Fire Station #87 also provides area for Fire Administration and an EOC. The re-location of Fire Prevention in 2009 has alleviated crowded conditions at the office areas, and provided additional space for a new EOC and multi-purpose meeting area for training and community use. Auxiliary storage areas are generally provided for, although medical supply storage at the mezzanine is not sufficiently air conditioned, limiting supplies to basic first aid (no narcotics). Rooftop HVAC equipment was replaced in 2005, and is in good working order. Standing water was observed at roof drains, indicating clogged drains and/or insufficient drainage to secondary scuppers. The roof appears to be watertight, although damage to tiles at mansard rooflines is evident, and soffits show water damage indicative of the building’s age. The barrel tile roof is a particular concern in a wind event, as these tiles if not properly installed can become airborne and cause extensive damage. Fire Station #87 Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 2: Existing Facilities – p. 14 Fire Station #20 Fire Station #20: The facility is not owned by the City, but is leased for Fire Department use and maintained by the City. Painting and superficial maintenance appears consistent, but the building age is evident in spalling and cracking noted at the concrete twin-T roof structure. The roof requires ongoing maintenance and ponding is reported as a problem, indicating clogged and/or insufficient drainage. Roof leaks have been reported at times without heavy rain, indicating other potential mechanical problems. Old awning type windows are poorly sealed, contributing to energy inefficiency. Bays are not drive-through and re-entry is difficult from this busy road at a traffic light intersection. Damage to door openings is evident. Bays also trap diesel exhaust and soot is a problem inside, where gear and equipment is also stored due to lack of other appropriate storage space. Two of the 4 bays do not have overhead clearance for apparatus, and effective utilization of the bay space is limited. Parking on site is limited and appears inadequate for shift change. There is no site security and the generator in the back alley is unprotected. Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 2: Existing Facilities – p. 15 Fire Station #9 Fire Station #9: The original structure dates to 1967. The Public Safety/BSO addition in 1984 was constructed to adjoin the building, but is structurally independent. However, water intrusion at the roof is shared by the two facilities. The roof has historically required ongoing maintenance, and extensive interior water damage and latent moisture issues are evident in deflected and stained ceiling tiles and affected light fixtures. Damage is most evident at the west side of the building, at the training room, and Battalion Chief and Lieutenant’s bunk rooms (consistent with similar issues noted at the Public Safety Building). Recently, extensive interior water damage from a roof leak required emergency renovations to gut out walls and rebuild bathrooms. Space limitations require that Crew quarters for the Battalion Chief, Lieutenant and Station Captain double as sleeping quarters and office space, an inappropriate arrangement for meeting with personnel. Storage and equipment rooms at the apparatus bay are not provided with building HVAC, and medical supplies are nominally provided some air conditioning by a through wall unit. The apparatus bay is at capacity. Parking for personal or city vehicles is not secure. The construction of basketball courts in 2009 have impacted some of the parking area, although BSO has since vacated the site. Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 2: Existing Facilities – p. 16 4. Public Safety Building - vacated in 2009 This facility was vacated upon the re-location of the Broward Sheriff Office to the New Muncipal Building in 2009. It has a history of roof problems and water damage as evidenced by stained and deflected ceiling tiles, the presence of mold, and extensive corrosion of windows and doors particularly at the west exterior wall. Latent moisture hidden in wall and ceiling cavities is a particular concern. The facility has additionally experienced failures along internal water and sewer lines, which required extensive abatement and repair. The age and condition of the building envelope make it an inefficient building to operate. It is currently being utilized for some storage, and to mitigate operating costs, HVAC is not fully operating. In this state, moisture related conditions will continue to further deteriorate the building. Public Safety Building Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 2: Existing Facilities – p. 17 Public Works 8. Municipal Services Building 9. Municipal Services Garage 10. Public Works Operations Buildings at the Municipal Services site were constructed in 1965, and are currently utilized by Public Works Administration. Although not constructed as a hardened facility, limited window openings and the twin-T concrete structure provide appropriate storm protection for utilizing the building for EOC camp functions. Some deficiencies include a site and building access security system, and efficient HVAC (currently supplied by through wall units). Overall, administrative office areas have benefitted from routine maintenance, and interior renovations at restrooms and workstation areas. The facility is lacking an identifiable public entrance for assistance. A common space to provide training and hold meetings for the whole department is not available. (The conference room is only able to provide space for break-out sessions). Crew facilities are nominal, and further crowded by shared use with Parks Division. Locker and shower facilities can not accommodate all crew, and break room space is limited. In general, crew leaders lack office space and work out of storage areas and shops which have already exceeded their capacity. Space for crew areas with computer workstations for report writing is not available. As indoor tool and material storage areas are over capacity, steel containers are utilized for covered yard storage of materials and supplies. Parks Division also utilizes the building and yard area. Multiple functions overlap at the yard, and the location of the Garage and fuel station impact site utilization. Many of the same conditions are observed at the Public Works Operations facility at the former water treatment plant site. The buildings constructed on this site date to 1967, and are solid concrete structures to serve the original industrial purposes. Hence, demolition would be significant. One building has been retrofitted with some success to provide administrative office area, but others have inherent limitations, and are not effectively utilized, other than for storage. The site area in general is underutilized, as the existing vacant buildings limit how it may be redeveloped. Similar to the Municipal Services facility, crew space is inadequate. A trailer on site to provide a crew meeting space and break area is in poor condition. Crew leader office space is adapted out of maintenance and storage shop areas, and data infrastructure for computers at these spaces is not available. Site access is limited by street infrastructure, and flooding is a problem during the wet season. The site is isolated in an industrial zone and a security system to monitor perimeter site access and building access is not in place. Public Works Facilities Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 2: Existing Facilities – p. 18 Municipal Services Building office space conference room / EOC camp public entrance reception - service window laundry locker room crew break area outdoor crew break area Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 2: Existing Facilities – p. 19 Municipal Services Yard and Garage Parks Division area used at Municipal Services site Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 2: Existing Facilities – p. 20 Public Works Operations administration offices crew trailer crew break area at trailer yard storage abandoned water treatment plant Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 2: Existing Facilities – p. 21 Utilities & Streets: storage and shop space office area crew break area crew lockers yard storage equipment storage office area secured storage: copper fittings yard office area equipment bay Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 2: Existing Facilities – p. 22 Parks and Leisure Facilities Parks and Leisure facilities vary in age and condition. Overall, routine maintenance has kept the actively used facilities in good working order. There are a few facilities, as will be noted, that are essentially no longer in commission for public use, and these facilities have had little or no maintenance and are being utilized at best for storage purposes if this is still viable. Documented on the following pages are facilities surveyed under the scope of this study in 2008. A few of these facilities have since been renovated or undergone a change of use. Noted are specific issues which still bear upon future considerations for the facility’s use. Collins Community Center roller hockey rink 11.Collins Community Center The facility was constructed in 1971, and has had no major improvements for over 20 years. Elements of the building envelope are in poor condition, and the facility is inefficient and costly to operate. Water intrusion from the roof is apparent, as observed at the interior ceilings and corrosion of exterior flashing. Awning type windows are poorly sealed and no longer shut completely. The facility has historically been the only large meeting space for Town Hall public meetings. The condition of this space is poor for such public gatherings, and notable deficiencies include accessibility requirements at the stage area and restrooms, and a fire sprinkler system. Depending on the scope, alterations to the existing structure could potentially trigger review and costly upgrades to current code. Considering the condition of the facility and spatial capacity, future viable uses are limited. Parks and Leisure administration has since re-located to City Hall, and the Active Adults program and youth pro-grams are now utilizing the facility. Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 2: Existing Facilities – p. 23 Collins Community Center recreation / community meeting space office area rec leader office exterior conditions reception for program registration former administration offices support areas Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 2: Existing Facilities – p. 24 12. Wimberley Fields 13. Dillon Tennis Center The amenity buildings at these facilities are approaching 40 years of age and are in poor condition, showing evidence of roof leaks and water damage at ceilings and corroded metal doors and frames. Dry rot and water damage is noted at wood framing elements and the fascia of the roof and covered porch at Dillon Tennis Center. Restroom facilities are in need of renovation. The office is not functional for meeting with the public and is additionally used for equipment storage. Picnic pavilion structures appear to be newer, but are in need of painting and some repair for corrosion at the roof structure. Wimberley Concessions/Restrooms show similar wear and age. The concrete floor is cracked throughout, indicating some settling of the slab on grade. Water damage at the ceiling requires further investigation. Renovations to Dillon Tennis Center began in 2009, and include new bathrooms and roof replacement. Wimberley Field concession/restroom interiors Dillon Tennis Center office water damage at ceiling pavilion Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 2: Existing Facilities – p. 25 14. Stevens Field Ceiling damage and extensive corrosion at exterior doors indicate failures at the roof and ongoing water penetration and damage. The building is being utilized for storage and is not suitable for occupancy in its present condition. Indoor air quality and odor indicate latent moisture problems and potential mold growth. Restrooms have been refurbished and are being maintained in fair condition. 15. Pioneer House In its present condition, public visitation is restricted. Rotted wood framing and exterior cladding is evident, as well as termite damage. The building does not have effective air conditioning, and is not being maintained, worsening the rate of deterioration. An engineering assessment was completed in 2007, that outlines conditions in detail beyond the scope of this survey. 16. Carter Woodson Park This facility is scheduled for improvements in 2010, to include new restroom facilities. An existing picnic pavilion is in fair condition. Stevens Field Pioneer House Carter Woodson Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 2: Existing Facilities – p. 26 17. Spiher Recreation Center Renovations were completed in 2009 and included new exterior windows and doors, exterior and interior painting, new flooring, and kitchen and restroom renovations. Prior survey indicated potential water intrusion from the roof. Outdoor HVAC equipment shows corrosion and appears to be in need of replacement. Playground equipment and shade structures are in new condition, and well utilized. Spiher Recreation Center Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 2: Existing Facilities – p. 27 18. Library The facility was constructed in 1963. As indicated by its age, elements of the building envelope are in poor condition, and the facility is inefficient and costly to operate. Water intrusion from the roof is apparent as observed at areas of extensive damage to ceilings. Awning type windows are poorly sealed and no longer shut completely. Deflection at window sills in Children’s area may indicate some settling of the foundations. HVAC is in need of replacement. Significant deficiencies include the absence of a fire sprinkler system. Data infrastructure is limited and patron’s use of computers is on time restrictions (wireless technology was implemented in 2009 to address this). There are limited locations with power receptacles for personal computers. Work space for librarians is overcrowded, and work flow is not optimal. Auditorium addition is being underutilized for its intended purpose, due to storage at the back of the room. Storage in inappropriate areas impedes clear access to points of egress. In general, interiors appear in need of refurbishment, but significant building conditions as noted preclude interior renovations. Depending on the scope, an addition or alteration to the existing structure could potentially require costly upgrades to the building to meet current code. Library Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 2: Existing Facilities – p. 28 19. Jaco Pastorius Park Community Center 20. Downtown Center Two existing facilities were surveyed. The Downtown Center (pictured) is largely underutilized. One tenant space is currently being leased, the remainder of the facility is being utilized for storage by various City Departments. These spaces are able to accommodate a mezzanine floor, and offer flexibility for an interior build-out. A building HVAC system is not in place: existing HVAC equipment varies by tenant build-out. Water intrusion is evident at ceilings, and it has since been confirmed that damage to the roof from recent hurricane seasons is extensive, and full roof replacement is required. Missing rain leaders have contributed to damage and staining at exterior paint/stucco. The facility otherwise appears to be structurally sound. The Jaco Pastorius Community Center has been renovated since the time of this survey. Construction was completed in 2009. Downtown Center & Jaco Pastorius Park Jaco Pastorius Community Center building: pre-renovation (2008) Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 2: Existing Facilities – p. 29 North Andrews Garden Community Center 21. Building A (new) 22. Building B Two buildings are utilized for programs at this site. Building B is a former Church. Exterior soffits remain in poor condition from prior storm damage. The building’s age and poorly sealed windows contribute to inefficiencies in operations and maintenance, and HVAC systems are not optimized. The main space is generally being used ’as-is’ for children’s activities. Office space and storage areas are at capacity. Bathrooms are relatively new and in good condition. Building A construction was completed in 2009. 23. NE High School Fieldhouse This facility is ‘leased’ by the City through agreement with the school. It is generally in suitable condition for its current level of use. NAG Community Center - new facility NAG Community Center, building B main activity room storage NE High School Fieldhouse exterior conditions support areas office area Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 2: Existing Facilities – p. 30 24. Royal Palm Park Restroom building at the south end of the park is fairly new (2005) and in good condition, bathroom interiors are fair condition. The south covered shelter is in need of some minor exterior repair and painting. The pavilion/restroom facility at the north end is in need of re-furbishment, to repair wood framing and cladding components that are beginning to deteriorate, exterior painting, and repair of eave vents and soffits/fascia. Restrooms are in fair condition. 25. Dog Park Shelters and restroom building is fairly new (2005) and in good condition. Restroom interiors were renovated in 2008. 26. Lakeside Sandpine Preserve Building is fairly new (2005) and in good condition. Royal Palm Park: north pavilion Lakeside Sandpine Preserve Royal Palm Park: south restrooms Dog Park Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 2: Existing Facilities – p. 31 Active Adults / Engineering - vacated in 2009 2. 250 NE 33 Street The original construction was in 1979 for use by Public Works. Interior and HVAC renovations have occurred since for occupancy by Engineering and Active Adults. The overall condition of the structure and exterior storefront windows and doors are in fair condition. Records indicate that the roof is near the point of replacement. Further assessment of the roof is suggested to determine if repair or replacement is required. Interiors remain in fair condition. Of note, an electric panel retrofit for the Ceramics shop (kilns) at the former Active Adults space is inappropriately located at a hallway. HVAC systems are not functioning optimally and new HVAC is anticipated to increase efficiency. 250 NE 33 Street Section 3: Citywide Evaluation Criteria Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 3: Citywide Evaluation Criteria, p.1 Section 3: Citywide Evaluation Criteria In assessing the condition and serviceability of existing facilities, consideration was given to citywide evaluation criteria: security, regulatory compliance, sustainability, information technology systems, and survivability. These criteria also factor into the scope and need for proposed new facilities and major renovations. 3.1 Facility Security A primary Strategic Plan initiative for the City, security may be one of the more important issues of consideration as it directly affects the safety of all occupants in a facility, be they full-time employees, visitors, or the general public. Recent National events have clearly placed a greater emphasis upon this criterion in governmental facilities. The way in which security will be provided in the future represents a continually evolving process as technological advances occur on an almost daily basis. There are two primary aspects to the overall question of facility security: Existing security and that proposed for new facilities. 3.1.1 Existing Security: City Services In many of the surveyed City facilities, including City Hall, exterior access is secured by the use of both keyed locksets and pushbutton/numeric code latchsets. Within City Hall, there is little, if any general security to control public access of personnel areas. There is, in essence, free access to almost all office areas and to common spaces such as conference rooms, restrooms etc., regardless of the floor level or department. It is noted that the lobby receptionist desk is currently vacant, and a sign-in / guest pass system or other form of visitor access documentation is not currently being maintained. There is some inter-departmental security via an Intelli-Key system, which is generally not employed in other city facilities. However, this system is sub-standard to current state-of-the-art proximity card systems which can track individual card users in addition to restricting access to designated card-holders. Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 3: Citywide Evaluation Criteria, p.2 Particular attention is to be paid to after-hours usage of the City Commission Chambers and other publicly accessed areas. Doors propped open after hours by cleaning services, for example, leave office areas accessible. Notably, security requirements at Human Resources have recently been addressed by the installation of a transaction window at the reception desk. This also functions to provide privacy between the public waiting area and office operations. It is extremely important to provide security systems and plans that are otherwise “discreet”, i.e. non-obtrusive. Citizens in the Community should not be subjected to barriers that limit their access, rather facilities should and can be planned to avoid situations that offer inappropriate opportunities. It is noted that video surveillance is employed at City Hall to provide a level of this kind of non-obtrusive security for the safety of personnel and the public. In addition to adopting a recommended city-wide security system, the City may also wish to consider having a detailed security plan prepared and adopted which would, as an example, provide a point of central control for access into City Hall, utilizing visitor’s passes, such as many similar City’s have adopted. This documents and controls unauthorized access, and has been accepted by the Public, particularly in regards to recent events in America. 3.1.2 Existing Security: Engineering/Community Development The initial 2008 survey of the department’s former facility at 250 NE 33 Street documented minimal standards of security, as observed citywide in general. The department moved into new offices at the New Municipal Building in 2009, enabling updated security systems to be implemented as part of the new facility renovation. 3.1.3 Existing Security: Police / Broward Sheriff Office The initial 2008 survey of BSO’s offices at the Public Safety Building facility documented minimal standards of security, as observed citywide in general. The department moved into new offices at the New Municipal Building in 2009, and state of the art access and surveillance systems have been implemented. Former conditions: Unprotected, clear access to personnel from Human Resources public lobby at reception counter window. A transaction window has recently been installed to address security requirements. Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 3: Citywide Evaluation Criteria, p.3 3.1.4 Existing Security: Fire Rescue Department Fire Rescue facilities were observed to have either keyed or pushbutton/numeric locksets securing exterior doors. Within the facility during normal business hours, it was observed that there was free access from the public entry to personnel areas. Secured areas for medical storage and records are fitted with keyed locksets, deadbolts, or padlocks. Apparatus bay doors were generally open when fire personnel were in the area, and otherwise closed, presumably locked. The urgency of security for Fire Stations is not as stringent as for Police Stations, however tight security is required for storage of medical supplies and equipment. It is also recommended that there be provision to control access from the Public Lobby to the personnel areas, and other secured areas of the facility in which discreet functions occur. It is recommended that all Fire Rescue facilities be upgraded with a comprehensive city-wide security system. 3.1.5 Existing Security: Public Works As previously noted in City facilities, exterior access is secured by both keyed locksets and pushbutton/numeric code locksets. Within the facility, general office areas are accessible, excepting locked storage rooms, some private offices, and mechanical/maintenance closets which are keyed and remain locked only through the diligence of personnel. It is recommended that these facilities be upgraded with a comprehensive city-wide security system. 3.1.6 Existing Security: Parks and Leisure These facilities are generally secured by keyed latchsets and/or padlocks at storage closets. Within the facility, general office areas are accessible, excepting locked storage rooms, some private offices, and mechanical/maintenance closets which are keyed and remain locked only through the diligence of personnel. It is recommended that these facilities be upgraded with a comprehensive city-wide security system. Typical exterior door lockset with pushbutton/numeric code access at City facilities. It is noted that exterior hardware in general is in poor condition, in addition to the corrosion of the door and frame. Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 3: Citywide Evaluation Criteria, p.4 3.1.7 Recommended Security: City-wide System We recognize that it is extremely important that security not become unnecessarily intrusive and that Oakland Park maintain its sense of community. The ability to monitor access and egress in a non-obstructive manner directly assists the premise of free access to City functions. The monitoring of visiting individuals in such a manner that their location may be continuously tracked is yet another example of emerging technology that the City may choose to include as part of their future security systems. This technology can now be provided in a discreet manner, integrated into a facility-wide security system that is monitored from a single location. Upon surveying the city facilities under the purview of this study, it is noted that these facilities are not secured under a comprehensive city-wide system. Many facilities are simply keyed, while others may also utilize outdated systems such as push-button keypads or Intelli-Key system. None of these offer any comprehensive electronic surveillance, documentation, or means of controlled access on an individual user basis. The recommendations as discussed in this section focus on the specific security systems that grant access into the building, and between spaces within the building. In some facilities of a critical nature as previously noted, a level of security may also be required for parking and roadways immediately adjacent to the building, to restrict access to the site by un-authorized vehicles or persons. It is recommended standard practice throughout many municipalities to employ security systems which utilize proximity card access control. These systems provide the ability to manage remote locations using access levels, codes or areas. Under the direction of an appropriate City Administrator, full control of access within facilities may be accomplished through the use of an external handheld personal computer. Some of the recommended system performance criteria include: 1. Provision for the tracking of individual card users to include dates, times, and user names and/or assigned numbers. 2. Control and/or monitoring of the system, to include the ability at any time to restrict and/or permit individual user access to a designated area through the use of a handheld Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 3: Citywide Evaluation Criteria, p.5 PC device to perform such tasks at each individual security device through proximity access. 3. Provision for system reporting to allow the end user to retrieve and print system related activity and transactions The system software application is recommended to be operated on a Windows based platform, typically under a software license agreement. A contract for extended vendor support is also recommended. It is important to ensure that the system affords protection from deterioration associate with wet weather, humidity, and salt air, for those components that will control external perimeter access. The integration of the selected security system with door hardware will need to be considered to ensure regulatory compliance with Life Safety, Fire Code, ADA, and other codes as may apply. 3.2 Regulatory Compliance Like many governmental facilities that have been constructed over a sustained time period, those at Oakland Park have identifiable problems and/or issues. As an example, City facilities including critical facilities such as Fire Rescue and the new BSO, are generally unsprinklered structures. While these are existing facilities, the Fire Rescue facilities are sub-standard to current NFPA 1 Code, which mandates that an automatic fire sprinkler system be provided at buildings housing emergency fire, rescue, and ambulance services. 3.2.1 Florida Building Code It is of particular importance to note that significant changes have been implemented to the Florida Building and Life Safety Codes since the original design and construction of many of the City facilities, the majority of which were originally constructed 20-40 years ago. The Florida Building Code initially adopted in 2001 increased the requirements for construction resistance to natural forces resulting from exposure to conditions commonly associated with hurricane storm activity. While it does not appear that the structure of these buildings presents a danger to the occupants, the buildings in their current state should not be expected to withstand the current coastal storm impact requirements. Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 3: Citywide Evaluation Criteria, p.6 Likewise, significant changes have been made to Energy Codes and requirements for HVAC systems related to energy conservation and indoor air quality. While equipment retrofits and routine maintenance may endeavor to meet higher standards of efficiency, the system is ultimately limited by the building envelope, and a full system energy modeling analysis as required by current code would likely not pass. In considering recommendations for the future development of properties, it is important to note that potential renovations to a facility will need to comply with the 2007 Florida Existing Building Code. The code is clear in identifying the level and scope of compliance based upon the nature of proposed alterations. Level 1 alteration includes removal and replacement of existing materials, elements, equipment or fixtures that serve the same purpose. Generally, Level 1 alterations require the City to maintain the level of safety/code compliance as originally constructed. Level 2 alterations include reconfiguration of space, the addition or elimination of any door or window, the reconfiguration or extension of any system or the installation of additional equipment. Generally, Level 2 alterations shall comply with the Florida Building Code including accessibility and life-safety requirements. It is important to note that compliance is required for all new construction elements, components, systems and spaces. Level 3 alterations apply where work area exceeds 50 percent of the aggregate area of the building and made within any 12-month period. Generally, where buildings are undergoing Level 3 alterations including structural alterations, the entire facility needs to be brought into current code compliance. The fact that a building as constructed does not meet current Florida Building Codes may impact scope and cost of a proposed renovation, and it may be economically more viable to defer such renovations until a full facility replacement can be funded. 3.2.2 Life Safety/Fire Code Requirements: Egress requirements and fire-rated construction at assembly spaces is an area where life-safety compliance is of paramount concern, as the level of public interaction in these spaces brings with it a higher potential for incidence. Visual observation alone cannot always ascertain compliance with fire-rated construction requirements. It is recommended that the City Fire Marshall conduct a detailed assessment of Life Safety issues and provide recommendations, to include an action Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 3: Citywide Evaluation Criteria, p.7 plan for implementation that may be considered as part of a general building renovation program. Egress paths must remain unobstructed, and some of the overcrowded conditions in office spaces are of concern, particularly where the “temporary” storage of file boxes and equipment has become permanent. Storage space is at a premium in many facilities, and combustible items (boxes, paper) stored in electrical closets and other spaces that exceed the allowable area of a storage room are of concern, particularly in facilities without fire sprinkler systems. In evaluating ADA criteria for egress, there are cited a couple instances where there is insufficient clear opening width at doors (for example: City Hall main entry, Fire Prevention offices doors at the New Municipal Building), which likewise is in violation of FBC/Life Safety Code. Also noted are ADA non-compliant changes in floor level at egress doors which have a step down to grade. 3.2.3 Florida Accessibility Code: ADA Requirements It is important to note that the entire issue of ADA compliance has come into greater focus for a variety of reasons. We have learned that certain previously recommended or mandated requirements would not provide the breadth of accessibility that is required. In essence ADA requirements are a Florida legislative and regulatory event, changing on a regular basis and as a result studies or action plans undertaken years ago, may no longer be valid relative to current State and Federal requirements. As part of the Facility Evaluation, an ADA Assessment was completed to review regulatory compliance with current Florida Building Code (FBC, Chapter 11) and federal ADA Accessibility Guidelines (ADAAG). As municipal facilities, all of the buildings surveyed fall under Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act, effective as of January 26, 1992. Title II of the ADA covers “public entities”, and prohibits the discrimination on the basis of disability in all service, programs, and activities provided to the public by State and local governments, including employment. With respect to facilities, a public entity must ensure that individuals with disabilities are not excluded from these services because buildings are inaccessible. Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 3: Citywide Evaluation Criteria, p.8 In conclusion, City facilities must be corrected to comply with chapter 11 of the Florida Building Code in order for all City services, programs, and activities to be accessed by everyone including individuals with disabilities. While many of the facilities generally conform to accessibility guidelines, full compliance is recommended. The “Citywide ADA Study” (submitted January 26, 2009) documents specific non-conforming items observed. Typical non-conformities that are cited throughout the report that are applicable to various City facilities include the following: • non-compliant changes of elevation at egress doors (exit doors with a step down to grade) • bathroom fixtures and accessories with insufficient clearance for access and installed outside of the acceptable reach ranges • insufficient clear opening width of doors along an accessible route, insufficient push/pull clearance at doors • door hardware (closers) which exceed the allowable push/pull force, and trim (handles) which require a twisting of the wrist to operate • insufficient minimum quantity of accessible parking stalls • non-compliant changes of level and/or discontinuity of an accessible path from ADA parking to a public entrance and/or public transportation • lack of detectable warning surfaces at traffic crossings Rear exterior doors serving as required second means of egress have steps at the door threshold varying from 3" to 7". –Changes in level greater than 1/2" on an accessible route require a ramp compliant with accessibility standards. Detectable warnings are not provided at intersection of sidewalk and vehicular way as required. Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 3: Citywide Evaluation Criteria, p.9 Some items at specific facilities as noted below will require more significant renovations to accomplish compliance: • egress stairs of insufficient clear width and lacking a 2-way communication system as required at a designated area of refuge • non-compliant elevator with cab of in-sufficient size and door opening clearance These examples demonstrate the range of items and corresponding level of difficulty and expense involved to accomplish compliance. Some repairs may be accomplished by City maintenance staff, while others will perhaps require an outside contractor to perform the work as part of the scope of a building renovation. It is also important to note that compliance may be waived in some existing facilities if an appropriate alternate accommodation plan is provided. However, consideration should be given to facilities that will undergo major renovation where full compliance with ADA will be a required element of the scope of construction. The intent of ADA is not to force full and immediate compliance on all facilities, rather to have the City adopt an action plan to accomplish modifications over an acceptable time period, recognizing that some items will be technically more feasible to accomplish. Paper towel dispensers at employee restrooms by first floor break room are mounted at 69" above finish floor. The maximum high forward reach accessible by persons in a wheelchair is 48" above the finish floor. Front counters are 42" above finish floor (aff) without any provision for an accessible counter area at 36" aff. (note: pictured is the former permit desk at City Hall, the department has since moved to new offices at the New Municipal Building) Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 3: Citywide Evaluation Criteria, p.10 It should be noted, however, that there is an increased scrutiny, from the legal profession and advocacy groups, relative to full compliance with all sections of the ADA Requirements. Therefore it is the recommendation that the City adopt an annual plan to accomplish full compliance of all facilities, particularly those that will undergo major renovation and remain in service into the future. Following is a prioritization schedule for implementing a renovation plan which takes into consideration each department’s level of interaction with the public: Prioritization Schedule for ADA Compliance 1. City Hall Complex at 3650 NE 12th Ave., Oakland Park, Florida. This building has high interaction with the public and several departments operate in it. 2. Public Library, 1298 NE 37th Street This building is highly visited year round by people of all age groups, which puts it at a high priority. 