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2007 Comprehensive Plan Volume 22007 Comprehensive Plan Adopted December 12, 2007 Revised February 2009 Volume II: Support Documents Mayor Larry Gierer Vice Mayor Layne Dallett Walls Commissioner Allegra Webb Murphy Commissioner Steven Arnst Commissioner Suzanne Boisvenue Prepared by: The Development Services Staff with assistance from CITY OF OAKLAND PARK FLORIDA 2007 Comprehensive Plan Originally Adopted December 12, 2007 Revised February 2009 TOC-1 Table of Contents Volume II – Support Documents Section Title Introduction 1 Future Land Use 2 Transportation 3 Housing 4 Sanitary Sewer, Solid Waste, Drainage, Potable Water and Natural Groundwater Aquifer Recharge (Infrastructure) 5 Coastal Management 6 Conservation 7 Recreation and Open Space 8 Intergovernmental Coordination 9 Capital Improvements 10 Public School Facilities Volume II – Table of Tables Table 1-1 - Population Trends in Oakland Park, Adjacent Cities and Broward County (1960-2006) ........................................................................ 1-2 Table 1-3 – Sample of Existing FARs for Non-Residential Uses ............................................... 1-5 Table 1-4 – Properties on Florida Master Site File .................................................................... 1-9 Table 1-5 - City of Oakland Park Population Projections (Five Year Increments to 2030) ...... 1-12 Table 1-6 - Potable Water Service Areas, 2007 ...................................................................... 1-14 Table 1-7 - Projected Water Supply LOS Demand .................................................................. 1-15 Table 1-8 - Wastewater Treatment Service Areas, 2007 ......................................................... 1-16 Table 1-9 - Wastewater LOS Demand, 2015 and 2030 ........................................................... 1-17 Table 1-10 - Solid Waste LOS Demand, 2015 and 2030 ......................................................... 1-18 Table 1-11 - Future Land Use Designations for Existing Vacant Parcels, 2007 ...................... 1-20 Table 2-1- Existing Functional Classification, 2007 ................................................................... 2-2 Table 2-2 – Roadway Functional Classification, Right-of-Way, Number of Lanes, and Maintenance Responsibilities, 2007 ............................................................................... 2-4 Table 2-3 – Roadway System 2004 Traffic Volumes and Levels of Service.............................. 2-6 Table 2-4 – Broward County Transit Routes, 2007 .................................................................... 2-8 Table 2-5 – Mode of Travel to Work, 2000 .............................................................................. 2-11 Table 2-6 – Roadway System 2030 Traffic Volumes and Levels of Service............................ 2-17 Table 3-1 – Number of Units by Type, 2000 .............................................................................. 3-1 Table 3-2 – Percentage of Units by Type, 2000 ........................................................................ 3-1 Table 3-3 - Units by Type, Detailed, 2000 ................................................................................. 3-2 Table 3-4 - Tenure of Units, 2000 .............................................................................................. 3-2 Table 3-5 - Number of Dwelling Units by Year Built, 2000 ......................................................... 3-2 Table 3-6 - Percentage of Dwelling Units by Decade Built, 2000 .............................................. 3-3 Table 3-7 - Units by Vacancy and Occupancy Status, 2000 ...................................................... 3-3 Table 3-8 - Gross Rent, 2000 .................................................................................................... 3-4 Table 3-9 - Values of Owner-Occupied Units, 2000 .................................................................. 3-4 Table of Contents (continued) TOC-2 Table 3-10 - Monthly Costs of Owner-Occupied Units, 2000 ..................................................... 3-5 Table 3-11 - Renter Household Income Spent on Housing, 2000 ............................................. 3-6 Table 3-12 - Owner Household Income Spent on Housing, 2000 ............................................. 3-6 Table 3-13 - Housing Conditions, 2000 ..................................................................................... 3-7 Table 3-14 - Group Homes, 2007 .............................................................................................. 3-8 Table 3-15 - Net Number of Units Receiving Certificates of Occupancy (1999-2005) ............... 3-8 Table 3-16 - City of Oakland Park Population Projections 2010 to 2030 ................................... 3-9 Table 3-17 - Projected Housing Needs 2005 to 2025 .............................................................. 3-10 Table 3-18 - Affordable Housing Needs for Oakland Park 2005-2025 .................................... 3-12 Table 3-19 - Construction Need by Income as a Percentage of AMI 2005-2025 .................... 3-13 Table 3-20 - Projected Housing Needs 2005 to 2025 - Households by Household Size ......... 3-14 Table 3-21 - Projected Housing Needs 2005 to 2025 - Households by Household Type, Total ................................................................................................................... 3-14  Table 3-22 - Projected Housing Needs 2005 to 2025 - Households by Household Type, Construction Need ....................................................................................................... 3-15 Table 3-23 - Projected Housing Needs 2005 to 2025 - Households by Tenure, Total............. 3-15 Table 3-24 - Projected Housing Needs 2005 to 2025 - Households by Tenure, Net ............... 3-15 Table 3-25 - 1995 Estimation of Migrant Workers and Migrant Worker Housing – Broward County .......................................................................................... 3-15 Table 3-26 – Proposed CRA Land Use Changes and Potential New Units, 2007 ................... 3-17 Table 4-1 - Sanitary Sewer Service Areas, 2007 ....................................................................... 4-2 Table 4-2 – Existing Land Uses Within the Fort Lauderdale Service Area, 2007 ...................... 4-3 Table 4-3 – Existing Land Uses Within the Broward County Service Area, 2007 ...................... 4-5 Table 4-4 – Existing Land Uses Within Unserved Areas of the City, 2007 ................................ 4-6 Table 4-5 - Projected Wastewater Flow Demand City-Wide & By Service Area, 2015 & 2030 ................................................................... 4-8 Table 4-6 – Existing Land Uses Within Oakland Park Service Area, 2007 ................................ 4-9 Table 4-7 – Projected Solid Waste Demand, 2015 and 2030 .................................................. 4-10 Table 4-8 – Existing Land Uses Within the Oakland Park Service Area, 2007 ........................ 4-12 Table 4-9 – Proposed Drainage Improvements, 2007 ............................................................. 4-15 Table 4-10 - Future Land Uses within all Potable Water Supply Service Areas, 2007 ............ 4-18 Table 4-11 - Wholesale Water Purchased from Fort Lauderdale by Oakland Park ................. 4-19 Table 4-12 - Projected Potable Water Supply Demand ........................................................... 4-22 Table 6-1 - Water Quality Trends (1998 to 2003) ...................................................................... 6-5 Table 6-2 - Local Bird Species ................................................................................................. 6-14 Table 6-3 - Endangered and Threatened Species, 2007 ......................................................... 6-15 Table 7-1 - City-Owned Park Facilities, 2007 ............................................................................ 7-5 Table 7-2 - Listing of Recreation Facilities Available to Oakland Park Residents, 2007............ 7-6 Table 7-3 - 2006, 2015, and 2030 Local Park Acreage Need/Demand and Deficiencies/ (Surplus) Based on Local Park Acreage Standards in the Broward County Land Use Plan .............................................................................................................. 7-15 Table 7-4 – Neighborhood Park Impact Fee Analysis for 2006, 2015 and 2030 ..................... 7-16 Table 8-1 - Intergovernmental Coordination Matrix, 2007 ......................................................... 8-2 Table 8-2 - Oakland Park Special Taxing Districts .................................................................. 8-12 Table 8-3 - Intergovernmental Coordination Needs, 2007 ....................................................... 8-15 Table 10-1: Summary of Enrollment Projections ..................................................................... 10-6 Table 10-2: Charter Schools Serving Elementary, Middle and High School Students .......... 10-10 Table 10-3: Population Broward County 1970-2015 ............................................................. 10-12 Table 10-4: School Age Population Broward County, 1970-2015 ........................................ 10-13 Table of Contents (continued) TOC-3 Table 10-5: Housing Characteristics Broward County, 1970-2005 ....................................... 10-14 Table 10-6: Residential Building Permits Issued by Type 2005-2015 .................................. 10-14 Table 10-7: Summary Profile of School Capacity ................................................................. 10-15 Table 10-8: Age of School Facility Buildings .......................................................................... 10-15 Table 10-9: Current Profile- Broward County Elementary Schools 2006/2007 ...................... 10-18 Table 10-10: Current Profile - Broward County Middle Schools 2006/2007 .......................... 10-23 Table 10-11: Current Profile - Broward County High Schools 2006/2007 ............................. 10-25 Table 10-12: Current Profile – Broward County Charter Schools 2006/ 2007 ....................... 10-26 Table 10-13: Current Profile - Broward County Special Schools 2006/2007 ......................... 10-29 Table 10-14: Ancillary Facility Inventory ............................................................................... 10-30 Table 10-15: Land Area Requirements ................................................................................. 10-32 Table 10-16: Projected 10 Year School Facilities by Planning Area and District-Wide ........ 10-35 Table 10-17: Analysis of Planning Area / Seat Availability .................................................... 10-36 Table 10-18: List of Emergency Shelters ............................................................................... 10-39 Table 10-19: Estimated Revenue and Financing Sources (stated in thousands) .................. 10-40 Table 10-20: Estimated Appropriations (stated in thousands) ............................................... 10-40 Table 10-21: Estimated Expenditures - Debt Service/Capacity ............................................ 10-42 Volume II – Exhibits Exhibit 1 Oakland Park Water Supply Facilities Work Plan City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan Volume II – Support Document Adopted December 12, 2007 Revised February 2009 Prepared By: Engineering and Community Development Department - Planning & Zoning Division Staff With assistance from:  General The Local Government Comprehensive Planning Act of 1975 (LGCPA) requires each governmental jurisdiction to prepare and adopt a comprehensive plan. Significant revisions to the LGCPA in 1985 and 1986 (known as the Growth Management Act) have added additional requirements for a more detailed and systematic approach to local planning. In addition to State Acts, the State of Florida Department of Community Affairs issued minimum criteria for plan compliance in Rule 9J-5 of the Florida Administrative Code. Additional modifications to State requirements were introduced in 2005 through Senate Bill 360. The Comprehensive Plan for the City of Oakland Park has been prepared relative to the State Growth Management Act and Rule 9J-5, as revised. It is designed to provide a guide for the future physical, economic, and social development of the City of Oakland Park. The City’s short- term planning horizon is 2012, and typically 2015 information is used because population projections are available in five-year increments. The long-term planning horizon for the City’s Comprehensive Plan is 2030. In 2008, the City adopted a Water Supply Facilities Work Plan (Exhibit 1) and in accordance with state law, portions of this Work Plan have been incorporated into the Comprehensive Plan. Affected sections include the Future Land Use, Infrastructure, Conservation, Coastal Management, Capital Improvements and Intergovernmental Coordination Elements. To be consistent with the WSFWP, information for the years 2013 and 2018 information was included, as appropriate. Plan Content and Format The Comprehensive Plan has been prepared in three volumes. The first volume is proposed to be adopted by the City Commission. Volume I consists of goals, objectives and policies of the City’s Comprehensive Plan, plus sections on Land Use Implementation, and Monitoring and Evaluation. The second volume of the Comprehensive Plan, Volume II, contains the supporting documentation. This volume is not proposed to be adopted by the City Commission. This document contains all of the Elements required by Rule 9J-5. Volume III consists of a series of maps divided into two sections. The first section consists of maps proposed to be adopted by the City Commission, such as the Future Land Use Map. The second portion of Volume III consists of maps for support purposes, used to illustrate information described in Volume II.  1 Future Land Use Element City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan City of Oakland Park Future Land Use Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 1-1 City Profile History The turbulent 1920’s in Oakland Park reflected national events. The early part of the decade was characterized by optimism, while the end of the decade brought troubled economic times, which would not disappear until after World War II. In the early 1920’s, the United States was enjoying economic growth and buyers from the north invested in Florida property. Many large tracts of land were subdivided. The initial subdivision of what is now the City of Oakland Park occurred in 1922 and lot sales commenced immediately. The subdivision was named Oakland Park after a large strand of oak trees along the Middle River. The City of Oakland Park was formally incorporated under the name of “Floranada” in 1925 and in 1929 the name of the City was changed to Oakland Park. The atmosphere of speculation in South Florida land collapsed for several months in 1926 due to a devastating hurricane that ripped through Dade and Broward Counties killing several persons and causing millions of dollars of property damage. Land sales resumed at a very slow rate because the region did not rebuild quickly. Potential buyers expressed caution. The stock market crash of 1929 further distressed the already weak real estate market. The City of Oakland Park grew little in the next 15 years. The end of World War II brought economic relief and population growth to South Florida. At the close of the war, Oakland Park was one of eight Broward County municipalities that contributed to the county-wide population of 84,000. Between 1945 and 1960, population in Broward County increased by 250,000 persons. In 1960, Oakland Park had grown to a city of 5,000 residents and 2,000 dwelling units. Growth in the City had mainly been in the form of single family detached residences occupied by retirees and veterans. The City experienced more rapid growth during the 1960’s than Broward County as a whole. Oakland Park’s population increased during the decade by more than 200 percent. Population growth has moderated since. During the 1970’s, the population increased by 41 percent and in the 1980’s and 1990’s growth remained at 15 and 18 percent, respectively. Broward County had large growth rates in these three decades and growth in the western areas continued. Table 1-1 illustrates population trends. The City’s population has increased approximately 41 percent from 2000 to 2006, primarily due to annexations that occurred in 2006. Countywide growth was a moderate nine percent. City of Oakland Park Future Land Use Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 1-2 Table 1-1 - Population Trends in Oakland Park, Adjacent Cities and Broward County (1960-2006) 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2006 Oakland Park 5,331 16,261 22,944 26,326 30,966 43,729 205% 41% 15% 18% 41% Broward County 333,946 620,100 1,018,257 1,255,531 1,623,018 1,771,714 86% 64% 23% 29% 9% Fort Lauderdale 83,648 139,590 67% 153,279 9.8% 149,238 -2.6% 152,397 2.1% 178,642 17% Lauderdale Lakes -- 10,577 25,246 139% 27,341 8.3% 31,705 16% 32,097 1.2% Wilton Manors 8,257 10,948 33% 12,742 16% 11,804 -7.4% 12,697 7.6% 12,573 -1.0% Tamarac -- 5,078 29,376 479% 44,822 53% 55,588 24% 58,504 5.2% Pompano Beach -- -- -- -- 78,191 102,731 31% Sources: 1995 City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, 2000 Census, Broward County Population Forecasting Model (as revised, February 9, 2007). Profile The City is located in the center of eastern Broward County, in South Florida (see Figure S1, in Volume III, the Map Series), and occupies 8.04 square miles of land area. The major transportation facilities within the City include Interstate 95, Dixie Highway/State Road 811, Commercial Boulevard, Oakland Park Boulevard, Andrews Avenue, the Florida East Coast Railway, and the South Florida Rail Corridor. The City is adjacent to the Cities of Fort Lauderdale, Pompano Beach, Tamarac, Lauderdale Lakes, and Wilton Manors, and unincorporated Broward County. The City is primarily a residential community and has an overall density of 5,303 persons per square mile. Residential uses occupy 39.9 percent of the land in the City, commercial uses occupy 9.9 percent; and industrial occupies 4.9 percent. The remaining 45.3 percent of the City consists of local activity center (mixed use district), utility, community facility, park, conservation (12.3 percent combined), water (6.7 percent), vacant land (3.3 percent), and roadways (23.0 percent). Table 1-2 identifies the amount of acreage and the percentage of each for the types of land uses existing in the City. The highest occurrence of multi-family uses is west of Interstate 95. Single-family, commercial and industrial uses are concentrated east of Interstate 95. The existing land uses for the entire City of Oakland Park are shown in Figure S2 in Volume III, the Map Series. City of Oakland Park Future Land Use Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 1-3 Table 1-2 - Existing Land Uses, 2006 Land Use Category Area (sq. ft) Area (acres) Percent Share Low Density Residential (L) 61,935,899 1,422 27.2% Low Medium Density Residential (LM) 11,945,585 274 5.2% Medium Density Residential (M) 8,381,536 192 3.7% Medium-High Density Residential (MH) 6,411,513 147 2.8% Irregular Density 2,176,075 50 1.0% Commercial (C) 22,480,900 516 9.9% Local Activity Center (LAC) 3,635,745 83 1.6% Industrial (I) 11,240,896 258 4.9% Utilities (U) 747,554 17 0.3% Community Facilities (CF) 9,300,673 214 4.1% Parks/Recreation (P/R) 13,556,210 311 6.0% Conservation (CON) 792,017 18 0.3% Water (W) 15,274,859 351 6.7% Roads 52,295,800 1,202 23.0% Vacant 7,448,935 171 3.2% Total Area 227,624,197 5,226 100.0% Source: Existing land use GIS map (April 2007), City of Oakland Park Development Services Department, Carter & Burgess, Inc. In 2005, the City completed its annexation program and no major areas are identified for future annexations. However, there are several smaller areas adjacent to the City that remain unincorporated, or are located in another jurisdiction, that may be annexed by the City in the future. Such annexations would be undertaken on a voluntary basis and to “square off” municipal boundaries to assist in the delivery of services. The land uses in areas adjacent to the City of Oakland Park (Figure S2 in Volume III, the Map Series) vary depending on the location. Commercial uses predominate to the east and south of the City, along the N. Federal Highway and Oakland Park Boulevard corridors, and industrial uses are located west of the City’s border along I-95 and east of the City’s northeast boundary of Dixie Highway. In all other areas, residential developments are the most prevalent uses, with low density residential as the major component, adjacent to the City. The following ranges of density and Floor Area Ratios (FARs) apply to future land designations and more details are provided in the Land Use Implementation section of Volume I: i Low Density Residential – allowing up to five (5) dwelling units per acre; i Low-Medium Density Residential – allowing up to ten (10) dwelling units per acre; i Medium Density Residential – allowing up to 16 dwelling units per acre; i Medium-High Density Residential – allowing up to 25 dwelling units per acre; i Commercial – (a) allowing 4.0 FAR along transit corridors in the CRA, subject to conditions, mixed use City of Oakland Park Future Land Use Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 1-4 projects may be established with a base density of 10 dwelling units per acre and a maximum density of 30 units per acre and a maximum FAR of 2.0 for non-residential uses; (b) allowing 4.0 FAR within the Federal Highway Mixed Use Business and Entertainment Overlay, subject to conditions, mixed use or townhome projects may be established with a base density of 25 units per acre, with additional incentives of up to 25 units per acre for townhome and “green” projects; (c) allowing 1.0 FAR in other areas; i Industrial – allowing 1.0 FAR; i Utilities – allowing 0.5 FAR; i Community Facilities – allowing 0.5 FAR; i Parks/Recreation – allowing 0.1 FAR; i Conservation – allowing 0.1 FAR; i Water – allowing no development; i Roads – allowing no development; i Local Activity Center (LAC) – allowing the following development: o 1,800 dwelling units consisting of 80 single-family homes, 120 duplex, 700 villas, 500 townhomes and 400 garden apartments. (High-rise units may be substituted for the above units, if approved by the City Commission.) o Commercial land uses – up to 400,000 square feet. o Office land uses – up to 225,000 square feet. o Community facility land uses up to 165,000 square feet. o Recreation and open space land uses of at least 5.47 acres (including the Downtown park (Jaco Pastorius Park) of 3.21 acres at the 3900 block of North Dixie Highway). i Mixed Use Residential (MUR) – allowing the following development: o The Low designation permits up to 5 residential dwelling units per gross acre and a floor area ratio (FAR) of 1.0 for combined development - residential and nonresidential. o The Medium designation permits up to 16 residential dwelling units per gross acre and a FAR of 1.5 for combined development - residential and nonresidential. o The Medium/High designation permits up to 25 residential dwelling units per gross acre and a FAR of 2.0 for combined development - residential and nonresidential. o The High designation permits up to 50 residential dwelling units per gross acre and a FAR of 2.5 for combined development - residential and nonresidential. i Transit Oriented Development (TOD) – allowing 2.5 FAR (density and intensity standards for each TOD shall be specified when the map designation is applied.) City of Oakland Park Future Land Use Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 1-5 i Transit Oriented Corridor (TOC) – allowing 2.0 FAR (density and intensity standards for each TOC shall be specified when the map designation is applied.) In establishing the above FARs, the City’s Land Development Code’s height requirements, pervious and parking requirements were considered. A two-tier approach is provided for Commercial future land use designations because of desired redevelopment in the City’s CRA and downtown areas. Other commercial areas, and sites in other non-residential future land use designations, are predominately built or will be developed similar to traditional patterns and the FARs established are based on a sampling of existing developments. Table 1-3 – Sample of Existing FARs for Non-Residential Uses Sample Parcel Existing Use Property Size (sq. ft.) Building Size (sq. ft.) Resulting Floor Area Ratio 1 Commercial – Stores 10,762 5,355 0.50 2 Commercial – Stores 28,875 2,915 0.10 3 Commercial – Stores 62,438 15,795 0.25 4 Commercial – Stores 49,926 19,671 0.39 5 Commercial – Stores 55,537 16,372 0.29 6 Commercial – Stores 43,750 11,675 0.27 7 Commercial – Stores 227,271 47,899 0.21 8 Commercial – Stores 21,535 5,202 0.24 9 Commercial – Stores 568,358 108,231 0.19 10 Commercial – Stores 27,309 22,932 0.84 11 Commercial – Stores 82,705 15,506 0.19 12 Commercial – Stores 29,190 6,849 0.23 13 Commercial – Stores 16,772 3,550 0.21 14 Commercial – Store & Office 60,847 29,561 0.49 15 Commercial – Store & Office 11,700 6,630 0.57 16 Commercial – Supermarket 98,407 60,049 0.61 17 Commercial – Office Building 146,039 45,954 0.31 18 Commercial – Office Building 9,375 7,920 0.84 19 Commercial – Office Building 43,610 3,175 0.07 20 Commercial – Office Building 69,400 21,933 0.32 21 Commercial – Office Building 185,018 60,184 0.33 22 Commercial – Office Building 14,836 10,140 0.68 23 Commercial – Office Building 28,500 49,723 1.74 24 Commercial – Office Building 40,724 8,301 0.20 25 Commercial – Restaurant 10,400 8,129 0.78 City of Oakland Park Future Land Use Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 1-6 Sample Parcel Existing Use Property Size (sq. ft.) Building Size (sq. ft.) Resulting Floor Area Ratio 26 Commercial – Banks 10,568 5,790 0.55 27 Commercial – Banks 65,720 27,312 0.42 28 Commercial – Gas Station 19,500 1,354 0.07 29 Commercial – Gas Station 29,662 2,760 0.09 30 Commercial – Auto Sales 37,913 8,161 0.22 31 Commercial – Auto Sales 24,483 2,864 0.12 32 Commercial – Auto Sales 21,787 1,132 0.05 33 Commercial – Auto Sales 498,825 18,094 0.04 34 Commercial – Hotel/Motel 154,682 105,096 0.68 35 Commercial – Hotel/Motel 94,501 38,322 0.41 36 Industrial – Light Manufacturing 203,157 55,560 0.27 37 Industrial – Light Manufacturing 30,000 8,077 0.27 38 Industrial – Light Manufacturing 17,630 13,360 0.76 39 Industrial – Light Manufacturing 62,663 11,755 0.19 40 Industrial – Light Manufacturing 21,875 3,302 0.15 41 Industrial – Light Manufacturing 90,000 19,410 0.22 42 Industrial – Light Manufacturing 48,626 32,337 0.67 43 Industrial – Light Manufacturing 59,470 3,600 0.06 44 Industrial – Light Manufacturing 87,874 50,151 0.57 45 Industrial – Warehousing 110,584 78,468 0.71 46 Industrial – Warehousing 102,366 94,659 0.92 47 Industrial – Warehousing 96,230 139,810 1.45 48 Industrial – Warehousing 19,086 3,000 0.16 49 Industrial – Warehousing 55,008 19,200 0.35 50 Industrial – Warehousing 18,282 7,564 0.41 51 Industrial – Warehousing 59,610 27,910 0.47 52 Industrial – Warehousing 36,952 16,851 0.46 53 Industrial – Warehousing 19,500 11,430 0.59 54 Industrial – Warehousing 6,500 5,000 0.77 55 Industrial – Warehousing 574,055 313,331 0.55 Source: Broward County Property Appraiser Parcel Data, 2007 (existing use, property size and building size) and Carter and Burgess, Inc., 2007 (floor area ratio calculation). City of Oakland Park Future Land Use Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 1-7 Natural Resources Area Geology The peninsula of Florida emerged some 70 million years ago as a geologic layer on top of the coastal continental shelf. The peninsula has similar characteristics to the Piedmont area of the eastern United States. The Piedmont area is characterized by overlying layers of sedimentary material. The shoreline of Florida has changed many times as new layers of sedimentary material form on top of previous layers. The latest form of deposit is the Miami oolite, a limestone with varying sand content. This oolite layer always has been subject to erosion. This has resulted in cross-county water course and a pitted quality in the layer causing the formation to conduct water well in a vertical but not horizontal fashion. Because of erosive action, the bearing capacity of the Miami oolite strata