3. Collins Recreation Center, 3900 NE 3rd Avenue 4. Parks Amenity Buildings: Wimberly Field, Stevens Field, Royal Palm Park, The Dog Park, Lakeside Sandpine Preserve Center, etc. 5. Fire Stations (#87, #9, #20) 6. Public Works Municipal Services Building, 3801 NE 5th Avenue 7. Public Works Operations (water treatment plant), 5100 NE 12th Terrace Consideration is to be given to buildings proposed for replacement or demolition, which may not warrant ADA renovations given the life expectancy of the existing facility. It is noted that any facility upgrades for ADA compliance will require a set of architectural drawings and specifications prepared by a licensed architect, for permit through the Building Department prior to commencement of any type of construction work. Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 3: Citywide Evaluation Criteria, p.11 3.3 Sustainability This topic is addressed by one of the City’s core Strategic Performance Areas: Financial Stability and Sustainability, a key element of which includes a cost containment strategy towards reductions in operation and maintenance costs. Discussed in this section will be conservation and green initiatives towards achieving these cost savings, primarily reductions in electricity usage and overall water consumption. It is noted that the City of Oakland Park has identified conservation efforts and ‘green’ initiatives as a priority. The City has adopted a program to retrofit facilities with water conserving fixtures and has recently completed an energy audit to assist the City’s maintenance program in evaluating the efficiency of existing HVAC systems and lighting. The implementation of a program to retrofit key facilities to realize higher conservation standard, and savings in operational costs, is a factor in recommendations for a comprehensive capital improvements program. Generally stated, the goal of energy-efficient (“green”) buildings is to reduce the impact of the building on the environment. Green building practices apply to construction, renovation, operation, and maintenance. LEED, USGBC and other such rating systems focus on a comprehensive approach towards achieving healthy buildings for the environment and the occupants. Perhaps applicable to the City of Oakland Park as a standard, LEED also provides standards for existing buildings and for improving building operations without making major exterior and interior changes. A key benefit of employing “green building” strategies is increased energy efficiency and water conservation. Specifically, a number of green building techniques can impact the bottom line through the creation of more energy efficient buildings and operations, including: thermally-efficient roofs, walls and windows; building shape and orientation; thermal mass and daylighting strategies that reduce cooling loads; more efficient heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning systems; efficient electrical lighting strategies that capitalize on daylighting; water efficient supply and waste fixtures; and interior designs providing visual access to the outdoors and access to daylight. Water Conservation The City has already begun to retrofit lavatories and water fountains with automatic sensor controls. Similar controls for toilets, new low-flush fixtures, and water-less urinals may additionally be installed to achieve further reductions in potable water consumption. Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 3: Citywide Evaluation Criteria, p.12 Recently passed legislation in the Broward County region, which restricts treated wastewater discharge through ocean outfalls, will require the establishment of reuse or reclaimed water programs. These alternative water supply projects may in the future reduce potable water consumption for uses such as irrigation, by the use of reclaimed water. However, as the City purchases its water from another municipality (Fort Lauderdale), these potential conservation measures may not be of economic benefit to the City, although of benefit to the sustainability of this essential natural resource. Additionally, surcharges imposed due to watering restrictions during drought conversely impact costs upon reduced water consumption. Passive strategies such as native landscaping and surface water collection (rain barrels) to reduce potable water use for irrigation are also worthy of consideration as a low maintenance strategy. Florida Energy Commission Guidelines Recent recommendations by the Florida Energy Commission for the FBC (Florida Building Code) and FEEC (Florida Energy Efficiency Code for Building Construction) advocate for the adoption of language in these codes to “facilitate and promote the use of cost-effective energy conserving, energy demand management, and renewable energy technologies into buildings.” While such recommendations are not yet mandated, it is likely that future editions of these codes and other regulatory standards will incrementally begin to incorporate these principles, initially as “recommendations”, and then potentially mandated at some level towards the achievement of these goals. As an example, FBC mandates that automatic lighting controls be installed in buildings greater than 5,000 square feet to automatically shut-off non-essential lighting after hours and/or when the building is otherwise unoccupied. This mandate is also of consideration where major renovations are of scope to require full compliance with current codes. Florida Energy Code has also drastically reduced the allowable watts per square foot, which is also an energy savings to the building. Recently proposed legislation (HB 7123, 2007) included a provision requiring that all new buildings constructed and financed by the state be designed to meet energy efficiency and sustainability standards. Although it was vetoed by the Governor, subsequently by Executive Order 07-126 the Department of Management Services has been directed to adopt LEED NC standards for all new buildings constructed Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 3: Citywide Evaluation Criteria, p.13 for or by the State of Florida. The precedence has been set for future State legislation to make its way into regulatory standards and local policy. The long-term proposed enhancements to the FEEC as recommended by the Florida Energy Commission may serve the City of Oakland Park as a benchmark for establishing similar goals. Stated is the goal of achieving incremental increases in the energy performance of new buildings by 20% beyond the 2007 Energy Code by 2010, and achieving 50% by 2019. Potential building options/elements that are suggested by the FEC to meet proposed energy efficiency goals include: • energy efficient windows, doors, and skylights • enhanced ceiling, roof, and wall insulation • low solar absorption roofs (“cool roofs”) • reduced leak duct systems • programmable thermostats • energy efficient lighting systems • energy efficient appliances • solar hot water heating 3.3.1 Building Envelope Performance: Essential to energy efficiency is building envelope performance. Given the age of the majority of the facilities surveyed in this study, what is evident throughout are poorly sealed windows and doors – the primary source of heat and moisture gains from the direct infiltration of the warm, humid south Florida air. Secondarily, the unprotected glass itself is a source of heat gain, as evident in facilities which lack shading devices such as awnings or the protection afforded by UV or low-E glazing technologies. For facilities appropriate of the investment, a window/door replacement program is recommended to achieve the desired operational efficiency. The primary components to achieve high building envelope performance include thermally efficient windows and doors, effective building insulation, and a cool roof strategy (as discussed separately below). In south Florida, the objective in increasing the building envelope performance is to reduce heat gains (including latent heat, i.e. humidity) from the external elements, and to reduce the loss of conditioned air to the outside (loss by infiltration). Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 3: Citywide Evaluation Criteria, p.14 The thermal efficiency of windows includes the installation as well as the fabrication and inherent components of the window assembly. In particular, glazing technologies continue to achieve higher performance levels in rejecting solar heat gains through an array of products including low-E, laminated, and fritted glass. As an additional feature, solar shade devices, such as awnings, can be employed to cut solar heat gains significantly. More obviously, an important aspect of a well sealed window or door is to prevent moisture intrusion, and the various complications that this can cause, including increased humidity into the building and consequently higher HVAC loads. Building insulation is integral to all components of the exterior envelope and is properly employed with a comprehensive strategy towards controlling the transfer of vapor through the building envelope, to protect the building from complications due to moisture intrusion. Specifically, vapor can potentially get trapped in inaccessible/unbreathable cavities of the building envelope, where it can condense into moisture, causing a host of complications including failure of the structural integrity of the building, increased HVAC loads due to humidity, and health complications from the introduction of mold. 3.3.2 Cool Roofs Perhaps of the greatest significance to the general integrity of the building envelope, and subsequently to the efficient operation of HVAC systems, is the structural condition of the roof and its waterproof membrane and finish construction. Given the age of many of these facilities, a history of some level of roof failure is inevitable, as is evident in ceilings which exhibit signs of prior water damage. Dark colored roofs are heat sinks, and the installation of “cool” (light-colored) roofs will yield a dramatic reduction in HVAC cooling loads. Traditional roofs typically use dark material (asphaltic based) and absorb more heat, potentially reaching temps of 150-190 F. These high roof surface temperatures contribute to increased energy use by air conditioners, resulting in higher utility bills compounded by higher peak electricity demand (with escalating production and effects on local utility provider), as well as also contributing to the acceleration of roofing-material deterioration yielding increased roof-maintenance costs. The impact on the community of the resulting “heat-island” effects is also of consequence. Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 3: Citywide Evaluation Criteria, p.15 A substantial savings may be achieved by installing white or light colored “cool” roofs with high solar reflectance, and therefore low solar absorption. Cool roofs can reduce the roof surface temp by up to 100F, and consequently the heat transferred into the building. As a result, this reduces energy costs and improves occupant comfort, as well as increasing the life cycle of the roof and reducing maintenance expenses. Additionally, “cool” protective coatings can be reapplied repeatedly every 10-15 years and reduce, if not eliminate, the need for expensive tear-offs and replacement. Initial material costs of “cool roofs” are comparable with traditional materials, and in consideration of the combined maintenance savings with an average 20% savings on air conditioning costs, the installation of a cool roof is a cost-effective investment. 3.3.3 Efficient HVAC Systems Efficient HVAC system design and delivery has the potential to achieve great economies in energy utilization. Although not code mandated, many private and public building owners are electing to install building automation/controls, to schedule the hours of HVAC operation and reduce usage after hours, realizing significant savings in energy use. These systems can also allow for a municipality to remotely monitor and control HVAC systems at various citywide facilities, to address a comprehensive check list, including: the operational status of equipment, scheduled routine maintenance such as filter replacement, the detection of faulty equipment, and to ensure that thermostat settings are within acceptable ranges for the comfort of the occupants as well as the most efficient utilization of the equipment. In a retrofit, a couple basic strategies are feasible to achieve savings in energy utilization: the replacement of old HVAC equipment that has exceeded its useful life with newer units of a higher SEER rating, and the simple installation of programmable thermostats where these controls are not already being employed. 3.3.4 Energy Efficient Lighting Systems Energy efficient lighting systems include the fixtures, the lamps (“light bulb”), and the controls. The design (configuration and material finish) of the fixture itself is responsible for producing the most efficient distribution of light for an intended task, rendering one fixture more efficient Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 3: Citywide Evaluation Criteria, p.16 in its light output than another. Lens covers, reflectors, and other customizable accessories can often achieve even greater efficiencies in a well-designed fixture. Retrofitting fixtures with more efficient lamps is perhaps the most feasible strategy for an existing building to achieve higher energy performance from lighting. Incandescent lighting is highly inefficient in consideration of the fact that 10% of the energy that is used is put out in the form of light, while 90% is put out as heat (which also is of impact to HVAC cooling loads). Compact fluorescent light bulbs by their efficiency utilize less energy for the same light output, produce minimal heat and therefore impose less on HVAC cooling loads, and last approximately 13 times longer than an incandescent bulb allowing more time in between replacement. Though the initial cost of a CFL lamp may be more, the savings can be 8 to 12 times its cost during its lifecycle. A rapidly developing technology in a category all its own is LED lighting. As of yet, LED is generally not economically the most feasible, due to the higher cost of these fixtures. In certain applications, the life cycle cost may far outweigh the initial investment. Some devices have technologically reached a high degree of economic feasibility, such as LED exit lights, LED scoreboards, and LED traffic signal modules. Automated lighting controls, such as motion and infrared sensors, can be effectively employed to reduce the unnecessary lighting of unoccupied spaces. This is an area of energy efficiency which has already become mandated by Florida Energy Code, as previously discussed. 3.3.5 Energy Efficient Appliances Adding energy efficiency as a criterion when purchasing new equipment, such as ENERGY STAR appliances, is recognized as good standard practice. The implementation of energy saving procedures for office equipment (computers and copy machines), such as powering off when not in use, will also yield measurable savings. Idle office equipment does use energy. New energy efficient vending machines are effective, as is the retrofit of existing machines with “vending misers” to reduce energy use. Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 3: Citywide Evaluation Criteria, p.17 3.3.6 Solar Energy Systems for Buildings To date, solar hot water heating is the most cost-effective solar energy system that can be implemented by an individual owner for their building. The potential savings of a solar water heater are directly related to the volatility of the energy source that the solar heater may potentially replace. This strategy has been effective for many home owners, but is not as often utilized in commercial or public buildings. Photovoltaics generally require a much greater initial investment and there is an economy of scale that is needed to achieve the most demonstrable savings. Emerging technologies to facilitate a more wide-spread use of photovoltaics continue to be developed, including photovoltaic panels fully integrated into metal panel roofing systems. Strategies and Recommendations When retrofitting existing buildings to achieve greater energy efficiency, a couple of strategies are worth noting which offer the assistance and expertise of an industry contractor or vendor: • Retain an Energy Service Company (ESCO) to analyze the potential cost savings from altering an existing building. An ESCO developes, installs, and finances projects designed to improve the energy efficiency and maintenance costs for facilities over a 7 to 20 year time period. This strategy is further discussed in Section 3 / Part I, under “Funding Opportunities”. • Conduct an energy audit to understand current conditions and the potential cost savings from altering public buildings and implementing energy efficient retrofits into existing ones. Audits should include both the structural and operational efficiencies (for example, lighting and cooling). An energy tracking and management system should be established to monitor progress over time and make course corrections as needed. Energy audits were completed for key city facilities in 2008, including: City Hall, the Library, Engineering/Active Adults, Collins Recreation Center, Public Works Municipal Building, and Fire Station #87. Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 3: Citywide Evaluation Criteria, p.18 The “Business Energy Evaluation Analysis” provided by FPL for these facilities generally inventoried lighting and HVAC. Recommendations for lighting systems included decreasing lamping and dis-connecting redundant ballasts on fluorescent fixtures, and replacing incandescent lamps with compact fluorescent. HVAC systems recommendations generally included setting thermostats at 75F cooling and 68F heating and installing tamper proof covers, routine maintenance (cleaning condenser and evaporator coils, changing filters), duct pressurization tests to locate leaks, and replacing HVAC units with high efficiency models on an as-fail basis. The recommended measures are projected to yield significant savings, the exact amount varies at each of the facilities, and is dependent on variables such as weather conditions. For example, the savings in kWh for de-lamping (and ballast removal) at fluorescent light fixtures ranged from 25% - 50% per fixture. Raising the thermostat at Collins Community Center from 73F to 76F was cited to yield a projected 3% savings in kWh. The City’s stated goal for fiscal year 2009 was to achieve a 5% reduction in kWh citywide. The FPL recommendations are proposed to be implemented at these 6 facilities as case studies, tracking kWh against the specific strategy employed to measure results. Renovations that may be proposed in this study, such as window and roof replacement, and new HVAC equipment, in conjunction with some of the immediately deployable energy saving strategies as suggested by FPL, will further the realize savings in energy costs. Full detailed Life Cycle Cost analysis is beyond the scope of this study, but increasingly sophisticated software is available, as well as professional specialty in this form of analysis. 3.4 Information Technology The City continues to implement processes and methods towards realizing the maximum benefits of a paperless environment. The implementation of electronic agenda systems and webcasting, virtual record management systems, bill-paying, payroll, finance documentation (accounting, purchasing, budget documentation) has served to streamline operations and further green initiatives through the reduction of paper waste, as well as reducing record storage space needs. Additionally, such technological initiatives and process improvements are being employed to achieve reductions in staff hours, enabling a more efficient work flow, and serving to increase the capabilities of current staff to meet future needs. Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 3: Citywide Evaluation Criteria, p.19 The increasing dependence on remote, virtual access will require an evaluation of the City’s current access to external infrastructure, and potential inter-agency coordination to provide fiberoptic upgrades or other connectivity upgrades such as wireless technologies. Wireless connectivity was provided at City Hall, the Library, and Jaco Pastorius Park in 2009, and the installation at other city facilities may be determined to be of benefit. Staff last proposed an IT Plan approximately five years ago. While incremental upgrades continue to be implemented to further the City’s stated goals, the ITS system at this point in its evolution will benefit from a strategic plan, to consider among other factors the replacement of foundational equipment and software to enable the use of currently available and future technologies, and potentially increase the efficiency of services to meet current and future needs. An effective strategic plan will guide future ITS development, as well as provide a short-term plan. It is anticipated that the Strategic Plan will yield specific design performance criteria and recommendations from which to enable the City to solicit bids through an RFP process. It is in the best interest of the City to solicit bids for a comprehensive contract to include system design per the City’s established criteria, equipment and installation, software training and support, and applicable warranties. Additionally, there may be a benefit to contracting with the selected vendor/contractor for extended maintenance support and system development to address issues that may arise or be desired as a result of emerging technologies. Spatial Needs for the ITS Department To summarize the conclusions of this study’s Spatial Needs Assessment, there are fundamental space requirements for the equipment and service functions of the ITS Department. The design of server rooms is highly specialized, and the configuration and layout of equipment is essential to the access needed for maintenance. Dedicated HVAC equipment and uninterrupted power units also require space, with proper adjacency to serve the IT equipment room. Often overlooked, this equipment can be of a size and weight that must be planned for in the facility design, to ensure for example that future additional or replacement equipment can be transported through the facility to the IT room (and old equipment removed). The trend towards a paper-less system is in constant refinement with new technologies. With these increasingly sophisticated technologies, additional technical support for software and equipment may require additional part-time staff, or other contracted vendor support. While remote capabilities to Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 3: Citywide Evaluation Criteria, p.20 monitor and implement the scheduled maintenance of systems may be employed, appropriate work space will continue to be required for technical staff who may be full-time or only report on a part-time or as needed basis. These areas need proper work tables to facilitate the technical repair of equipment and components. Generally, it was observed that throughout the City facilities surveyed under this study, dedicated closets for IT connection points to the building and networked equipment were lacking. Additionally, printers and other newly acquired office equipment used on a daily basis by staff generally do not have dedicated work space areas. With any potential renovation or new facility design, these considerations may be fully integrated. ITS Equipment Requirements The monetary value of state-of-the-art IT equipment is considerable, in addition to the value of the critical functions that this equipment provides. In consideration of both, the system is an asset that necessarily carries the utmost priority for survivability. This equipment is recommended to be located in a hardened facility, secure from flood and other external hazards, with uninterrupted emergency power that is further recommended to provide a level of redundancy which includes UPS/battery back-up and on-line power from an emergency generator. Criteria for the server room itself includes dedicated HVAC systems, unique fire suppression systems, and an anti-static “clean” environment. The space presently allocated to ITS at City Hall compromises the current installation in all of these aspects, and an opportunity to upgrade the facility to meet these recommended standards is a priority. In consideration of the lack of facility area for a proper ITS equipment installation, consolidating servers under contract off-site may be a viable alternative option. 3.5 Survivability Criteria: The issue of building survivability is of paramount importance in particular to those facilities that have critical functions, such as Police, Fire Rescue, Emergency Operations, and City Services. It is recommended that these critical facilities as a minimum be designed to the standards of a category 4 storm event, recognizing that structures of this type are complex and clearly more expensive than those that would meet current code requirements. It is for this reason among others, that this report recommends that the replacement of these facilities be considered and planned for in the future. Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 3: Citywide Evaluation Criteria, p.21 Critical City facilities have weathered recent storm events without significant damage or disturbance of operations. While the City has taken the necessary preparations for these events, these facilities are none-the-less sub-standard to the level of construction currently mandated for a storm-hardened critical facility. As noted previously, the existing facilities are of construction dating 20-40 years old, and were not engineered to meet the more stringent criterion of current building codes. The code specifically identifies a need for buildings to withstand wind loads as defined in Chapter 16, section 1605.1. Additionally, Table 1604.5 – Importance Factors for Buildings and Other Structures, increases the resistance for buildings defined as essential facilities by a factor of 1.15. Police, Fire Rescue, City Hall and Public Works administration with their role in a post-event emergency operations system, are facilities which would be included in this category. The window system, as an example, will be subject to not only sustained wind forces, but to the more destructive force of impact from wind-borne debris. This equates to projectiles that can penetrate both glass and wall systems, depending upon the magnitude of the storm. In general, the existing facilities utilize storm shutters to protect openings during an event. These require advance warning and time for installation. The replacement of window systems at critical facilities with an appropriate impact rated assembly may be appropriate if facility replacement is not anticipated in the near term. Replacement relates to the entire window assembly system (frames, glass and connection to the walls) and may be prioritized to replace windows at the second floor first, recognizing that ground level areas can be protected by easily installed shutters or other protective materials. Notably, new windows will also contribute towards the improved energy efficiency of the building. Most importantly, the roof of a building is, in many respects, the most critical element to the integrity of the structure, and the most difficult element of the building envelope to design and construct to resist the forces of wind and water. The experiences of recent storm events have clearly shown that the point where the roofing material connects with the exterior wall is the area of critical importance and typically, its weakest link. Once this “connection” fails, the roof system begins the process of destruction which inevitably leads to building failure. Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 3: Citywide Evaluation Criteria, p.22 It is also important to note that the design and installation of the sub-roof and roofing insulation must incorporate more restrictive standards for adhesion than is normally provided. The roof composition in essence must be considered as an entire system and not in terms of individual components. Generally speaking, an NOA (Miami-Dade Notice of Acceptance) or Florida Product Approval will govern the entire assembly, from structural substrate to the material and specified attachment of each subsequent layer of the roof (sheathing, insulation, substrate, and finish material). It is equally important to consider the occurrence of man-made events, be they purposeful or accidental. A chemical spill on a highway or rail adjacent to a facility, as an example, can render the entire complex unusable for a sustained period of time. This type of hazard is of particular concern for facilities such as City Hall and Fire Station #20, which are within immediate proximity to freight rail lines. These two rail lines also pose unique challenges to the City’s effective emergency response plan, in the event that access to/from these regions beyond the rail lines are obstructed by an accident, or irregular rail service schedules. Certainly not all events can be prevented nor can facilities, by themselves, protect occupants from all events. It is important, however, to relocate those functions that are most critical into a protected and survivable facility, removed from external hazards. Additional recommended survivability criteria for critical facilities to be considered in the design of a new facility include the following: 3.5.1 Criteria for Redundant Facility Systems The nature of a critical/first-response facility mandates that major portion of the facility remain operational prior to, during, and after an emergency/event. In order to achieve this goal it is of critical importance that the facility itself be “survivable”, including all of its critical facility systems. The failure of any singular system can, and often does, result in an inability for the facility to remain operational. Few, if any jurisdictions, have back-up facilities to which emergency response functions can be transferred in the event of an inability to continue utilization of the primary facility. 3.5.2 Redundant Systems Redundant Systems, defined as those of a highly critical nature are summarized as follows: • Power/Emergency Generators • Water/Back-up Potable Water Systems Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 3: Citywide Evaluation Criteria, p.23 • Sewer/Waste Water Systems • Communications/Back-up or Secondary Systems • Air Handling Systems 3.5.3 Power/Emergency Generators A key component in the survivability of a critical facility is emergency power. The City has emergency power capabilities provided by generators in good working order at each of the three fire stations and co-located EOC, the new BSO, and the Public Works Administration building, which serves as an Emergency Operations Center (EOC) Camp for the department. Uninterrupted back-up power for City Hall’s ITS operations is also a critical need, and improvements were made in 2009 to install plug-in capability for the hook-up of a portable generator. A permanent generator and uninterrupted back-up power source for essential building systems and ITS at City Hall is recommended as an essential service to be provided as part of a future renovation or replacement facility. Physical protection from wind-borne debris and acts of vandalism is also necessary to ensure that the generator will be serviceable when required. Generators at Fire Stations #87 and #9 are located within the facility and are fully secured and protected, while generators at Fire Station #20 and the BSO/New Municipal Building are outdoor stand-alone units, which although designed to weather the elements, are potentially vulnerable to vandalism or other acts. Generator at Fire Station #20Generator at BSO/New Municipal Building Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 3: Citywide Evaluation Criteria, p.24 During an event it is highly probable that standard electrical service to a facility will be adversely affected or disrupted. The various response systems of a Police Facility, as an example, are such that power must continue to be provided to the facility and that it be designed to provide 100% of the electrical demand. In facilities of the highest level of survivability, such as an Emergency Operations Center, it is our belief and recommendation that redundant emergency generators be provided so that the failure of a single emergency generator does not result in the facility becoming inoperable. Dual Emergency Generators, while expensive, provide the capability for a facility to continue to provide service, even if one of the generators fails to operate. A Fire Rescue facility does not necessarily warrant this level of redundancy, but if feasible, it is recommended to provide additional “plug-in” capability, so that a portable emergency generator can be transported to the facility and be easily accommodated if needed. Emergency generators must be tested and operated on a regularly scheduled basis in order to be sure that they are in operable condition. Certain fuels for emergency generators have the characteristic of deterioration over a period of time if they are not utilized. The maintenance and testing of these systems must be part of a comprehensive ongoing facility review process, which is recorded in order to ensure compliance. It is recommended as noted above, that emergency generators be sized to accommodate 100% of facility electrical needs, including all Mechanical equipment power needs. A/C systems which are not at full capacity, when needed, quickly render a facility un-useable. Moving air, with a fan system, is not sufficient as the outdoor temperatures, quickly become indoor temperatures, despite the benefits of thermal mass that could be provided by the building. Higher temperatures begin to adversely affect both equipment performance and the ability of individuals to provide acceptable levels of service. 3.5.4 Water/Redundant Water Systems Most water systems that service buildings are part of a pumped or pressurized system and as such are contingent upon a continued supply of electrical service to pumping stations. Gravity systems are unusual and can equally be disrupted by the dynamic forces of an event. It is Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 3: Citywide Evaluation Criteria, p.25 important, in that respect, to anticipate that potable water systems, serving the facility on a day-to-day basis, will be unavailable during and after an event. Potable water is utilized not only for human consumption but for the other critical functions of food preparation, the cooling of certain mechanical equipment systems, for plumbing systems (flushing of toilets), and basic human sanitation. Strategies to address this issue include water storage facilities, either of a permanent nature (tanks) or inflatable blatters which can be filled just prior to an event, and provisions to accommodate the transport of water supply to the site. 3.5.5 Sewer/Waste Water Systems New critical facilities, such as an Emergency Operation Center, should consider providing a redundant sanitary sewer system in order to remain operational. It is recommended that the secondary system for a septic and/or a collection/storage system (holding tank) be provided to ensure that the facility remains functional. Some natural events have the capability of saturating a site with large quantities of water, with an impact upon the ability of septic systems to operate efficiently. 3.5.6 Communications/Secondary Systems Law Enforcement Facilities, by their nature, must retain fully operational communications capability on a 24/7 basis. Many such facilities utilize a primary communications tower which is subject to the forces of a natural and man-made event. Failure of this system poses significant problems, even with back-up capability. Secondary towers should be designed into the facility, using appropriate tie-down and/or fold down capability when an event is anticipated. Communication towers can also be stored within a protected environment and deployed when the situation warrants. The “tie-down” of a communications tower requires additional structural systems beyond those normally provided. It is equally important to locate towers in secure environments that are electronically monitored and covered by a CCTV system, both of which should be alarmed to Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 3: Citywide Evaluation Criteria, p.26 provide intrusion notification. Additionally, it is important to determine the “fall down” radius to ensure that should the tower collapse it does not potentially impact the facility. 