is not constant. A sandstone stratum contains the area ground water table. It ranges beyond 100 feet in thickness and is highly permeable. The table is fed by infiltration of rain water. The table fluctuates in proportion to the incidence of rainfall and is highest in September or October. The water table is fed by surface water infiltration, making the dangers of pollution by waste matter, especially sewage, greater. Soils There are three predominate soil types existing within the corporate limits of the City as shown in Figure A5, Minerals and Soils, in Volume III, the Map Series. The predominant soil types are Duette and other urban land soils. The second most frequently occurring soil type is Immokalee, followed by Margate and Udorthents. Although certain soils cannot support septic tanks, all permit development. As in most South Florida communities, some soils do not drain particularly well. Efficient storm water drainage and management should be considered for most development and redevelopment in the City. Topography The City of Oakland Park has no significant topographical relief. The highest points in Oakland Park are only ten (10) feet above sea level and only a few such sites exist. Most likely these sites have been constructed instead of occurring naturally. Figure A6 in Volume III, the Map Series, provides elevation contours in the City. The City lies in two topological classifications. Most of the City is generally five to ten feet above mean sea level. Lands along Oakland Park Boulevard extending to the northwest and northeast lie zero to five feet above mean sea level. City of Oakland Park Future Land Use Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 1-8 Other Natural Resources Figure A2 in Volume III, the Map Series, depicts the rivers, lakes, waterways and major drainage systems in the City. Figure A3 in Volume III, the Map Series, shows the City’s floodplain areas based on Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) data for the City. Figure A4 in Volume III, the Map Series, delineates wetlands in the City. The City of Oakland Park is a participant in the FEMA Federal Flood Insurance Program. Residential flood insurance is generally required by mortgage lenders, whose requirements follow the flood elevation criteria depicted in the local maps prepared by FEMA. With the exception of the North Andrews area, virtually the entire City lies within the “AE” zone, the zone of potential flooding in a 100-year storm. Federal flood protection guidelines require that the first floor of all residences in the 100-year floodplain be elevated above the 100-year flood elevation. If a storm of serious magnitude destroys existing properties, redevelopment will be expected to comply with flood insurance standards. New development and voluntary redevelopment of existing parcels also must comply with these requirements. There are no potable water well fields in the City and with recent closure of nearby wellfields; there are no wellfield protection areas (zones 1, 2 or 3) located in the City. No areas within the City fall within a designated area of critical state concern. The City does not have any existing dredge spoil disposal sites or disposal responsibilities. Historic Resources There is only one historic structure, Oakland Park Elementary School, listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The school’s location is identified in Figure A7 in Volume III, the Map Series. There are 150 sites within the City that are listed in the Florida Master Site File (FMSF) and the locations of these sites are shown in Figure A.7. A listing of the addresses for these sites is in Table 1-4 below. City of Oakland Park Future Land Use Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 1-9 Table 1-4 – Properties on Florida Master Site File Site Site Toner Property 3235 N Dixie Hwy 769 NE 35 Street Williams Residence School Annex 799 NE 35 Street Oakland Park Elementary School 936 NE 33rd St 899 NE 35 Street Oakland Park Pre-Owned Autos 3301 N Dixie Hwy 1015 NE 35 Street B.S. Cruikshank Building 3334 N Dixie Hwy 1041 NE 35 Street Cottage Annex NE 32nd St 1061 NE 35 Street Gas Station 33rd St 1279 NE 35 Street Mt Zion Ame Church 3431 NE 5 Ave 1055 NE 35 Street Munford, Lillie Mae House 325 NE 34th Court 1077 NE 35 Street Lee J. Stevens House 1028 NE 36 St 1299 NE 35 Street Trebor Building Old Dixie Hwy 1384 NE 35 Street Oakland Park Historical Society 3876 NE 6 Ave 1509 NE 35 Street Delegal Property 4100 N Dixie Hwy 1631 NE 35 Street Waters Property 4281 N Dixie Hwy 1531 NE 35 Street 1302 NE 32 Street 161 NE 35 Court 1546 NE 32 Street 860 NE 36 Street 1256 NE 33 Street 1042 NE 36 Street 797 NE 33 Street 1068 NE 36 Street 801 NE 33 Street 220 NE 35 Court 859 NE 33 Street 1002 NE 36 Street 901 NE 33 Street 3601 N Andrews Ave 3321 NE 6 Avenue 601 NE 36 Street 1099 NE 33 Street 719 NE 36 Street 1253 NE 32 Street 953 NE 36 Street 1021 NE 33 Street 1001 NE 36 Street 1027 NE 33 Street 1027 NE 36 Street 1033 NE 33 Street 1069 NE 36 Street 1077 NE 33 Street 1091 NE 36 Street 1573 NE 33 Street 1085 NE 36 Street 3381 NE 11 Avenue 981 NE 36 Street 1515 NE 33 Street 1041 NE 36 Street 1561 NE 33 Street 954 NE 37 Street 3361 NE 11 Ave 799 NE 37 Street 3361 NE 16 Avenue 901 NE 37 Street 3341 NE 11 Avenue 919 NE 37 Street 1279 NE 32 Street 899 NE 37 Street 902 NE 34 Street 935 NE 37 Street 1254 NE 32 Street 798 NE 38 Street 1498 NE 34 Court 1028 NE 38 Street 1033 NE 34 Street 645 NE 38 Street 1001 NE 34 Street 769 NE 38 Street 1015 NE 34 Street 871 NE 38 Street 1321 NE 34 Street 801 NE 38 Street 1353 NE 34 Street 901 NE 38 Street 1399 NE 34 Street 999 NE 38 Street 1398 NE 34 Street 899 NE 38 Street 3451 NE 15 Ave 1077 NE 38 Street 1548 NE 34 Street 1085 NE 38 Street 1555 NE 34 Street 782 NE 39 Street 884 NE 34 Court 736 NE 39 Street 3481 NE 10 Ave 770 NE 39 Street City of Oakland Park Future Land Use Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 1-10 Site Site 1034 NE 34 Street 872 NE 39 Street 1056 NE 34 Court 954 NE 39 Street 1302 NE 34 Court 798 NE 39 Street 1370 NE 34 Court 1062 NE 39 Street 1498 NE 34 Street 735 NE 39 Street 3500 NE 3 Avenue 1240 NE 34 Court 1261 NE 34 Court 1330 NE 40 Court 1622 NE 34 Drive 1367 NE 40 Court 3561 NE 11 Ave 1401 NE 40 Court 602 NE 35 Street 4101 NE 10 Avenue 754 NE 35 Street 280 NE 41 Street 920 NE 35 Street 4202 North Dixie Hwy 982 NE 35 Street 4211 NE 8 Avenue 1028 NE 35 Street 747 NE 43 Street 1624 NE 35 Street 4271 NE 7 Terrace 1338 NE 35 Street 680 NE 43 Street 1524 NE 35 Street 630 NE 43 Street 1568 NE 35 Street 521 NE 43 Street 1642 NE 35 Street 651 NE 43 Street 601 NE 35 Street 661 NE 43 Street 731 NE 35 Street 701 NE 43 Street 817 NE 35 Street 1499 NE 35 Street 801 NE 35 Street 1265 NE 35 Street 981 NE 35 Street 1287 NE 45 Street Source: Florida Master Site File, April 2007. City of Oakland Park Future Land Use Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 1-11 Population Projections Population from the decennial Census of Population and Housing, collected by the United States Bureau of the Census, is considered to be the definitive base for population modeling in the United States. There is a continued need to project population growth and distribution to support long- and short-range planning for future land use, transportation, community services, schools and public facilities. Population forecasting is an integral component of planning by Broward County staff. For the past 15 years, County staff has projected the County’s population for a thirty-year period, using the Broward County Population Forecasting Model (BCPFM). This model has been certified by the Department of Community Affairs for use in Broward County. The BCPFM uses a cohort-survival methodology in which births, deaths and net migration are projected for each age-gender-race cohort in the population. Projections are output in one-year increments for thirty years following the base year of 2000. The information is sorted by Traffic Analysis Zones (TAZs), which are grouped by municipality to provide municipal level population projections. Counts or estimates of the number of dwelling units per municipality are made if a TAZ spans more than one municipality. The population projections for the City are given in Table 1-5. The citywide projections are directly from the BCPFM. The Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) projections are provided separately to evaluate and support redevelopment activities in this area. The CRA projections were determined by evaluating the existing land use patterns and aerial photographs to assess the amount of residential uses. Persons per household ratios were used to determine the average household size in each area to estimate population. The City’s population is projected to grow by 16,391 between 2006 and 2030, which is a 37 percent increase or 1.6 percent annually. Of the population increase, 4,868 residents, or over one fourth, are projected to locate in the CRA area. Similarly, the number of dwelling units is projected to increase to 23,978 in 2030 from 19,235 in 2006. Of the total increase of 4,744 units, 29 percent, or 1,371 new units are projected to be located in the CRA. Several factors relate to the City being able to accommodate the projected population: i As mentioned previously, population growth in the City will be accommodated through redevelopment and infill. Many infill lots in the City are being developed with small townhome projects of three to twenty units. i Mixed-use projects are being encouraged in commercial areas and additional residential units are anticipated. i The City is seeing a decreasing trend in the seasonal population as the growth in the number of retirees moving to the area slows. Seasonal units are instead being used by permanent residents. City of Oakland Park Future Land Use Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 1-12 i The demographic changes of the population include households with larger number of children and extended families, and the average number of persons per household will increase to 2.60 in 2030 from the 2.43 estimate for 2006. i The vacancy rates of units countywide will decrease from 6.6 percent in 2006 to 3.7 percent in 2030. The decrease will also help house the expected population. Table 1-5 - City of Oakland Park Population Projections (Five Year Increments to 2030) Availability of Public Facilities Adequacy of Transportation Facilities Broward County is responsible for acquiring right-of-way and monitoring the level of service of the regional roadway network that serves Oakland Park. Broward County also operates Broward County Transit (BCT), the entity that provides transit services within the County. Broward County has made a policy decision, with the support of the municipalities in Broward County, to limit the roadway capacity of County arterials and collectors and focus its mobility dollars on the provision of transit service and pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure. This policy 2006 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 City 19,235 19,738 20,806 21,910 23,043 23,978 CRA 4,005 4,130 4,464 4,803 5,143 5,376 City 503 1,571 2,675 3,808 4,744 CRA 125 458 798 1,138 1,371 City 43,729 45,873 49,752 53,523 57,280 60,121 CRA 10,158 10,734 11,865 13,111 14,290 15,026 City 2,143 6,023 9,793 13,551 16,391 CRA 575 1,707 2,953 4,131 4,868 City 2.43 2.48 2.53 2.57 2.60 2.60 City 6.6% 6.1% 5.5% 4.8% 4.2% 3.7% 2) The CRA projections are determined by evaluating the existing land use patterns and aerial photos to assess the amount of residential in a TAZ. 3) Population projections for the CRA are based on the persons per household and vacancy rates determined by Broward County for the specific TAZ. Population Growth Factors Notes: 1) The projections were provided by Broward County (dated 02/09/07). Difference above 2006 Dwelling Units Source: Broward County Population Forecasting Model (as revised February 9, 2007) and Carter & Burgess. Vacancy Rate Difference above 2006 Persons per Household City of Oakland Park Future Land Use Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 1-13 has resulted in increased congestion and LOS F conditions on many roads. Broward County has replaced the roadway concurrency system in the eastern portion of the County with a transit oriented concurrency system. (Prior to the change to a transit-based system, the majority of the City was designated a Transportation Concurrency Exception area.) The transit oriented concurrency system established ten concurrency districts and eight of the ten districts use a transit-based concurrency with district-wide level of service standards. Figure A8 in Volume III, the Map Series, shows the districts, or the County’s transportation concurrency management areas. The City of Oakland Park is located in the Central Transit Oriented Concurrency District. Concurrency fees are collected by Broward County to meet the identified level of service standards. The fees are used to provide transit infrastructure and services. There are no public transit terminals or transfer stations within Oakland Park, other than the Park-and-Ride Lot on Cypress Creek Road west of I-95. This site is the City’s only intermodal facility, allowing commuters to transfer from their vehicles to a BCT bus or to Tri-Rail. The Tri- Rail Cypress Creek station is located just across Andrews Avenue (within Fort Lauderdale’s municipal boundary). Bus stops are located throughout the City along the numerous fixed bus routes. The City has developed, in conjunction with Broward County Transit, a community bus route that provides service to City Hall and major shopping areas. The City is developing another route that will serve the western portions of the community. There are nine Broward County Transit (BCT) routes operating within the City, including routes 10, 11, 14, 20, 31, 50, 55, 62, and 72. There are no port or aviation facilities in Oakland Park, although the Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport is located just west of the City. There are two railway corridors within the City: the South Florida Railway Corridor (SFRC, formerly CSX) Railroad and the Florida East Coast (FEC) Railroad. Both railway corridors are utilized for freight service. However, passenger