3.5.7 Air Handling Systems Another critical system for facility survivability is that of the mechanical equipment. This system should be located within the facilities sheltered environment. An out-door cooling tower, as an example is subject to air borne debris (impact) which can quickly result in the failure of the mechanical system. While it may not be economically feasible to provide redundant mechanical systems, it is important to maintain an on-site supply of critical parts; those which experience suggests have the highest potential for failure over a sustained period such as fan belts, lubricants, etc. Maintenance and operational manuals as well as on-site personnel trained in basic systems maintenance are important criteria to consider and to incorporate into response procedures. Section 4: Facilities Master Plan Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 4: Facilities Master Plan, p. 1 Section 4: Facilities Master Plan - Considerations In master planning for the current and future needs, additional City planning criteria was considered, including concurrency with the City’s Comprehensive Plan, specifically the established goals of the City’s Community Redevelopment Area (CRA), Future Land Use, and the Recreation and Open Space Element, as further developed in the recently adopted Recreation and Parks Master Plan. The Master Plan implementation strategy for the CRA includes a comprehensive schedule of capital improvements. The majority of the properties surveyed under this study lie within the CRA district, and some more specifically within the Local Activity Center (LAC), designated as a new Downtown Mixed Use District. The CRA Plan was adopted and approved in 2005, with a vision towards “creating a small town with big city opportunities”. The goals and objectives focus on catalytic projects and programs to promote further investment and momentum to achieve the City’s vision. It is anticipated that the CRA Board will update this plan in 2015, to establish a second phase implementation plan for the 2016-2025 time period. In addition to the stated goals and vision for the CRA, these capital projects directly respond to the City’s Strategic Performance Areas, namely: “smart growth and redevelopment”, “expanding Parks & Leisure facilities and activities”, and “focus on Oakland Park’s image”. A vibrant and developing CRA district is also a key component to ensure “financial stability and sustainability”. It is important to note that to date funding has been directed towards infrastructure improvements, specifically stormwater infrastructure is over halfway complete with 2 of the 4 major trunk lines finished and the remainder 75% funded through FEMA grants. In addition to paving the way for new development, completion of this essential infrastructure may allow the next phase of capital improvement funding to be directed towards facilities. The following City maps illustrate the boundaries of the CRA (black dashed line) and LAC (red dashed line), and highlight the existing public properties, including city-owned properties (purple shading), within these boundaries. As mapped on the right, several parks exist within the boundary of the CRA (green shading), and more have been added since which are not represented, the most significant being Jaco Pastorius Park. Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 4: Facilities Master Plan, p. 2 Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Plan: Existing Properties Carter Burgess | Iler Planning Group | EDSA, 2005 Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 4: Facilities Master Plan, p. 3 The implementation strategy for the Local Activity Center / Downtown Mixed Use District has several components, including: 1) a main street concept specifically for the Downtown District including enhancement of the FEC right of way and NE 12th Avenue beautification; 2) the creation of a cultural destination and center of community activity; 3) the creation of a “gateway” to the new downtown at N. Dixie and NE 38th Street (additional gateways are proposed for the CRA as a whole to develop the N. Dixie corridor as an anchor: south at Oakland Park Blvd and north at Commercial Blvd.); and 4) the creation of pedestrian oriented commerce anchored by municipal services (City Hall and Post Office) to promote further investment in the area, including the potential future plans for a commuter rail hub in the vicinity of City Hall. Some of these capital projects have been funded and are underway or completed: 1) Jaco Pastorius Park and the renovation of the Downtown Center (1098 NE 40th Court); 2) infrastructure improvements / road re-alignment at NE 38th Street and Dixie Highway; and 3) the NE 12th Avenue beautification and FEC right of way enhancement. Of note, further infrastructure projects as recommended by the 2004 Traffic Study may potentially find funding and further the initiative towards transit oriented development. As experienced nationwide, the economic downturn has impacted further development, and public-private ventures, the prime economic catalysts, have since pulled out of the area. However, with the goals established for the LAC, the City is poised for future development with a master plan to guide the re-development of city-owned properties in this area. In particular, City Hall and the adjoining properties (Spiher Recreation Center, Greenleaf Park, City Library) occupy a key strategic location, as does Jaco Pastorius Park/Downtown Center. Future Land Use (FLU) / Zoning Designation of the Local Activity Center (LAC) and adoption of the Downtown Mixed Use District Ordinance, have contributed to significant changes in land use, to support the redevelopment of industrial areas within the CRA for higher density residential and mixed use. Zoning for higher density/mixed use will primarily be focused on key potential transit oriented corridors, where affordable housing and pedestrian oriented development may support walkable communities. Specifically, a Transit Oriented Development (TOD) Ordinance will direct mixed use development linked to the FEC railroad corridor, where proposed future commuter rail service will support mass transit nodes. Oakland Park Boulevard is a second key corridor for similar development, as explored in a recent Transit Housing Oriented Redevelopment (THOR) study by FDOT and Broward County. Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 4: Facilities Master Plan, p. 4 In general, changes in land use from Commercial to Mixed Use, with additional residential units (up to 30 Du/Ac) will be the pattern of development along these key corridors, while throughout the City higher density redevelopment and infill of existing low/low-medium density areas (5-10 DU/Ac) will increase to medium /medium-high density (16-25 DU/Ac). Areas of the City to be impacted by new future development patterns are illustrated in the following Existing Land Use map, which highlights the existing uses at areas which are designated in the Future Land Use map to change to mixed-use, transit oriented, and higher density development. Existing Land Use Map, 2007 Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 4: Facilities Master Plan, p. 5 Future Land Use Map Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 4: Facilities Master Plan, p. 6 Parks and Open Space While the City has an abundance of acreage designated for parks, much of the area is actually water. This is especially true of the area of the City west of I-95. As concluded in the Recreation and Parks Master Plan, the area of land based parks does not meet the established goals of the City’s 2007 Comprehensive Plan or the City’s Strategic Plan. Added to this deficit for current needs, additional dry land acreage is required to meet the projected level of service needs of future population growth. As the City is largely built-out and does not anticipate future annexations, a land reclamation program may need to be employed to strategically consolidate properties for future development of a comprehensive parks system. This may include greyfield and brownfield redevelopment, infill development, and other creative strategies to capture lost site area and re-develop its potential. Land acquisition will pose the greatest challenge to achieve these goals. The provision for additional dry land area for parks is a primary recommendation of the Recreation and Parks Master Plan (adopted October 2009). Additionally, the Plan recommends an equitable distribution of parks citywide, including (6) new neighborhood parks, (3) Community Centers, and (1) new large active sports Community Park on the west side of the City, all interconnected by an Urban Trails Program. As the master plan map below indicates, Community Centers exist to serve the north and central regions of the City, while a new facility will be required to serve the western region. New Community Centers in essence will be required at these existing facility sites, to expand programs and services which are recommended to meet future needs. In coordination with these recommendations, the Facilities Master Plan provides for these new and expanded facilities as part of the long range planning objectives for these sites. In particular, facility expansion of the Collins Community Center as a central recreational “Hub” for the City will be challenged by the adjacent uses of the City’s most essential core services: Public Works and Fire Station #9. New facilities such as the North Community Center, West Community Center and sports park, urban trails, and citywide parks enhancements are provided for in the Parks Capital Improvement Program, and are excluded from the Facilities Master Plan C.I.P. Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 4: Facilities Master Plan, p. 7 Recreation & Parks Master Plan, 2009 Miller Legg and Associates Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 4: Facilities Master Plan, p. 8 Near Term Planning: Existing Facilities Inventory The Facilities Master Plan is guided in the near term (5 year horizon) by one of the City’s seven “Strategic Performance Areas”: Financial Stability and Sustainability. The annual operations and maintenance budget is impacted both by the quantity of facilities, as well as the condition of those facilities. Guiding the recommendations in this Plan is the premise of a “sustainable, consolidated, fiscally conservative” approach to managing the City’s facility needs. The “Near Term Plan” also borrows from the City’s overall business plan strategy to “reshape, automate, resize for excellence” (R.A.R.E.). The operations and maintenance costs of the existing facilities inventory may be mitigated in 4 ways: 1.) consolidate personnel and services at appropriate facilities to reduce the citywide facility area 2.) vacate and cease maintenance of under-utilized and defunct facilities which have exceeded their useful life 3.) sell or lease viable vacated properties, and/or maintain properties at no cost to hold for future development 4.) upgrade and repair facilities which will be utilized into the foreseeable future, to reduce annual maintenance expenditures and operation costs (energy and water usage). In consideration of the age of many of the City’s facilities and the investment required to implement facility upgrades, a conservative approach to any proposed renovation is recommended. Energy efficiency may be achieved with minimal investment by the installation of compact fluorescent bulbs and automated lighting controls, and by implementing the additional recommendations of the City’s recent FPL Business Energy Evaluation Analysis. More significant renovations may include the replacement of HVAC equipment with new higher efficiency equipment on an as-fail basis. However, the full efficiency of upgraded HVAC equipment will not be realized if the more permanent building components (distribution system design) and building envelope (windows, doors, roof, insulation) are in poor or sub-standard condition. Upgrading these components is a much greater investment when measured both in dollars and the potential loss of facility usage during renovation, which must be weighed against the life expectancy of the facility. When additional criteria is considered, such as regulatory compliance and the occupant’s organizational space needs, consideration may have to be given to planning for facility replacement. Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 4: Facilities Master Plan, p. 9 Long Range Planning: Future Facilities The Facilities Master Plan presents recommendations for long range planning, including facility replacement and proposed new facilities to meet future needs. These proposed future projects will require the adoption of a long-range planning and budgeting strategy to finance design and construction, and may also include land acquisition. Importantly, these long range plans also serve to guide the decisions related to investing in interim renovations. Proposed New and Replacement Facilities (2020/2030) 1. Community Center Facilities The Parks and Open Space Master Plan Study recommends (3) new Community Centers strategically located to serve the City’s population: Central, West, and North. The redevelopment of the Collins Community Center site is proposed for the new Central Community Center, and phased Development Alternatives are outlined and included in the Facilities C.I.P. (The North and West Community Centers are proposed as new facilities in the Parks Master Plan/C.I.P, and are excluded from the Facilities C.I.P.) 2. Public Works Complex A consolidated, centralized, Public Works Complex is recommended to combine Public Works Administration and Operations at one facility site. Interim goals include re-locating Public Works Operations to the Municipal Services site, to vacate the current offices at the water treatment plant site. Interim renovations and master planning for the adaptive re-use of existing buildings at the Municipal Services facility are balanced in the C.I.P. against the master plan for new facilities scheduled for 2020/30 implementation 3. Replacement of Fire Rescue Facilities A Fire Rescue Master Plan Study is recommended to assess the long range planning for future City-wide fire rescue needs, to include the effective city-wide allocation of resources and facilities, taking into account City geography and access routes, demographics, future population growth and densities, and the corresponding demand upon Fire Rescue services. This Study may also consider the need for a new Emergency Operations Center, either as a stand-alone or joint Fire Rescue facility. Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 4: Facilities Master Plan, p. 10 The recommendations of the study may require land acquisition to site facilities strategically to meet service demands. Appropriate properties may not currently be available, and the need to implement a long-range strategy for assembling the land, and funding, is critical. For this reason, it is recommended that the study be funded in the near term (5-year time frame), so that the outcomes of the study may immediately be considered alongside other citywide needs for land acquisition. A preliminary budget for future Fire Rescue facilities is an element of the proposed C.I.P. for the purpose of establishing a long-range funding program. Land acquisition is not included. Further refinement of this projected future budget is anticipated to be an outcome of the recommended Fire Rescue Master Plan Study. 4. New Emergency Operations Center (EOC) As noted above, the Fire Rescue Master Plan Study may also include the programmatic master plan for a future EOC as part of the Fire Rescue response plan. A future EOC may also be developed concurrent with Fire Rescue and the Broward Sheriff Office, as a joint Public Safety facility. Upon determining future needs for an EOC, potentially as an outcome of the Fire Rescue Master Plan Study, a budget line item for future planning purposes can be implemented in the C.I.P. 5. New City Hall An option for the redevelopment of City Hall and the adjacent properties is outlined in the following section for consideration. A new City Hall and central civic campus for the City in the heart of the CRA’s Local Activity Center will require long-range planning and funding. A budget is forecast in the C.I.P. for 2020/2030 to establish a long-range funding program for a future new facility. Interim renovations had been considered and are also outlined as an alternate development option, but are not recommended or carried forward in the 5-Year C.I.P. as the recent re-location of Parks & Leisure Administration to City Hall and the consideration of alternate solutions to accommodate ITS expansion off-site have since taken precedence. 6. Library Replacement If the Library is to be maintained as a City owned and operated facility, funding towards the construction of a new building is to be established. A preliminary budget estimate for future facility replacement is included in the C.I.P. for this purpose. Interim major renovation and repairs of the current facility are anticipated and carried forward in the 5-Year C.I.P., contingent on the schedule for the construction of a new facility. Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 4: Facilities Master Plan, p. 11 7. Parking Facilities and Future Transit Oriented Development Transit oriented development and other elements of the CRA master plan may require future funding for parking facilities. Available land for Park-and-Ride and similar amenities to serve mass-transit hubs is currently lacking. Garages to serve mixed-use developments may potentially be funded through public-private partnership. The proposed C.I.P. does not project future funding for these facilities as level of service requirements are not determined. Upon further definition of the goals and implementation strategy to meet future parking needs, a program to establish funding is to be integrated into the C.I.P. Land acquisition will also require long-range planning. Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 4: Facilities Master Plan, p. 12 4.1 Development Alternatives: Existing City Facilities The aim of the Facilities Master Plan and Capital Improvement Program (C.I.P.) is to permit and encourage a pragmatic approach to current and future development of the City’s properties. In consideration of the City’s stated goals and objectives for the Facilities Master Plan, outlined below are recommended Development Alternatives for existing facilities which are currently underutilized or otherwise vacated, as well as properties that are recommended to be master-planned for redevelopment. Review and input from City staff and a presentation at a May 2009 Commission Workshop provided further direction in preparing recommendations that support the City’s Strategic Plan initiatives. Also of consideration has been the subsequent development of some of the City’s properties in the interim. Preparatory to the development of a Capital Improvements Program, estimated development costs for the proposed description of work is outlined for each facility as a “C.I.P. Project Detail” (Section 5.2). Vacated Facilities and Properties • 3. City Annex, 2901 E. Oakland Park Blvd. (This facility was removed from the City Inventory in 2009. Code Enforcement offices were re-located to the New Municipal Building in 2009, and the lease for this facility has been terminated.) • 4. Public Safety Building, 301 NE 38th Street Demolish building and redevelop site area for expansion of adjacent Public Works and Parks & Leisure facilities. The facility is currently being utilized for unconditioned storage. Roof and HVAC renovations are not warranted to upgrade the use of the facility, and based upon the facility’s history of water damage and air quality concerns, there are no recommended alternative uses in its present condition. (Note: Fire Station #9 is to remain operational until a future replacement facility is funded.) • 15. Pioneer House, 3860 NE 6th Avenue Facility maintenance is suspended, pending establishment of private or non-profit entity to administer its renovation and maintenance. Alternately, historic artifacts may be removed for installation and display at another public venue, and the property may be sold. • 2. Engineering/Active Adults, 250 NE 33rd Street HVAC and roof replacement is to be funded to upgrade the facility as a viable lease property. Alternately, the property may be sold or leveraged for land swap (the opportunity to exchange with owner of properties adjacent to Carter Woodson Park has been a consideration put forward by Parks & Leisure) Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 4: Facilities Master Plan, p. 13 • 20. Downtown Center-Building B, 1101 NE 40th Court One commercial suite is currently being leased, and the remainder of the facility is vacant or being used for storage by Parks & Leisure, Streets Division, and the Fire Department. The facility has value for tenant lease space; however, grant funds used to acquire the property may limit its use to Parks and Leisure programs only. Adaptive reuse or future redevelopment is recommended in the long-range plan to provide a multi-purpose arts facility and expand the program capabilities of Jaco Pastorius Park. As project scope is not yet determined, the C.I.P. include a preliminary budget estimate based upon renovation of the existing structure, including associated fees, and is to be used for establishing a long-range funding plan. A partial renovation may be implemented in the near term to provide space for new arts and music programs, and potentially interim offices for Parks and Leisure Administration (offices were re-located to City Hall in 2009). Roof replacement is to be funded in the 5-Year C.I.P. to protect the building from damage. Facilities to be vacated upon replacement or other re-location of services • 22. NAG, Community Center B (former church), 250 NE 56th Court The facility is in need of renovations within the 5-year CIP if it is to continue to be utilized for the current programs. Alternately, joint use agreements with area schools may provide space to re-locate programs, and allow for the closing of this building and demolition to facilitate the re-development of the site to support the programs of the co-located newly constructed NAG Community Center “A”. This site is not of adequate acreage to be redeveloped for the future North Andrews Gardens Community Center that is proposed in the Recreation & Parks Master Plan. • 14. Stevens Fieldhouse, 3881 NE 6th Avenue The facility is utilized for maintenance storage and also provides restrooms for Stevens Field and the Jog Track. It is recommended to build new restroom facilities to serve these parks, and demolish the building. Renovation is not warranted to upgrade the use of the facility, and based upon the facility’s history of water damage and air quality concerns, there are no recommended uses in its present condition. The facility is a former pumphouse and an abandoned underground clear well may impact future vertical construction on the site. An appropriate future use may be open green space, which could also provide overflow parking. Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 4: Facilities Master Plan, p. 14 • 10. Public Works Operations, 5100 NE 12th Terrace It is proposed that Public Works Operations vacate the facility upon re-location to the Municipal Services site, and that lease or sale opportunities be pursued for the property. One consideration is that the site may have potential value to FPL for use as a substation. A land swap to acquire other FPL owned land that would be advantageous to the City (Jog Track and NE 5th Ave parking area at west end of Stevens field) will require further inquiry by the City's real estate specialist. Other sale/lease options are to be explored, including development through a public/private venture. Alternately, it was considered to re-locate the future Public Works Complex at this site. However, the location is geographically de-centralized within the City and daily administrative and maintenance functions would be impacted. Hours of operations for Solid Waste would also be undesirable to the adjacent residential community, and public support would likely not be received. • 17. Spiher Recreation Center, 1246 NE 37th Street Interior renovations and installation of new windows and doors were completed in 2009; however, HVAC replacement may be required to extend the facility’s use beyond 5 years (included in the C.I.P.). Roof repair or replacement may also be anticipated. Alternately, if programs are re-located, the site may be redeveloped to support a new City Hall Master Plan (a consideration for the 2020/2030 time frame). Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 4: Facilities Master Plan, p. 15 Facility sites to master plan for redevelopment (2020/2030) • 11. Collins Community Center, 3900 NE 3rd Avenue • 8, 9. Municipal Services Building and Garage, 3801 NE 5th Avenue • 4. Public Safety Building Central to the City are a cluster of contiguous properties that provide an opportunity to implement a master plan for proposed future facilities: a Central Community Center and a consolidated Public Works Complex. As the city approaches full build-out, there are limited opportunities for the acquisition of large parcels of land to accomplish facilities of this scale. Existing Facility Sites: 4 Public Safety Building 301 NE 38th Street (2.46 acres) 6 Fire Station #9 301 NE 38th Street 8, 9 Municipal Services 3801 NE 5th Avenue (3.46 acres) 11 Collins Community Center 3900 NE 3rd Avenue (1.55 acres) 12 Wimberley Fields 4000 NE 3rd Avenue (8.60 acres) 13 Dillon Tennis Center 4091 NE 5th Avenue (2.49 acres) 14 Stevens Field 3881 NE 6th Avenue (3.95 acres) 15 Pioneer House 3860 NE 6th Avenue (0.28 acres) 30 Parking Lot 3900 NE 6th Avenue (0.61 acres) Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 4: Facilities Master Plan, p. 16 Phased Redevelopment: Central Community Center and Public Works Complex The future development of a Central Community Center is proposed for the existing Collins Recreation Center site. This location is strategic as the geographical center of the City, allowing equitable access by all citizens. When combined with the adjacent sports parks, it is also the only City-owned site that can feasibly provide the 12+ acres required for the proposed program. The Recreation & Parks Master Plan recommends a facility of 30,000 square feet, with outdoor swimming pool and other amenities, to be implemented in 2015. This Facilities Master Plan has anticipated design services commencing within the 5-Year C.I.P., with construction completed potentially in 2 phases by the 2020/30 time frame. If funding is successful, the facility may be built in one phase within the 2015-20 time frame, to be determined. Supporting the programs of the Central Community Center are the adjacent facilities at Stevens Field and the Giusti Heart Parcours Jog Track. It is to be noted that the jog track and parking at NE 5th Avenue to the west of Stevens field (used as overflow parking for Stevens and Public Works) are not city-owned. These properties are owned by FPL, under lease agreement to the city. To ensure the future use of these facilities, it is recommended that the City pursue acquisition of these properties, potentially by land swap with other city-owned property. The current Municipal Services site is likewise strategic to Public Works, and a centralized facility at this location is proposed to consolidate the department and optimize operations. Essential services and existing infrastructure in place at this site are to be further developed to accommodate the Public Works Operations Division. The re-location of Public Works Operations will allow the water treatment plant site to be vacated and leveraged for potential land swap or sale. As referenced previously, options on FPL properties adjacent to Stevens are recommended as a potential land swap to be explored by the City. With the proposed demolition of the Public Safety Building, this site area may be utilized in the interim by Public Works and Parks Division to implement the proposed Phase 1 renovations to re-locate the PW Operations offices to the Municipal Services site. It is also noted that Fire Station #9 is to remain in operation, as its current site is also a centralized location strategic to the current Fire Rescue response plan. It will be important that future recommendations take into consideration the effective allocation of Fire Rescue facilities citywide and the master plan for the Central Community Center and the Public Works Complex. Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 4: Facilities Master Plan, p. 17 Proposed Future Master Plan: Public Works Complex 3801 NE 5th Avenue (5 acres) Central Community Center 3900 NE 3rd Avenue (12+ acres total) 12 Wimberley Fields 4000 NE 3rd Avenue 13 Dillon Tennis Center 4091 NE 5th Avenue 6 Fire Station #9 301 NE 38th Street 14 Stevens Field 3881 NE 6th Avenue (3.95 acres) 30 Parking Lot 3900 NE 6th Avenue (0.61 acres) Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 4: Facilities Master Plan, p. 18 FY 2011: • Public Safety Building is demolished for re-utilization of site by Public Works and Parks Division for maintenance / storage functions (vacating area used by Parks Division at the Municipal Services Building and returning use to Public Works) • Fire Station #9 remains FY 2011-12: • Renovation/expansion of Garage to accommodate expanded fleet and maintenance functions (pending expansion of Solid Waste fleet to provide services to the N.Andrews Garden district in 2011) FY 2012-13: • The Municipal Service site is master planned for a new consolidated Public Works Complex, with a phased implementation plan to allow current operations to continue during re-development. • Programs at Collins Community Center are re-located or interim facility renovations are provided FY 2014-15: • Commence Master Planning and Design for the Central Community Center Future Phases: 2015-20 • Demolition of Collins Community Center • Construction of Central Community Center Phase 1, to include Parks & Leisure Administration offices. • Construction of Public Works Complex Phase 1 (new maintenance facilities, which will serve in the interim to provide office space to re-locate Public Works Operations to the site). Future Phases: 2020-30 • Central Community Center, Phase 2 • Public Works Complex, Phase 2 (new facility to consolidate Administration and Operations Divisions: administrative offices and crew functions) • Acquire NE 5th Avenue parking and Jog Track site from FPL Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 4: Facilities Master Plan, p. 19 Facility sites to master plan for redevelopment (2020/2030) • 1. City Hall, 3650 NE 12th Avenue • 17. Spiher Recreation Center, 1246 NE 37th Street • 18. Library, 1298 NE 37th Street The City Hall property has value as a strategic commercial property within the Local Activity Center (LAC) of the CRA. Combined with the adjacent city-owned parcels, there is an opportunity to redevelop the total acreage as a central civic campus, to include a new City Hall. Existing Facility Sites: (3.25 acres total) 1. City Hall 3650 NE 12th Avenue 17. Spiher Recreation Center 1246 NE 37th Street 18. Library 1298 NE 37th Street Future Development Options For consideration, alternative development options include: 1. The City Hall property may be leveraged for public-private redevelopment, to assist in funding a new City Hall and civic park with community meeting space on the remaining properties. (requiring the re-location of the Library and Spiher Recreation Center) 2. Spiher Recreation Center is re-located and all 3 properties are redeveloped as a central civic campus, to include a new City Hall and Library. 3. The City Hall property may be leveraged for public-private redevelopment to assist in funding the construction of a new City Hall at a new site. Options remain to redevelop Spiher and the Library with new facilities. Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 4: Facilities Master Plan, p. 20 A master plan for the future replacement of these facilities and redevelopment of this property is recommended to most effectively leverage the City’s assets and facilitate the best use of the land, in coordination with the goals of the LAC. Interim Renovations: As redevelopment within the LAC is intrinsically linked to local, state and national economic conditions, it is to be assumed that facility replacement and master planning of this scale may not be feasible in the near term, and that renovations at City Hall and the Library will be required in the interim. Subsequently, the re-location of the Building Division to its new facility in 2009 has vacated space at City Hall, which is currently occupied by Parks and Leisure Administration. Alternately, an opportunity was explored to use the former Building Division office space to re-locate City Clerk and Human Resources, and reconfigure and enlarge the ITS Department and Commission Chambers. This would alleviate space needs on the second floor as well. A concept floor plan follows. These renovations are not being recommended at this time, as the ITS Department is exploring options to meet its current and future needs through off-site and virtual capabilities for expanded services and equipment support. The Library is currently in need of major maintenance and repair that will require funding within the 5-Year C.I.P. A preliminary budget for these improvements is recommended and outlined on the facility’s “C.I.P. Project Detail” sheet. This capital investment in the near term is to be weighed against the value and likelihood of future facility replacement, or other options to pursue the provision of these services through inter-local agreement. Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 4: Facilities Master Plan, p. 21 Concept Plan, City Hall First Floor expanded and re-located services Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 4: Facilities Master Plan, p. 22 Parking Facilities • Parking Lot, 3900 NE 6th Avenue The parking lot serves as overflow parking for the adjacent Stevens Field, primarily utilized in the evenings. Recently (2009), the principle business user has closed its offices and the lot is underutilized during daytime hours. Maintenance of the property is provided by Facilities Maintenance and Parks Division. • Parking Lots, West and East Prospect Road at Andrews Avenue An annual assessment to business owners for maintenance is recommended and is a Business Plan initiative for 2010. Transit oriented development and other elements of the CRA master plan may impact the City with the need for public parking facilities. Appropriate sites such as this will be a valuable commodity. Options for current and future City parking facilities: 1. Implement a special assessment district for the maintenance of City parking lots 2. Implement a metered parking system at city-owned parking lots, with the goal of providing for their maintenance and potentially generating revenue Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 4: Facilities Master Plan, p. 23 4.2 Conclusion: Proposed Project Priorities and Recommendations An effective CIP plan will require consensus on the strategic prioritization of projects, to utilize available funding to strike a balance between improvements required for essential City operations and capital improvements towards meeting the City’s future needs. In evaluating the information and conclusions of as presented in this report, and in consideration of the current economic uncertainty, we recommend for consideration the following priorities (in no order of preference) to guide the near-term and long-term capital improvements to be considered in the Facilities C.I.P. for the City of Oakland Park. Phase I: Near Term (5-10 year) 1. Cost Containment and Maintenance • Close vacated and underutilized facilities, assess opportunities to lease viable properties to maintain the facility at no cost (and potentially generate revenue), and hold property for future redevelopment • Implement a special assessment district for the maintenance of city-owned parking facilities, or alternately implement a metered parking system. 2. City-Wide Upgrades and Maintenance of Core Facilities • Adopt a ten year plan to stabilize and repair those facilities to remain in use for the foreseeable future (beyond 5 years), to accomplish mandated code issues, extend the useful life, and achieve reductions in operation costs, specifically to address the following criteria: 1. Security (implement citywide system) 2. Regulatory Compliance: Life Safety and ADA compliance 3. Energy Efficiency (equipment, fixtures, and building envelope performance) 4. Information Technology (implement citywide upgrades) 5. Survivability (as required for critical facilities) 3. Facility Improvements for ADA Compliance • Adopt a five year plan to achieve citywide ADA compliance as prioritized, in coordination with proposed capital improvements. Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 4: Facilities Master Plan, p. 24 Phase II: Long Term Growth and Planning (2020/2030) 4. Public Works Complex Replacement Facility • Construct a new consolidated Public Works Complex for the Administration and Operations Divisions at the Municipal Services site. 5. New Parks & Leisure Facilities • Central Community Center • Library replacement (coordinate with the Recreation and Cultural C.I.P.) 6. Replace Fire Rescue Facilities / New EOC • A separate study is recommended to assess the future citywide needs that will establish the long range plans for the effective allocation of facilities and resources. Land acquisition may be a required element. 