service is provided on the SFRC/CSX corridor via Tri-Rail and Amtrak. There are no terminals or transfer stations for these passenger services within Oakland Park. Potable Water Supply The City receives potable water from two entities, the City of Fort Lauderdale and Broward County.However, the City acts as a distributor, ultimately creating three water service providers within the City. The City of Oakland Park services a majority of the central portion of the City. The Broward County Office of Environmental Services is responsible for the northernmost and westernmost portions of the City. The City of Fort Lauderdale services the remaining areas of the City. The following table shows the City acreage served by each of these entities along with the percent share of the total City area. Figure S3 in Volume III, the Map Series, shows the service areas. City of Oakland Park Future Land Use Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 1-14 Table 1-6 - Potable Water Service Areas, 2007 Service Entity Acreage Served Percent of Total Oakland Park 2,770 72% Fort Lauderdale 252 7% Broward County 816 21% Totals 3,838 100.0% Note: Totals are based on serviced areas (excluding roads and water bodies.) Sources: GIS-based map, City of Oakland Park, Carter & Burgess, Inc. The City has large user agreements with both the City of Fort Lauderdale and Broward County to ensure that adequate quantities of potable water are provided. Neither the City of Fort Lauderdale nor Broward County allocates plant capacity, but both agree to meet the City’s water demands. The majority of the water purchased by the City from Fort Lauderdale is treated at the Fiveash Water Treatment Plant. Fiveash has a capacity of 70 million gallons per day (MGD) and also serves the jurisdictions of Fort Lauderdale, Wilton Manors, Lauderdale-by-the-Sea, Port Everglades and portions of Tamarac, Davie and Broward County. An additional 18 MGD capacity is available from Fort Lauderdale’s Peele/Dixie Water Plant, where interconnections between it and Fiveash provide for back-up capacity in periods of high demand or plant maintenance shutdowns. Combined, these two plants have a potable water capacity of 90 MGD. The projected demand in 2010 for potable water is 65.82 MGD (City of Fort Lauderdale, Evaluation and Appraisal Report); thus the combined capacity of the two plants exceeds the existing and short-term demand. Potable water from Broward County is treated at the Broward County Lauderdale Lakes Water Treatment Plant, which has an existing capacity of 16.0 MGD. The service area for this plant includes portions of the cities of Fort Lauderdale, Lauderdale Lakes, Lauderhill, North Lauderdale, Oakland Park, Plantation, Pompano Beach, and Tamarac, as well as certain unincorporated areas in central Broward County. The projected 2005 demand for potable water from this plant is 12.4 MGD. The City maintains the water distribution system and recently completed an analysis of the ability of this distribution system to continue to provide adequate service to City residents. The analysis found that the existing distribution system is adequate to handle average daily, maximum daily, and peak hourly demands. In addition to evaluating the ability to provide adequate water supply to residents and businesses, the analysis also addressed the adequacy of existing fire hydrant locations and fire flow pressures. The analysis indicates that the City needs to add 392 fire hydrants and improve fire flow pressures in several areas; however, pressure in the system is excellent under peak hour flow conditions. City of Oakland Park Future Land Use Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 1-15 The adopted LOS standard for potable water is 148 gallons per day per resident. For the 2006 population estimate, 6.56 MGD of potable water supply was required to maintain this level of service standard. Based on the City’s population projections an additional 0.78 MGD will be needed in 2015 and 2.28 MGD will be needed by 2030.Table 1-7 below provides the detailed values. Table 1-7 - Projected Water Supply LOS Demand Year Population MGD at 148* gallons per resident MGD increase from 2006** 2006 43,729 6.56* NA 2008 44,887 6.61 0.05 2010 45,873 6.76 0.20 2013 48,201 7.11 0.55 2015 49,752 7.34 0.78 2018 52,015 7.67 1.10 2020 53,523 7.88 1.32 2025 57,280 8.44 1.88 2030 60,121 8.84 2.28 Source: Broward County Population Forecasting Model (02/09/07). Service Area GIS Map (April 2007), City of Oakland Park Public Works Department, Carter & Burgess, Inc. * Refer to pp 4-22 and 4-23 for details **2006 calculations were based on 150 MGD The City performs an analysis of the potable water demand for each development application as part of the development review process. There have not been any issues related to inadequate potable water supply since the 1998 Plan. If additional potable water is required, the City will renegotiate its contracts with the City of Fort Lauderdale and Broward County. The City coordinated with the City of Fort Lauderdale, Broward County, and the South Florida Water Management District in the preparation of its Ten Year Water Supply Plan, and will continue to do so. Wastewater As with potable water, the City does not provide wastewater treatment services but does provide and maintain the wastewater collection system. (Responsibility for the collection system for the areas annexed in 2005 will be turned over to the City in 2008.) Responsibility for Wastewater treatment is provided by the City of Fort Lauderdale and Broward County. Figure S4 in Volume III, the Map Series, shows the service areas and Figure S5 in Volume III, the Map Series, shows collection facilities the City currently operates. The City of Fort Lauderdale has the largest wastewater treatment service area within the City, with Broward County only City of Oakland Park Future Land Use Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 1-16 providing wastewater treatment to the northern and western portions of the City. The following table shows the acreage served by these entities and the percent share of the City’s total area. Table 1-8 - Wastewater Treatment Service Areas, 2007 Service Entity Acres Served Percent of Total Fort Lauderdale 3,831 73% Broward County 1,402 27% Totals 5,233 100% Sources: GIS-based map, City of Oakland Park, Carter & Burgess, Inc. The City has large user agreements with both the City of Fort Lauderdale Utilities Department and the Broward County Office of Environmental Services to ensure that adequate wastewater treatment services are provided. Neither the City of Fort Lauderdale nor Broward County has established a fixed allocation of their wastewater treatment plants for the City. The wastewater collected in the City by the City of Fort Lauderdale is treated at the G.T. Lohmeyer Sewage Treatment Plant. This plant has a treatment capacity of 43 million gallons per day (MGD) and also serves the jurisdictions of Fort Lauderdale, Wilton Manors, and portions of Tamarac, unincorporated Broward County and Port Everglades. Wastewater treated by Broward County is treated at the Broward County North Regional Sewage Treatment Plant. This plant has a capacity of 80 MGD and serves the jurisdictions of Coral Springs, Coconut Creek, Deerfield Beach, Lauderhill, North Lauderdale, Pompano Beach, Plantation and portions of unincorporated Broward County. The adopted LOS for sanitary sewer was 150 gallons per resident per day. Based on the 2005 population estimate, the City should be generating approximately 6.45 million gallons of wastewater per day. For the 2004 fiscal year (October 1, 2003 to September 30, 2004), Broward County collected a total of 0.5 million gallons of wastewater from the City. The City of Fort Lauderdale collected a total of two billion gallons of wastewater for the same period, resulting in an annual total of approximately two billion gallons. Converting this to a daily total results in 5.5 MGD, which when divided by the 2004 population estimate (31,810) gives an estimated 172 gallons of wastewater per resident per day. This exceeds the City’s adopted LOS by 22 gallons per day. The City considered revising its adopted LOS standard for sanitary sewer to more accurately reflect existing conditions but instead elects to keep the 150 gallons per person per day standard and work toward reducing the actual amount of wastewater treated. There is sufficient capacity available at both the City of Fort Lauderdale and Broward County to meet the existing demand; however, because the City’s wastewater volumes exceed its potable water consumption it is clear repair and rehabilitation of the wastewater collection system is warranted. The City is investigating the wastewater collection system to determine where inflow and infiltration is prevalent and will undertake maintenance actions so that by 2030 the actual City of Oakland Park Future Land Use Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 1-17 demand will coincide with the level of service standard. Stormwater drainage improvements also may help to reduce the amount of wastewater collected for treatment. As with potable water, the estimated demand for sanitary sewer is calculated during the development review process to ensure adequate capacity is available. There has not been an incident of inadequate sanitary sewer capacity since the 1998 Plan was adopted. If additional capacity is required, the City will renegotiate with the County and the City of Fort Lauderdale for the necessary capacity. Table 1-9 - Wastewater LOS Demand, 2015 and 2030 2006 2015 2030 Population 43,729 49,752 60,121 MGD at 175 gallons per resident 7.65 8.71 10.52 MGD at 150 gallons per resident 6.56 7.62 9.02 MGD increase from 2006 (@ 150 gallons per resident) 1.06 2.46 MGD increase from 2006 (@ 175 gallons per resident) 1.06 2.87 Source: Broward County Population Forecasting Model (02/09/07). Stormwater and Drainage The City maintains two major drainage canals, a variety of secondary facilities and drainage systems associated with roadway runoff. Figure A2 in Volume III, the Map Series, shows the stormwater and drainage facilities within and adjacent to the City. The C-13 drainage canal on the south boundary and the C-14 canal on the northern boundary are operated and maintained by the South Florida Water Management District. Both canals eventually drain into the Intracoastal Waterway. The City also contains several lake and canal systems associated with residential development. These canals and lakes drain into the Middle River. Most major roadways have installed storm runoff systems. These systems distribute stormwater runoff to drainage canals. Certain areas experience minor flooding during rains of high intensity. To address the periodic flooding conditions, the City completed a Master Drainage Plan in 1998. This plan identifies 30 drainage deficient areas and 14 potential area projects, including projects previously identified in the comprehensive plan. The City began the design and permitting process for several projects and started construction on a stormwater trunk line to drain the Central Area of the City. The 1998 Stormwater Master Plan is aggressive regarding the projects to be undertaken and the City is actively working to obtain funding for expediting design and construction. Potential funding sources include stormwater utility fees, Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) mitigation grant programs, City of Oakland Park Future Land Use Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 1-18 Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) grants such as the Special Projects Authorization Process, and other revenue sources available to the City. Two adopted level of service (LOS) standards apply for stormwater. The first, for roadway crowns, is to provide sufficient drainage for a ten-year three-day storm. The second standard applies to finished floor elevations and requires a floor elevation that is no lower than one (1) foot above the FEMA base flood elevation, the 100-year flood elevation or twelve (12) inches for residential development and six (6) inches for non-residential development above the adjacent roadway crown. The City also is limited by the discharge rates set by the South Florida Water Management District for outfall into District canals and the New River. The City has met these levels of service standards in the past and the standards will continue to apply in the future. Solid Waste The City provides single-family residential solid waste collection services twice weekly, with monthly collection of bulk items. The City also performs commercial and multi-family solid waste collection services, at frequencies appropriate to the user. Weekly curbside recycling of newspapers, glass, aluminum, steel, and certain plastics is offered to both residential and commercial customers. There are no solid waste terminal disposal sites within the City and solid waste collected by the City is transported to County-managed facilities. Broward County, through an interlocal agreement with the City, is responsible for the management of solid waste, including treatment and disposal of solid waste and the coordination of recyclable material collected in the solid waste collection process. The County also handles collection and disposal of household hazardous wastes. The adopted level of service (LOS) for solid waste is eight (8) pounds per capita per day with bi- weekly pickup. In 2004, 1,167 tons of recyclable materials were delivered to the materials recovery facility and 38,018 tons of refuse was delivered to disposal sites. This figure includes bulk trash, residential refuse, and commercial refuse. For the 2004 population estimate of 31,810 persons, the total amount of materials collected equates to 6.75 pounds per capita per day, well under the eight (8) pounds per capita per day level of service standard. Table 1-10 - Solid Waste LOS Demand, 2015 and 2030 2006 2015 2030 Population 43,729 49,752 60,121 Annual Tons at 8 lbs per resident per day 63,844 72,638 87,777 Annual Tons increase from 2006 8,794 23,933 Source: Broward County Population Forecasting Model (02/09/07). City of Oakland Park Future Land Use Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 1-19 Natural Groundwater