7. Replace City Hall • Construct new City Hall at current location or future site to be determined, pending the future development and goals of the CRA Local Activity Center 8. Parking Facilities and Future Transit Oriented Development • Transit oriented development and other elements of the CRA master plan may require future funding for parking facilities. Available land for Park-and-Ride and similar amenities to serve mass-transit hubs is currently lacking. Upon further definition of the goals and implementation strategy to meet future parking needs, a program to establish funding is to be integrated into the C.I.P. Land acquisition will also require long-range planning. These recommendations are also in recognition of the City Commission’s policy direction to focus on both the maintenance of public safety and the preservation of “brick and mortar” core services. It is important to note that available funding will influence to a great degree the actual phased implementation of the proposed capital improvements, and what is most essential is to distinguish between the near term and long term objectives. Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 4: Facilities Master Plan, p. 25 General Recommendations to Support Project Priorities 1. Facility Planning – Long Term Goals • It is recommended that the City adopt a facility design “mission statement” that all new facilities be planned to be efficiently and cost effectively designed, that they be planned to accommodate future expansion, and that they are as flexible as possible in order to meet the changing needs in the future and maximize the useful life of the building. 2. Energy Management and Conservation Technologies • It is recommended that the City adopt a policy to integrate energy management and conservation technologies into new construction and proposed renovations. 3. Capital Improvement Program • It is recommended that the City adopt a defined C.I.P. plan and put into place appropriate funding that will be of sufficient magnitude as to fund the noted facilities and selected development options. The implementation of a land acquisition strategy will be critical to meet future facility needs. 4. Funding Strategy: • It is recommended that the City establish a “City Funding Committee,” whose goal and/or mission statement is to identify and establish funding methodologies for the improvements and new facilities that are identified within the adopted C.I.P. This Committee should meet on a regularly scheduled basis, identify funding opportunities, seek appropriate grants and pursue alternative funding. Section 5: Capital Improvement Program Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: Capital Improvement Program, p. i Section 5: Capital Improvement Program Almost all municipalities adopt a long term Capital Improvement Program (C.I.P.) which, in essence, budgets for projects and improvements over an extended time frame, typically five or ten years. This process begins with establishment of facility need, initially providing funding for detailed studies, land acquisition, then fees for design of the facility and subsequently, funds for construction. This process may take as long as three or four years with the majority of the funds required at the later stages during the construction of the facility. In addition to funding facility expansion and new construction, a C.I.P. will generally also include budgeting for facility repair and maintenance of major scope, such as: HVAC replacement, roof repair/replacement, painting and weatherization renovations, security upgrades, and major equipment such as a generator. The important factor is to implement a program, recognizing that it is not an overnight process and that it is a work in progress. Once implemented, a C.I.P. will require annual review and modification for concurrency with the prior year’s actual budget and funding allocation, budget forecasting for future years, and to ensure relevancy to current and proposed new capital improvements. The C.I.P. summary that follows reflects a focus on the strategic use of funds towards the repair and maintenance of critical facilities in the near term, and funding towards facility replacement in future years. In consideration of the current economic challenges, “Financial Stability and Sustainability” will guide the near term (5 year) priorities of the City’s Capital Improvements Plan. As part of a cost containment and consolidation strategy, it is recommended that the functions of less critical facilities be re-located in the interim until facility replacement is feasible, and that the facility be retired from service. The cost savings are potentially two-fold: 1) divert operations and maintenance costs from these older building which are in poor condition, not feasible to renovate, and generally more costly to operate, and 2) generate revenue (or swap for more strategic land) through the sale or lease of these properties. The goal which forms the basis of the proposed 5-Year C.I.P. is to phase out the inventory of older facilities which are generally deficient in space needs, more costly to operate and maintain, have cited ADA non-compliant issues, and are not feasible for renovation especially if upgrades are required to meet current building codes. Rather than implement costly renovations, funds are to be allocated towards future new and replacement facilities. This in turn increases the overall inventory of new, modernized facilities which will meet current and future functional and space needs, be compliant with current applicable codes, and meet standards for energy Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: Capital Improvement Program, p. ii efficient construction, to realize lower operational costs and nominal maintenance in the initial years of the new building’s life cycle (offsetting other capital expenditures). As summarized in the table below, 74% of the City’s 2009 gross facility area consisted of facilities that have been constructed (or undergone major renovation) prior to 2005. The original construction of many of these facilities dates back 40+ years, and in some cases was followed by major renovations 20+ years ago. In consideration of a life expectancy of approximately 15-20 years for a roof or HVAC equipment, further renovation of such a facility may not be warranted. As previously state, upon further analysis of the facility’s functional utilization, existing conditions, and the operations and maintenance costs of the facility, the funding needed for major renovations is often not economically viable. Facility Inventory Summary CC The proposed 5-Year C.I.P. immediately benefits from a reduction of the facility inventory accomplished in 2009: a 20% decrease in gross facility area (GFA) due to the re-location of Engineering & Community Development and the Broward Sheriff Office to the New Municipal Building, and the subsequent re-location of the Active Adults program to the Collins Community Center. This resulted in 3 vacated facility properties: 250 NE 33 Street, Public Safety Building, and the City Annex (lease terminated). By the conclusion of the 5-Year C.I.P. in 2014, the proposed C.I.P. program projects a nearly 50/50 ratio of pre and post-2005 construction GFA, accomplished in part by a small overall net reduction of facility inventory. By Inventory: Age of Facility Citywide Facility Area (estimated gross square feet) Existing 2008/09 Current 2010 Proposed 5-Year 2010-2014 Proposed Future 2020/2030 Pre-2005 Construction/Major Renovation 110,292 89,269 77,280 26,855 Post-2005 Construction/Major Renovation 39,488 39,488 68,688 167,288 Total Citywide Facility Area 149,780 128,757 145,968 194,143 Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: Capital Improvement Program, p. iii 2020/2030, the proposed C.I.P. program will result in an 86% GFA of post-2005 construction/renovation, or otherwise stated, 86% of the city’s facility inventory will be no more than 15-25 years old. An even more aggressive goal towards a 100% replacement/major renovation of the facility inventory by 2020/2030 may be adopted. The C.I.P. program also proposes an increase in the total citywide gross facility area by 2020/2030, in response to meeting the projected future need. While this will impact the operations budget proportionately, it is important to note that this additional facility area will be in the category of new, modernized facilities which will be more efficient to operate and maintain. C.I.P. Summary: General Notes As the implementation of the Facilities Master Plan will be limited by available funds in the near term, interim renovations of critical facilities may be required to extend the useful life of the facility in the event that the future plans are not funded. Such interim renovations should be carefully considered, so as not to exceed the cost benefit savings of the renovations. It is recommended that the City reserve some contingency funds for this potential unforeseen need. Citywide renovations to implement ADA compliance are generally most economically implemented as part of a facility renovation, and for those facilities proposed for renovation, ADA corrective work is to be included in the project scope and budget. Additionally, a separate line item for “ADA Repairs” is included to provide for an annual allowance towards the implementation of a prioritized citywide ADA renovation program. Unused funds may be re-allocated or carry forward to future years. Security and Energy Efficiency upgrades for critical facilities are likewise best implemented as part of a facility renovation, if the cost savings benefit warrants these improvements. Generally, facilities of a less critical nature are not budgeted to receive these upgrades, as these facilities are recommended either for abandonment in the near term (5-year) and/or replacement in near-term or future years of the CIP, and the cost savings benefits will likely not be realized. A full cost benefit analysis is beyond the scope of this study. Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: Capital Improvement Program, p. iv C.I.P. Project Details It is recommended that the “Project Detail” summary sheets be utilized by the Department Director, with oversight and assistance from Finance and Real Estate divisions, to develop a full C.I.P. implementation plan which accounts for an Expenditure Plan, Operations and Maintenance Budget Impact, and Funding Plan, linking the C.I.P. to the Annual Budget. This will also facilitate the tracking and internal accounting of these scheduled improvements within the 5-Year C.I.P., and carry forward into any subsequent future revision of the C.I.P. Concurrency with the City’s strategic plan, business plan, and Capital Improvements Element (C.I.E.) of the Comprehensive plan are also important factors to be assessed annually against the C.I.P. Long-Range Planning Noted in the C.I.P. are preliminary budget estimates to achieve long-range plans for future facilities. Future facilities projected for 2020/2030 may yet be largely indeterminate at this phase in planning (in particular with regards to land acquisition), but what is important is that funding is established and allocated, as the project scope and budget continues to be refined. In this regard, the projected future budget for these proposed facilities as noted on the C.I.P. is for the preliminary purpose of establishing a long-range funding program. Building Name / Address Project 1. City HallADA Renovations(see line item #31, FY10)- - - - - - - 3650 NE 12th Avenue Future Facility Replacement - - - - - - $ 4,032,000 2.Engineering / Active AdultsRenovations $ 77,200 - - - - $ 77,200 - 250 NE 33rd Street 3. City Hall Annex- - - - - $- - 2901 E.Oakland Park Blvd 4. Public Safety BldgDemolition /site clean-up- $ 55,000 - - - $55,000 - 301 NE 38th Street Maintenance/storage trailers (Parks Div.)- - - $ 65,000 - $65,000 - 5. Fire Station #87 Renovations- - - $ 20,000 $ 96,000 $ 116,000 - 2100 NW 39th Street Future Replacement $ 3,136,000 6. Fire Station #9 Renovations- - - $ 15,000 $ 89,000 $ 104,000 - 301 NE 38th Street Future Replacement $ 2,665,600 7. Fire Station #20 Renovations- - - $ 15,000 $ 70,800 $85,800 - 4721 NW 9th Avenue Future Replacement $ 2,665,600 8. Municipal Services Phase 1 Renovation/Construction- - $ 30,000 - $ 360,000 $ 390,000 $ 715,000 3801 NE 5th Avenue Phase 2 Construction - - - - - - $ 3,364,500 9. Municipal Services GarageRenovations- $ 89,400 $ 92,000 - - $ 181,400 - 3815 NE 5th Avenue 10. Public Works Operations - - - - - - - 5100 NE 12th Terrace 11. Collins Community CenterFacility Replacement: Phase 1 - - - - $180,000 $ 180,000 $2,899,000 3900 NE 3rd Avenue Facility Replacement: Phase 2- - - - - - $ 3,424,000 Interim Renovations (pending)- - - $ 140,000 - $ 140,000 - 12. Wimberly FieldsFacility Replacement- - - - $ 63,900 $63,900 $ 239,000 4000 NE 3rd Avenue(restrooms/concession, shelters) 13. Dillon Tennis Center - - - - - - - 4091 NE 5th Avenue14. Stevens FieldhouseFacility Replacement- - - - $ 167,840 $ 167,840 - 3881 NE 6th AvenueFY 12 FY 13 FY 14 2020/20305-Yr CIPTotal Project CostFY 10 FY 11 Section 5: Capital Improvements Program C.I.P. SummaryCity of Oakland Park Facilities 5-Year Schedule of Capital ImprovementsFutureYearsFacilities Master Plan: City of Oakland ParkADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Summary Building Name / Address Project FY 12 FY 13 FY 14 2020/20305-Yr CIPTotal Project CostFY 10 FY 11 Section 5: Capital Improvements Program C.I.P. SummaryCity of Oakland Park Facilities 5-Year Schedule of Capital ImprovementsFutureYearsFacilities Master Plan: City of Oakland ParkADG Project No. 791-0715. Pioneer House- - - - - - - 3860 NE 6th Ave 16. Carter Woodson Park - - - - - - - 3490 NE 3rd Avenue 17. Spiher Recreation CenterHVAC Replacement- - - - $ 20,000 $20,000 - 1246 NE 37th Street 18. LibraryRenovations- - $ 10,000 $162,000 $269,420 $ 441,420 - 1298 NE 37th Street Facility Replacement - - - - - - $ 3,024,000 19. Downtown Center -A- - - - - $- - 1098 NE 40th Court 20. Downtown Center -B Roof Replacement- $ 104,000 - - - $ 104,000 - "Jaco Pastorius Park Partial Interior Renovation- - $ 300,000 - - $ 300,000 - Community Center"Facility Redevelopment/Adaptive Reuse$ 2,329,600 1101 NE 40th Court 21. NAG Community Center: A- - - - - $- - 250 NE 56th Court 22. NAG Community Center: B Renovations - - - $ 50,000 - $ 50,000 - 250 NE 56th Court 23. N.E. High School Fieldhouse- - - - - $- - 750 NE 56th Street24. Royal Palm Park 4100 NW 17th Avenue North Pavilion/Restrooms - renovations- - - $15,000 - $15,000 - 1701 NW 38th Street South Restrooms - - - - - $- - 25. Dog Park - - - - - $- - 931 NW 38th Street26. Lakeside Sandpine Preserve - - - - - $- - 2820 NW 27th Avenue27. New Municipal Building - - - - - $- --5399 N Dixie Highway Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Summary Building Name / Address Project FY 12 FY 13 FY 14 2020/20305-Yr CIPTotal Project CostFY 10 FY 11 Section 5: Capital Improvements Program C.I.P. SummaryCity of Oakland Park Facilities 5-Year Schedule of Capital ImprovementsFutureYearsFacilities Master Plan: City of Oakland ParkADG Project No. 791-0728. Parking Lot - - - - - $- - W. Prospect Rd/Andrews Ave 29. Parking Lot - - - - - $- - E. Prospect Rd/Andrews Ave30. Parking Lot - - - - - $- - 3900 NE 6 Ave. 31. ADA Implementation PlanCitywide$ 75,000 $ 40,000 $ 40,000 $ 40,000 $ 40,000 $ 235,000 - 32. Roof AssessmentCitywide$ 25,000 - - - - $25,000 - 33. PROPOSED CIP TOTAL $ 177,200 $ 288,400 $ 472,000 $ 522,000 $ 1,356,960 $ 2,816,560 $ 28,494,300 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Summary Section 5: Capital Improvements Program C.I.P. Project Detail Facilities Master Plan: City of Oakland ParkADG Project No. 791-07FACILITY1. City Hall 3650 NE 12th Avenue AGEDEPARTMENTCity Adminstration FACILITY STATS1963with renovations in 1969, 1991 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 1 PROJECT DESCRIPTIONRenovations SIZEPROJECT RATIONALE SITEYRenovations include ADA repairs for compliance.City Hall is a highly visited public building and is a priority facility for ADA compliance.14,120 SFtwo story 0.78 acres OPERATING BUDGET IMPACTYes COMMENTS COMMENTS On-line emergency power to serve ITS and critical administrative functions is critical. Plug-in capability allows for hook-up of portable generator in an emergency.New access security system is essential. Security camera monitoring system to be implemented in 2010. HVAC replacement is proposed, pending grant funding (EECBG).Preliminary budget for proposed future facility replacement is identified to establish a long-range funding plan. RenovationsCONSTRUCTIONADA (see CIP item#31, FY10 funding) - - - - - - ‐                       PROJECT TOTAL RECOMMENDED IN CIP $- $- $- $- $- $- $- FY 13 FY 14 5-YR Total 2020/2030ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10 FY 11 FY 12 Facility ReplacementPROFESSIONAL SERVICESDesign/Construction Documents (@12%)$432,000 LAND-- $- CONSTRUCTIONNew City Hall (20,000SF @ $180/SF)$3,600,000 PROJECT TOTALRECOMMENDED IN CIP$$$$$$$4 032 000PROJECT TOTAL RECOMMENDED IN CIP$- $- $- $- $- $- $4,032,000 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 1 Section 5: Capital Improvements Program C.I.P. Project Detail Facilities Master Plan: City of Oakland ParkADG Project No. 791-07FACILITY2. Engineering / Active Adults 250 NE 33rd Street AGEDEPARTMENT[vacated] FACILITY STATS1979 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 2PROJECT DESCRIPTIONAlternate Options SIZE SITEPROJECT RATIONALE5,920 SF single story 1.14 acres Option 1: Pursue opportunity for land swap or sale of propertyOption 2: Lease in 'as is' conditionOption 3: Renovate to facilitate leaseCurrent economic conditions may not be favorable for the sale or lease of this OPERATING BUDGET IMPACTYesO&M has been minimized to a level as required to preserve the building's value for future resale. Lease/sale 'as-is' is optimal to eliminate O&M and any capital improvements, and potentially provide revenue COMMENTSThe facility has been vacated by Engineering and Parks&Leisure Active Adults program as of spring 2009.Current economic conditions may not be favorable for the sale or lease of this property. Roof and HVAC is in poor condition and lease terms to be considered may require the City to replace these building systems  COMMENTSimprovements, and potentially provide revenue1. optimal lease terms will include tenant responsibility for O&M, roof repair/HVAC replacement contingent on grant funding.2. potential land swap for additional strategic property at Carter Woodson Park may be pursued further by City real estate specialist Renovations*PROFESSIONAL SERVICES--  CONSTRUCTIONRoof replacement: 5900 SF @$8/SF $ 47,200 - - - - $ 47,200 - HVAC replacement$30 000$30 000FY 10 FY 11 FY 12 FY 13 FY 14 5-YR Total 2020/2030 ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSHVAC replacement$30,000 - - - - $30,000 - - - - - - $- - PROJECT TOTAL RECOMMENDED IN CIP $77,200 $- $- $- $- $77,200 $- Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 2 Section 5: Capital Improvements Program C.I.P. Project Detail Facilities Master Plan: City of Oakland ParkADG Project No. 791-07FACILITY3. City Hall Annex 2901 E. Oakland Park Blvd. AGEDEPARTMENT[vacated] FACILITY STATS-- Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 3PROJECT DESCRIPTION SIZE SITEPROJECT RATIONALE1,400 SF single story -- OPERATING BUDGET IMPACTYes COMMENTS COMMENTSThe facility has been vacated by the Code Enforcement Division as of March 2009, and the lease terminated.annual lease and O&M for this facility is eliminatedCOMMENTS FY 12 FY 13 FY 14 5-YR Total 2020/2030 Code Enforcement offices have been consolidated with the new Community Development offices at 5399 N. Dixie ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10 FY 11 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES-- CONSTRUCTION-- PROJECT TOTAL $- $- $- $- $- $- $-   Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 3 Section 5: Capital Improvements Program C.I.P. Project Detail Facilities Master Plan: City of Oakland ParkADG Project No. 791-07FACILITY4. Public Safety Building 301 NE 38th Street AGEDEPARTMENT[vacated] FACILITY STATS1984 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 4PROJECT DESCRIPTIONDemolition and site re-utilization SIZEPROJECT RATIONALE SITE13,103 SFsingle storyDemolish structure to utilize site area for expansion of Public Works and Parks Division maintenance. 2.46 acrestotal site area for co-located Public Safety Building and Fire Station #9The roof is in a poor condition, and the facility has a history of water and moisture intrusion which has left comprehensive damage to the interior finish and exterior wall components. HVAC equipment is estimated to be 10 years old, and salvage OPERATING BUDGET IMPACTCOMMENTSBuilding and Fire Station #9 COMMENTSwall components. HVAC equipment is estimated to be 10 years old, and salvage may not be feasible.The facility has been vacated by BSO as of fall 2008.O&M for this facility is to be eliminated FY 11 FY 12 1. Site area is of value to proposed master plan to expand the adjacent Municipal Services Yard and Parks & Leisure facilities.2. Fire Station #9 is to remain operational, repairs to demising wall included in scope of demolition work.FY 13 FY 14 5-YR Total 2020/2030 ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES-- LAND-- CONSTRUCTIONDemolition / site clean-up - $ 55,000 - - - $ 55,000 - Maintenance / storage trailers (Parks Division) - - - $ 65,000 - $ 65,000 - FY 11 FY 12 FY 13 FY 14 5YR Total2020/2030 S OJ C COS SFY 10 PROJECT TOTAL $- $55,000 $- $65,000 $- $120,000 -     Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 4 Section 5: Capital Improvements Program C.I.P. Project Detail Facilities Master Plan: City of Oakland ParkADG Project No. 791-07FACILITY5. Fire Station #87 2100 NW 39th Street AGEDEPARTMENTFire Rescue FACILITY STATS1982 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 5PROJECT DESCRIPTIONRenovation SIZE PROJECT RATIONALE SITE {Some tile roof repairs are needed, due to prior storm damage. Standing water was observed in the area of roof drains A roof assessment is recommended and1.20 acres7,699 SFRenovate facility to extend useful life of building. Repair/replace roof, upgrade security. Renovations may include energy efficiency upgrades, bathroom replacement, ADA repairs.two story (second floor: approx. 600 SF of storage space) OPERATING BUDGET IMPACTYeswas observed in the area of roof drains. A roof assessment is recommended and future replacement may be warranted. Energy efficiency upgrades to include lighting and future HVAC replacement.{This facility is at a priority for new access security system, proposed for FY10 funding from reserves. COMMENTSFire Prevention has re-located to the New Municipal Building, and an EOC and training/multi-purpose space (also provides Energy efficiency renovations are aimed at reducing operating expenses.COMMENTScommunity meeting space) are now provided at the vacated space. Fire Administration also operates from this facility.Facility replacement is needed. A separate study is recommended to consider the effective citywide allocation of Fire Rescue resources to meet needs of future City growth. This study is to recommend an implementation schedule and funding requirements. Currently proposed renovations are contingent on proposed future facility replacement.RenovationsCONSTRUCTIONRenovations - - - $ 20,000 - $ 20,000 - Roof Replacment (7,099SF @$8/SF) - - - - $ 56,000 $ 56,000 - HVAC replacement- - - - $ 40,000 $ 40,000 - 5-YR Total 2020/2030 ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10 FY 11 FY 12 FY 13 FY 14 Facility Replacement*PROFESSIONAL SERVICESDesign and Permitting (@12%)$ 336,000 LAND(to be determined)--CONSTRUCTIONNew Facility: 10,000SF @$280/SF$ 2,800,000 PROJECT TOTAL RECOMMENDED IN CIP $- $- $- $20,000 $96,000 $116,000 $3,136,000 *f th f t bli hi b d t t d f t f di d l th *for the purpose of establishing a budget towards future funding needs only, the Master Plan Study may recommend other allocation of fundsFinal Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 5 Section 5: Capital Improvements Program C.I.P. Project Detail Facilities Master Plan: City of Oakland ParkADG Project No. 791-07FACILITY6. Fire Station #9 301 NE 38th Street AGEDEPARTMENTFire Rescue FACILITY STATS1967 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 6PROJECT DESCRIPTIONRenovation SIZE PROJECT RATIONALE SITE2.46 acrestotal site area for co-located Public Safety Building and Fire Station #9The facility has a history of water and moisture intrusion and the current condition of the roof is questionable A roof assessment is recommended and6,750 SFRenovate facility to extend useful life of building. Repair/replace roof, upgrade security. Renovations may include energy efficiency upgrades and ADA repairs. (bathroom renovations completed in 2009) OPERATING BUDGET IMPACTYesBuilding and Fire Station #9 COMMENTSBSO is now vacated from the Public Safety Building and siteE ffi i ti i d t d i ticondition of the roof is questionable. A roof assessment is recommended and future replacement may be warranted. Energy efficiency upgrades to include lighting and future HVAC replacement. Proposed demolition of the Public Safety Building in FY10 to include repair at demising wall.{This facility is at a priority for new access security system, proposed for FY10 funding from reserves. COMMENTSEnergy efficiency renovations are aimed at reducing operating expenses.Facility replacement is needed. A separate study is recommended to consider the effective citywide allocation of Fire Rescue resources to meet needs of future City growth. This study is to recommend an implementation schedule and funding requirements. Currently proposed renovations are contingent on proposed future facility replacement.RenovationsCONSTRUCTIONRenovations - - - $ 15,000 - $ 15,000 - Roof Replacment (6,750SF @$8/SF) - - - - $ 54,000 $ 54,000 - HVAC replacement- - - - $ 35,000 $35,000 - 5-YR Total 2020/2030 ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10 FY 11 FY 12 FY 13 FY 14 HVAC replacement $35,000 $35,000 Facility Replacement*PROFESSIONAL SERVICESDesign and Permitting (@12%)$ 285,600 LAND(to be determined)--CONSTRUCTIONNew Facility: 8,500SF @$280/SF$ 2,380,000 PROJECT TOTAL RECOMMENDED IN CIP $- $- $- $15,000 $89,000 $104,000 $2,665,600 ,,,,, *for the purpose of establishing a budget towards future funding needs only, the Master Plan Study may recommend other allocation of fundsFinal Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 6 Section 5: Capital Improvements Program C.I.P. Project Detail Facilities Master Plan: City of Oakland ParkADG Project No. 791-07FACILITY7. Fire Station #20 4721 NW 9th Avenue AGEDEPARTMENTFire Rescue FACILITY STATS1968renovations in 2008/09 (ceramic tile floors, bay door replacement)Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 7PROJECT DESCRIPTIONRenovation SIZE PROJECT RATIONALE SITE0.38 acresRoof leaks have been reported and immediate repair may be required. A roof assessment is recommended and future replacement may be warranted Energy 5,100 SFRenovate facility to extend useful life of building. Repair/replace roof. Upgrade security. Renovations may include energy efficiency upgrades, bathroom replacement, ADA repairs.single story OPERATING BUDGET IMPACTYesCOMMENTSassessment is recommended and future replacement may be warranted. Energy efficiency upgrades to include lighting and future HVAC replacement. {This facility is at a priority for new access security system, proposed for FY10 funding from reserves. COMMENTSLeased facility, conditional on Fire Rescue Department use only.Proposed energy efficiency renovations are aimed at reducing operating expenses.COMMENTSFacility replacement is needed. A separate study is recommended to consider the effective citywide allocation of Fire Rescue resources to meet needs of future City growth. This study is to recommend an implementation schedule and funding requirements. Currently proposed renovations are contingent on proposed future facility replacement.RenovationsCONSTRUCTIONRenovations- - - $ 15,000 - $ 15,000 - Roof Replacment (5,100SF @$8/SF)- - - - $ 40,800 $ 40,800 - HVAC replacement- - - - $ 30,000 $ 30,000 - 5-YR Total 2020/2030 ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10 FY 11 FY 12 FY 13 FY 14 Facility Replacement*PROFESSIONAL SERVICESDesign and Permitting (@12%)$ 285,600 LAND(to be determined)--CONSTRUCTIONNew Facility: 8,500SF @$280/SF$ 2,380,000 PROJECT TOTAL RECOMMENDED IN CIP $- $- $- $15,000 $70,800 $85,800 $2,665,600 *for the purpose of establishing a budget towards future funding needs only, the Master Plan Study may recommend other allocation of fundsFinal Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 7 Section 5: Capital Improvements Program C.I.P. Project Detail Facilities Master Plan: City of Oakland ParkADG Project No. 791-07FACILITY8. Municipal Services 3801 NE 5th Avenue AGEDEPARTMENTPublic Works PROJECT DESCRIPTIONFacility Renovation and Expansion FACILITY STATS1965interior renovations in 1987Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 8yp SIZE PROJECT RATIONALE SITE3,172 SFsingle story(area of administrative offices only)Greater efficiency is to be achieved by consolidating Public Works Administration and Operations divisions on one site3.46 acresThe consolidation of Public Works at this facility site includes the Phase 1: renovation/adaptive re-use of existing facilities and new construction, and Phase 2: new consolidated administration facility (Ph.1 new facilities then become re-purposed for crew maintenance/storage) OPERATING BUDGET IMPACTYesCOMMENTSP bli W k C l M t Pl i l d i f S lid W tAdministration and Operations divisions on one site. Building area and O&M will increase at this facility; however, O&M for former PW Operations facility is eliminated. New and renovated facilities to be of greater energy efficiency. Net result achieves efficiencies by the consolidation of services at one facility.COMMENTSPublic Works Complex Master Plan may include expansion of Solid Waste Division (to serve N.Andrews Garden in 2011), future replacement of fuel station, and upgraded systems for Public Works EOC Camp (new generator installed FY'09).5-YR Total 2020/2030 ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10 FY 11 FY 12 FY 13 FY 14 Phase I Renovations/Construction PROFESSIONAL SERVICESMaster Plan Programming, Design - - $ 30,000 - - $ 30,000 $115,000 New Facility: 8,000SF@$120/SF - - - - $360,000 $ 360,000 $ 600,000 (Garage renovation: see Project Detail 9) - - - - - - - PROJECT TOTAL RECOMMENDED IN CIP $- $- $30,000 $- $360,000 $390,000 $715,000 Phase 2 ConstructionPROFESSIONAL SERVICESDesign/Construction Documents - - - - - - $ 376,500 CONSTRUCTIONNew Facility: 16,600SF @$180/SF - - - - - - $ 2,988,000 PROJECT TOTAL RECOMMENDED IN CIP $- $- $- $- $- $- $3,364,500 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 8 Section 5: Capital Improvements Program C.I.P. Project Detail Facilities Master Plan: City of Oakland ParkADG Project No. 791-07FACILITY9. Municipal Services Garage 3815 NE 5th Avenue AGEDEPARTMENTPublic Works FACILITY STATS1965 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 9PROJECT DESCRIPTIONRenovation SIZEPROJECT RATIONALE SITE4,844 SFRenovations may include bay door replacement, and expansion to add one additional bay.single story Additional Solid Waste Division fleet will be acquired to serve North Andrews Garden district by 2011.3.46 acresOPERATING BUDGET IMPACTYesCOMMENTSBuilding area and O&M will increase at this facility. COMMENTS S lid W t fl t i d d t b fi d Solid Waste fleet expansion and needs to be confirmed.5YRTtl2020/2030ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10FY 11FY 12FY 13FY 14RenovationsCONSTRUCTIONReplace bay doors - - $ 92,000 - - $92,000 - Additional Bay- $ 50,600 - - - $50,600 - Roof Replacement: 4,844SF @$8/SF - $ 38,800 - - - $38,800 - -----$- -5-YR Total 2020/2030 ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10 FY 11 FY 12 FY 13 FY 14 - - - - - $ - PROJECT TOTAL RECOMMENDED IN CIP $- $89,400 $92,000 $- $- $181,400 - Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 9 Section 5: Capital Improvements Program C.I.P. Project Detail Facilities Master Plan: City of Oakland ParkADG Project No. 791-07FACILITY10. Public Works Operations 5100 NE 12th Terrace AGEDEPARTMENTPublic Works FACILITY STATS1967renovations in 1980 to administration buildingFinal Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 10PROJECT DESCRIPTIONSale or lease of property SIZEPROJECT RATIONALE SITE2025 SFsingle story(area of administrative offices only)It is proposed that PW Operations vacate the facility upon re-location to the Municipal Services site, and that lease/sale opportunities be pursued. 5.00 acres former water treatment plantThe facility site area is not effectively used, existing buildings are minimally maintained, or have been abandoned. The administration office is overcrowded and does not provide office area for all Division Managers and Foremen AOPERATING BUDGET IMPACTYes, favorableCOMMENTSO&M for this facility is eliminated and does not provide office area for all Division Managers and Foremen. A leased trailer on-site to provide crew space is in poor condition and does not meet space needs. A consolidation of the Public Works department at the Municipal Services site is proposed for increased efficiency.The facility houses the Public Works Operations Division. Existing buildings have been adapted for maintenance and storage uses The actual building area inCOMMENTSCOMMENTS 5YRTtl2020/2030The site has potential value to FPL for use as a substation, and the potential for a land swap to acquire FPL owned land (Giusti Parcours and NE 5th Ave parking area at west end of Stevens field) will require further inquiry by the City's real estate specialist. Other sale/lease options are to be explored.ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10FY 11FY 12FY 13FY 14storage uses. The actual building area in use beyond the administration offices is undetermined.PROFESSIONAL SERVICES-- CONSTRUCTION-- 5-YR Total 2020/2030 ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10 FY 11 FY 12 FY 13 FY 14 PROJECT TOTAL $- $- $- $- $- $- $- Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 10 Section 5: Capital Improvements Program C.I.P. Project Detail Facilities Master Plan: City of Oakland ParkADG Project No. 791-07FACILITY11. Collins Community Center 3900 NE 3rd Avenue AGEDEPARTMENTParks and Leisure FACILITY STATS1971renovations in 2000Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 11PROJECT DESCRIPTIONFacility Replacement SIZE PROJECT RATIONALE SITESite to be re-developed as Central Community Center in 2 phases (15,000 SF each), program to be determined, to include Parks & Leisure administrative offices, indoor gymnasium, and outdoor aquatic facility, and handball court. 