Aquifer Recharge There are no regionally significant recharge areas in the City. As shown in Figure A4 in Volume III, the Map Series, the majority of the City has an annual groundwater recharge rate between 21 to 42 inches. Portions of the City west of I-95 have annual groundwater recharge rates of 42 inches or more. The northeastern portions of the City have a lower rate. Vacant Land Analysis The Broward County Property Appraiser Tax Rolls, as well as information from the City’s Development Services Department and field reviews, were used to compile a summary of vacant land. There are approximately 171 acres of vacant land in the City, representing 3.3 percent of the City’s total area. The Existing Land Use Map (Figure S2 in Volume III, the Map Series) shows the vacant developable land within the City. The majority of the vacant land is located in the southwest portion of the City, which is the area south of NW 39th Street and west of I-95. In this area, there are several large vacant parcels that front on either NW 31st Avenue or Oakland Park Boulevard. There are other smaller lots located south of Oakland Park Boulevard. The primary reason that these parcels are vacant is a lack of infrastructure. Potable water is available to the area, but sanitary sewer is not as widely available and must be provided with new development. Also, for the area known as Orange Grove Manor (south of Oakland Park Boulevard and east of NW 31st Avenue), the local roads are not improved. Access is possible, but on unpaved roads. Perhaps the most significant vacant land is the parcel located south of Cypress Creek Road that was approved for development as the Commons at Cypress Creek (formerly Lightspeed) Development of Regional impact (DRI). This 8.8-acre parcel is currently used as a Park-n-Ride and intermodal transfer facility for Tri-Rail. The property has remained undeveloped as a result of ownership issues and is being considered for transit-oriented development. The character of the remaining vacant land (almost all of which is located west of I-95) is as follows: 1. Soils: the variety of soil associations (see Figure A5 in Volume III, the Map Series) are poorly drained and not suitable for septic tanks. 2. Topography: the flat terrain varies from five to ten feet above sea level. 3. Natural Resources: some of the vacant land fronts on the sizeable number of ponds (some with vegetation) in western Oakland Park. 4. Historic Sites: there are no known historic or archeological sites on the vacant land. City of Oakland Park Future Land Use Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 1-20 Table 1-11 - Future Land Use Designations for Existing Vacant Parcels, 2007 Future Land Use Designation Area (acres) Percentage Commercial 28.32 17% Community Facility 0.00 0% Conservation 0.00 0% Industrial 9.63 6% Irregular Density 39.60 23% LAC 22.43 13% Low Density Residential 42.32 25% Low Medium Density Residential 7.09 4% Medium Density Residential 16.58 10% Medium High Density Residential 0.05 0% Park 0.15 0% Right-of-Way 0.01 0% Utility 4.83 3% Water 0.00 0% Total 171.00 100% Sources: GIS-based existing and future land use maps (April 2007), City of Oakland Park, Carter & Burgess, Inc. Redevelopment Analysis Because very little vacant land remains available for development in the City of Oakland Park, the majority, if not all, of new development will occur in the form of redevelopment. Several areas of the City are in particular need of redevelopment or revitalization through neighborhood planning. In 1994, Broward County designated the eastern portion of the County an urban infill and redevelopment area. It includes areas to the east of I-95 from Commercial Boulevard north to the Palm Beach County Line and to the east of Florida’s Turnpike from south of Commercial Boulevard to the Miami-Dade County Line. The urban infill and redevelopment designation is still in affect in the Broward County Land Use Plan and applies to all land in the City except for the Commons at Cypress Creek development (part of a Development of Regional Impact) west of I-95 at Cypress Creek Road. Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) The City of Oakland Park has recognized that significant areas of Downtown Oakland Park and other sections of the City are in need of redevelopment. After a 1981 study of slum and blight conditions, the City established a Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) target area and the Main Street Program to invest and create redevelopment and economic development programs. City of Oakland Park Future Land Use Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 1-21 In 2001, the City Commission authorized the preparation of a slum and blight study, in accordance with Chapter 163, Florida Statutes, to identify a specific area in need of redevelopment and to establish the existence of slum and blight as defined in the statutes. This type of study is the first step in creating a Community Redevelopment Area (CRA), which provides a tool for local governments to initiate and promote redevelopment. In 2002, Broward County approved the Oakland Park CRA and in 2005, the CRA Plan was adopted. The CRA contains 1,007 acres and is roughly bounded by Oakland Park Boulevard, Northeast 13th Avenue, Prospect Road and North Andrews Avenue. This area is shown on the City’s official Future Land Use Map, Figure A1 in Volume III, the Map Series. The linchpin of the Community Redevelopment Plan is the Downtown Mixed Use District, located along Dixie Highway, north of Oakland Park Boulevard. This area was designated a Local Activity Center in 2004, a land use category designation that promotes compact, mixed use development. The future land use designation and capital improvement projects identified in the redevelopment plan will enhance and distinguish Downtown Oakland Park as a local destination. While Downtown Oakland Park is important, other commercial and residential areas also received attention in the redevelopment plan. Improving neighborhoods, pedestrian and bicycle circulation, green spaces and connections to the downtown area are key elements of the plan. For example, streetscape improvements will connect residential neighborhoods to the downtown while improving blighted conditions. Harlem McBride and other residential areas will be enhanced by decreasing incompatible industrial uses and increasing park space and affordable housing. A design district along Floranada Road will continue to attract home improvement businesses and consumers. A designated Midtown centering on Prospect Road and Andrews Avenue with a unique streetscape will enhance long-standing, favorite local businesses. An arts district will attract artists that will call Oakland Park home and attract visitors and residents to their studios. The capital improvements projects and programs in the CRA total approximately $92 million. Projects will include Downtown infrastructure improvements including a pedestrian bridge and public parking, funding for the expansion of Carter G. Woodson Park, and parks and streetscape improvements throughout the CRA. Private/public partnerships will be encouraged and pursued for Park Place, the Dixie Mixed Use (East) development and public parking, Dixie Mixed Use (West) demonstration project, and the Watts Estates housing development. Objectives and policies supporting redevelopment of the CRA are incorporated in the future land use, capital improvements, and other elements of the comprehensive plan. City of Oakland Park Future Land Use Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 1-22 Other Areas and Neighborhood Planning To address the visions of the City as a whole, the City has adopted a policy to undertake a citywide visioning exercise. In parallel and consistent with this exercise, the City will develop more specific visions or master plans for neighborhood planning areas. For this purpose, the City has been divided into approximately 30 neighborhoods, as shown in Figure S6 in Volume III, the Map Series. Two or more neighborhoods may be combined, or larger neighborhoods divided, for the purposes of creating master plans. In the 1998 Plan, four areas in need of redevelopment were identified: the Central Oakland Park Chapter 163 Redevelopment Area, the Rock Island Area, the Dixie Highway Redevelopment Area, and the Orange Grove Estates Redevelopment Area. Only one of these areas was fully included in the official CRA – the Central Oakland Park Redevelopment Area. A portion of the Dixie Highway Redevelopment Area is also included in the CRA. Redevelopment plans for the remaining areas were not adopted. A redevelopment strategy for Rock Island was completed in 1993 but was not adopted by the City Commission. This area does not meet the eligibility guidelines of HUD for CDBG funding, and therefore, the City determined that the best course of action was to enhance code enforcement activities and to provide incentives for private development that would achieve greater conformance with the land use plan and allow for the needed public improvements. This plan for Rock Island is being revisited by the City. The 1998 Plan indicates that the strategy for the Orange Grove Estates Redevelopment Area is for the City to assist a private redevelopment effort. However, it has not been until recently that developers have been interested in this area due to the need to implement the water, wastewater, roadway and drainage infrastructure. Several recent future land use map amendments have occurred in the Orange Grove Estates area, aggregating property and establishing townhouse subdivisions. The Dixie Highway Redevelopment Area, as shown in the 1998 Plan, extends the length of Dixie Highway within the City. Only a portion of this area was included in the Chapter 163 Redevelopment Area established by the County in 1986. Improvements were made to this area along Dixie Highway as a result of a roadway-widening project. 2 Transportation Element City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan City of Oakland Park Transportation Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 2-1 Introduction The City’s Transportation Element was adopted in 2001 when the former Traffic Circulation Element was replaced pursuant to State law. The purpose of the Transportation Element is to plan for a multi-modal transportation system that places more emphasis on public transportation. Because of the City’s size and population, the City is not required to prepare a Mass Transit or Ports, Aviation and Related Facilities Element. Description of the Existing Transportation System This portion of the Element examines the facilities that serve vehicular and non-vehicular traffic within the City of Oakland Park. The transportation system is a critical component of society, playing a role in all facets of life, having economic implications and recreational value. The transportation system has two basic components. One is the internal access and circulation of the City’s residential neighborhoods and other areas. The other is the external component that serves as the link to other communities. The first component, local roads, is maintained by the City or private entities. The second component forms part of the State’s Strategic Intermodal System (SIS), State Highway System (SHS), Federal Interstate Highway System or Broward County Traffic Circulation Network. The Broward County transportation planning process is carried out by the Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO), whose charge is to master plan and coordinate roadways, mass transit and other transportation systems on a countywide basis. The MPO’s governing board consists of elected officials from the Broward County Commission and municipalities in the County. Consistent with the County Charter, Broward County oversees the transportation concurrency process for the County and municipalities. The County is responsible for acquiring right-of-way and monitoring level of service for the regional roadway network that serves Oakland Park. In the mid 1990’s, the eastern areas of Broward County were designated an urban infill and redevelopment area and designation as a Transportation Concurrency Exception Area (TCEA). The City of Oakland Park has not used roadway concurrency as a factor in development review and approval for over a decade. In 2004, the TCEA was replaced by a transit oriented concurrency based system, which is described more fully below. Roadway System Figure S7, Existing Functional Classification, and Figure S8, Existing Number of Through Lanes, in Volume III, the Map Series, graphically illustrate the existing transportation road system. Within the City of Oakland Park, the roadways are classified as identified in Table 2-1. City of Oakland Park Transportation Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 2-2 Existing Roadway Functional Classification, Number of Through Lanes, and Maintenance Responsibilities The Functional Classification of roadways is utilized to create a hierarchical system to establish the responsibility for roadway maintenance and operation either by the State, County or local jurisdiction. The following broad guidelines are used to define roadway types: i Principal Arterials – Major highways serving heavy volumes of traffic through the urban area. i Minor Arterials – Roadways carrying moderately heavy volumes of traffic that channel traffic to community activity centers. i Collectors – Roadways carrying moderate volumes of traffic to the arterial network. i Local Roadways – Neighborhood roadways carrying low volumes of traffic to collector or arterial roadways. Table 2-1- Existing Functional Classification, 2007 Limited Access Facility -I-95 Arterial Roads -NW 31st Avenue Powerline Road/NW 9th Avenue N. Andrews Avenue N. Dixie Highway US-1/Federal Highway Cypress Creek Road/NE 62nd Street Commercial Boulevard Prospect Road Oakland Park Boulevard Collector Roads -NW 21st Avenue NE 6th Avenue NE 16th Avenue NE 18th Avenue NE 56th Street Floranada Road (NE 45th Street) NW 44th Street 38th/39th Street NW 26th Street Local Roads - all other City public roads. Sources: Broward County MPO Division and City of Oakland Park Planning Services Division City of Oakland Park Transportation Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 2-3 The functional classification of roadways in the City, associated number of through lanes, and maintenance responsibilities are provided in Table 2-2 and illustrated in Figures S7, S8 and S9 in Volume III, the Map Series. Maintenance responsibilities are divided between the State Department of Transportation for I-95, Commercial Boulevard, Powerline Road, US 1, Cypress Creek Road, and Oakland Park Boulevard, Broward County for other arterial and County collector roadways and the City for City collector and local streets. Per the Broward County Charter, the Broward County Planning Council has authority over thoroughfares. The right-of-way requirements shown in Table 2-2 are based on the Broward County Trafficways Plan as prepared and maintained by the Broward County Planning Council. City of Oakland Park TransportationComprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 2-4Table 2-2 – Roadway Functional Classification, Right-of-Way, Number of Lanes, and Maintenance Responsibilities, 2007 Roadway Segment Functional Classification Required ROW Number of Lanes Maintenance Responsibility I-95 South City limits to N. City limits Principal Arterial 325’ 10 lanes divided State NW 31st Avenue Commercial Blvd. to S. City limits Minor Arterial 106’ 6 lanes divided County NW 21st Avenue Commercial Blvd. to S. City limits Collector 94’ 3 lanes City Powerline Road Cypress Creek Rd. to S. City limits Principal Arterial 120’ 6 lanes divided State Andrews Avenue I-95 to Commercial Blvd. Minor Arterial 106’ 4 lanes, 4 lanes divided County NE 6th Avenue Cypress Creek Rd. to S. City limits Collector 50’ 2 lanes CityDixie Highway Cypress Creek Rd. to S. City limits Minor Arterial 80’ 4 lanes, 4 lanes divided, 5 lanes County NE 16th Avenue Floranada Rd. to S. City limits Collector 50’/80’ 2 lanes City NE 18th Avenue Floranada Rd. to N. City limits Collector 50’ 2 lanes CityUS 1 Floranada Rd. to Oakland Park Blvd. Principal Arterial 120’ 6 lanes divided State Cypress Creek Rd. (NE 62nd Street) Andrews Ave. to Dixie Highway Minor Arterial 156’/110’ 6 lanes divided, 4 lanes StateNE 56th Street NE 6th Ave. to Dixie Highway Collector 80’ 2 lanes CityCommercial Blvd. W. City limits to US 1 Principal Arterial 120’ 6 lanes divided State Floranada Road Dixie Highway to US 1 Collector 80’ 2 lanes CityProspect Road Commercial Blvd. to Dixie Highway Minor Arterial 100’ 4 lanes divided, 6 lanes divided County NE 38th Street/ NW 39thStreetUS 1 to NW 31st Ave. Collector 80’ 2 lanes CityNW 44th Street W. City Limits to NW 21st Ave. Collector 80’ 2 lanes CityOakland Park Boulevard W. City limits to US 1 Principal Arterial 120’ 6 lanes divided State NW 26th Street NW 21st Ave. to NW 31st Ave. Collector 50’ 2 lanes CitySource: Broward County Transportation Element (06-2 Comprehensive Plan Amendment); City of Oakland Park City of Oakland Park Transportation Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 2-5 Existing Average Daily, Peak Hour Levels of Service for Roads and Mass Transit The existing average daily traffic and peak hour levels of service for roadways in the City as monitored by Broward County are provided in Table 2-3. Significant Parking Facilities The City considers several developments to warrant a description of having significant parking facilities. The City’s definition of significant includes available spaces of 500 or more. These significant parking facilities are identified on Figure S10, Existing Major Trip Generators and Attractors, in Volume III, the Map Series. 1. North Ridge Medical Center – approximately 888 parking spaces. This facility is located west of Dixie Highway and north of NE 56th Street. 2. North Ridge Shopping Center – approximately 658 parking spaces. This facility is located north of Commercial Boulevard and west of Dixie Highway. 3. Home Depot and adjacent commercial uses – approximately 864 parking spaces. This area is located north of Oakland Park Boulevard, west of I-95. 4. Broward County School Board Bus Depot – approximately 562 automobile spaces and 350 bus parking spaces. This facility is located north of NW 38th Street, west of I-95 and north of Easterlin Park. 5. Kmart Shopping Plaza – approximately 526 spaces. This facility is located south of Oakland Park Boulevard and east of SE 6th Avenue. The parcel is slated for redevelopment and these spaces may be removed. 6. Cypress Creek Station Park-n-Ride Lot – approximately 750 spaces. This facility is located south of Cypress Creek Road between Andrews Avenue and I-95. Redevelopment of this site is anticipated and the number of parking spaces may change. Powerline Rd S of Commercial Blvd NA NA 4.68 -- NA S of Prospect Rd 24,000 2.17 4.68 0.46 * N of Oakland Park Blvd 25,500 2.31 4.68 0.49 * S of Oakland Park Blvd 26,000 2.35 4.68 0.50 C Interstate 95 S of Cypress Creek Rd 260,000 19.89 17.16 1.16 F S of Commercial Blvd 262,000 20.04 17.16 1.17 F S of Oakland Park Blvd 279,000 21.34 17.16 1.24 F Andrews Ave N of Commercial Blvd 17,400 1.83 3.11 0.59 C N of Prospect Rd 20,600 1.85 3.11 0.59 C N of Oakland Park Blvd 28,700 2.62 2.95 0.89 D S of Oakland Park Blvd 28,900 2.57 2.95 0.87 D NE 6 Ave N of Oakland Park Blvd 8,900 0.92 0.95 0.97 D Dixie Hwy N of NE 62nd St 21,500 1.95 3.11 0.63 C N of Floranada Rd 23,000 2.08 3.11 0.67 C N of 38 St 26,500 2.40 3.11 0.77 C S of Oakland Park Blvd 20,000 1.81 3.11 0.58 C NE 16 Ave S of Oakland Park Blvd 9,500 0.92 0.95 0.96 D US 1 N of Oakland Park Blvd 51,000 5.29 4.68 1.13 F NE 62 St E of I-95 37,500 3.39 4.24 0.80 D NE 56 St W of Dixie Hwy 7,400 0.75 0.95 0.79 D Floranada Rd W of US 1 11,200 0.94 0.95 0.99 D Commercial Blvd E of 31 Ave 55,800 4.46 4.68 0.95 D W of Andrews Ave 61,000 5.52 4.68 1.18 F W of Old Dixie Hwy 53,800 3.81 4.24 0.90 C Prospect Rd S of Commercial Blvd 15,800 1.69 3.11 0.54 B W of Powerline Rd 26,000 2.32 3.11 0.75 C W of Andrews Ave 26,500 2.45 4.45 0.55 C W of Old Dixie Hwy 20,200 1.79 4.45 0.40 * N 38/39 St W of Powerline Rd 9,100 0.63 0.95 0.66 D E of Andrews Ave 8,700 0.78 0.95 0.82 D W of US 1 NA NA 0.95 -- NA Oakland Park Blvd W of NW 31 Ave 57,500 5.20 4.68 1.11 F E of NW 31 Ave 55,000 4.98 4.68 1.06 F W of I-95 57,500 5.20 4.68 1.11 F E of I-95 69,500 6.29 4.68 1.34 F W of Powerline Rd NA NA 4.24 -- NA W of Andrews Ave 56,000 5.07 4.24 1.20 F E of Andrews Ave 48,500 4.39 4.24 1.04 E W of Dixie 44,500 4.03 4.68 0.86 D W of US 1 37,500 3.39 4.68 0.73 C NW 26 St E of NW 31 Ave 4,300 0.39 0.95 0.41 C *The level of service for these segments is better than C, but the exact level cannot be determined using the FDOT’s Generalized tables. Source: Broward County MPO, Roadway Capacity and Level of Service Analysis for 2004 and 2030. City of Oakland Park Transportation Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 2-7 Major Public Transportation Generators and Attractors The City considers four areas as being either major trip generators or attractors. Figures S10 and S11 in Volume III, the Map Series, depict these areas. Figure S10 shows existing locations of generators and attractors and Figure S11 shows future locations. 1. Cypress Creek Road/I-95 Employment Center – While not located within the City, the area immediately northwest of the municipal limits near Cypress Creek Road and Andrews Avenue, is an approximate 250-acre suburban downtown within mid-rise office uses, hotels, retails uses, restaurants and financial institutions. The exact square footage of these uses is not known, but the traffic impacts are significant on City roadways. Based on observations of the uses and using ITE data, it could be assumed that approximately 100,000 trips per day are generated in this area. 2. North Ridge Hospital Complex – The North Ridge Hospital Complex is located west of Dixie Highway between NE 58th Street and NE 56th Street. The site is approximately 11.25 acres in size and contains a hospital, medical offices and related uses. This complex generates approximately 7,000 trips per day based on information provided by the hospital (1,000 employees/80,000 square feet of office). 3. Downtown Local Activity Center – The Downtown Mixed Use District was designated a Local Activity Center (LAC) and is being redeveloped to support a mix of uses. This district is along Dixie Highway, immediately north of Oakland Park Boulevard. The City established design guidelines and standards for the area in 2004. Because redevelopment of this area is in the beginning stages, this area of the City is not identified as an existing generator/attractor of trips. It is, however, destined to be a major generator and attractor in the future. 4. Highway Commercial Uses – The City’s major arterial roadways (Commercial Boulevard, US 1, and Oakland Park Boulevard) and minor arterial roadways (Andrews Avenue, Dixie Highway and Prospect Road) have commercial uses fronting nearly the entire roadway frontage. Most can be described as “strip commercial” in function and appearance with numerous curb cuts and generally small uses. It is estimated that approximately 400 acres of commercial uses front roadway. Based on an assumed building coverage of 25% and noting that most uses are single story, it is estimated that approximately 504,000 trips per day are generated by these areas. City of Oakland Park Transportation Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 2-8 Public Transit System Figure S12 in Volume III, the Map Series, depicts the existing public transit system provided by Broward County Transit (BCT), the South Florida Regional Transportation Authority (Tri-Rail) and the City. In addition to the nearby Tri-Rail and Amtrak railroad corridor, there are nine BCT fixed routes that serve the City, as identified below. Table 2-4 – Broward County Transit Routes, 2007 Sources: Broward County MPO Division and BCT. Along each route are numerous bus stops and shelters and there are too many to identify on the map series. According to a map prepared in January 2006 by the Broward County MPO, most of these routes are considered to be over capacity, which means at least one segment of the route experiences overcrowding. In particular, a route or segment is considered congested, or over capacity, if ridership was greater than or equal to the number of seats available during the 2004 survey period. Details about each route are below. i Route 10 is a north/south bus route generally following US 1 (Federal Highway) from downtown Ft. Lauderdale to downtown Boca Raton in Palm Beach County. The route originates at the Broward Central Terminal at Broward Boulevard and Andrews Avenue in downtown Ft. Lauderdale. The route travels east on Broward Boulevard and turns north onto US 1. The route includes stops at several regional malls along the US 1 corridor. The City of Oakland Park adjoins US 1 from Oakland Park Boulevard to Floranada Road (NE 45th Street) which is approximately ¼ mile south of Commercial Boulevard. This route is considered to be over capacity, as is the segment of the route located adjacent to the City. i Route 11 is a meandering bus route traversing Oakland Park in a north/south direction west of l-95. The route initiates at the Pompano Citi Centre located at US 1 and Copans Road in the City of Pompano Beach, travels southeast to SR A1A and continues south to Las Olas Boulevard in Ft. Lauderdale and then heads west on Sistrunk Boulevard to NW 27th Avenue. The route snakes to the north through several neighborhoods and enters the City of Oakland Park at NW 21st Avenue and NW 26th Street. The route then continues north i Oakland Park Boulevard (BCT fixed route no. 72) i Commercial Boulevard (BCT fixed route no. 55) i Cypress Creek Road/NE 62nd Street (BCT fixed route no. 62) i NW 31st Avenue (BCT fixed route no. 31) i NW 21st Avenue (BCT fixed route no. 11) i Powerline Road (BCT fixed route no. 14) i Andrews Avenue (BCT fixed route no. 60) i Dixie Highway (BCT fixed route no. 20) i US-1/Federal Highway (BCT fixed route no. 10) City of Oakland Park Transportation Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 2-9 along NW 21st Avenue to Prospect Road then northwesterly on Prospect Road crossing Commercial Boulevard and continuing, into the City of Tamarac to the Sunshine Plaza Shopping Center at SR 7 and Commercial Boulevard. This route is considered to be over capacity; however, the portion of the route located in Oakland Park is not. i Route 14 is a north/south bus route following the Powerline Road alignment. This route initiates north of Ft. Lauderdale/Hollywood International Airport and meanders through downtown Ft. Lauderdale and then west to Powerline Road, northward into Pompano Beach and then eastward to Pompano Fashion Square at US 1 and Copans Road. This route is considered to be over capacity, as is the portion of the route located in the City. i Route 20 is a north/south bus route generally along US 1 adjacent to the City of Oakland Park. The route initiates at the Central Terminal at Broward Boulevard and Andrews Avenue in downtown Ft. Lauderdale which extends northeasterly to the Galleria Mall on Sunrise Boulevard then turns north on Bayview Drive to Oakland Park Boulevard. The route travels west to US 1 and then heads north to Floranada Road (NE 45th Street). The route travels west on Floranada Road to NE 18th Avenue and then turns north on NE 18th Avenue extending into the City of Pompano Beach and terminating at north Broward Medical Center at Sample Road and I-95. This route, including all segments, is not considered to be over capacity. i Route 31 is a north/south bus route generally following the NW 31st Avenue alignment along the western edge of the City. This route initiates at the Central Terminal at Broward Boulevard and Andrews Avenue and then follows Andrews Avenue north to Sunrise Boulevard, then west to NW 15th Avenue, north on NW 15th Avenue to NW 19th Street, and then west on NW 19th Street to NW 31st Avenue. The routes extends north on NW 31st Avenue to Atlantic Boulevard, then heads west into the City of Margate, then eastward through the southerly portion of Coconut Creek back to Atlantic Boulevard and then east into Pompano Beach. This route is considered to be over capacity, as is the portion of the route located in the City. i Route 50 is a north/south bus route generally following the Dixie