1.55 acrescurrently serves Active Adults and childrens' programs 6,942 SFsingle storyA new facility is recommended by the Parks Master Plan to achieve concurrency with the Parks and Open Space Element of the City's Comp Plan, and established OPERATING BUDGET IMPACTYesCOMMENTSNew facility will be of greater square footage and require more staff for expanded P&L programs. New, modernized facilities to be of energy efficient construction.childrens programs Active Adults program re-located to Collins in 2009, upon re-location of Parks & Leisure administration from Collins to interim offices at City Hall with the Parks and Open Space Element of the Citys Comp Plan, and established LOS standards.COMMENTS 5-YR Total 2020/2030 ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10 FY 11 FY 12 FY 13 FY 14 If construction of the new facility is deferred, renovations to the existing facility will be required for continued effective use, as outlined below as an alternate. "Renovations" may include energy efficiency upgrades(lighting), upgraded security, ADA repairs, bathrooms.Facility Replacement: Phase 1PROFESSIONAL SERVICESmaster plan & facility design / construction doc - - - - $180,000 180,000 $144,000 CONSTRUCTIONdemolition of Collins - - - - - - $ 55,000 Phase 1 Facility: 15,000SF@$180/SF - - - - - - $ 2,700,000PROJECT TOTAL RECOMMENDED IN CIP $- $- $- $- $180,000 $180,000 $2,899,000Facility Replacement: Phase 2$324 000PROFESSIONAL SERVICESdesign / permitting- - - - - - $ 324,000 CONSTRUCTIONPhase 2 Facility: 15,000SF@$180/SF - - - - - - $ 2,700,000 Swimming Pool (25 m) - - - - - - $ 250,000 Shuffleboard (2 courts) - - - - - - $ 40,000 Racquetball/Handball (4 courts) - - - - - - $ 110,000 PROJECT TOTAL RECOMMENDED IN CIP $- $- $- $- $- $- $3,424,000 Alternate: Facility Renovation renovations- - - $ 45,000 - $ 45,000 - roof replacement: 6,942SF@$8/SF‐                   - - $ 55,000 ‐                  $ 55,000 ‐                  HVAC replacement‐                   - - $ 40,000 ‐                  $ 40,000 ‐                  ADA (see CIP item #31) - - - - - - - PROJECT TOTAL RECOMMENDED IN CIP - - - $140,000 - $140,000 - Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 11 Section 5: Capital Improvements Program C.I.P. Project Detail Facilities Master Plan: City of Oakland ParkADG Project No. 791-07FACILITY12. Wimberly Fields 4000 NE 3rd Avenue AGEDEPARTMENTParks and Leisure FACILITY STATS1971 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 12PROJECT DESCRIPTIONFacility Replacement SIZEPROJECT RATIONALE SITE 8.60 acresThe facility is past its life expectancy, and requires significant renovation. ADA compliance is acheievable at the women's restroom, but would eliminate 1 fixture at the men's. The number of fixtures provided is less than recommended by code area baseball fields, skate rink, and playground served by the facility, includes 619 SFrestroom / concession / pavilion facility replacement single storyOPERATING BUDGET IMPACTYes, favorablereplacement facility would potentially be built to achieve greater energy efficiency, and require less maintenance in the initial years of use at the mens. The number of fixtures provided is less than recommended by code to serve the associated sports fields. It is recommended that new facilities are constructed to provide an appropriate number of fixtures and meet ADA compliance at restrooms and concession.playground served by the facility, includes on-site parking under joint-use with Public Works (alt. hours), and street parking to the east & westreplacement facility to be considered as part of a campus master plan for a new COMMENTSCOMMENTS FY 13 FY 14 5-YR Total 2020/2030 ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10 FY 11 FY 12 New bathroom facilities were completed in 2009-10 at the adjacent Dillon Tennis Center, north of the ballfields. Proposed facilities are convenient to the ballfields from the south, and are still needed. This project and budget may also be fulfilled within the scope of the proposed Central Community Center.efficiency, and require less maintenance in the initial years of use part of a campus master plan for a new Central Community Center and recreational complexFacility ReplacementPROFESSIONAL SERVICESdesign / permitting @12% construction value - - - - $31,900 $ 31,900 - CONSTRUCTIONdemolition - - - - - - $ 5,000 new restroom/concession 1,200SF @$180/SF- - - - - - $ 216,000 new pavilion 300SF @ $80/SF- - - - $ 24,000 $ 24,000 - $$8 000FY 13 FY 14 5YR Total2020/2030 ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10 FY 11 FY 12 new picnic shelter 100SF @ $80/SF- - - - $ 8,000 $ 8,000 - site access / walkways- - - - - $- $ 18,000 PROJECT TOTAL RECOMMENDED IN CIP $- $- $- $- $63,900 $63,900 $239,000 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 12 Section 5: Capital Improvements Program C.I.P. Project Detail Facilities Master Plan: City of Oakland ParkADG Project No. 791-07FACILITY13. Dillon Tennis Center 4091 NE 5th Avenue AGEDEPARTMENTParks and Leisure FACILITY STATS1971 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 13PROJECT DESCRIPTIONmaintenance SIZEPROJECT RATIONALE SITE8 tennis courts (includes 2 new courts completed in 2009/10), on-site parking and A new womens restroom building and the remodeling of restrooms for men at the existing building were completed in 2009/10. No further building renovation were included in the scope.2.49 acres321 SFexterior renovations are needed, to be covered under maintenance budget single storyOPERATING BUDGET IMPACT Yesp),pgstreet parking to the west is providedpCOMMENTS COMMENTS 5-YR Total 2020/2030 ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10 FY 11 FY 12 FY 13 FY 14 Future facility replacement is recommended to provide adequate administrative office space. New pavilions may be provided as part of a citywide implementation of standardized facilities, as recommended by the Recreation & Parks Master Plan.PROFESSIONAL SERVICES-- CONSTRUCTION PROJECT TOTAL$$$$$$$PROJECT TOTAL $- $- $- $- $- $- $- Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 13 Section 5: Capital Improvements Program C.I.P. Project Detail Facilities Master Plan: City of Oakland ParkADG Project No. 791-07FACILITY14. Stevens Fieldhouse 3881 NE 6th Avenue AGEDEPARTMENTParks and Leisure FACILITY STATS1968 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 14PROJECT DESCRIPTION Facility Replacement SIZEPROJECT RATIONALE SITE The building is generally underutilized and requires repairs to correct moisture damage to allow for other public uses. Restroom facilities are essential to Stevens ball field and adjacent jog track, and will require replacement if the building is to 3.95 acres 1,782 SFReplace restroom facilities and demolish pumphouse building. single storyOPERATING BUDGET IMPACT ball field and adjacent jog track, and will require replacement if the building is to be demolished. COMMENTSFacility is a former water treatment plant, and the existing underground clear well is abandoned.Facility is used for storage of maintenance COMMENTS 5-YR Total 2020/2030 ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10 FY 11 FY 12 FY 13 FY 14 Facility is used for storage of maintenance supplies and sports program equipment, and provides restrooms for Stevens Field and the adjacent jog track.Abandoned underground clear well to be considered with regards to future construction on the site.Facility Replacement PROFESSIONAL SERVICESDesign/Permitting @12% construction value - - - - 15,840 $ 15,840 - --Demolition - - - - 20,000 $ 20,000 - CONSTRUCTIONnew restrooms 600SF @$180/SF- - - - 108,000$ 108,000 - 5YR Total2020/2030 ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10 FY 11 FY 12 FY 13 FY 14 new pavilion 300SF @ $80/SF- - - - 24,000 $ 24,000 - - PROJECT TOTAL RECOMMENDED IN CIP $- $- $- $- $167,840 $167,840 - Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 14 Section 5: Capital Improvements Program C.I.P. Project Detail Facilities Master Plan: City of Oakland ParkADG Project No. 791-07FACILITY15. Pioneer House 3860 NE 6th Avenue AGEDEPARTMENTParks and Leisure FACILITY STATS1920original date of structure, re-located to current site in 1987Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 15PROJECT DESCRIPTIONSell Property SIZEPROJECT RATIONALE SITEThe facility is in need of extensive renovation to allow for public visitation. An independent facility assessment (2007) estimates renovations at $250,000 - $350,000, excluding ADA repairs and professional fees. 0.28 acres Re-locate historic articles and pursue sale of property, or fund improvements and maintenance via private non-profit and grant funding.600 SFsingle storyOPERATING BUDGET IMPACTYes, favorable$350,000, excluding ADA repairs and professional fees.COMMENTSFacility is closed to public visitation.Eliminate O&M, potentially generate revenue from sale of property.COMMENTS 5-YR Total2020/2030ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10FY 11FY 12FY 13FY 14Storage of historic items may be required until facility space is allocated for their display. PROFESSIONAL SERVICES - - - - - ‐            - CONSTRUCTION - - - - - ‐            - PROJECT TOTAL RECOMMENDED IN CIP $- $- $- $- $- $‐            - 5YR Total2020/2030 ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10 FY 11 FY 12 FY 13 FY 14 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 15 Section 5: Capital Improvements Program C.I.P. Project Detail Facilities Master Plan: City of Oakland ParkADG Project No. 791-07FACILITY16. Carter Woodson Park 3490 NE 3rd Avenue AGEDEPARTMENTParks and Leisure FACILITY STATSca.1980 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 16PROJECT DESCRIPTIONland acquisition / facilities SIZEPROJECT RATIONALE SITE Future land acquisition is proposed to create a neighborhood park to serve the immediate community. New restroom facilities are funded under the Parks C.I.P. in FY 2009/10.1.87 acres 300 SFPark redevelopment is an element of the Parks C.I.P. open-air pavilion OPERATING BUDGET IMPACT--in FY 2009/10.COMMENTSFacility consists of open-air pavilion and basketball court. COMMENTS 5-YR Total2020/2030ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10FY 11FY 12FY 13FY 14{Options to be explored for land acquisition to expand the park include a potential land swap with other City property (250 NE 33rd Street), and funding through FRDAP grants.LAND PROFESSIONAL SERVICES - - - - - - - CONSTRUCTION - - - - - - - PROJECT TOTAL RECOMMENDED IN CIP $- $- $- $- $- $- - 5-YR Total2020/2030 ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10 FY 11 FY 12 FY 13 FY 14 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 16 Section 5: Capital Improvements Program C.I.P. Project Detail Facilities Master Plan: City of Oakland ParkADG Project No. 791-07FACILITY17. Spiher Recreation Center 1246 NE 37th Street AGEDEPARTMENTParks & Leisure FACILITY STATS1975renovations ca.1980, 2008Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 17PROJECT DESCRIPTIONHVAC Replacement SIZE SITEPROJECT RATIONALE 1.15 acres Recent facility renovations included new windows and doors, and interior4,386 SFHVAC replacement, contingent on future master plan for site and facility. one story OPERATING BUDGET IMPACTCOMMENTS Recent facility renovations included new windows and doors, and interior finishes. If the facility is to be maintained beyond the next 5 years, HVAC replacement may be warranted.  COMMENTS PROFESSIONAL SERVICES-- - - - - - CONSTRUCTIONHVAC Replacement- - - - $ 20,000 $ 20,000 - $$$$$$FY 13 FY 14 5-YR Total 2020/2030 ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10 FY 11 FY 12 PROJECT TOTALCONTINGENCY$- $- $- $- $20,000 $20,000 -     Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 17 Section 5: Capital Improvements Program C.I.P. Project Detail Facilities Master Plan: City of Oakland ParkADG Project No. 791-07FACILITY18. Library 1298 NE 37th Street AGEDEPARTMENTParks & Leisure FACILITY STATS1963with renovations in 1972, 1987 (HVAC & roof)Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 18PROJECT DESCRIPTIONRenovation SIZE PROJECT RATIONALE SITEHVAC and roof replacement, renovations to include bathroom upgrades, energy efficient lighting, and ADA repairs, and interior renovation.0.55 acres Prior water damage to ceiling tiles and excess humidity cited in the 2008 FPL Energy Assessment requires repair. Other energy efficiency upgrades may13,471 SFone storyOPERATING BUDGET IMPACTYesRoof repair, HVAC replacement, and modifications to lighting will serve to increase the energy efficiency of the buildingCOMMENTS Energy Assessment requires repair. Other energy efficiency upgrades may include lighting and controls. As a highly public facility, repairs for ADA compliance are at a priority.  COMMENTSincrease the energy efficiency of the building.Future facility replacement is recommended, and a budget estimate is given for funding purposes only. Renovations in the short term (5-year CIP) are needed in the interim. Interior renovations may be deferred pending schedule for facility replacement. RenovationsCONSTRUCTIONRoof replacement: 13,471 SF @$8/SF - - - $ 108,000 - $ 108,000 - HVAC replacement- - - $ 54,000 - $ 54,000 - E Effi i (li hti / t l )$10 000$10 000FY 13 FY 14 5-YR Total 2020/2030 ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10 FY 11 FY 12 Energy Efficiency (lighting/controls) - - $ 10,000 - - $ 10,000 - Interior Renovations: 13,471 @$20/SF - - - - $ 269,420 $ 269,420 - ADA (see CIP item #31 funding)- - - - - - - PROJECT TOTALRECOMMENDED IN CIP $- $- $10,000 $162,000 $269,420 $441,420 $- Facility Replacement PROFESSIONAL SERVICESDesign and Permitting (@12%)$ 324,000 LAND(assume use of current site)LAND(assume use of current site)--CONSTRUCTIONNew construction: 15,000 SF @$180/SF $ 2,700,000 PROJECT TOTALRECOMMENDED IN CIP $- $- $- $- $- $- $3,024,000 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 18 Section 5: Capital Improvements Program C.I.P. Project Detail Facilities Master Plan: City of Oakland ParkADG Project No. 791-07FACILITY19. Downtown Center - building A "Jaco Pastorius Park Community Center" 1098 NE 40th CourtAGE DEPARTMENTParks and Leisure FACILITY STATS2008, new renovations(est. date of original construction: 1985)Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 19 SIZEPROJECT DESCRIPTION No additional scope of work is anticipated at this time. PROJECT RATIONALE SITE5,480 SF single story 0.30 acres facility is part of the Downtown Center with a total park area of 6 99 acresFull facility renovation completed in 2009. OPERATING BUDGET IMPACT with a total park area of 6.99 acres including Jaco Pastorius Park COMMENTScompleted renovations include interior construction, new commercial kitchen, new interior and exterior accessed restroom facilities COMMENTS FY 11FY 12FY 13FY 145 YR Total2020/2030facilities ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10PROFESSIONAL SERVICES-- - - - - - - - LAND-- - - - - - - - CONSTRUCTION--- - - - - - - PROJECT TOTAL $- $- $- $- $- $- $- FY 11 FY 12 FY 13 FY 14 5-YR Total2020/2030 ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10 OJ C O$ $ $ $ $ $ $ Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 19 Section 5: Capital Improvements Program C.I.P. Project Detail Facilities Master Plan: City of Oakland ParkADG Project No. 791-07FACILITY20. Downtown Center - building B 1101 NE 40th Court AGEDEPARTMENTParks and Leisure --(estimated date of construction: 1985)purchased in 2006 FACILITY STATSFinal Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 20PROJECT DESCRIPTIONRenovation SIZEPROJECT RATIONALE SITE1. The roof was damaged in the 2005 hurricane season and replacement is necessary to protect the building against damage due to potential water and moisture intrusion13,000 SF (footprint)single story, with some existing 2nd floor tenant build-outs facility is part of the Downtown Center with a total park area of 6 99 acresRoof replacement, partial interior renovation 0.80 acres OPERATING BUDGET IMPACT 1. Replacement of the roof will decrease maintenance requirements.2. Proposed Parks&Leisure occupancy will increase O&M.moisture intrusion. 2. Partial interior renovation is proposed as an option to provide interim facility area for Parks and Leisure administration and arts/culture programs.One tenant space is currently occupied by lease agreement, remainder of facility is vacant or utilized by Parks & Leisure, Streets Division and Fire Rescue forCOMMENTSwith a total park area of 6.99 acres including Jaco Pastorius Park COMMENTS Streets Division, and Fire Rescue for storage purposes.Facility has limits on use for Parks & Leisure programs only. A funding option for the future development of an Arts Center may be through public/private partnership, and potentially provide additional revenue.FY 10FY 11FY 122020/20305 YR TotalFY 14FY 13ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTS Renovations - - - - - CONSTRUCTIONRoof Replacement 13,000 SF @$8/SF - $ 104,000 - - - $ 104,000 - Partial Interior Renovation 6,000 SF @$50/SF - - $300,000 - - $ 300,000 - PROJECT TOTAL RECOMMENDED IN CIP $- $104,000 $300,000 $- $- $404,000 - FY 10 FY 11 FY 12 2020/2030 5-YR TotalFY 14 FY 13 ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTS Facility Redevelopment / Adaptive Reuse PROFESSIONAL SERVICESDesign/Construction Documents/Permit @12% $249,600 LAND--- CONSTRUCTIONPreliminary Budget: 13,000 SF @160/SF $2,080,000 PRELIMINARY BUDGETRECOMMENDED IN CIP$-$-$-$-$-$-$2,329,600PRELIMINARY BUDGETRECOMMENDED IN CIP$- $- $- $- $- $- $2,329,600 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 20 Section 5: Capital Improvements Program C.I.P. Project Detail Facilities Master Plan: City of Oakland ParkADG Project No. 791-07FACILITY21. NAG Community Center A 250 NE 56th Court AGEDEPARTMENTParks and Leisure FACILITY STATS2008Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 21PROJECT DESCRIPTION SIZEPROJECT RATIONALE SITE1,750 SFNo additional scope of work is anticipated at this time. single story 1.09 acres total site area for both building A & BOPERATING BUDGET IMPACT -- COMMENTS COMMENTS FY 12FY 13FY 145-YR Total2020/2030new construction, completed in 2008ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10FY 11PROFESSIONAL SERVICES-- - - - - - - - LAND-- - - - - - - - CONSTRUCTION--- - - - - - - PROJECT TOTAL $- $- $- $- $- $- - FY 12 FY 13 FY 14 5YR Total2020/2030 ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10 FY 11 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 21 Section 5: Capital Improvements Program C.I.P. Project Detail Facilities Master Plan: City of Oakland ParkADG Project No. 791-07FACILITY22. NAG Community Center B 250 NE 56th Court AGEDEPARTMENTParks and Leisure FACILITY STATS--original date of construction not determinedFinal Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 22PROJECT DESCRIPTIONRenovation SIZE PROJECT RATIONALE SITEProposed renovations include roof repair, HVAC replacement, bathroom upgrades and ADA repairs for compliance.Renovations will be required within the next 5 years to extend the useful life of this facility The proposed new North Community Center may serve as this3,285 SFsingle story 1.09 acres total site area for both building A & BOPERATING BUDGET IMPACT -- this facility. The proposed new North Community Center may serve as this facility's replacement in the future (location to be determined). The completion of NAG Community Center A at this site now provides new, modernized facility space. COMMENTSfacility is a former churchCOMMENTS A new facility to serve the area is proposed for 2030 in the Parks Master Plan, and renovations to this facility may be deferred in the interim if programs can be re-located. Facility could then be demolished for redevelopment of site area. Location of proposed future facility requires a larger site. RenovationCONSTRUCTIONInterior renovations - - - $ 15,000- $ 15,000 - HVAC replacement- - - $ 15,000- $ 15,000 - Roof repair- - - $ 20,000- $ 20,000 - ADA (see CIP item #31)FY 13 FY 14 5-YR Total 2020/2030 ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10 FY 11 FY 12 ADA (see CIP item #31)- - - - - - PROJECT TOTALRECOMMENDED IN CIP $- $- $- $50,000$- $50,000 - Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 22 Section 5: Capital Improvements Program C.I.P. Project Detail Facilities Master Plan: City of Oakland ParkADG Project No. 791-07FACILITY23. NE High School Fieldhouse 750 NE 56th Street AGEDEPARTMENTParks and Leisure FACILITY STATS--Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 23PROJECT DESCRIPTION SIZEPROJECT RATIONALE SITE --616 SFNo scope of work is anticipated at this time. two storyOPERATING BUDGET IMPACT --Leased facility COMMENTS COMMENTS FY 13FY 145 YR Total2020/2030 ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10FY 11FY 12PROFESSIONAL SERVICES-- - - - - - - - LAND-- - - - - - - - CONSTRUCTION--- - - - - - - PROJECT TOTAL $- $- $- $- $- $- - FY 13 FY 14 5-YR Total2020/2030 ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10 FY 11 FY 12 OJ C O$ $ $ $ $ $ Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 23 Section 5: Capital Improvements Program C.I.P. Project Detail Facilities Master Plan: City of Oakland ParkADG Project No. 791-07FACILITY24. Royal Palm Park 4100 NW 17th Avenue (north) 1701 NW 38th Street (south)AGEDEPARTMENTParks and Leisure FACILITY STATS1998 (north), 2005 (south)Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 24PROJECT DESCRIPTIONRenovation SIZEPROJECT RATIONALE SITENorth pavilion renovations include upgraded restrooms facilities, and ADA repairs to building and site for compliance. 33.68 acres637 SF (north), 500 SF (south)one storyOPERATING BUDGET IMPACT -- North facility consists of a pavilion with restrooms and concession. South facility consists of a restroom building, and open air pavilion. Small pavilions and picnic COMMENTSCOMMENTS FY 13FY 145-YR Total2020/2030air pavilion. Small pavilions and picnic areas are located throughout the park. ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10FY 11FY 12Renovation - North Pavilion/RestroomsCONSTRUCTIONBathroom upgrades- - - $ 15,000 - $ 15,000 - ADA (See CIP item #31, FY11 funding)- - - - - $- - PROJECT TOTALRECOMMENDED IN CIP $- $- $- $15,000 $- $15,000 - FY 13 FY 14 5YR Total2020/2030 ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10 FY 11 FY 12 Renovation - South Restrooms/PavilionsCONSTRUCTION-- - - - - - $- - Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 24 Section 5: Capital Improvements Program C.I.P. Project Detail Facilities Master Plan: City of Oakland ParkADG Project No. 791-07FACILITY25. Dog Park 931 NW 38th Street AGEDEPARTMENTParks and Leisure FACILITY STATS2005Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 25PROJECT DESCRIPTION SIZEPROJECT RATIONALE SITE 2.26 acres 500 SFNo additional scope of work is anticipated at this time. single storyOPERATING BUDGET IMPACT -- Facility consists of restroom building and (2) small covered pavilions to serve dog walk areas. COMMENTSCOMMENTS FY 13FY 145-YR Total2020/2030renovations to restrooms completed in 2008/09ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10FY 11FY 12PROFESSIONAL SERVICES-- - - - - - - - LAND-- - - - - - - - CONSTRUCTION--- - - - - - - PROJECT TOTAL $- $- $- $- $- $- - FY 13 FY 14 5YR Total2020/2030 ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10 FY 11 FY 12 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 25 Section 5: Capital Improvements Program C.I.P. Project Detail Facilities Master Plan: City of Oakland ParkADG Project No. 791-07FACILITY26. Lakeside Sandpine Preserve 2820 NW 27th Avenue AGEDEPARTMENTParks and Leisure FACILITY STATS2005Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 26PROJECT DESCRIPTION SIZEPROJECT RATIONALE SITE minor repairs for ADA compliance may be accomplished by City maintenance staff5.62 acres 400 SFNo additional scope of work is anticipated at this time. single storyOPERATING BUDGET IMPACT -- Facility consists of open-air pavilion for educational instruction with attached restrooms. COMMENTSCOMMENTS FY 13FY 145-YR Total2020/2030 ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10FY 11FY 12PROFESSIONAL SERVICES-- - - - - - - - LAND-- - - - - - - - CONSTRUCTION--- - - - - - - PROJECT TOTAL $- $- $- $- $- $- - FY 13 FY 14 5YR Total2020/2030 ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10 FY 11 FY 12 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 26 Section 5: Capital Improvements Program C.I.P. Project Detail Facilities Master Plan: City of Oakland ParkADG Project No. 791-07FACILITY27. New Municipal Building 5399 N.Dixie Highway AGEDEPARTMENTEngineering & Community Development Broward Sheriff Office (BSO) FACILITY STATSca.1980, 2008/09original date of construction circa 1980, renovations completed in 2008/09Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 27PROJECT DESCRIPTION SIZE PROJECT RATIONALE SITENo additional scope of work is anticipated at this time.30,858 SFtwo story 1.83 acres OPERATING BUDGET IMPACT -- COMMENTSFloor 1: Engineering & Community Development, Fire Prevention, City Clerk storage, and BSO lobby/booking services Floor 2: BSO COMMENTS FY 11FY 12FY 13FY 145-YR Total2020/2030Floor 2: BSO ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10CONSTRUCTION - - - - - - -- - - - - - - -- PROJECT TOTAL $- $- $- $- $- $- --FY 11 FY 12 FY 13 FY 14 5-YR Total2020/2030 ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 27 Section 5: Capital Improvements Program C.I.P. Project Detail Facilities Master Plan: City of Oakland ParkADG Project No. 791-07FACILITY28. West Prospect Road / Andrews Avenue Parking Lot AGEDEPARTMENT FACILITY STATS-- Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 28PROJECT DESCRIPTION SIZE SITE PROJECT RATIONALEapprox. 150 parking spaces --An annual assessment to the business owners for maintenance is a 2010 Business Plan initiative. (City to contract out maintenance) 1.50 acres PROJECT RATIONALE OPERATING BUDGET IMPACT Yes, favorableProperty is maintained at no cost to the City. COMMENTS O&M costs are removed from the City's annual budget COMMENTS 5YRTtl2020/2030ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10FY 11FY 12FY 13FY 14Parks Division and Facilities Maintenance currently provide maintenance. PROFESSIONAL SERVICES-- - - - - - - - LAND-- - - - - - - - CONSTRUCTION--- - - - - - - PROJECT TOTAL$-$-$-$-$-$--5-YR Total 2020/2030 ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10 FY 11 FY 12 FY 13 FY 14 PROJECT TOTAL $- $- $- $- $- $- - Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 28 Section 5: Capital Improvements Program C.I.P. Project Detail Facilities Master Plan: City of Oakland ParkADG Project No. 791-07FACILITY29. East Prospect Road / Andrews Avenue Parking Lot AGEDEPARTMENT FACILITY STATS-- Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 29PROJECT DESCRIPTION SIZE SITE PROJECT RATIONALE-- approx. 150 parking spaces An annual assessment to the business owners for maintenance is a 2010 Business Plan initiative. (City to contract out maintenance) 1.40 acres PROJECT RATIONALE OPERATING BUDGET IMPACT Yes, favorable COMMENTSO&M costs are removed from the City's annual budgetProperty is maintained at no cost to the City. COMMENTS FY 13FY 145YRTtl2020/2030Parks Division and Facilities Maintenance currently provide maintenance. ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10FY 11FY 12PROFESSIONAL SERVICES-- - - - - - - - LAND-- - - - - - - - CONSTRUCTION--- - - - - - - PROJECT TOTAL$-$-$-$-$-$--FY 13 FY 14 5-YR Total 2020/2030 ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10 FY 11 FY 12 PROJECT TOTAL $- $- $- $- $- $- - Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 29 Section 5: Capital Improvements Program C.I.P. Project Detail Facilities Master Plan: City of Oakland ParkADG Project No. 791-07FACILITY30. Parking Lot 3900 NE 6th Avenue AGEDEPARTMENT FACILITY STATS-- Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 30PROJECT DESCRIPTION SIZE SITE PROJECT RATIONALEapprox. 41 parking spaces--Option 1: O&M costs are funded by annual assessment to the business owners. (adjacent primary business closed in 2009 )Option 2: A metered parking system is implemented, to cover O&M costs and potentially generate revenue. 0.61 acresPROJECT RATIONALE OPERATING BUDGET IMPACT Yes, favorableProperty is maintained at no cost to the City, and potential revenue may be generated. Property is maintained as overflow parking for evening sports events at Stevens Field. COMMENTS O&M costs are removed from the City's annual budget COMMENTS 5YRTtl2020/2030ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10FY 11FY 12FY 13FY 14Parks Division and Facilities Maintenance currently provide maintenance. Adjacent primary user closed business in 2009. Parking is used as overflow parking for sports events at Stevens Field, primarily in the evenings. PROFESSIONAL SERVICES-- - - - - - - - LAND-- - - - - - - - CONSTRUCTION--- - - - - - - PROJECT TOTAL$-$-$-$-$-$--5-YR Total 2020/2030 ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10 FY 11 FY 12 FY 13 FY 14 PROJECT TOTAL $- $- $- $- $- $- - Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 30 Section 5: Capital Improvements Program C.I.P. Project Detail Facilities Master Plan: City of Oakland ParkADG Project No. 791-07FACILITY31. ADA Implementation Plan citywide AGEDEPARTMENT PROJECT DESCRIPTION SIZE SITEPROJECT RATIONALEOPERATING BUDGET IMPACT COMMENTS FACILITY PRIORITIZATIONCity Hall, Library, Collins 75,000 - - - - 75,000 - Parks facilities, FS#87 - 40,000 - - - 40,000 - Parks facilities 40,000 40,000 - Parks facilities, FS#9, FS#20 - - - 40,000 - 40,000 - Public Works 40,000 40,000 - PROJECT TOTAL $75,000 $40,000 $40,000 $40,000 $40,000 $235,000 - FACILITY STATS-- --5-YR Total 2020/2030 All facilities surveyed fall under Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act, signed into law July 26, 1990. Buildings must be corrected to comply with Chapter 11 of the Florida Building Code in order for all City services, programs, and activities to be accessed by everyone including individuals with disabilities.ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10 FY 11 COMMENTS FY 12 FY 13 FY 14 Citywide renovations for ADA compliance, to address items cited in the Citywide ADA Study (January 26, 2009). --ADA renovations for compliance to be addressed within the scope of any proposed facility renovation.Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 31 Section 5: Capital Improvements Program C.I.P. Project Detail Facilities Master Plan: City of Oakland ParkADG Project No. 791-07FACILITY32. Roof Assessment citywide AGEDEPARTMENT PROJECT DESCRIPTION SIZE SITEPROJECT RATIONALE OPERATING BUDGET IMPACTYes COMMENTS ASSESSMENTcitywide facilities $ 25,000 - - - - $25,000 - - - - - - - - PROJECT TOTAL $25,000 $- $- $- $- $25,000 - FACILITY STATS-- --Citywide roof assessment to inventory age, conditions, type of construction, maintenance requirements, and warranty coverage.Assessment to aid in creating a prioritization schedule for replacement, repairs, and maintenance. -- The roof is a critical component of the building envelope to protect against water and moisture intrusion, and is integral to the building's survivability and energy efficiency. COMMENTS Where the investment is warranted, appropriate new roof installations will serve to increase energy efficiency and minimize maintenance requirements.5-YR Total 2020/2030 The roof is a critical element of the building envelope, to ensure a well-sealed and insulated building and reduce cooling loads. Energy efficiency may be positively impacted by the installation of cool roofs which deflect solar heat gains and reduce cooling loads. Cool (light colored) roofs also resist solar degradation, and require less maintenance over the life time of the roof.ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTSFY 10 FY 11 FY 12 FY 13 FY 14 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 5: C.I.P. Project Detail, p. 32 Section 6: Funding Opportunities Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 6: Funding Opportunities p.1 Section 6: Funding Opportunities and Budget Considerations The current economic situation presents many challenges for all Florida municipalities to maintain existing services, and especially to acquire funding to create new facilities that will serve expanded programs and future needs. In addition to budget shortfalls at the local level, shortfalls at the state level also are of great impact to local governments. In consideration of these challenges, “Financial Stability and Sustainability” will guide the near term (5 year) priorities of the City’s Capital Improvements Plan. The City’s general strategy to fund its CIP is on a “cash-basis”, through a combination of internal funding of portions of selected CIP projects while also seeking outside funding. The combined funding sources include grants, impact fees, City’s General Fund, CIP Funds available fund balances, and where applicable the City’s Operating Fund. The City currently utilizes the Florida League of Cities and the Florida State CEP Revolving Fund for long-term and short-term financing. As in many municipalities, debt financing may include bank loans or the issuance of special revenue bonds. Or, residents may be asked to approve a ballot item authorizing the issuance of general obligation bonds. While it is stated that the City may opt to partially offset costs of capital improvement projects through the use of reserves (consistent with policy to fund these one-time expenses for small capital projects), it is anticipated that major capital improvement projects (such as additional parks and recreation and City buildings) normally funded on cash basis will be offered to the voters for approval by general obligation bonds. ADG has had the opportunity to work with several Cities and Counties on studies of similar scope to that of Oakland Park. The aspect of project funding is undoubtedly a critical component in a successful CIP strategy. In working with other municipalities, we note that a significant effort is required to identify and put into place funding sources that could be utilized for facility construction. It is recommended that the City adopt a “process” that defines in specific terms: project scope, cost, mission, and which has as its goal, compliance with these criteria, avoiding financial surprises or delays in the delivery of the needed facilities. In this era of declining tax revenue, and its direct impact on City Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 6: Funding Opportunities p.2 Capital Improvement Plans (C.I.P.), it is critically important that proposed project budgets are achievable. It is anticipated that any future federal stimulus packages may continue to favor shovel ready infrastructure and projects of impact to provide employment, as well as stimulus grants to fund energy efficiency retrofits at the state and local level. The recommendations for many of the City’s facilities include such renovations, and programs that have been identified are described below. Funding Opportunities As the City has identified in its financial strategy, one of the factors in considering the renovation and/or construction of new City facilities is the necessity to identify a funding source or a variety of funding sources. Following is a summary of the funding opportunities which may be applicable to the proposed CIP projects discussed in this study: 1. Voter referendums/Tax based: Many governmental entities, either as a political necessity or as a statutory requirement, require voter referendums to approve the funding of new facilities. Generally speaking, voters are asked to approve (or disapprove) additional revenue such as increased property taxes, an increase in sales taxes, adoption of a special fee or tax, or a “one time” assessment. State laws govern permissible sources and the use of funds with a significant difference between what different jurisdictions allow. It is of merit to note that high levels of public sensitivity to public safety and the City’s delivery of essential core utility services has a direct relationship upon voter attitudes. We are aware of positive voter responses to referendums in which new City Administrative facilities have been approved. A positive voter response is largely dependent upon “making the case” in a professional and pro-active manner by directly informing the citizens of the community of the necessity for improved or new facilities. Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 6: Funding Opportunities p.3 2. Tax Exemption Programs: The State of Florida will permit governmental entities, to exempt their infrastructure improvements from sales tax. The State of Florida, as an example, has a 6% to 7% sales tax, depending on geographical location, which applies to materials for the construction of a new facility. Being able to “save” this project cost can result in significant cost savings to the project and can be utilized for expanding the project scope or for purchasing furnishings or equipment. The potential savings when equated to a multi-million dollar project can result in significant monetary values. 3. Capital Improvement Bonds: There are a wide variety of bonds that can be used for a funding source. Bonds require a dedicated revenue source; however, they may be very attractive investments for citizens of your community. Existing bonds, perhaps utilized for previous road improvements, utility systems or similar infrastructure improvements, may be in the final stages of payout. In many cases these dedicated revenue sources can then be utilized to fund a community need, such as new municipal facilities. A general rule of thumb is that each $100,000 of dedicated bond revenue can equate to approximately $1,000,000 in bond funding for improvements. Typically, bond issues are a very attractive funding source and, as such, utilized by many jurisdictions for funding a variety of projects. Additional funds can also be acquired by the temporary investment of bond proceeds until such time as the funds are needed for construction. 4. Franchise Fees: Many communities have, or are adopting, franchise fees that charge entities, such as cable or dish TV systems, telephone systems, 911 service, etc., a specific fee with that source of revenue being used to acquire a bond issue or funding from a lending institution. Franchise fees are typically based upon levels of participation and can generate significant funds with the potential of growth in the future. Florida law is changing how municipalities can utilize franchise fees so a careful review of this methodology is important. Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 6: Funding Opportunities p.4 5. Private Finance: There are several private sector companies that specialize in the funding of governmental facilities. Basically they advance the construction/development costs for improvements in return for annual payments; almost a “rent-to-buy” process. A municipality will still need to have a revenue source in which to repay this loan, which can come from general revenue or as a budgetary set-aside. In many cases we have found that the rental cost of existing facilities provides a significant portion of the monies required to fund improvements. 6. Community Redevelopment: The City adopted and approved a CRA Plan in 2005, subsequently establishing a Redevelopment Trust Fund, and entering into City/County/CRA Interlocal Agreement in 2006. This has enabled the City to access the Broward County Redevelopment Capital Program funding and tax increment financing for redevelopment projects, and increases the City’s eligibility for federal and state grants that can be used for infrastructure improvements, business development, and property acquisition. Current economic conditions may stall the release of these funds for the City’s use, as some funding is conditional on permitting activity. It is understood that strategies to transfer secured CRA funding to ensure its future use are being explored further by the City. The Master Plan implementation strategy that has been outlined for the CRA includes a comprehensive schedule of capital improvements. The CRA includes the majority of the city-owned properties under consideration in this study. 7. Developer “Set Asides”: During times of high development activity in Florida, many jurisdictions opted to require developers to set aside property for governmental usage or in lieu of property, to contribute toward the cost of future facilities. Many developers would prefer to provide land in lieu of monetary grants. While less desirable to a municipality, such an agreement should include the ability or right of the City to trade or sell this property in order to generate funds. The location of donated property, as well as its zoning and development rights, becomes an important factor if it is considered in terms of its future sale. Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 6: Funding Opportunities p.5 8. Development Impact Fees: In the current economic climate with declining development activity, an impact fee program may hinder progress for development in the City. In times of growth, impact fee programs have been effective in funding the construction of new or expanded facilities, and other associated improvements, that result from the increased services that must be provided by a municipality to support the new development. The impact of adopting such fees can be significant as developers typically are politically involved. From their perspective, any additional cost of development is of significance. Conversely, there is the theory that new residents or businesses should be responsible for additional costs of City services that are a result of new development. Homeland Security and Emergency Management Funding opportunities to assist with public safety facilities are offered at the Federal and State level, and specifically address issues of public safety and security, hazard mitigation, and emergency management. 9. Federal Grants “Homeland Security”: While Federal Grants have traditionally been rare for local facilities, the events of September 11th, coupled with the current economic recession, have created an environment which may result in funds becoming available in the near future. Many cities and counties, in that respect, have initiated studies in order to have appropriate documentation assembled for Federal Grants. Additionally, they have contacted their respective legislative delegation members in order “to make their case.” Clearly, time becomes of the essence, as when Federal Funds become available they will go to those that are prepared and who are situated in a geographically and politically important location. 10. Federal Grants: “F.E.M.A. Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP)”: The Federal Emergency Management Agency is tasked with disaster mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery planning. As a part of its mission, the Agency makes available grant to States and local governments to implement long-term hazard mitigation measures. A component Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 6: Funding Opportunities p.6 of this mitigation is the planning and construction of Municipal Facilities designed to handle mitigation efforts prior to, during, and after a hazardous event. The Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) funds may be used to fund projects that will reduce or eliminate the losses from future disasters. Projects must provide a long-term solution to a problem, for example, elevation of a home to reduce the risk of flood damages as opposed to buying sandbags and pumps to fight the flood. Funds may be used to protect either public or private property or to plan for and construct essential facilities to a “hardened” level of survivability above code requirements. 11. State Grants: Several States fund City and County Capital Improvement projects based upon political leadership of elected officials from geographical areas. The State of Florida also has specialized grant programs which provide funds for having facilities that will serve as an Emergency Operational facilities and Emergency Shelters. As an example, the State of Florida, in response to the devastation of Hurricane Andrew, created an “Emergency Preparedness Fund” under the oversight of the State Department of Community Affairs. Twice a year, grant applications are accepted, reviewed, prioritized and funds awarded to cities and counties for projects, the “hardening” of existing or new facilities, and for spaces within facilities that can serve as an emergency response facility. 12. F.E.M.A.: The Federal Government has not provided any funding of significance for new projects for several years due to a cutback in funding to the Agency. F.E.M.A., in the last quarter of each fiscal year, will request that funded projects that have not been completed or initiated return those funds for reallocation to qualified agencies. The Regional Office will be able to advise if any “turn back” funds are currently available. Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 6: Funding Opportunities p.7 Energy Efficiency There exist a variety of grants and incentive based funding opportunities to assist with projects promoting energy efficient construction and operations. As this is an area of much topical discussion and has recently been highlighted as a key element of the 2009 Federal Stimulus Package, it is anticipated that new opportunities and creative strategies will continue to emerge, and diligent research is needed to stay informed. Several Federal and State agencies are resources for these innovative programs. Among these are: • Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) • Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FL DEP) • US Department of Energy (US DOE) • Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office (EERE), under the US DOE • Florida Department of Energy (FL DOE) • Florida Energy Office, under the FL DOE • Database of State Incentives for Renewable Energy (DSIRE) • Florida Energy Commission (FEC) In Florida, a principal resource for info about renewable fuel sources is the Florida Energy Office, the state’s primary center for energy policy (www.dep.state.fl.us/energy). In addition to developing and implementing Florida’s energy policy, the Energy Office coordinates all federal energy programs delegated to the state. Another source whose recommendations have been cited extensively in this report is the Florida Energy Commission. (www.floridaenergycommission.gov) Some initiatives which have been employed successfully by other municipalities to fund, or partially fund, capital improvements and operational costs associated with energy efficiency strategies include: 13. Guaranteed Energy Performance Savings Contracts Under the Guaranteed Energy Performance Savings Contract Act (GEPSCA), the state and other public entities may contract with an Energy Service Company (ESCO) for energy conservation measures. The energy conservation measures must produce a utility savings sufficient to cover Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 6: Funding Opportunities p.8 the cost of financing, completing, and maintaining the contract. To accomplish this, the contractor guarantees that the public entity will achieve a utility savings sufficient to finance the proposed energy conservation measures. If the utility savings are not sufficient to cover individual financing payment, the contractor must pay for the shortfall. In essence, a private company pays to make energy efficient improvements and is then reimbursed with the money saved through lower energy bills over the lifetime of the project (typically 7-20 years). This has been successfully employed in many case studies, where the public entity does not have the capital up front to implement the retrofits. In some case study examples, this form of contract was used in conjunction with already funded projects, for example HVAC equipment partially funded by a municipality’s reserve or operations fund, combined with partial funding from the ESCO. 14. Third Party Renewable Energy Service Providers In this arrangement, the public entity contracts with a third party renewable energy service provider, who is able to take advantage of State renewable energy income tax credits, in turn transferring these savings to the public entity through their utility rates. 15. Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Partnerships This program is administered through the EPA (www.epa.gov/chp). CHP technologies, also known as cogeneration, can utilize a single power plant located near consumers to produce both electricity and steam for heating and cooling. Primarily, CHP systems recover heat that is normally wasted at power plants and funnels the heat into surrounding buildings, thereby reducing energy costs and GHG emissions. Waste heat recovery may also be utilized for cooling and dehumidification, or process applications. The EPA established the Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Partnership in 2001 to encourage cost-effective CHP projects in the U.S., by fostering cooperative relationships with the CHP industry, state and local governments, and other relevant stakeholders. The CHP Partnership maintains a database of funding opportunities, including regularly updated lists of state and federal incentives applicable to CHP and biomass/biogas projects. These opportunities take a variety of forms, including: grants, tax incentives, low-interest loans, favorable partial load rates (e.g. standby rates), and tradable allowances. Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 6: Funding Opportunities p.9 16. Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants (EECBG) Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, funding has been allocated for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's (EERE) programs and initiatives. One such program which was administered is the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG). The EECBG Program (EECBG) provides grants to U.S. local governments, states, territories, and Indian tribes, to fund projects that reduce energy use and fossil fuel emissions, and that improve energy efficiency in the transportation and building sectors, as well as other appropriate sectors. An additional purpose of the EECBG Program is to spur economic growth and create and/or retain jobs under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. The EECBG Program is administered by the Office of Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). (It is modeled after the Community Development Block Grant Program, administered by HUD.) The application due date for cities eligible for these direct formula grants was June 25, 2009, and the program is currently closed. The City of Oakland Park utilized this program to apply for funding to provide an energy assessment and HVAC retrofit strategy for City Hall. Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 6: Funding Opportunities p.10 Parks and Recreation Funding opportunities for recreational CIP projects is an element of the Parks and Open Space Master Plan Study (adopted October 2009). Some initial resources for consideration follow, and include grants administered to local governments through the Grants Section of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, such as the Florida Recreation Development Assistance Program (FRDAP) and the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF). These are competitive grant programs which provide grants for acquisition or development of land for public outdoor recreation. Note that the Legislature and Governor did not allocate funding toward the FRDAP program for fiscal year July 1, 2009-June 30, 2010. Therefore, no projects submitted for FY 2009-2010 will be funded, and applicants who submitted projects for the 2009-2010 grant cycle are being given the choice of rolling-over their current submittals to the 2010-2011 grant cycle and leaving the standing score as is or conversely, presenting a brand new application during the next submission period. It is hoped that funding will be provided next fiscal year (2010-2011), to be determined in spring 2010. Close monitoring of these programs is warranted. A list of potential funding sources follows: • FRDAP (Florida Recreational Development Assistance Program) grants to fund land acquisition for Parks. It is to be explored if this funding can also extend towards remediation. • Matching grant programs available at the County level • Local agency funding sources through FDOT Fund for transportation. These are typically 50/50 matching grants for transportation oriented projects, which may be creatively applied to “sidewalks” and other pathway/connectivity elements. FDOT’s Transportation Enhancement Program funds transportation enhancement projects, such as bike and pedestrian trails and facilities, landscaping, and restoration of historic transportation structures. • Brownfield Redevelopment (the remediation of sites contaminated by former industrial, agricultural, and other uses): Funding programs are available through the Federal and State DEP and EPA. Facilities Master Plan: Volume I City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report - February 17, 2010 Section 6: Funding Opportunities p.11 • Greyfield Initiatives (the redevelopment of built sites that have been abandoned, such as shopping malls and light industrial or warehousing): This is a more recent and topical area of redevelopment, and greyfield initiatives may not yet have well-established programs for federal and state assistance. It is anticipated that continued emphasis on the sustainability of the built environment will focus attention on this area. • Land and Water Conservation Fund Program (LWCF): LWCF is a competitive program administered through the Florida Department of Environmental Protection which provides grants for acquisition or development of land for public outdoor recreation use. The purpose of the grant is to provide matching grants to the State of Florida, and through the State to governmental entities, for the acquisition and development of outdoor recreation purposes. (www.dep.state.fl.us/parks/oirs) • Community Development Block Grant Program (CDBG): Funding from the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development, the program allows each community to determine which projects are most needed, with a focus on Housing, Neighborhood Revitalization, Commercial Revitalization, and Economic Development. The national objectives of the program are to benefit low- and moderate-income persons, eliminate slum or blight, and address urgent community development needs. • Department of Community Affairs, Florida Communities Trust: Provides grant and loan assistance to local governments for the acquisition and conservation of outdoor recreation lands that are needed to implement local government comprehensive plans. • Florida Greenways and Trails Program: Formerly known as the Florida Rails-to-Trails Program, provides acquisition funds for the purchase of greenways and trails for recreational and conservation purposes. • Urban and Community Forestry Grant Program: The Florida Department of Agriculture (FDACS), with funding from the USDA Forest Service, issues grants to local governments and non-profits to develop and enhance urban and community forestry programs on a cost-share basis. It can be used for tree ordinance development or revision, tree inventories, management plans, master plans, in-house training, staffing, student internships, and equipment purchases. Volume 2: Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master Plan Final Report February 17, 2010 Architects Design Group, Inc. Winter Park Fort Myers, Florida Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Volume II: Spatial Needs Assessment Final Report – February 17, 2010 INDEX Overview Section 1: City Administration • Organizational Structure • Spatial Needs Summary • Space Needs Assessment 1.1 City Manager’s Office 1.2 City Clerk 1.3 Financial Services 1.4 Human Resources 1.5 Information Technology Services Section 2: Engineering and Community Development • Organizational Structure • Spatial Needs Summary • Space Needs Assessment 2.1 Engineering and Construction 2.2 Building Division 2.3 Code Enforcement Division 2.4 Planning and Zoning Division 2.5 Department Support Areas Section 3: Police – District 12 Broward Sheriff Office • Organizational Structure • Existing Facility Area Summary INDEX (continued) Section 4: Fire Rescue • Organizational Structure • Spatial Needs Summary • Space Needs Assessment 4.1 Fire Station #87 4.2 Fire Station #9 4.3 Fire Station #20 4.4 Fire Prevention Section 5: Public Works • Organizational Structure • Spatial Needs Summary • Space Needs Assessment 5.1 Public Works Central Office 5.2 Administration Divisions 5.3 Operations Divisions 5.4 Facility Support 5.5 Unconditioned Facility Area 5.6 Exterior Area: Yard Section 6: Parks and Leisure Services • Organizational Structure • Spatial Needs Summary • Space Needs Assessment 6.1 Parks and Leisure: Administration 6.2 Parks and Leisure: exterior area, parking 6.3 Parks Division: Administration 6.4 Parks Division: Unconditioned Facility Area 6.5 Parks Division Exterior Area: Yard Appendix A: Space Needs Standards Volume II: Spatial Needs Assessment Overview: An Organizational Needs Assessment has been prepared by ADG to aid in evaluating the adequacy and current utilization of existing facilities to meet the functional needs of the occupants. A multi-task methodology was employed, which included the distribution of a Space Needs questionnaire to designated department personnel, followed by interviews and facility tours. The evaluation, including staff review and consensus, was completed in January 2009. Thus, the current needs have been analyzed based upon the recommended space requirements for a facility to accommodate the staffing levels as budgeted for the 2009 fiscal year. The spatial needs analysis provides recommended facility areas to meet the current and future needs for each department. Since the commencement of this study in early 2008, the economic and demographic climate has changed considerably, and forecast models for population growth since the 2000 Census have been adjusted, generally beginning in forecast year 2005. As population is one factor that relates to the provision of City services and a department’s spatial needs for operations, this decline in growth may in part mitigate the need for facility expansion to meet current needs in the near term. Directly related, declining revenue and the consolidation of programs and services also factors into projections for facility spatial needs. In response to this forestalled growth, current need, as utilized for the purposes of this study, is identified as space need that is projected for the short term (5 years: 2010–2014) and which should be considered as the minimum threshold to be provided as the basis of a 5-Year Capital Improvement Program. Future needs have been projected out much further, to 2020 and 2030, and are the basis for establishing a long-range Master Plan and Capital Improvement Program for the City’s future. Included in this volume are the full space needs assessments for each department. In summary, the following schedule compares the currently allocated existing facility area to the area that is recommended to meet the current operational needs of each department, and the needs for potential future growth. Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Volume II: Spatial Needs Assessment – p. ii Citywide Space Needs Assessment Summary Table 1 Cumulative totals 2 Approximate existing office area allocated at City Hall for the City Manager, Finance, City Clerk, Human Resources, and ITS. 3 Existing area noted is the area allocated for Engineering/Community Development at the New Municipal Building. 4 A Space Needs Assessment for BSO future needs is excluded from the scope of this report, existing area carried forward as future need. 5 Combined facility area for administrative and crew functions of both Administration and Operations Divisions. (Unconditioned facility area and yard space for maintenance and storage functions is excluded from this summary table). 6 Combined facility area for administrative and crew functions of both Parks & Leisure Services and Parks Division. (Unconditioned facility area and yard space for maintenance and storage functions is excluded from this summary table). Department Existing Facility Area 2009 (estimated gross square feet) Spatial Requirements (in gross square feet) Current Need 2010-14 Future Need1 2020 Future Need1 2030 City Administration 8,1022 13,098 13,678 14,458 Engineering/Community Development 8,5683 9,182 9,542 10,952 Police/Broward Sheriff Office 17,289 17,2894 17,2894 17,2894 Fire Rescue 20,473 32,834 34,548 38,318 Public Works5 8,500 14,250 16,600 17,750 Parks and Leisure6 4,500 10,057 10,401 11,249 Total 67,432 96,710 102,058 110,016 Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Volume II: Spatial Needs Assessment – p. iii Space Standards: Over the past 30 years ADG has had the opportunity to provide services for over 160 space needs assessments, for both City and County Facilities. We have in that respect developed and visually represented typical space utilization standards for a wide variety of governmental entities from large County Governmental Facilities to those for smaller Cities and Towns. Illustrated in Appendix A are floor plans, perspectives, and “standards” for typical office layouts and related areas, such as conference rooms, work spaces, etc. These area standards are the basis for tabulating the required total area to meet the organizational needs of each of the Departments that have been reviewed in this study. The recommended areas that are represented have been developed from a variety of sources, including published County, City and National Standards, as well as Professional Standards. They are in many respects very similar in terms of the general areas that are provided, and their configuration. Actual Space vs. Needed Space: In addition to establishing a quantifiable space need, there are other factors that determine the adequacy of the facility to serve its intended purpose. The location, layout, configuration and size of the space is often of greater importance than sheer square footage. Specific room dimensions and adjacencies are often critical to the occupant’s ability to function properly and efficiently. It is in this regard that the space needs standards are intended to establish a guideline base square footage only, from which to begin further refinement through the subsequent design process. Open Space Planning There has long been debate relative to the utilization of open-space planning concepts, such as when a larger, open area is provided when function warrants. While private offices are mandated for certain discrete work functions, there are also appropriate uses of less private work environments. There is a direct relationship to both cost and space flexibility, which in buildings of moderate to large size can result in substantial savings or costs, depending upon the decision that is made. Perhaps the greatest advantage to open space systems is the premise of space flexibility and the ability to easily accommodate future change. Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Volume II: Spatial Needs Assessment – p. iv It is important to note that there is a cost associated with the acquisition of modular systems, typically utilized in open space planning. These systems vary significantly in cost, related to their quality, flexibility, and integrated technology. It is important to include the cost of these units when considering the issue of open space planning vs. private offices in order to arrive at an “apples-to-apples” comparison of value. Technology: Space standards have substantially changed over the past 15 to 20 years with the universal utilization and reliance upon computer systems. Equipment has been added to spaces which has placed a further burden upon existing areas. Computers, hard drives, printers, scanners, etc. are now natural parts of a typical office or work space environment. Conversely, the increasing use of ‘paperless’ technologies in the future may reduce the space needs for equipment and record storage. As we consider future technology we must also envision the increased use of equipment to provide such functions as video conferencing, with an added impact upon space utilization. Standardized vs. Specialized Areas: It is important that individuals understand the need to provide uniform work areas as opposed to personal preference spaces. The adoption of standard office work areas ensures that modifications, changes in personnel, and reorganization can occur in an orderly and cost effective manner. Conversely, there are various departments in which functions require either larger workstations or individual office space beyond that generally provided to Administrators and Department Directors. For example, Community Development has specific space need requirements to accommodate plan review, resulting in larger workstations and additional plan layout area. In the Financial Services Department, sensitive financial information must be accommodated discreetly, and private offices are standard. Privacy and confidentiality issues are such that Human Resources requires a discreet copy workroom area with document shredder. Within the Police Department, there are significant issues of confidentiality; dealing with witnesses, informants, the planning of case-sensitive operations as well as other service functions, which must be accommodated within secure environments. Many of these spaces, and their respective ability to be secured by access controls, are mandated by both State Guidelines and Standards of Accreditation. Section 1: City Administration Section 1: City Administration *Fiscal Year 2009 Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 1: City Administration – p. ii Organizational Structure: The City of Oakland Park’s Administration Departments are currently co-located at City Hall. Contained in this report is an organizational space needs analysis for the following Departments: • City Manager • City Clerk • Financial Services • Human Resources • Information Technology Systems The existing facility is a result of multiple renovations over the years, in which areas were reallocated to meet the current needs at the time. Because of the method of these renovations and due to the age of the building, there are several issues associated with sustainability, ADA accessibility and security that have not been addressed and do not meet present standards of building technology or regulatory compliance codes. These issues are discussed in Volume I / Section 2 of this report. The former Building Division offices on the first floor (vacated in early 2009) are currently being utilized by Parks & Leisure administration. This study evaluated the opportunity to utilize this area for Human Resources and the City Clerk, in conjunction with the expansion of ITS and the City Commission Chambers, and an internal re-organization of the second floor for Financial Services, the City Manager, CRA office, and related areas. While such a renovation may better utilize the existing area at City Hall to meet short term needs for the City Administration, the investment is to be weighed against a more comprehensive future master plan. In conclusion, this study presents Development Alternatives for consideration (see Volume I). In general it was observed that record storage is crowding various offices, where space is at a premium. Additionally, at the time of the survey, record storage was observed to be crowding other facilities throughout the City, often being “temporarily” stored in unsuitable locations (spaces at facilities without security or climate control). With the City’s adoption of paper-less technologies and procedures, paper files storage needs will be reduced. Centralized storage area for the City Clerk at the New Municipal Building became available in 2009 to provide for the current and near future needs. Off-site leased storage space will still remain as a viable component to meet these needs, in particular for records to be kept in perpetuity at a secured, storm-hardened facility. Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 1: City Administration – p. iii Spatial Need: Summarized below are the conclusions of the space needs assessment. Following is the room-by-room, space-by-space assessment of the space needs for the staffing and functions of the City Administration Departments. For purposes of this analysis, common facility support (e.g.: restrooms, break room, building services such as mechanical and electrical equipment) has been excluded from each department’s space needs. What is tabulated are the required office spaces and accessory areas for the operational needs of the department. City Administration: Space Needs Summary Table Department Existing Facility Area 2009 (estimated gross square feet) Spatial Requirements (in gross square feet) Current Need 2010-14 Future Need1 2020 Future Need1 2030 City Manager’s Office 2,293 2,488 2,488 2,488 City Clerk2 715 1,300 1,300 1,300 Financial Services 2,592 4,230 4,350 4,630 Human Resources 1,450 2,250 2,370 2,370 Information Technology Services 1,052 2,830 3,170 3,670 Total 8,102 13,098 13,678 14,458 1 Cumulative totals 2 This excludes record storage, provided at the New Municipal Building FY’09 (approx. 1,500 SF) ADG Project No. 791-07 Total 13,098 13,678 14,458 1.31.5 2,8303,170 3,6704,2304,350 4,6301.4 2,2501.2 1,3001,300 1,3001.1 2,4882,488 2,488Information Technology ServicesCity ClerkFinancial ServicesNeed NeedCity Manager's Office2,370 2,370Human ResourcesGeneral Notes No. Space Function2010-14 2020 2030Current Future FutureNeedVolume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Analysis Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 1: City Administration - Department Summary Space Designation Space Requirements (square feet)January 2009Section 1: City Administration - Department Summary ADG Project No. 791-071.1Reception/Waiting Area160 -- --1.2 City Manager's Office 240 -- -- 1.3 Admin. Assistant II @140SF(3)420 -- --1.4 Restroom 90 -- -- 2.1 Assistant City Manager's Office 180 -- --2.2 Administrative Assistant I 120 -- --2.3 acting CRA Director2.3 Assistant to the City Manager 140 -- --2.4 Administrative Aide -- -- -- 3. Public Information Officer 140 -- --4. Special Projects Coordinator -- -- --Space Designation Space Requirements (square feet)1.City of Oakland Park2020FutureNeedFacilities Master PlanNeed2030FutureNeedVolume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Section 1.1: City Manager's Office Space FunctionCity Manager's Office2. Assistant City Manager's OfficeNo.Current2010-14General NotesJanuary 2009Section 1.1: City Manager's Office - p.2 ADG Project No. 791-07Space Designation Space Requirements (square feet)City of Oakland Park2020FutureNeedFacilities Master PlanNeed2030FutureNeedVolume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Section 1.1: City Manager's Office Space FunctionNo.Current2010-14General Notes5. Grants Specialist -- -- --6. Conference/Meeting Room 180 -- --7. includes office supply7.Copy/Work Room120-- -- 8. Records and File Room 140 -- --10. Mini-Break Room 60 -- --11. Sub-Total 1,990 -- --12.Efficiency Factor @ 25%498 -- -- 13. Total 2,48800 14. Cumulative Total 2,488 2,48812. The efficiency factor is space used for corridors, wall thicknesses, etc. and will range from 25%-30% depending on the type and function of the space.8. include storage space for presentation boardsJanuary 2009Section 1.1: City Manager's Office - p.3 ADG Project No. 791-071. Clerk's Office1.1 City Clerk 220-- -- 1.2Deputy City Clerk180-- -- 1.3 Administrative Aide 120 -- --2. Records Specialist 140 -- --3. Administrative Assistant 120 -- --4. Mail and Copy Room -- -- --5. Documents Prep Area -- -- --6. Secured Records Vault 160 -- --7. File/Record Storage -- -- --8. Office Storage/copy workroom 80 -- --9. coffee station9. Mini-Break Area 20 -- --Space DesignationCurrent FutureSpace Requirements (square feet)Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkFutureVolume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Section 1.2: City ClerkSpace FunctionNeed2020 2030Need2010-14Need7. active file storage (file boxes/cabinets) excludes archival storage elsewhere 6. includes recordings of Commission mtgs, ordinanceand resolutions5. electronic processes have eliminated physical space needsGeneral Notes No.1. record storage to be re-located to new City facility in spring '09.3. workstation for document scanning1.3 full-time position, currently filled by temp.January 2009 Section 1.2: City Clerk - p.4 ADG Project No. 791-07Space DesignationCurrent FutureSpace Requirements (square feet)Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkFutureVolume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Section 1.2: City ClerkSpace FunctionNeed2020 2030Need2010-14NeedGeneral Notes No. 10. Sub-Total 1,040 0 011.Efficiency Factor @ 25% 260-- --12. Total 1,300 0 0 13 Cumulative Total 1,300 1,300 11. The efficiency factor is space used for corridors, wall thicknesses, etc. and will range from 25%-30% depending on the type and function of the space.January 2009 Section 1.2: City Clerk - p.5 ADG Project No. 791-071. Reception/Waiting Area 120 -- --2. Director's Office 220-- -- 3.1Comptroller 180 -- --3.2 Accountant: @140 SF ea.(2)280 -- --3.3 Accounting Tech II: @80 SF ea.(2)160 -- --3.4 file cabinets3.4 File Storage 20 -- --3.6 Vault 120 -- --4.1 CIP & Purchasing Manager 180 -- -- 4.2 Accountant 140 -- --3. Accounting Division4.Capital Projects & Purchasing Division2020 2030Current Future FutureSpace Function2010-14Need Need NeedVolume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 1.3: Financial ServicesSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)General Notes No.3. CAFR, accounts payable, payroll January 2009Section 1.3: Financial Services - p.6 ADG Project No. 791-072020 2030Current Future FutureSpace Function2010-14Need Need NeedVolume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 1.3: Financial ServicesSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)General Notes No.4.3Purchasing Specialist 140 -- -- 4.4 file cabinets4.4 File Storage 20 -- -- 5.1 Treasurer 180 -- --5.2 Accounting Tech I 80 -- 805.3Lobby/Service Area 200-- --5.4Electronic Payment Area 60-- --5.5 Cust. Serv. Rep: @100 SF(2)200 --(1)1005.6 Cust.Serv.Coordinator: @100 SF(2)200 --(1)1005.7 Field Service Tech: (3) -- -- -- 5.8Utility/Billing Manager --120 --5.9Cashier Work Area 120-- --5.3 Utility & BillingServices section with cashier functions at first floor of City Hall, proposed to be re-organized with Public Works in FY'095. Treasury Division5.9 currently located at first floor of City Hall5.5 need ADA service counter5.7 meter readers, under purview of Eng/DCD(code enforcement)January 2009Section 1.3: Financial Services - p.7 ADG Project No. 791-072020 2030Current Future FutureSpace Function2010-14Need Need NeedVolume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 1.3: Financial ServicesSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)General Notes No.5.10 File/Copy work area 64 -- --6.1 Financial Manager 180 -- --6.2 re: property insurance6.2 Risk Manager 160 -- --7. Conference Room 180 -- --8. Copy/Workroom 1609. Mini-Break Area 20 -- --9. coffee station 10. Sub-Total 3,384 120 28011.Efficiency Factor @ 25%846 -- --12. Total 4,230120 280 13. Cumulative Total4,350 4,63012. The efficiency factor is space used for corridors, wall thicknesses, etc. and will range from 25%-30% depending on the type and function of the space.Financial Management Division8. with work counter for Finance Audit prep., providepaper shredder7,8,9. shared by all divisions of Financial Services Dept.6.6. City annual budget, planning/forecastingJanuary 2009Section 1.3: Financial Services - p.8 ADG Project No. 791-071. Reception/Waiting Area 160 -- --2. HR Director 220 -- --3.HR Assistant160 -- --4.HR Generalist: @ 120 SF ea.(3)360(1)120 --5.Conference/Work Room 180 -- --6. Training Room 360 -- --7. reference materials 7. Training Room Storage 40 -- --8. Secured Employee Records/Files 100 -- --9. Centralized Filing 40 -- -- 10. Storage Room/Office Supplies 80 -- --11. Copy/Fax/Printer Area 80 -- --12. coffee station12.Mini-Break Area20 -- --Future FutureNeed Need6. with A/V capablilities, also used for private conference 5. private conference, also used for testing4. (2)FT/(1)PT, + futurestation used now by intern1. security needs: panic button, bullet-resistant glazing at reception Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 1.4: Human ResourcesSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)2020 2030General Notes No.Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Space Function2010-149. no statute on old employee records, laser-fiche archiving 3 years backNeedCurrent11. confidential area, providepaper shredderJanuary 2009Section 1.4: Human Resources - p.9 ADG Project No. 791-07Future FutureNeed NeedFacilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 1.4: Human ResourcesSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)2020 2030General Notes No.Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Space Function2010-14NeedCurrent 13. Sub-Total 1,800 120 014.Efficiency Factor @ 25%4500015. Total 2,250120 0 16. Cumulative Total2,370 2,370 12. The efficiency factor is space used for corridors, wall thicknesses, etc. and will range from 25%-30% depending on the type and function of the space.January 2009Section 1.4: Human Resources - p.10 ADG Project No. 791-071. ITS Director 220 -- --2. Network Administrator 180 -- -- 3. Desktop Support Specialist140-- 1204.E-Government Specialist140-- -- 5.Application Support Specialist140-- --6. Enterprise Applications Specialist140-- -- 7. PC Storage Room 140 -- 1408. PC Work Room 400 80 80 9.1 Data/Mainframe 240 180 1009.2 Data Program Storage 200 -- 609.1 dedicated server for records management neededin 5 years, future virtualized server9. Server Room8. work table space, with 3 Engineer Tech @80SF1. with small conference table, City CCTV 9. w/dedicated HVAC and emergency powerGeneral Notes No. Space FunctionVolume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 1.5: Information Technology ServicesSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)2010-14 2020 2030FutureNeedFutureNeed NeedCurrentJanuary 2009Section 1.5: Information Technology Services - p.11 ADG Project No. 791-07General Notes No. Space FunctionVolume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 1.5: Information Technology ServicesSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)2010-14 2020 2030FutureNeedFutureNeed NeedCurrent9.3 UPS 80 80 --10. Conference/Work Room 160 -- --11. Copy/Supply 64 -- --12. coffee station12. Mini-Break Area 20 -- --13. Sub-Total 2,264 340 50014.Efficiency Factor @ 25%566 -- -- 15. Total 2,830340 50016. Cumulative Total3,170 3,670 January 2009Section 1.5: Information Technology Services - p.12 Section 2: Engineering and Community Development Section 2: Engineering and Community Development Department *Fiscal Year 2009 Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 2: Engineering & Community Development – p. ii Organizational Structure: The City of Oakland Park’s Engineering and Community Development Department consists of the following Divisions: • Engineering and Construction • Building Division • Code Enforcement Division • Planning & Zoning Division At the time of the initial survey in 2008, these divisions were operating out of separate facilities at locations throughout the city. All divisions were combined in 2009 as the Engineering and Community Development Department, under the administrative direction of the Engineering Division, and re-located to the New Municipal Building. This consolidation facilitates economies in staffing and workflow, and the elimination of redundant work spaces. Combining these divisions under one department within one facility provides for the economies of shared facility support (restrooms, central break room, building services such as mechanical, electrical/IT and building maintenance). While one large multi-purpose conference space may be provided as a shared facility amenity, additional smaller meeting rooms and/or accessory work areas are recommended within each division’s office area for efficient work flow. For comparative purpose, the space needs assessment that follows accounts for these dedicated functional areas (reception/administrative support, conference rooms, copy/storage/work areas, active file storage) within each division summary, but excludes facility support areas common to the building and its other tenants. If population growth forecasts hold true, staff increases may be anticipated in the future (2020/30) to maintain a corresponding level of service. In particular, it is anticipated that code enforcement, planning and zoning, and permitting services would be most affected. In general it can be commented that the services of Engineering and Community Development require additional storage area for oversized documentation (plans). Plan review and engineering services also require larger workstations and/or accessory work areas with adequate desk space for plan layout. The Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 2: Engineering & Community Development – p. iii space standard illustrations included in Appendix A present some options for work room arrangements which provide common layout space within an open office suite. While ‘paper-less’ plan review is not anticipated in the near future, archival documentation is expected to become increasingly electronic, and area required for plan storage may level off. Adequate area for storage of active applications and documentation (including plans of projects in various stages of permitting and construction) are recommended, and it is assumed that archival storage needs will continue to be met by a combination of off-site leased storage and increasingly, electronic file storage. Additional technical staff may be required in the future as electronic archival documentation services increase. It is also noted that Fire Prevention services have been co-located with the Engineering and Community Development Department at the new facility, thus office area for fire plan review is not provided within the Building Division area summary. (see Section 4: Fire Rescue for Fire Prevention space needs) Parking Requirements Upon occupancy of the New Municipal Building, Engineering and Community Development staff was estimated at 40 employees, including part-time County employees who are contracted to provide plan review services. Additionally, ample customer parking is required for permitting services, beyond what may be code-mandated based upon occupancy. Public parking also requires an allocation of short term (15 minute) parking for permit runners. Adequate separation and security from the operations of the Broward Sheriff Office, which shares the same facility, also impacts parking and site circulation requirements. Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 2: Engineering & Community Development – p. iv Spatial Need: Summarized below are the conclusions of the spatial needs assessment. Following is the room-by-room, space-by-space assessment of the space needs for the staffing and functions of this Department. Engineering and Community Development Department: Space Needs Summary Table Department Existing Facility Area 2009 (estimated gross square feet)2 Spatial Requirements (in gross square feet) Current Need 2010-14 Future Need1 2020 Future Need1 2030 Engineering & Construction 2,776 1,750 1,750 2,200 Building Division 4,662 2,913 3,153 3,473 Code Enforcement Division 1,130 1,775 1,755 2,055 Planning & Zoning Division --3 1,125 1,245 1,465 Department Support Areas --3 1,619 1,619 1,759 Total 8,568 9,182 9,542 10,952 1. Cumulative totals. 2. Existing area provided at the New Municipal Building (FY’09 occupancy). 3. Included as part of re-structured Engineering & Community Development offices at the New Municipal Building. ADG Project No. 791-07 Total 9,182 9,542 10,952 4-2.5 areas shared by all divisions: copy, conference, storage, etc.2.5 Department Support 1,619 1,619 1,759Need2.4 Planning & Zoning Division 1,1252.2 Building Division1,7751,2452,2003,4732,0551,4652020Need2,9132.3 Code Enforcement Division 1,7752.1 Engineering & Construction 1,750 1,7503,153* Facility Support (buildingservices such as mechanicaland electrical/IT, restrooms, staff lounge/kitchen) are excluded from this Summary TotalVolume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 2: Engineering & Community Development - Department SummarySpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)2030Current Future FutureNeedGeneral Notes No. Space Function2010-14January 2009Section 2: Engineering and Community Development - Department Summary ADG Project No. 791-071. Reception/Waiting Area 120 -- -- 2. Director's Office 220 -- --3. Administrative Specialist 120 -- --4. workstation at reception4. Administrative Secretary 80 -- --5. private office5. Assistant Director 160 -- --6. open office6. Administrative Specialist 120 -- --7. open office7. Project Manager @ 140 SF ea(2) 280--(1)1408. open office8. Civil Engineer II(1) 140--(1)1409. workstation cubicle9. Engineering Inspectors @80SF(2)160 --(1)80 Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 2.1: Engineering & Construction Management DivisionNeedSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)Current Future FutureNeed NeedGeneral Notes No. Space Function2010-14 2020 20302. Department Head for Engineering/Comm. Dev.3. open office, also supportsEngineering DivisionJanuary 2009Section 2.1: Engineering and Construction Management Division - p.2 ADG Project No. 791-07Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 2.1: Engineering & Construction Management DivisionNeedSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)Current Future FutureNeed NeedGeneral Notes No. Space Function2010-14 2020 2030 10. Sub-Total 1,400 0 36011. Efficiency Factor @ 25% 350 -- 90 12.Total 1,7500 450 13. Cumulative Total 1,750 2,200 11. The efficiency factor is space used for corridors, wall thicknesses, etc. and will range from 25%-30% depending on the type and function of the spaceJanuary 2009Section 2.1: Engineering and Construction Management Division - p.3 ADG Project No. 791-07 1.1 Lobby 1501.2 ADA: 1 each (M&W)1.2 Public Restrooms @80 SF ea.(2)160 -- -- 1.3 Waiting Area 240 1.4 Counter/Application Area 180 -- 80 2.1 private office2.1 Permitting & Licensing Supervisor 160 -- --2.2 open office/work area2.2 Permitting Techs @ 100 SF ea(4)400 -- --2.3 Processing / Work Area 200 3.1Plans Examiner @120 SF eac. (2) 240 (1)240(1)2402030Need NeedGeneral Notes No. Space Function2010-14Future2020NeedCurrent FutureVolume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 2.2: Building & Permitting DivisionSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)1. Public Access2. Permitting 2.3 incoming/outgoing applications3. Plan Review3.1 cubicles, with adjacency to work roomJanuary 2009Section 2.2 Building and Permitting Division - p.4 ADG Project No. 791-072030Need NeedGeneral Notes No. Space Function2010-14Future2020NeedCurrent FutureVolume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 2.2: Building & Permitting DivisionSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet) 3.2 full-time City staff3.2 Building Inspectors (2) 160-- --@80 SF ea. 3.3 private office3.3County Building Official140 -- --3.4County Plans Examiners 120-- --@120 SF ea. 3.5 Plans Review Work Room 180 -- -- 4. Sub-Total 2,330 240 3205. Efficiency Factor @ 25% 583 -- --6. Total 2,913240 320 7. Cumulative Total3,153 3,4735. The efficiency factor is space used for corridors, wall thicknesses, etc. and will range from 25%-30% depending on the type and function of the space3.4 workstation for part-time (County) staff on flex basis as needed3.5 layout space / reference libraryJanuary 2009Section 2.2 Building and Permitting Division - p.5 ADG Project No. 791-071. Public Waiting & Clerical Area 160 -- -- 2. private office2. Administrator 180 -- --3. Admininstrative Assistant -- -- --4. private office4. Code Enforcement Tech 120 -- -- 5.Code Enforcement Officer II (6) 600 --(2)200@100 SF ea. 6.BSO Officer (part-time)-- -- -- 7. shelving at open work area7. Reference Library 40 -- --8. Central Filing / workroom 180 -- 809. Office Supply/Copy Room 120 -- --10.Mini-Break Area 20-- --10. coffee station2020 2030NeedFutureCurrentNeedFutureNo. Space Function2010-149. copy/printers in central location, for dedicated use by Code Enf. division8.active files/cases open for many years, no plan review5. cubicles, need good noise buffering (phone calls)Need1. include workstation for receptionGeneral Notes6. office space for position to be provided at new co-located BSO facilty in FY'093. open workstation, servesas liason to magistrate and Board, position vacant FY'09Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 2.3: Code Enforcement DivisionSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)January 2009Section 2.3: Code Enforcement Division - p.6 ADG Project No. 791-072020 2030NeedFutureCurrentNeedFutureNo. Space Function2010-14NeedGeneral NotesVolume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 2.3: Code Enforcement DivisionSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)11. Sub-Total 1,420 0 28012. Efficiency Factor @ 25% 355 -- --13. Total 1,7750 280 14. Cumulative Total1,775 2,05512. The efficiency factor is space used for corridors, wall thicknesses, etc. and will range from 25%-30% depending on the type and function of the spaceJanuary 2009Section 2.3: Code Enforcement Division - p.7 ADG Project No. 791-071. workstation for reception1. Reception/Clerical Area 140 -- --2. private office2. Development Manager 180 -- -- 3. Admin. Secretary @100SF ea. -- (1)1004. Senior Planners @160 SF each(2)320 -- -- 5. open office5. Planners @120 SF ea.(1)120 -- --6. flex cubicle, part-time use 6. Intern @80 SF ea.(1)80 -- --7. Future Flex Office Space -- 120 120 8. Files/Reference Materials 40 -- -- 9. coffee station9. Mini-Break Area 20 -- --Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 2.4: Planning and Zoning DivisionSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment 8. shelving/file cabinetsat open office spaceFutureNeed Need NeedGeneral Notes No. Space Function2010-14 2020 2030Current Future7. flex office space for future staff positions to be determined: Asst. Planner, Dev. Review Tech., GIS...January 2009Section 2.4: Planning and Zoning Division - p.8 ADG Project No. 791-07Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 2.4: Planning and Zoning DivisionSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment FutureNeed Need NeedGeneral Notes No. Space Function2010-14 2020 2030Current Future13. Sub-Total 900 120 22014. Efficiency Factor @ 25% 225 -- --15. Total 1,125120 22014. Cumulative Total1,245 1,46514. The efficiency factor is space used for corridors, wall thicknesses, etc. and will range from 25%-30% depending on the type and function of the spaceJanuary 2009Section 2.4: Planning and Zoning Division - p.9 ADG Project No. 791-071. Multi-Purpose/Conference Room 325 -- -- 2. Small Conference Room 1503. Plan Storage 300 -- 804. Files & Records Area 200 -- 60 5. Office Supply/Copy Room 120 -- --6. plan repro: plotter6. Copy and Equipment Room 140 -- --7. Mini-Break Area 60 -- -- 8. Sub-Total 1,295 0 1409. Efficiency Factor @ 25% 324 -- -- 10.Total 1,6190 140 11. Cumulative Total1,619 1,759Need Need10. The efficiency factor is space used for corridors, wall thicknesses, etc. and will range from 25%-30% depending on the type and function of the space1. reference library / meeting room, to accommodate review with applicantGeneral Notes No. Space Function2010-14 2020 2030Current Future FutureNeedVolume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 2.5: Engineering & Community Development - Department SupportSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)January 2009Section 2.5: Department Support - p.10 Section 3: Police - District 12 Broward Sheriff Office Section 3: Police Department – Broward Sheriff Office *Fiscal Year 2009 Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 3: Police Department – p. ii Organizational Structure: The Broward Sheriff Office re-located to new offices at the New Municipal Building in 2008-09. Organizational planning for the new facility was completed prior to this study. A space needs analysis is therefore not under the purview of this study, however upon review of the facility some comments may be noted. There are inherent challenges in renovating a building to meet the standards required for a Law Enforcement facility. The new facility was originally constructed as commercial lease space approximately 10-15 years ago. The level of construction for the intended original use, coupled with its age, indicate that the core construction is sub-standard to that of a structure built to the current building code requirements for a Law Enforcement facility. The structure suffered some damage due to 2005 hurricane events, resulting in moisture intrusion, and renovation and repair to the roof and interior construction had commenced prior to planning for the new BSO facility use, requiring the organizational space needs of BSO to adapt to the existing plan layout. Flexibility to accommodate future space needs may be compromised as a result of the adaptation of the existing interior layout for the current BSO needs. Additionally, the non-ADA compliant elevator compromises the use of the second floor offices which are not accessible by individuals in wheelchairs, requiring alternate accommodations on the first floor. While the BSO offices at the New Municipal Building address the current space needs and provide upgraded security and other technologies, the future needs of BSO may face challenges, particularly with regard to the competing future space needs of the Engineering and Community Development offices in the same facility. Parking Requirements Co-locating the functions of the BSO with the daily business (public) functions of Engineering & Community Development presents challenges to site use and vehicle/pedestrian interaction, as well as security. Controlled site access and secure parking for BSO use, and the parking needs and site access requirements of the co-located Community Development offices have since been addressed by the City. Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 3: Police Department – p. iii Spatial Need: Following is a summary of the existing area allocated to the Broward Sheriff Office at the New Muncipal Building. Police Department – Broward Sheriff Office: Existing Facility Area Table Department Existing Facility Area 2009 (estimated gross square feet)1 Spatial Requirements (in gross square feet) Current Need2 2010-14 Future Need2 2020 Future Need2 2030 BSO: New Municipal Building Floor 1 1,860 -- -- -- BSO: New Municipal Building Floor 1 15,429 -- -- -- Total 17,289 -- -- -- 1. Area provided at the New Municipal Building in FY’09. 2. Excluded from this study. ADG Project No. 791-07 Total 17,289 --1,860-- --15,429--General Notes Space Function2008/09No.ExistingAreaVolume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Analysis Space Designation Space Requirements (square feet)Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 3: Police / District 12 Broward Sheriff's Office - Department Summary3.1New Municipal Building: Floor 13.2New Municipal Building: Floor 22030FutureNeed2020FutureNeedJanuary 2009Section 3: Police - Department Summary Section 4: Fire Rescue Section 4: Fire Rescue Department *Fiscal Year 2009 Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 4: Fire Rescue – p. ii Organizational Structure: The Oakland Park Fire Rescue Department operates from three facilities: Fire Stations #87, 9, and 20. In addition to fire rescue functions, Fire Station #87 currently houses Fire Administration and the department’s Emergency Operation Center (EOC), allowing for shared personnel support and resources. In FY’09, Fire Prevention re-located to offices adjacent to the Engineering & Community Development Department in the New Municipal Building, to facilitate the functions of plan review and building inspection. Former Fire Prevention office space at FS#87 now supports a multi-purpose room that may be used for training and public education, as well as community meeting space to serve the western region of the City. This space has also been newly equipped to serve as an EOC, re-locating this function from the FS#9/Public Safety Building. While FS#87 serves in this regard as the main station, Fire Station #9 is the geographic center of the City. FS#9 alone responds to more calls than FS#87 and FS#20 combined, with a response area that extends into the northern and eastern limits of the City. In contrast, FS#20 which was acquired by interlocal lease agreement with the annexation of the North Andrews Garden district in 2005, has a limited strategic response from its location at the fringes of the City limits. In consideration of the City’s geography and the three fire station locations, the Department has implemented an Adaptive Response Program to effectively utilize and assign staff to all facilities in response to citywide service needs. The Space Needs Assessment reflects that the existing facility areas are well under current space standards for fire rescue facilities at comparable municipalities. Notwithstanding the current facility area and staffing, the Department reports a level of service that exceeds established performance measures. The age and condition of these facilities however will warrant future replacement and the opportunity to readdress the department’s space needs and the citywide allocation of fire rescue services in a comprehensive master plan. Facility replacement will in the long term be more cost-effective than the renovation which would be required of an existing facility to upgrade the building structure to meet current building code for coastal storm impacts, to comply with current ADA and NFPA code requirements, to provide appropriate security and other technologies, and to address standards for gender separation at crew quarters among other functional space needs. In consideration of current equipment storage needs, it was observed that reserve apparatus is presently in interim storage at the Parks & Leisure Downtown Center, and that other units such as the marine and disaster assistance response units, are generally stored outdoors, unprotected. While enhanced future facilities may provide bay space for reserve apparatus, consideration is warranted in the interim to provide a Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 4: Fire Rescue – p. iii more permanent, protected storage space for reserve apparatus. A future study is recommended to assess the long range planning and future City-wide fire rescue needs, to include the effective city-wide allocation of resources and facilities, taking into account City geography and access routes, demographics, future population growth and densities, and the corresponding demand upon Fire Rescue services. Proposed renovations of existing fire rescue facilities are to be carefully evaluated against the long-range investment of a new facility at such time that this is required and feasible. Spatial Need: Summarized below are the conclusions of the space needs assessment. Following is the room-by-room, space-by-space assessment of the space needs for the staffing and functions of the Department. Fire Rescue Department: Space Needs Summary Table Department Existing Facility Area 2009 (estimated gross square feet) Spatial Requirements (in gross square feet) Current Need 2010-14 Future Need1 2020 Future Need1 2030 Fire Station #87 7,6992 11,5983 12,7083 14,7583 Fire Station #9 6,750 9,878 9,986 11,406 Fire Station #20 5,100 9,708 9,984 9,984 Fire Prevention 9242 1,650 1,870 2,170 TOTAL, Facility Area 20,473 32,834 35,548 38,318 1. Cumulative totals 2. Existing area for FS#87, including Fire Administration and Fire Prevention office area. 3. Area total includes Fire Administration and Fire Station #87 fire rescue functions at this facility. 4. Area allocated to Fire Prevention at the New Municipal Building (FY’09 occupancy). Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 4: Fire Rescue – p. iv Oakland Park Fire Rescue Station Locations ADG Project No. 791-07 Total 32,834 34,548 38,318 Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkCurrent FutureVolume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Section 4: Fire-Rescue - Department SummarySpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)No.NeedGeneral Notes2030Need2010-14Space Function202012,7089,986FutureNeed1,6509,70811,5989,87814,7584-4.1 includes Fire Administration and EOC4-4.4 to be re-located at theNew Municipal Bldg (2009) 1,8704.24.44.32,1709,984 11,4064.1Fire Prevention9,984Fire Station #9Fire Station #87Fire Station #20January 2009Section 4: Fire-Rescue - Department Summary ADG Project No. 791-07 1.1 Foyer 80 -- --1.2 access from public foyer1.2 First-Aid 120 -- --1.3 Restrooms (M/W) @160 SF ea.(2)320 -- --1.4 Watch Office / Dispatch 120 -- --2.1 Fire Chief 220 -- -- 2.2 Assistant Fire Chief 180 -- --2.3 Restroom 80 -- --2.4 Administrative Specialist 120 -- --2.5 Administrative Secretary -- -- 100 2.6 Office Supply/Copy 64 -- --Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 4.1: Fire Station #872010-14General NotesNeedSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)Need Need2020 2030FutureNo. Space FunctionFutureCurrent1. Public Access1.1 secured vestibule, public entry to fire station2. Fire Administration1.3 (3)fixtures each w/ADA stall, to serve occpupancy of multi-purpose room, with access from public foyer 1.4 (2) workstations, withsurveillance of public foyer 2.3 single ADA, shared by Chief & Asst. ChiefJanuary 2009Section 4.1: Fire Station #87 - p.2 ADG Project No. 791-07Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 4.1: Fire Station #872010-14General NotesNeedSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)Need Need2020 2030FutureNo. Space FunctionFutureCurrent 3.1 Training Officer -- 120 --3.2 Public Information Officer -- -- 120 3.3 Multi-purpose/Training Room 600 -- -- 3.4 Training Equipment Storage 100 -- -- 3.5 Public Education Storage 80 -- --4.1 EMS Coordinator -- 120 --4.2 EMS Clerk -- -- 804.3 EMS File/Storage -- -- 60 EMS3. Training/Public Education3.1-3.2 currently served by Fire Prevention personnel3.3 multi-purpose space: training, community meeting, public education, equipped to serve as interim EOC (to accommodate 30 people in classroom setting or 60 people in auditorium type setting)4.January 2009Section 4.1: Fire Station #87 - p.3 ADG Project No. 791-07Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 4.1: Fire Station #872010-14General NotesNeedSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)Need Need2020 2030FutureNo. Space FunctionFutureCurrent 5.1 Support Services120-- --5.2 Equipment Receiving / Storage -- 360 --6.1 EOC use6.1 Overflow Sleeping Quarters - Office140-- --- Bunk @108 SF108-- -- 6.2 - 9' x 12' bunk module6.2 Lieutenant/Captain - Office140-- --- Bunk @108 SF108-- --6.3 shared by command staff6.3 Toilet/Shower120-- -- 6. Command Area5. Resource ManagementJanuary 2009Section 4.1: Fire Station #87 - p.4 ADG Project No. 791-07Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 4.1: Fire Station #872010-14General NotesNeedSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)Need Need2020 2030FutureNo. Space FunctionFutureCurrent7.1 Bunkrooms: @ 108 SF ea.(5) 540 (1)108 --7.2 Toilet/Shower @120 SF ea.(3) 360-- --8. Dayroom280-- -- 9. Physical Agility280-- --10. (2) workstations10. Library/Report Writing120-- --11. Laundry 100 -- --12.1 Food Preparation140-- --12.2Shift Pantry @ 36 SF each(3)108 -- --12.3 Dining 160 -- --12.7. Crew QuartersKitchen/Dining7.2 total (3) fixtures: (2) men, (1) unisex for 7.1 - 9' x 12' bunk module, sixth firefighter per FY'08 budget, or volunteerJanuary 2009Section 4.1: Fire Station #87 - p.5 ADG Project No. 791-07Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 4.1: Fire Station #872010-14General NotesNeedSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)Need Need2020 2030FutureNo. Space FunctionFutureCurrent13. Apparatus Bays: @ 16' x 80'(2)2,560 --(1)1,280 14.Bunker Gear 180-- -- 15. Hose/Equipment Storage 160 -- --16. Compressor/workshop -- 180 -- 17. Storage 160 -- -- 18. Medical Supply/Storage80-- --19. Ice Machine30-- -- 20.1 SCBA maintenance/bottle storage 140 -- -- 20.2 Cascade/Tankfill60-- --17. surplus gear, equipment, provisions13. fire rescue & ladder , battalion chief, water rescue and disaster response trailer (additional bay needed for reserve apparatus )16. department currently shares compressor at FS#9 20. Breathing GearJanuary 2009Section 4.1: Fire Station #87 - p.6 ADG Project No. 791-07Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 4.1: Fire Station #872010-14General NotesNeedSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)Need Need2020 2030FutureNo. Space FunctionFutureCurrent 21.1 Eyewash/shower 60-- --21.2Hazmat Supply Storage80-- --21.3 Hazmat Waste60 -- -- 21.4 Commercial Washer/Dryer40-- --22.1HVAC Equipment 220 -- -- 22.2Electrical Equipment 120 -- -- 22.3 IT/Telecommunications 60 -- --22.4 Emergency Generator 300 -- --22.5 Janitor's Closet 60 -- -- 22. Facility Support21. DecontaminationJanuary 2009Section 4.1: Fire Station #87 - p.7 ADG Project No. 791-07Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 4.1: Fire Station #872010-14General NotesNeedSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)Need Need2020 2030FutureNo. Space FunctionFutureCurrent23. Sub-Total 9,278 888 1,640 24. Efficiency Factor @ 25% 2,320 222 410 25. Total 11,5981,110 2,050 26. Cumulative Total12,708 14,75824. The efficiency factor is space used for corridors, wall thicknesses, etc. and will range from 25%-30% depending on the type and function of the spaceJanuary 2009Section 4.1: Fire Station #87 - p.8 ADG Project No. 791-07 1.1 Foyer 80 -- --1.2 access from public foyer1.2 First-Aid 120 -- --1.3 Public Restroom 80 -- -- 1.4 Watch Office / Dispatch 120 -- --2.1 - 9' x 12' bunk module2.1 Battalion Chief - Office140-- --- Bunk @108 SF108-- -- 2.2 - 9' x 12' bunk module2.2 Captain - Office140-- --` - Bunk @108 SF108-- -- 2.3 - 9' x 12' bunk module2.3 Lieutenant - Office140-- --- Bunk @108 SF108-- --Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 4.2: Fire Station #9Space FunctionSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)Need Need2010-14 2020 2030Current FutureNeedCommand Area1. Public Access1.1 secured vestibule, public entry to fire stationFutureGeneral Notes No.1.3 single, uni-sex ADA with access from public foyer1.4 work space for 2 people, surveillance of public foyer 2.January 2009Section 4.2: Fire Station #9 - p.9 ADG Project No. 791-07Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 4.2: Fire Station #9Space FunctionSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)Need Need2010-14 2020 2030Current FutureNeedFutureGeneral Notes No.2.4 shared by command staff2.4 Toilet/Shower120-- -- 3.1 Bunkrooms: @ 108 SF ea.(5) 540 (1)108 --3.2 Toilet/Shower @120 SF ea.(3) 360-- --4. Dayroom/Training280-- 140 5. Physical Agility280-- -- 6. (2) workstations6. Library/Report Writing120-- --7. Laundry 100 -- -- 3. Crew Quarters3.1 - 9' x 12' bunk module, sixth firefighter per FY'08 budget, or volunteer3.2 total (3) fixtures: (2) men, (1) unisex for January 2009Section 4.2: Fire Station #9 - p.10 ADG Project No. 791-07Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 4.2: Fire Station #9Space FunctionSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)Need Need2010-14 2020 2030Current FutureNeedFutureGeneral Notes No.8.1 Food Preparation140-- --8.2Shift Pantry 3 @ 36 SF each 108 -- --8.3 Dining 160 -- --9. Apparatus Bays: @ 16' x 80'(2)2,560 --(1)1,28010.Bunker Gear 180-- --11. to service sub-stations11. Hose/Equipment Storage 160 -- --12. to service sub-stations12. Compressor/workshop 180 -- -- 13. Storage 160 -- -- 14. Medical Supply/Storage80-- --15. Ice Machine30-- --Kitchen/Dining13. surplus gear, equipment, provisions9. engine + spare engine,fire rescue, battalion chief, EMS/response vehicle, boat rescue (additional bay needed to store all inside)8.January 2009Section 4.2: Fire Station #9 - p.11 ADG Project No. 791-07Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 4.2: Fire Station #9Space FunctionSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)Need Need2010-14 2020 2030Current FutureNeedFutureGeneral Notes No. 16.1 SCBA maintenance/bottle storage 140 -- -- 16.2 Cascade/Tankfill60-- -- 17.1 Eyewash/shower 60-- --17.2Hazmat Supply Storage80-- --17.3 Hazmat Waste60 -- -- 17.4 Commercial Washer/Dryer40-- --18.1HVAC Equipment 220 -- --18.2Electrical Equipment 120 -- --Breathing Gear17. Decontamination18. Facility Support16.January 2009Section 4.2: Fire Station #9 - p.12 ADG Project No. 791-07Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 4.2: Fire Station #9Space FunctionSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)Need Need2010-14 2020 2030Current FutureNeedFutureGeneral Notes No. 18.3 IT/Telecommunications 60 -- --18.4 Emergency Generator 300 -- --18.5 Janitor's Closet 60 -- --19. Sub-Total 7,902 108 1,42020. Efficiency Factor @ 25% 1,976 -- -- 21. Total 9,878108 1,420 22. Cumulative Total 9,986 11,406 20. The efficiency factor is space used for corridors, wall thicknesses, etc. and will range from 25%-30% depending on the type and function of the spaceJanuary 2009Section 4.2: Fire Station #9 - p.13 ADG Project No. 791-07 1.1 Foyer 80 -- --1.2 access from public foyer1.2 First-Aid 120 -- --1.3 Public Restroom 80 -- -- 1.4 Watch Office / Dispatch 120 -- -- 2.1 Overflow Sleeping Quarters - Office140-- --- Bunk @108 SF108-- -- 2.2 - 9' x 12' module2.2 Lieutenant - Office140-- --- Bunk @108 SF108-- -- 2.3 shared by command staff2.3 Toilet/Shower120-- --1.3 single, uni-sex ADA with access from public foyer1.4 work space for 2 people, surveillance of public foyer 2.Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 4.3: Fire Station #20Space FunctionSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)Need Need2010-14 2020 2030Current1. Public Access1.1 secured vestibule, public entry to fire stationFutureGeneral Notes No.FutureNeedCommand AreaJanuary 2009Section 4.3: Fire Station #20 - p.14 ADG Project No. 791-07Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 4.3: Fire Station #20Space FunctionSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)Need Need2010-14 2020 2030Current FutureGeneral Notes No.FutureNeed 3.1 - 9' x 12' bunk module3.1 Bunkrooms: @ 108 SF ea.(4) 432 (2)216 --3.2 Toilet/Shower @120 SF ea.(3) 360-- --4. Dayroom/Training28060 -- 5. Physical Agility280-- --6. (2) workstations6. Library/Report Writing120-- --7. Laundry 100 -- --8.1 Food Preparation140-- --8.2Shift Pantry @ 36 SF each(3)108 -- --8.3 Dining 160 -- --3. Crew Quarters8. Kitchen/Dining3.2 total (3) fixtures: (2) men, (1) unisex for womenJanuary 2009Section 4.3: Fire Station #20 - p.15 ADG Project No. 791-07Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 4.3: Fire Station #20Space FunctionSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)Need Need2010-14 2020 2030Current FutureGeneral Notes No.FutureNeed9. Apparatus Bays: @ 16' x 65'(3)3,120 -- --10.Bunker Gear 180-- --11. provided at FS#911. Hose/Equipment Storage -- -- --12. provided at FS#912. Compressor/workshop -- -- -- 13. Storage 160 -- -- 14. Medical Supply/Storage80-- --15. Ice Machine30-- -- 16.1 SCBA maintenance/bottle storage 140 -- -- 16.2 Cascade/Tankfill60-- --16.13. surplus gear, equipment, provisionsBreathing Gear5.13 engine, fire rescue, battalion chief, EMS/response vehicleJanuary 2009Section 4.3: Fire Station #20 - p.16 ADG Project No. 791-07Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 4.3: Fire Station #20Space FunctionSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)Need Need2010-14 2020 2030Current FutureGeneral Notes No.FutureNeed 17.1 Eyewash/shower 60-- --17.2Hazmat Supply Storage80-- --17.3 Hazmat Waste60 -- -- 17.4 Commercial Washer/Dryer40-- --18.1HVAC Equipment 220 -- --18.2Electrical Equipment 120 -- -- 18.3 IT/Telecommunications 60 -- --18.4 Emergency Generator 300 -- -- 18.5 Janitor's Closet 60 -- --17. Decontamination18. Facility SupportJanuary 2009Section 4.3: Fire Station #20 - p.17 ADG Project No. 791-07Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 4.3: Fire Station #20Space FunctionSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)Need Need2010-14 2020 2030Current FutureGeneral Notes No.FutureNeed19. Sub-Total 7,766 276 020. Efficiency Factor @ 25% 1,942 -- -- 21. Total 9,708276 0 22. Cumulative Total9,984 9,98420. The efficiency factor is space used for corridors, wall thicknesses, etc. and will range from 25%-30% depending on the type and function of the spaceJanuary 2009Section 4.3: Fire Station #20 - p.18 ADG Project No. 791-07 1. Fire Marshal 180 -- -- 2.Assistant Fire Marshal 140-- --3.Administrative Secretary 100-- --4. Senior Fire Inspector @120 SF ea.-- --(1)1205. Fire Inspectors @120 SF each(3)360(1)120 --6. Plans Review/Storage 200 100 1007. Conference/Reference Library 180 -- -- 8. Copy/Fax Work Room 80 -- -- 9. File/Supply Storage 80 -- 80 2030Future FutureVolume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 4.4: Fire PreventionNo. Space Function2010-14CurrentNeedSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)Need Need20206. storage and workroom with layout spaceGeneral Notes5. also provides plan review services7. plan review with applicantand staff meetingsJanuary 2009Section 4.4: Fire Prevention - p.19 ADG Project No. 791-072030Future FutureVolume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 4.4: Fire PreventionNo. Space Function2010-14CurrentNeedSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)Need Need2020General Notes10. Sub-Total 1,320 220 30011. Efficiency Factor @ 25% 330 -- --12. Total 1,650220 30013. Cumulative Total 1,870 2,17011. The efficiency factor is space used for corridors, wall thicknesses, etc. and will range from 25%-30% depending on the type and function of the spaceJanuary 2009Section 4.4: Fire Prevention - p.20 Section 5: Public Works Section 5: Public Works Department *Fiscal Year 2009 Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 5: Public Works – p. ii Organizational Structure: The City of Oakland Park’s Public Works Department consists of the following Divisions: • Public Works Administration - Building Maintenance Division - Solid Waste Division - Fleet Maintenance Division • Public Works Operations -Streets / Stormwater Division -Utilities Division (Water / Wastewater) Presently, the two branches of Public Works Administration and Public Works Operations are located at separate facilities within the City, which lack the proximity to each other that is desired to optimize operations and management. A consolidation of Public Works which would co-locate staff and resources at one Public Works Complex is proposed, and is the basis for the organization of the following space needs analysis. Consolidating these divisions at one facility provides for the economies of shared functional areas (crew break room, restrooms and lockers) and facility support (central storage and building services such as mechanical, electrical/IT and emergency generator power). In the following space needs analysis, dedicated functional areas (reception/administrative support, conference rooms, copy/work areas, storage) are accounted for within each division’s area summary, including crew access to computer workstations for report writing functions and communications. These division offices are also supported by the staff and resources accounted for as part of the central Public Works Office. Depending upon the arrangement of office areas within the proposed facility, redundant areas may be further consolidated. This space needs analysis establishes baseline recommended areas, which may be further refined in the schematic design phase of a proposed facility. Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 5: Public Works – p. iii Current inadequacies in existing facilities include the garage (additional bays needed for future fleet expansion), support areas and meeting space for crews (break areas shared with Parks Division at the Municipal Building, inadequate space at the Operations facility), and office area for the management within each division (foreman and crew leader office space is not consistently provided). Site usage at the Municipal Building also currently includes material storage and yard space in use by the Parks Division. The most significant impact upon site area requirements for the Public Works facility are those for maintenance and storage facility area, and yard space for vehicles, equipment and materials, and other covered storage. It is anticipated that the Solid Waste Division will need to expand its fleet to provide sanitation services to the 2005 City annexed area by January 2011. This potential fleet expansion may be of impact to the garage and yard area requirements in the near term. An estimate of the current existing area for “Maintenance/Storage Facility Area” and “Exterior Yard Area” has been tabulated in 2 separate sections (allocated by division), as a baseline starting point from which to establish current needs and future requirements. Maintenance/Storage facility area may include a combination of conditioned and unconditioned facility area, to be factored into the planning for a future facility. Parking requirements are factored into the yard area requirement, and include secured areas for City service vehicles and heavy equipment, in addition to employee and visitor parking per FY’09 staff. Spatial Need: Summarized below are the conclusions of the space needs assessment. Following is the room-by-room, space-by-space assessment of the space needs for the staffing and functions of the Department, assuming the organizational structure of a consolidated facility. Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 5: Public Works – p. iv Public Works Department: Space Needs Summary Table Department Existing Facility Area 2009 (estimated gross square feet)2 Spatial Requirements (in gross square feet) Current Need 2010-14 Future Need1 2020 Future Need1 2030 Public Works Central Office -- 4,625 4,625 4,625 Administration Divisions 5,0002 4,269 4,539 4,809 Operations Divisions 3,5002 4,156 4,286 4,416 Facility Support -- 1,200 3,150 3,900 TOTAL, Facility Area 8,500 14,250 16,600 17,750 Maintenance/Storage Facility Area 9,500 13,740 15,300 16,500 Exterior Areas: Yard and Parking -- 146,300 158,420 160,340 TOTAL, Unconditioned/yard area -- 160,040 173,720 176,840 SUB-TOTAL, Facility Site Area --3 174,290 190,320 194,590 TOTAL, Facility Site Area -- 217,8634 5.00 acres 237,9004 5.46 acres 243,2384 5.58 acres 1. Cumulative totals. 2. Approximate existing area allocated to administrative and crew functions. 3. Public Works currently utilizes 2 sites, each of which has been assessed in this study for its development potential to accommodate the proposed consolidated Public Works Complex. 4. Includes a 25% site utilization efficiency factor (site area allowance for setbacks, right of way, stormwater retention, etc.) ADG Project No. 791-07 Sub-Total, conditioned space 14,250 16,600 17,750 Sub-Total, unconditioned/yardSF SF SF Sub-Total, site area: SF SF SF Effective Site Utilization @25% 43,573 47,580 48,648 Total, site areaSF SF SF5.00acre5.46acre5.58acre4,625NeedVolume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment No. 5.1 Central OfficeFacilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkNeed2030Section 5: Public Works - Department SummarySpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)Current FutureSpace Function2010-14Need2020FutureGeneral Notes 5.55.64,2694,156Maintenance/Storage Facility AreaExterior Area: Yard and ParkingOperations Divisions 5.2 5.3Administration Divisions 5.4 Facility Support 1,200146,30013,7404,625 4,62516,50015,3004,539 4,8094,286 4,4163,9003,150217,863 237,900 243,238190,320 194,590174,290160,340158,420160,040 173,720 176,840January 2009Section 5: Public Works -Department Summary ADG Project No. 791-07 1.1 Lobby / Waiting 160 -- -- 1.2 Reception 60 -- -- 1.3 unisex, ADA1.3 Public Restroom 80 -- --2. private office2. Director 220 -- --3. private office3. Assistant Director: Administration 220 -- --4. private office4. Assistant Director: Operations 220 -- --5. private office5. Administrative Assistant I 160 -- -- 6. open office6.Admin. Technician @140 SF(2)280 -- --7. open office7. Data Processor 120 -- --8. proposed for FY'098. Utility and Billing Manager 120 -- -- 1. Public AccessNeed NeedGeneral Notes No. Space Function2010-14 2020 2030Current Future FutureNeedVolume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 5.1: Public Works Central OfficeSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)January 2009 Section 5.1: Public Works Central Office - p.2 ADG Project No. 791-07 Need NeedGeneral Notes No. Space Function2010-14 2020 2030Current Future FutureNeedVolume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 5.1: Public Works Central OfficeSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet) 9. see sec. 4-5.2 and 4-5.39. Division Managers -- -- -- 10.1 Multi-Purpose Room 600 -- -- 10.2 Equipment Storage 120 -- -- 11.1 Conference Room 180 -- --11.2 Library / Reference Materials 80 -- -- 11.3 Copy/Office Supply 120 -- --11.4 File//Records Area 180 -- --11.5 Computer Networking / Server 100 -- -- 11. Department Resources10. EOC Camp10.1 Public Works Dept. meetings, EOC equippedJanuary 2009 Section 5.1: Public Works Central Office - p.3 ADG Project No. 791-07 Need NeedGeneral Notes No. Space Function2010-14 2020 2030Current Future FutureNeedVolume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 5.1: Public Works Central OfficeSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)12. M/W: (3) fixtures each12. Staff Restrooms @160 SF ea.(2)320 -- -- 13. ADA restroom @120 SF eac.(1)120 -- --14. kitchen w/table14. Break Room 240 -- --15. Sub-Total 3,700 0 016. Efficiency Factor @ 25% 925 -- --17.Total 4,62500 18. Cumulative Total4,625 4,625 16. The efficiency factor is space used for corridors, wall thicknesses, etc. and will range from 25%-30% depending on the type and function of the space.13. unisex, with shower for EOC useJanuary 2009 Section 5.1: Public Works Central Office - p.4 ADG Project No. 791-07 1. see sec. 4-5.1 2.1 Foreman 80 -- -- 2.2 Crew Leader 80 -- --2.3 Open Office Area/Crew Room 200 -- --2.4Maintenance Workers (3)--(1)--(1)-- 2.5 Report Writing @40 SF ea.(1)40 --(1)40 2.6Conditioned Storage Space 200100 100 2.7Building Maint. Sub-Total600 100 140 Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 5.2: Public Works Administration DivisionsSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)1. Assistant Director, AdministrationNeed NeedGeneral Notes No. Space Function2010-14 2020 2030Current Future FutureNeed2. Building Maintenance Division2.1 workstation at open office area 2.2 workstation at open office area 2.5 computer workstation at crew room2.3 work room and crew meeting space, copy/fax, reference library: maint. manuals, documentationJanuary 2009Section 5.2: Public Works Administration Divisions - p.5 ADG Project No. 791-07Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 5.2: Public Works Administration DivisionsSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)Need NeedGeneral Notes No. Space Function2010-14 2020 2030Current Future FutureNeed 3.1 private office3.1 Solid Waste Manager 160 -- -- 3.2 Foreman 80 -- --3.3 Crew Leader @ 80 SF ea.(3)240 -- --3.4 Open Office Area 140 -- --3.5Service Operator (14)--(6)-- --3.6 Report Writing @40 SF ea.(2)80(1)40 -- 3.7Copy/office supply 60-- -- 3.8Conditioned Storage Space160 -- -- 3.9Solid Waste Sub-Total920 40 03. Solid Waste Division3.2 workstation at open office area 3.3 workstation at open office area 3.4 work room and meeting area3.5 will provide services to annex area, effective Jan.20113.6 computer workstations at open office areaJanuary 2009Section 5.2: Public Works Administration Divisions - p.6 ADG Project No. 791-07Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 5.2: Public Works Administration DivisionsSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)Need NeedGeneral Notes No. Space Function2010-14 2020 2030Current Future FutureNeed 4.1 Foreman 80 -- --4.2 Crew Leader 80 -- --4.3 Open Office Area 200 -- -- 4.4Mechanic II (1)-- -- --4.5Mechanic I (2)-- -- --4.6Fleet Assistant (1)-- -- --4.7 Report Writing @40 SF ea.(1)40 -- --4.8Conditioned Storage Space100 -- -- 4.9Fleet Maint. Sub-Total500004.3 work room and crew meeting space, copy/fax, reference library: maint. manuals, documentation4. Fleet Maintenance Division4.1 workstation at open office area 4.2 workstation at open office area 4.7 computer workstations at open office areaJanuary 2009Section 5.2: Public Works Administration Divisions - p.7 ADG Project No. 791-07Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 5.2: Public Works Administration DivisionsSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)Need NeedGeneral Notes No. Space Function2010-14 2020 2030Current Future FutureNeed 5.1 Lockers: Mens @50 SF (6)300(1)100(1)1005.2 Lockers: Womens @50 SF(1)50 -- --5.3 uni-sex/ADA, private5.3 Restroom/Shower @120 SF ea.(1)120 -- -- 5.4 Shower/Changing: Men 220 -- --5.5 (5) fixtures5.5 Restroom: Men 180 -- --5.6Vending & Ice Machines80 -- --5.7 Employee Locker Area @30 SF(4)120(1)30(1)30 5.8 kitchen with seating5.8 Crew Break Room 325 -- -- 5.9Common Areas Sub-Total 1,395 130 130 5. Common Areas5.1 -(4) lockers/50SF, full size, with adjacency to h5.7 -(8) per 30SF, 2-tier lockers, for personal items5.4 -(6) shower stalls, adjacent to lockers5.2 -(4) lockers/50SF, full size, with adjacency to hJanuary 2009Section 5.2: Public Works Administration Divisions - p.8 ADG Project No. 791-07Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 5.2: Public Works Administration DivisionsSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)Need NeedGeneral Notes No. Space Function2010-14 2020 2030Current Future FutureNeed 6. Sub-Total all Divisions 3,415 270 2707. Efficiency Factor @ 25% 854 -- --8.Total 4,269270 270 9. Cumulative Total4,539 4,809 7. The efficiency factor is space used for corridors, wall thicknesses, etc. and will range from 25%-30% depending on the type and function of the space.January 2009Section 5.2: Public Works Administration Divisions - p.9 ADG Project No. 791-07 1. see sec. 4-5.1 2.1 private office2.1 Streets/Stormwater Manager 160 -- --2.2 Open Office Area 200 -- --2.3 Report Writing @40 SF ea.(3)120 -- -- 2.4Conditioned Storage Space 100-- --2.5 Streets Foreman 80 -- -- 2.6 Streets: Equipment Operators(1)-- -- -- 2.7 Streets: Service Workers(4)-- -- --2.8 Stormwater Foreman 80 -- --2.9 Stormwater Crew Leader 80 -- --2.10 Equipment Operator II(3)-- -- --Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 5.3: Public Works Operations DivisionsSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)NeedGeneral Notes No. Space Function2010-14 2020 2030Current Future FutureNeed NeedAssistant Director, OperationsStreets/Stormwater Division2.5 workstation at open office area 2.8 workstation at open office area 2.9 workstation at open office area 2.1.2.2 work room and crew meeting space, copy/fax, reference manuals2.3 computer workstations at open office areaJanuary 2009Section 5.3 Public Works: Operations Divisions - p.10 ADG Project No. 791-07Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 5.3: Public Works Operations DivisionsSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)NeedGeneral Notes No. Space Function2010-14 2020 2030Current Future FutureNeed Need2.11 Utility Tech II(4)-- -- --2.12 Utility Tech I(4)-- -- --2.13Streets/Stormwater Sub-Total 820 0 0 3.1 private office3.1 Utilities Manager 160 -- --3.2 Open Office Area 200 -- --3.3 Report Writing @40 SF ea.(3)120 -- --3.4 Map Room 150 -- -- 3.5Copy/office supply 60-- --3.6Conditioned Storage Space 100-- -- 3. Utilities Division3.2 meeting room, with layout area for document review3.3 computer workstations at open office area3.4 storage and layout space,adjacency to open officeJanuary 2009Section 5.3 Public Works: Operations Divisions - p.11 ADG Project No. 791-07Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 5.3: Public Works Operations DivisionsSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)NeedGeneral Notes No. Space Function2010-14 2020 2030Current Future FutureNeed Need3.7 Water Foreman 80 -- --3.8Water Crew Leader 80-- --3.9 Water Div.3.9Equipment Operator II (1)-- -- --3.10 meter reading functions3.10Utility Tech II (1)-- -- --3.11 meter reading functions3.11Utility Tech I (4)-- -- --3.12Wastewater Foreman 80 -- --3.13Wastewater Crew Leader 80-- --3.15 Wastewater Div.3.15Utility Tech: Ops & Maint. (3)-- -- --3.15 W6astewater Div.3.16Service Workers I (3)-- -- --3.17 Wastewater Div.3.17Equipment Operator (1)-- -- --3.18Utilities Sub-Total 1,110 0 0 3.13 workstation at open office area 3.8 workstation at open office area 3.12 workstation at open office area 3.7 workstation at open office area, SCADA PC systemJanuary 2009Section 5.3 Public Works: Operations Divisions - p.12 ADG Project No. 791-07Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 5.3: Public Works Operations DivisionsSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)NeedGeneral Notes No. Space Function2010-14 2020 2030Current Future FutureNeed Need 4.1 Lockers: Mens @50 SF (6)300(1)100(1)1004.2 Lockers: Womens @50 SF(1)50 -- -- 4.3 uni-sex/ADA, private4.3 Restroom/Showers @120 SF ea.(1)120 -- -- 4.4 Shower/Changing: Men 220 -- -- 4.5 Restroom: Men 180 -- --4.6Vending & Ice Machines80 -- --4.7 Employee Locker Area @30 SF(4)120(1)30(1)30 4.8 kitchen with seating4.8 Crew Break Room 325 -- -- 4.9Common Areas Sub-Total 1,395 130 130Common Areas4.7 -(8) per 30SF, 2-tier lockers, for personal items4.2 -(4) lockers/50SF, full size, with adjacency to h4.4 -(6) shower stalls, adjacent to lockers4.4.1 -(4) lockers/50SF, full size, with adjacency to hJanuary 2009Section 5.3 Public Works: Operations Divisions - p.13 ADG Project No. 791-07Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 5.3: Public Works Operations DivisionsSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)NeedGeneral Notes No. Space Function2010-14 2020 2030Current Future FutureNeed Need 5. Sub-Total all Divisions 3,325 130 1306. Efficiency Factor @ 25% 831 -- --7.Total 4,156130 130 8. Cumulative Total 4,286 4,416 6. The efficiency factor is space used for corridors, wall thicknesses, etc. and will range from 25%-30% depending on the type and function of the space.January 2009Section 5.3 Public Works: Operations Divisions - p.14 ADG Project No. 791-07 1.1 Surplus furniture/equipment -- 600 2001.2 Procurement / Bulk City Storage -- 400 2001.3 Office Supplies -- 200 1001.4Uniform Distribution and Storage-- 200 100 2.1 Mechanical Room @160 SF(2)320 160 --2.2 Electrical Closet 140 -- -- 2.3 IT / Telecom Closet 100 -- --2.4 Janitor Closet @40 SF(2)80 -- --2.5 Generator 320 -- --NeedGeneral Notes No. Space Function2010-14 2020 2030Current Future2.5 may be at exterior area, in separate building.Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 5.4: Public Works Facility SupportSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)FutureNeed2. Building ServicesNeed1. Central Storage1.2 with workstation for shipping/receiving functionJanuary 2009 Section 5.4: Public Works Facility Support - p.15 ADG Project No. 791-07NeedGeneral Notes No. Space Function2010-14 2020 2030Current FutureVolume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 5.4: Public Works Facility SupportSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)FutureNeed Need 3. Sub-Total 960 1,560 6004. Efficiency Factor @ 25% 240 390 1505.Total 1,2001,950 750 6. Cumulative Total3,150 3,900 4. The efficiency factor is space used for corridors, wall thicknesses, etc. and will range from 25%-30% depending on the type and function of the space.January 2009 Section 5.4: Public Works Facility Support - p.16 ADG Project No. 791-07 1.1 repair and maintenance1.1 HVAC Maintenance 300 -- 200 1.2 parts / equipment storage1.2 HVAC Storage 240 -- 1001.3 Cabinet Shop 500 -- --1.4 material/tool storage1.4 Cabinet Shop Storage 200 -- 2001.5 Paint/Sign Shop and Storage 400 -- -- 1.6 Key Shop 40 -- --1.7 Maintenance Supplies 200 -- 100 1.8Building Maint. Sub-Total 1,880 0 600Need2030Current Future FutureNeed Need2010-14 2020Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 5.5: Public Works - Maintenance/Storage Facility AreaSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)1.3 repair/maintenanceworkshopVolume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment General Notes No. Space Function1. Building Maintenance Division1.7 cleaning supplies, paper goodsJanuary 2009 Section 5.5: Public Works - Maintenance/Storage Facility Area - p.17 ADG Project No. 791-07Need2030Current Future FutureNeed Need2010-14 2020Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 5.5: Public Works - Maintenance/Storage Facility AreaSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment General Notes No. Space Function 2.1Tools Storage180 -- --2.2Misc. Equipment Storage300 100 --2.3Solid Waste Sub-Total480 100 0 3.1Garage/Maintenance Bays (4)3,600(1)900 --900 SF per Bay (20' x 45') 3.2 Parts Storage Room 600 200 --3.3 Tool Distribution Room 240 -- -- 3.4 Welding & Fabrication Shop -- -- --2.3. Fleet Maintenance DivisionSolid Waste Division 3.4 to be outsourced, need facility per OSHA standards January 2009 Section 5.5: Public Works - Maintenance/Storage Facility Area - p.18 ADG Project No. 791-07Need2030Current Future FutureNeed Need2010-14 2020Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 5.5: Public Works - Maintenance/Storage Facility AreaSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment General Notes No. Space Function3.5 Small Engine Repair Room 200 -- --3.6 Paint Equipment Storage 240 160 --3.7 Lubricant Storage 360 -- -- 3.8 Waste Oil Storage 200 -- --3.9 Compressor Room 240 -- --3.10Tire Shop800 -- --3.11New Tire Storage400 200 --3.12Storage Room400 -- --3.13Battery Room320 -- -- 3.15Fleet Maint. Sub-Total7,600 1,460 0January 2009 Section 5.5: Public Works - Maintenance/Storage Facility Area - p.19 ADG Project No. 791-07Need2030Current Future FutureNeed Need2010-14 2020Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 5.5: Public Works - Maintenance/Storage Facility AreaSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment General Notes No. Space Function 4.1Storage Area for Equipment, 1,200 -- 400Tools and Lumber 4.2 Locked Storage (equipment) 600 -- --4.3 Paint shop/storage 400 -- -- 4.4 Sign Shop/Storage 400 -- --4.5Streets/Stormwater Sub-Total 2,600 0 400 5.1Meter Repair Shop / Parts 400-- --5.2 Meter Equipment Storage 280 -- --5.3Equipment Storage200 -- 200Streets / Stormwater Division4.5. Utilities Division January 2009 Section 5.5: Public Works - Maintenance/Storage Facility Area - p.20 ADG Project No. 791-07Need2030Current Future FutureNeed Need2010-14 2020Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 5.5: Public Works - Maintenance/Storage Facility AreaSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment General Notes No. Space Function 5.4 plumbing parts (copper)5.4Secure Storage300 -- --5.5Utilities Sub-Total1,180 0 200 6.Total 13,740 1,560 1,200 7. Cumulative Total 15,300 16,500 January 2009 Section 5.5: Public Works - Maintenance/Storage Facility Area - p.21 ADG Project No. 791-07 1.1 Miscellaneous Storage 600 -- --1.2Building Maint. Sub-Total 600 0 0 2.1 Dumpster Bin Storage 15,000 -- --2.2 included in yard area total2.2 Tire Storage -- -- -- 2.3 "White Goods" Storage -- -- --2.4 Truck parking / Yard 42,000 7,000 --2.5Solid Waste Sub-Total 57,000 7,000 0Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 5.6: Public Works - Yard and ParkingSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)Need Need1. Building MaintenanceGeneral Notes No. Space Function2010-14Need2020 2030Current Future Future2.1 estimated existing area, at PW Operations yard2.4 estimated existing area at Municipal yard, additional sanitation services to be provided to annexed area in Jan.20112.3 abandoned appliances and misc. equipment, included in yard area total2. Solid Waste DivisionJanuary 2009Section 5.6: Public Works - Yard and Parking - p.22 ADG Project No. 791-07Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 5.6: Public Works - Yard and ParkingSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)Need NeedGeneral Notes No. Space Function2010-14Need2020 2030Current Future Future 3.1Service Vehicle Parking / Yard 10,000 -- --3.2Vehicle Wash -- -- -- 3.3 Fueling Station 4,000 3,200 --3.4 included in yard area total3.4 Tire Storage -- -- --3.5Fleet Maint. Sub-Total 14,000 3,200 0 4.1 Materials Storage / Yard 36,000 -- -- 4.2 included in yard area total4.2Service Equipment Parking-- -- --4.3Streets/Stormwater Sub-Total 36,000 0 03.3 upgrade underground tanks in 2014, estimated area3.2 included in yard area, need oil/water separator3.1 estimated existing area at Municipal Services yard3. Fleet Maintenance Division4. Streets / Stormwater4.1 gravel /sand, exterior container storage, estimated existing area at PW Operations yardJanuary 2009Section 5.6: Public Works - Yard and Parking - p.23 ADG Project No. 791-07Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 5.6: Public Works - Yard and ParkingSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)Need NeedGeneral Notes No. Space Function2010-14Need2020 2030Current Future Future 5.1Materials Storage / Yard11,500 -- --5.2 included in yard area total5.2Service Equipment Parking-- -- --5.3Utilities Sub-Total11,500 0 0 6.Employee Parking @320 SF (75)24,000(3)960(3)9607.Visitor Parking @320 SF (10)3,200 -- 960 8.TotalSF12,120SF1,920SF 9. Cumulative TotalSF SF SF3.36acre3.64acre3.68acre146,300158,420 160,340146,3005.1 estimated existing area at PW Operations yard5. Utilities7. 9x18 stall + circulation (factors in ADA required)6. 9x18 stall + circulation (factors in ADA required)January 2009Section 5.6: Public Works - Yard and Parking - p.24 Section 6: Parks and Leisure Services Section 6: Parks and Leisure Services Department *Fiscal Year 2009 Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 6: Parks & Leisure Services – p. ii Organizational Structure: The City of Oakland Park’s Parks and Leisure Services Department consists of the following Divisions: • Parks and Leisure Services Administration • Parks Division • Library Division The department’s main administrative offices are presently located at City Hall, and include all administration for the department, including that for the Parks Division (Landscape/Horticulturists). However, maintenance operations for the Parks Division are located at the Public Works Municipal Services facility, where a trailer provides office space for the Parks Superintendant and Crew, and yard space and crew support areas are shared with Public Works. A need has been identified for the Parks Division administration and maintenance to be centralized within its own facility, to provide more effective management and oversight of daily operations and staff. Managerial staff has previously been combined in one office area, compromising the private office space that is needed for crew supervisory functions. Meeting space and restroom/locker areas are also needed for the maintenance crews, which currently share these spaces with Public Works. Landscape review services require adequate plan layout space, reference material storage, and accessory areas for daily operations (now more appropriately accommodated at City Hall offices). Parks Division also requires significant site area for material storage and equipment. As a baseline starting point, existing area for Parks Division use at the Public Works yard is estimated at approximately 7,500 square feet, consisting of service vehicle parking, exterior material storage, open bays for covered material storage and tools (2,200 square feet), and a Park Foreman office. In response to these identified needs, the analysis that follows accounts for the area required to support Parks and Leisure Administration and Parks Division in separate facilities, potentially co-located on the same site. A space needs analysis for the City library, which operates as a division within Parks & Leisure Services, is excluded from the scope of this study. Spatial Need: Summarized below are the conclusions of the space needs assessment. Following is the room-by-room, space-by-space assessment of the spatial needs for the staffing and functions of the Department, based upon the provision to accommodate Parks & Leisure Administration and Parks Division in separate facilities. Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No. 791-07 Final Report – February 17, 2010 Section 6: Parks & Leisure Services – p. iii Parks and Leisure Services Department: Space Needs Summary Table Department Existing Facility Area 2009 (estimated gross square feet) Spatial Requirements (in gross square feet) Current Need 2010-14 Future Need1 2020 Future Need1 2030 Parks and Leisure Administration 4,5002 5,708 5,972 6,500 Exterior Area: Parking -- 14,400 15,680 17,280 TOTAL: Parks and Leisure -- 25,1345 27,0645 29,7245 Facility Site Area 1.40 acres3 .58 acres .62 acres .68 acres Parks Division Administration --2 4,349 4,429 4,749 Unconditioned Facility Area 1,5004 2,120 2,120 3,540 Exterior Areas: Yard and Parking 10,0004 19,600 19,600 25,360 TOTAL: Parks Division 11,500 32,5865 32,6865 42,0615 Facility Site Area .26 acres .75 acres .75 acres .97 acres 1. Cumulative totals 2. Existing Parks Division administration area included in existing area total for Parks and Leisure administration. 3. Estimated site area at Collins, includes parking and recreational site activities. 4. Estimated existing area allocated for Parks Division at the Municipal Services site. 5. Includes a 25% site utilization efficiency factor. ADG Project No. 791-07Sub-Total, site area: 20,108 21,652 23,780 Effective Site Utilization @25% 5,027 5,413 5,945 Total, P&L site area:SF SF SF 0.58acre0.62acre0.68acreSub-Total, site area: Effective Site Utilization @25% 6,517 6,537 8,412 Total, Parks site area:SF SF SF 0.75acre0.75acre0.97acre 25,134 27,064 29,72432,58626,069 26,14932,686 42,06133,64925,3603,5404,7496,50017,2805,97215,680Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Section 6: Parks and Leisure Services - Department SummaryGeneral Notes20205,70814,400 6.1 Parks & Leisure: Administration Parks & Leisure: Parking Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkNo. Space Function2010-14Space DesignationNeedFutureNeedSpace Requirements (square feet)Current FutureNeed2030 6.3Parks Division: Unconditioned Facility Area 2,120 2,120 6.4 Parks Division: Yard/Parking 19,600 19,600 6.2 Parks Division: Administration 4,349 4,429January 2009Section 6: Parks and Leisure Services - Department Summary ADG Project No. 791-071.1 Lobby 150 -- --1.2 Reception / Waiting Area 160 -- --1.3 ADA, 1 each (M&W)1.3 Public Restrooms @80 SF ea.(2)160 -- -- 2.1 Director's Office 220 -- --2.2 Administrative Specialist 120 -- --2.3 Office Specialist (part-time) 120 -- --2.4 Assistant Director 160 -- --2.5 Office Specialist 100 -- 100 2.6 Community Center Manager 120 -- --Administrative Offices1.2 reception staffed by Admin. Secretary1.1 information kiosks, help-desk/registration 2.Current Future Future2020 2030General NotesSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 6.1: Parks and Leisure AdministrationNeedNeed1. Public AccessNeedNo. Space Function2010-14January 2009Section 6.1: Parks and Leisure Administration - p.2 ADG Project No. 791-07Current Future Future2020 2030General NotesSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 6.1: Parks and Leisure AdministrationNeedNeed NeedNo. Space Function2010-142.7 Tennis Manager(1 FT)120 -- -- 3.1 full-time, cubicles3.1 Park Rangers @64 SF ea.(2 FT)128 --(1 FT)64 3.2 part-time, share cubicle3.2 Park Rangers @64 SF ea.(2 PT)64(2 PT)64(2 PT)64 3.3 open office3.3 (4)400(1)100(1)100 3.4 open office3.4 (2)100(1)100(1)100 3.5 Recreation Leaders (1 FT)64 -- -- 3.6 Summer Recreation Aides -- -- --4. Multi-Purpose Meeting Room 800 -- --Recreation Coordinator @100 SF eachRecreation Specialist@100 SF each3.5 located at various rec facilities: 10 PT (2009)3.6 located at various rec facilities: 24 PT (2009)3. Recreation Programs2.7 1 full-time, 2 part-time located at Tennis facility4. for meetings of recreation coordinators and leaders, also with public access from lobby for community use January 2009Section 6.1: Parks and Leisure Administration - p.3 ADG Project No. 791-07Current Future Future2020 2030General NotesSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 6.1: Parks and Leisure AdministrationNeedNeed NeedNo. Space Function2010-145. Equipment Storage 200 -- 1006. Conference Room 180 -- --7. Copy/Office Supply work room 120 -- --8. Record File Storage 100 -- --9.1 Kitchen/Break Room 240 -- --9.2 Staff Restrooms @160 SF ea.(2)320 -- --9.3 Mechanical Equipment 180 -- --9.4 Electrical Room 100 -- --9.5 IT Room 80 -- --9.6 Janitor / Maintenance Closet 60 -- -- Facility Support5. A/V equipment and other materials, adjacency to multi-purpose meeting room9.2 ADA, (3) fixtures each (men and women)9.January 2009Section 6.1: Parks and Leisure Administration - p.4 ADG Project No. 791-07Current Future Future2020 2030General NotesSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 6.1: Parks and Leisure AdministrationNeedNeed NeedNo. Space Function2010-1410. Sub-Total 4,566 264 528 11. Efficiency Factor @ 25%1,142 -- --12. Total 5,708264 528 13. Cumulative Total5,972 6,50014.1Employee Parking @320 SF (34)10,880(4)1,280(5)1,60014.2Visitor Parking @320 SF (11)3,520 -- --14.3Total 14,4001,280 1,60014.4 Cumulative Total 15,680 17,28014.2 per LDC: 1/200 SF for office, 1/100 SF for public assembly11. The efficiency factor is space used for corridors, wall thicknesses, etc. and will range from 25%-30% depending on the type and function of the space.14. Parking14. -9x18 stall + circulation (factors in ADA parking)14.1 -(18) staffed positions, with overflow for (34) Rec Leaders/AidesJanuary 2009Section 6.1: Parks and Leisure Administration - p.5 ADG Project No. 791-071.1Lobby/Reception60 -- -- 1.2 Superintendant's Office 160 -- --1.3 with plan layout desk1.3 Horticulturalist I 140 -- --1.4 with plan layout desk1.4 Horticulturalist II 140 -- --1.5 Conference/Reference Library 200 -- --1.6 Record Files Storage 80 40 401.7 Copy/Office Supply 64 -- --1.8 Mini Break Area 60 -- --1.9 uni-sex, ADA1.9 Staff restroom @80 SF ea.(1)80 -- --1.5 also to serve for landscape plan review FutureNeed NeedGeneral Notes No. Space Function2010-14Need2020 20301. Administrative Offices1.2 private office with spacefor one-on-one meetingsCurrent FutureVolume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 6.2: Parks Division AdministrationSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)January 2009Section 6.2: Parks Division Administration - p.6 ADG Project No. 791-07FutureNeed NeedGeneral Notes No. Space Function2010-14Need2020 2030Current FutureVolume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 6.2: Parks Division AdministrationSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)2.1 Parks Forman's Office 140 -- --2.2 Crew Leader's Office @120 SF (3)360 --(1)120 2.3 Crew Muster 325 -- -- 2.4 Report Writing @40 SF ea.(3)120(1)40(1)402.5 Copy/Record File Storage 80 -- 602.6 Break area 60 -- -- 2.7 Ice Machine/Vending 80 -- --2.8 (4) lockers/50 SF module2.8 Lockers: Mens @50 SF (5)250 --(2)602.9 (4) lockers/50 SF module2.9 Lockers: Womens @50 SF(2)100 -- --2.10 Restroom/Showers @120 SF ea.(3)360 -- --2.11 (4) fixtures2.11 Restroom: mens 220 -- -- 2.10 uni-sex, private bath with toilet/sink/shower, provide 1 ADA compliant2.3 meeting space for 20 field tech /crew2.4 shared computer workstations for crew2. Maintenance Office2.2 private office needed for evaluations/disciplinarymeetings with crew2.6 coffee/microwave/refrig.,at crew muster spaceJanuary 2009Section 6.2: Parks Division Administration - p.7 ADG Project No. 791-07FutureNeed NeedGeneral Notes No. Space Function2010-14Need2020 2030Current FutureVolume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 6.2: Parks Division AdministrationSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)3.1 HVAC Equipment 1803.2 Electrical Closet 1003.3 IT Closet 603.4 Janitor/Maintenance Storage 60 4. Sub-Total 3,479 80 320 5. Efficiency Factor @ 25%870 -- --6. Total 4,34980 320 7. Cumulative Total4,429 4,749 3. Facility SupportJanuary 2009Section 6.2: Parks Division Administration - p.8 ADG Project No. 791-07 1.Central Storage Bay @14'x50' 700 -- 700 2.Workshop240 -- 160 3. maintenance equipment3. Tool/Equipment Storage 300 -- 804. fertilizers, other4. Flammable Storage 80 -- 80 5. Covered Material Storage800--400 6. Total 2,120 0 1,420 7. Cumulative Total2,120 3,540 1. recreation equipment, including special events trailer5. landscape material, non-combustible fertilizersNeed NeedVolume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 6.3: Parks Division - Unconditioned Facility AreaSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)2030Current2010-14General Notes No. Space Function2020Future FutureNeedJanuary 2009Section 6.3: Parks Division - Unconditioned Facility Area - p.9 ADG Project No. 791-071. Landscaping Materials 1,000 -- -- 2. Equipment 1,000 -- --3. 12x18 stall + circulation3. Department Vehicles @400 SF(20)8,000 --(8)3,2004.Employee Parking @320 SF (27)8,640 --(8)2,5605.Visitor Parking @320 SF (3)960 -- -- 6.TotalSF SF SF 7. Cumulative TotalSF SF SF0.45acre0.45acre0.58acre 25,36019,60019,60019,600 5,7600Volume II: Citywide Spatial Needs Assessment Facilities Master PlanCity of Oakland ParkSection 6.4: Parks Division - Yard and ParkingSpace Designation Space Requirements (square feet)2010-14 2020Need2030Current Future FutureNeed Need5. 9x18 stall + circulation (factors in ADA parking)4. 9x18 stall + circulation (factors in ADA parking)General Notes No. Space FunctionJanuary 2009Section 6.4: Parks Division - Yard and Parking - p.10 Appendix A: Space Needs Standards Appendix A: Space Needs Standards January 2009 Appendix A - p. 1 Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No : 791-07 Appendix A: Space Needs Standards January 2009 Appendix A - p. 2 Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No : 791-07 Appendix A: Space Needs Standards January 2009 Appendix A - p. 3 Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No : 791-07 Appendix A: Space Needs Standards January 2009 Appendix A - p. 4 Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No : 791-07 Appendix A: Space Needs Standards January 2009 Appendix A - p. 5 Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No : 791-07 Appendix A: Space Needs Standards January 2009 Appendix A - p. 6 Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No : 791-07 Appendix A: Space Needs Standards January 2009 Appendix A - p. 7 Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No : 791-07 Appendix A: Space Needs Standards January 2009 Appendix A - p. 8 Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No : 791-07 Appendix A: Space Needs Standards January 2009 Appendix A - p. 9 Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No : 791-07 Appendix A: Space Needs Standards January 2009 Appendix A - p. 10 Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No : 791-07 Appendix A: Space Needs Standards January 2009 Appendix A - p. 11 Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No : 791-07 Appendix A: Space Needs Standards January 2009 Appendix A - p. 12 Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No : 791-07 Appendix A: Space Needs Standards January 2009 Appendix A - p. 13 Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No : 791-07 180 SF 12’-0” x 15’-0” 15’-0” 12’-0” Appendix A: Space Needs Standards January 2009 Appendix A - p. 14 Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No : 791-07 Appendix A: Space Needs Standards January 2009 Appendix A - p. 15 Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No : 791-07 Appendix A: Space Needs Standards January 2009 Appendix A - p. 16 Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No : 791-07 Appendix A: Space Needs Standards January 2009 Appendix A - p. 17 Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No : 791-07 Appendix A: Space Needs Standards January 2009 Appendix A - p. 18 Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No : 791-07 Appendix A: Space Needs Standards January 2009 Appendix A - p. 19 Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No : 791-07 Appendix A: Space Needs Standards January 2009 Appendix A - p. 20 Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No : 791-07 Appendix A: Space Needs Standards January 2009 Appendix A - p. 21 Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No : 791-07 Appendix A: Space Needs Standards January 2009 Appendix A - p. 22 Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No : 791-07 Appendix A: Space Needs Standards January 2009 Appendix A - p. 23 Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No : 791-07 Appendix A: Space Needs Standards January 2009 Appendix A - p. 24 Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No : 791-07 Appendix A: Space Needs Standards January 2009 Appendix A - p. 25 Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No : 791-07 Appendix A: Space Needs Standards January 2009 Appendix A - p. 26 Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No : 791-07 Appendix A: Space Needs Standards January 2009 Appendix A - p. 27 Facilities Master Plan: Volume II City of Oakland Park ADG Project No : 791-07