Highway alignment through the City. This route initiates at the Central Terminal at Broward Boulevard and Andrews Avenue in downtown Ft. Lauderdale extending north along NE 3rd Avenue/NE 4th Avenue/Wilton Drive to Dixie Highway. The route follows Dixie Highway north to NE 56th Street. North Ridge Hospital and a Veterans Hospital are located at this intersection. The route heads west on NE 56th Street to NE 6th Avenue and then extends north along NE 6th and 7th Avenue to Cypress Creek Road. The route travels east on Cypress Creek Road to Dixie Highway and then heads north along Dixie Highway through Pompano Beach and into Deerfield Beach terminating at SR A1A and Hillsboro Boulevard. This route is considered to be over capacity, as is the portion of the route located in the City. City of Oakland Park Transportation Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 2-10 i Route 55 is an east/west bus route generally following Commercial Boulevard through the City. The route initiates at the Central Terminal at Broward Boulevard and Andrews Avenue in downtown Ft. Lauderdale. The route meanders northeasterly to NE 15th Avenue and extends northward to US 1 at NE 26th Street. The route follows US 1 north to Oakland Park Boulevard, then heads east to Bayview Drive, then north to Commercial Boulevard. The route heads west along Commercial Boulevard through the City of Oakland Park and terminates at Sunshine Plaza in the City of Tamarac at SR 7 and Commercial Boulevard. This route is considered to be over capacity, as is a portion of the route located in the City. i Route 60 is a north/south bus route generally following Andrews Avenue in the central area of the City. This route is one of two routes in the City which provides linkage to the Cypress Creek Station Park-n-Ride intermodal node at Cypress Creek Road and Andrews Avenue. This route initiates at the Central Terminal at Broward Boulevard and Andrews Avenue in Downtown Ft. Lauderdale and follows Andrews Avenue northward through the City of Oakland Park into Pompano Beach terminating at Dixie Highway and Atlantic Boulevard in the Old Pompano Beach City Center. This route is considered to be over capacity, as is the portion of the route located in the City. i Route 62 is an east/west bus route generally following the Cypress Creek Road corridor at the northern edge of Oakland Park. The route initiates at the Coral Square Mall in the City of Coral Springs located at Atlantic Boulevard and University Drive. The route extends southwesterly into the City of Tamarac and then heads east along McNab Road and Kimberly Boulevard through the Cities of North Lauderdale and Margate. The route follows Cypress Creek Road eastward to the Cypress Creek Station Park–n-Ride lot intermodal node at Andrews Avenue then continues eastward to US 1, south to Commercial Boulevard, east on Commercial Boulevard and south on SR A1A to the Galt Ocean Mile area. This route is considered to be over capacity; however, the portion of the route located in Oakland Park is not. i Route 72 is an east/west bus route generally following Oakland Park Boulevard through the southern portion of the City. This route initiates at the Sawgrass Mills Mall in the City of Sunrise at Flamingo Road and Sunrise Boulevard. The route runs between the Sawgrass Mills Mall and the Galt Ocean Mile area in the City of Ft. Lauderdale at SR A1A. This route is considered to be over capacity, as is a portion of the route located in the City. The City has developed, in conjunction with Broward County Transit, two community bus routes. The East route provides service to City Hall and major shopping areas and the West route serves the western portions of the community. City of Oakland Park Transportation Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 2-11 No public transit terminals or transfer stations exist within Oakland Park, other than the Cypress Creek Station Park-n-Ride lot on Cypress Creek Road west of I-95. Bus stops are located throughout the City along the numerous fixed bus routes. The Broward County School Board maintains a regional public school bus terminal in the City, located north of NW 38th Avenue, west of I-95. The facility is not for the transfer of students and is instead a maintenance/storage facility. Public Transit Rights of Way and Exclusive Public Transit Corridors Most transit rights-of-way within the City are bus bays along several major roads. The only exclusive public transit corridor located near the City is the South Florida Rail Corridor (CSX) used by Tri-Rail and Amtrak. The Florida Department of Transportation is undertaking a study to determine the feasibility of providing passenger service in the vicinity of the Florida East Coast (FEC) rail corridor. The City is supportive of this service and is desirous of a station being located in the City to support and correspond to redevelopment planned for the Downtown. Modal Split According to the 2000 Census, the percentage of residents in Oakland Park using public transportation to travel to work is 4.4 percent, as compared to 2.3 percent of Broward County residents. Similarly, 2.3 percent of City residents, versus 1.3 percent of County residents walk to work, and approximately the same percentages of City (0.6 percent) and County (0.5 percent) residents bicycle to work. These higher percentages are reflective of Oakland Park’s urban character. Table 2-5 – Mode of Travel to Work, 2000 Broward County Oakland Park Car, truck, or van: 684,540 92.1% 14,793 89.9% Drove alone 595,165 80.0% 12,472 75.8% Carpooled 89,375 12.0% 2,321 14.1% Public transportation: 17,048 2.3% 721 4.4% Bus or trolley bus 14,435 1.9% 653 4.0% Railroad 1,108 0.1% 24 0.1% Taxicab 992 0.1% 36 0.2% Motorcycle 1,205 0.2% 30 0.2% Bicycle 3,406 0.5% 104 0.6% Walked 9,680 1.3% 375 2.3% Other means 6,155 0.8% 98 0.6% Worked at home 21,509 2.9% 336 2.0% Total: 743,543 100% 16,457 100% Source: 2000 Census, Summary File 3. City of Oakland Park Transportation Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 2-12 Transportation Disadvantaged In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA), paratransit service is provided by Broward County for the purpose of delivering transportation services to individuals who, due to a functional disability (physical, cognitive, other), are unable to access or use the public transportation system. Broward County’s paratransit system is called TOPS, for the many Transportation Options available. Significant Bicycle and Pedestrian Ways Figure S13, Existing Pedestrian Ways and Missing Sidewalks, and Figure S14, Existing Bike Facilities and Blueways, in Volume III, the Map Series, depict the existing bicycle and pedestrian ways within the City. a) Bicycle Traffic Bike lanes exist on NW 21 Avenue, south of Oakland Park Boulevard, and undesignated facilities and wide curb lanes are located along Andrews Avenue (between Oakland Park Boulevard and Prospect Road), Federal Highway, Cypress Creek Road (NW 62 Street), NE 6 Avenue (south of Oakland Park Boulevard), and Dixie Highway (north of Commercial Boulevard). Bicycling within the City’s local streets is feasible and on major roadways, bicyclists typically use sidewalks for safety reasons. b) Pedestrian Traffic Pedestrian traffic is mostly limited to within the City’s neighborhoods. Sidewalks are located throughout the City mostly on major roadways; however, the system is not complete in some locations and the City is installing additional sidewalks as other infrastructure projects occur or roadways are refurbished. The environment along the major roadways is not conducive to pedestrian travel; however, the City is working to change this situation as redevelopment occurs. The relationship of travel lanes to buildings and parking facilities with almost no landscaping creates a potentially hazardous environment. Despite this, pedestrian travel occurs between the residential and commercial service areas and access to transit routes predominately occurs on major roadways. Transit Oriented Concurrency The Transit Oriented Concurrency Management System divides Broward County into ten (10) Concurrency Districts. The City of Oakland Park is totally contained within the Central District (Figure A8 in Volume III, the Map Series). Two of these districts (Northwest and Southwest Districts) maintain the existing roadway concurrency system. The remaining eight districts, City of Oakland Park Transportation Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 2-13 including the Central District, are designated as Transit Oriented Concurrency (TOC) Districts. The District boundaries, as well as the transit improvements within the districts, are the result of extensive consultations with the municipalities. Transit Oriented Concurrency assessments are based on a five-year Transit Development Plan (TDP) adopted by the County Commission. The Transit Concurrency Assessment is calculated as the total peak-hour trip generation of the proposed development, multiplied by a constant dollar figure for each District, that represents the cost per trip of all the TDP enhancements in that District. The revenues from Transit Concurrency Assessments must be used to fund transit enhancements in the District. Broward County oversees the transit oriented concurrency system. It is important to note, however, that there are opportunities for substantial credit against these fees for projects which are designed to encourage transit usage. Within the new Transit Oriented Districts, instead of assessing concurrency at the plat stage, the system assesses development prior to the application for a building permit. This broadens the County’s concurrency program to cover all new development and redevelopment, not only development subject to platting. Since the proposed concurrency assessments are calculated to represent mitigation for all project trips, no road or transit impact fees are assessed on projects paying transit concurrency fees. Prior to the application for a building permit with any local government within Broward County, an applicant must obtain a Transportation Concurrency Satisfaction Certificate from Broward County. No municipal government can accept a building permit application, or issue a building permit, unless the corresponding Transportation Concurrency Satisfaction Certificate is presented. Enforcement of the proposed concurrency system is connected to the County’s environmental review/approval of construction plans. The City of Oakland Park lies entirely within the Central district and has the following transportation level of service standards: i I-95 (a SIS corridor) – LOS E; i Cypress Creek Road from I-95 to Andrews Avenue and Andrews Avenue from Cypress Creek Road to the Tri-Rail station entrance (a SIS connector) – LOS D i As part of the Broward County Central District using transit oriented concurrency – coordinate with the county to achieve headways of 30 minutes or less on 80% of routes (non-contract BCT routes), establish at least one neighborhood transit center, and establish at least two additional community bus routes, increase bus shelters by 30%, and maintain the peak hour two-way maximum service volumes on arterial roads as list below: i Two-lane arterials 2,555 i Four-lane arterials 5,442 i Six-lane arterials 8,190 i Eight-lane arterials 10,605; i for Local Roadways – LOS “C” ADT, PSDT and PKHR City of Oakland Park Transportation Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 2-14 Based on the above level of service standards, I-95 is the only roadway that does not meet its adopted level of service standard. The Florida Department of Transportation is currently undertaking a Project Development and Environment (PD&E) study to assess adding lanes to I-95 from Oakland Park Boulevard to the Palm Beach County Line. FDOT is also coordinating with Broward County to evaluate proportionate fair share mechanisms for SIS and TRIP facilities in the County. The City will monitor the progress of this work. Oakland Park Boulevard also deserves mention because congestion on this roadway is so severe that the City determined it should be a major issue for its Evaluation and Appraisal Report. The City will need to work closely with the County and the Department of Transportation to develop solutions to congestion on these roadway segments. Ports, Airports, Railways and Intermodal Facilities Figure S15 in Volume III, the Map Series, illustrates the proximity of the City to nearby ports, airports, freight and passenger railways and related facilities. Port Facilities There are no port facilities within Oakland Park. The nearest major seaport is Port Everglades which is located approximately 5.5 miles southeast of the City, southeast of the central business district of the City of Fort Lauderdale. Port Everglades is a deep-water port managed by Broward County serving commercial freight customer, cruise lines and recreation boating needs. There are no airport or heliport facilities with the City; however there are three airports within a few miles of the City. Fort Lauderdale/Hollywood International Airport i Fort Lauderdale/Hollywood International Airport is located approximately 6.5 miles south of the City. The runway alignments are generally east/west. Air traffic typically lands from the west and takes off eastward over the Atlantic Ocean before beginning turning movements. Therefore, there are no clear zones or obstruction issues affecting the City. Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport i Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport is a general aviation facility located approximately one half-mile north/northwest of the City. Air traffic is generally restricted to noncommercial activities. The airport has east/west and diagonal (northwest/southeast and northeast/southwest) runway alignments. Air traffic typically takes off and lands on the City of Oakland Park Transportation Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 2-15 east/west runway due to prevailing winds. The use of the other runway alignments may cause some flyover conflicts such as noise or safety concerns. The relationship of the built environment to the airport has existed for many years and generally no clear zone or obstruction issues affect the City. However, as redevelopment occurs, particularly near the Cypress Creek Station Park-n-Ride lot, sensitivity to clear zones and obstructions, as well as compatibility with surrounding land uses, will be maintained. Pompano Beach Airport i Pompano Beach Airport is a general aviation facility located approximately 3.5 miles northeast of the City within the City of Pompano Beach. Air traffic is generally restricted to noncommercial activities. The runway alignments are generally east/west and air traffic typically makes turning movements within a few miles of the airport. No clear zone or obstruction issues face the City. Other Facilities i There are no heliports or similar facilities within the City. However, several heliports exist in the greater Fort Lauderdale area. Freight and Passenger Rail Lines and Terminals The City has two rail lines corridors within its boundaries. One is located generally east of and parallel to Dixie Highway in the east/central portion of the City and the second is located just west of I-95. Both corridors run in a north/south direction. The eastern corridor is known as the Florida East Coast (FEC) railroad line. The corridor is used almost exclusively for freight service. However, the Florida Department of Transportation is undertaking a study to assess reestablishing passenger service in this corridor. There are grade crossings at NE 62nd Street, NE 56th Street, Commercial Boulevard, Floranada Road (NE 45th Street), NE 38th Street, and Oakland Park Boulevard. The western corridor is now known as the South Florida Rail Corridor (SFRC), formerly the Seaboard Coastline Railroad (CSX). The corridor is used almost exclusively for passenger services. Both Amtrak and the Tri-Rail commuter train utilize this corridor. This corridor is identified by Broward County as the only exclusive public transit corridor in the County. There are no transit stations within the City of Oakland Park. There is, however, a Tri-Rail station just south of NE 62nd Street (Cypress Creek Road) and west of Andrews Avenue. FDOT owns and operates a park-and-ride lot at the southeast corner of NE 62nd Street and Andrews Avenue. In this general vicinity of this intersection there are a large number of high intensity City of Oakland Park Transportation Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 2-16 office uses clustered around the transit station and parking lot. Persons parking at the park-and- ride lot have the option of walking to the rail transit station or taking a bus to another destination. Intermodal Terminals and Access to Intermodal Facilities As mentioned above, there is one intermodal terminal within the City. This is the Cypress Creek Station Park-n-Ride lot located south of NE 62nd Street (Cypress Creek Road) between I-95 and Andrews Avenue. The parking lot has approximately 556 parking spaces. Bus shelters are located throughout the parking lot. Also, commuters can walk a short distance to the west across Andrews Avenue to the Tri-Rail station. Transportation Facilities Critical to the Evacuation of the Coastal Population According to the 2006 Hurricane Evacuation Map prepared by the Broward Emergency Management Agency, “Plan A” and “Plan B” evacuation areas are specified. The “Plan A” area consists of the barrier islands and will typically be evacuated for hurricanes at category 1 and above. The “Plan B” area consists of the area east of US 1 and will typically be evacuated for hurricanes at category 3 or higher. Mobile homes are to be evacuated in all instances of hurricanes and potentially during tropical storm warnings. Because the City of Oakland Park lies west of US 1, only mobile home parks in the City are required to be evacuated in preparation for storm conditions. No storm shelters are located in the City. The two closest are Park Lakes Elementary School in the City of Lauderdale Lakes and Rock Island Elementary/Arthur Ashe Middle School in the City of Fort Lauderdale. Except for I-95, there are no evacuation routes in the City. The Broward County Emergency Management Agency has defined evacuation routes as those segments of roadways necessary to evacuate residents from the barrier island to either US 1 or Dixie Highway. Description of the Future Transportation System Because of the developed nature of the City of Oakland Park, significant changes to the roadway transportation network are not anticipated. Instead, the City envisions pedestrian, bicycle and transit improvements to address the needs of future residents, businesses and visitors of the City. Coordination with Broward County and the Broward County MPO will be important in meeting the City’s needs. For these reasons, the future transportation system discussion in this section relies heavily on improvements included in the MPO’s 2030 Long Range Transportation Plan (LRTP). Table 2-6 shows the 2030 projected traffic volumes and levels of service for roadways in the City of Oakland Park. The MPO continues to evaluate roadway level of service and volume to capacity ratios (V/C) even though the Central district relies on transit-oriented concurrency. City of Oakland Park Transportation Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 2-17 Table 2-6 – Roadway System 2030 Traffic Volumes and Levels of Service Roadway Segment Daily Volume LOS D Capacity V/C LOS NW 31 Ave N of NW 19 St 56,214 50,825 1.11 F N of Oakland Park Blvd 58,865 49,200 1.20 F NW 21 Ave N of NW 19 St 28,730 31100 0.92 D N of Oakland Park Blvd 24,222 31100 0.78 D Powerline Rd N of NW 19 St 55,311 49,200 1.12 F N of Oakland Park 65,861 53,500 1.23 F N of Prospect Rd 55,360 53,500 1.03 F Interstate 95 N of Oakland Park Blvd 293,418 182,600 1.61 F N of Commercial Blvd 279,788 182,600 1.53 F N of Cypress Creek Rd 272,072 182,600 1.49 F Andrews Ave N of Oakland Park Blvd 31,359 32,700 0.96 D N of Prospect Rd 29,557 32,700 0.90 D N of Commercial Blvd 30,435 32,700 1.93 D N of Cypress Creek Rd 34,944 50,825 0.69 B NE 6 Ave N of Oakland Park Blvd 9,517 10000 0.95 D N of Prospect Rd 6,944 10000 0.69 D N of Commercial Blvd 7,821 21700 0.36 C N of NE 56 St 8,521 10000 0.85 D Dixie Hwy N of Oakland Park Blvd 21,305 32,700 0.65 C N of NE 38 St 29,830 32,700 0.91 D N of Commercial Blvd 28,590 32,700 0.87 D NE 16 Ave N of Oakland Park Blvd 5,880 10,000 0.59 D US 1 N of Oakland Park Blvd 58,620 49,200 1.19 F NE 62 St E of Andrews Ave 47,687 63,800 1.75 C E of I-95 41,595 49,200 0.85 D NE 56 St E of Andrews Ave 9,039 10,000 0.9 D Floranada Rd E of Dixie Hwy 19,723 10,000 1.97 F Commercial Blvd E of 31 Ave 54,836 49,200 1.11 F E of 21 Ave 65,530 49,200 1.33 F E of I-95 66,093 49,200 1.34 F Prospect Rd E of NW 31 Ave 20,138 21,700 0.93 D S of Commercial Blvd 28,767 32,700 0.88 D E of Powerline Rd 27,912 49,200 0.57 C E of Andrews Ave 18,934 49,200 0.38 C N 38/39 St E of NW 31 Ave 12,897 10,000 1.29 F E of NW 21 Ave 7,097 10,000 0.71 D E of Powerline Rd 7,781 10,000 0.78 D Oakland Park Blvd E of State Road 7 59,726 49,200 1.21 F E of NW 31 Ave 61,588 49,200 1.25 F E of I-95 66,657 49,200 1.35 F E of Andrews 57,436 49,200 1.17 F NW 26 St E of NW 31 Ave 4,876 10,000 0.49 D Source: Broward County MPO, Roadway Capacity and Level of Service Analysis for 2005 and 2030. City of Oakland Park Transportation Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 2-18 The number of through lanes to be available in 2030 for the roadway network in the City of Oakland Park is shown in Figure A9 in Volume III, the Map Series. The cost feasible improvements projected to be provided include: i widening of I-95 from eight to 10 lanes north of Commercial Boulevard, i expansion of Andrews Avenue from two to four lanes north of Commercial Boulevard and south of Cypress Creek Rd and six lanes north of Cypress Creek Road, and i expansion of NW 21 Avenue from two to four lanes for the entire length of the City. Several changes in the transit system are proposed for 2030, as shown in Figure A10 in Volume III, the Map Series. In addition to service improvements on existing routes, the following cost feasible improvements are identified in the 2030 LRTP: i Express bus service on Cypress Creek/McNab Road from the Sawgrass Mills area to Tri- Rail and downtown Fort Lauderdale, i Rapid Bus Transit on Oakland Park Boulevard from the Sawgrass Mills area to downtown Fort Lauderdale (via US 1), i Express bus on Powerline Road from the Palm Beach County line to downtown Fort Lauderdale, i High performance transit in the FEC railway corridor from the Miami-Dade County line to the Palm Beach County line. Express bus service provides limited stops on routes to reduce travel delays. Rapid bus transit offers stops at larger intervals and includes technology to improve the speed of boardings and alightings as well as on-road travel times. High performance transit typically includes services in dedicated guideways. The City supports all of these services, particularly improvements along Oakland Park Boulevard, which will help relieve congestion and the introduction of passenger transit service in the FEC corridor. The City has identified a location, which is shown on Figure A10 in Volume III, the Map Series, in the Community Redevelopment Area, within the Downtown Mixed Use District, for a potential station for this transit service. This area is being planned as a pedestrian oriented, urban mixed-use center that will be transit supportive. As shown in Figure S11 in Volume III, the Map Series, the Downtown Mixed Use District is the major new/emerging public transportation generator and attractor anticipated in the City in the short- and long-range planning periods. The City anticipates infill commercial, industrial and mixed-use development along the City’s major corridors, thereby increasing the number of public transportation generators and attractors. City of Oakland Park Transportation Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 2-19 The transit oriented concurrency system is based on financially feasible improvements in service and coverage that can be provided through fiscal year 2010. Broward County and the municipalities in the Central District will be meeting before that time to determine what, if any, improvements should be addressed in future years. The City anticipates being an active participant in the discussions and decisions to ensure that local needs are met. The City of Oakland Park’s growth trend can best be described as increasing at a slow rate. There is not a great amount of remaining vacant land in the City and travel patterns and interactions between land uses and transportation facilities are well established. No major future changes are anticipated, only roadway widening or alternate transportation methods. The compatibility between land uses and transportation facilities is also well established. No conflicts are anticipated other than to ensure that redevelopment near the Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport complies with appropriate noise and height compatibility requirements. This element is consistent and compatible with the Future Land Use Element and other Transportation Elements including the Broward County Transportation Element, the Broward County Land Use Plan, the MPO’s 2030 Long Range Transportation Plan, the Florida Department of Transportation’s Adopted Work Program, the MPO’s Transportation Improvements Program (TIP), the South Florida Regional Transportation Authority’s plans related to Tri-Rail, and the Broward County Bicycle Facilities and Greenways Plans. Because the City relies on partnerships with these agencies in the provision of transportation infrastructure, projects from these plans are included in the City’s capital improvement program (see Table 2 in Volume I). There are no identifiable deficiencies noted within the City. City residents are expected to continue the use of automobiles for primary travel purposes as is common in Broward County, where 92 percent of County residents and 90 percent of City residents use an automobile as their means of travel to work. However, as transit service coverage expands through the use of community buses and more frequent and new fixed-route services, the percentage of residents, employees and visitors using alternate modes of travel is expected to increase. There are portions of missing bikeway/sidewalk segments that could eventually complete a more comprehensive citywide system. The City will continue to support and implement the completion of the sidewalk and bicycle networks as capital improvements are undertaken or redevelopment occurs. As part of the MPO’s 2030 Long Range Transportation Plan, several bicycle facility enhancements are proposed in the City of Oakland Park, as shown in Figure A11 in Volume III, the Map Series. Unmarked bike lanes are proposed for Commercial Boulevard, from NW 9 Avenue/Powerline Road to the City’s eastern municipal limits. Similarly, a wide curb lane and City of Oakland Park Transportation Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 2-20 future greenway are proposed for the length of Dixie Highway and this project is in design. A greenway is also proposed for the C-13 canal near NW 38 Street, Future facilities also are proposed for portions of NW 9 Avenue/Powerline Road and Prospect Road. As mentioned previously, no airport or seaport facilities are located within the City. The City does not anticipate establishing any in the future. 3 Housing Element City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan City of Oakland Park Housing Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 3-1 Housing Inventory An inventory of the number of Oakland Park and Broward County dwelling units as enumerated in the 2000 Census is set forth in a series of tables on the following pages. The inventory addresses type, tenure, age, rent, value, monthly cost of owner occupied units, and rent/cost-to- income ratios. In 2005, the City annexed the areas of North Andrews Gardens, Twin Lakes South, Mira Lago and Montage by the Lake/Satori Plat Area. These annexations added approximately 5,133 units and 11,500 additional residents to the City. The dwelling unit and population projections for the City include the annexed areas. However, the information provided below is based on the 2000 Census and the annexed areas are not included. A major factor in the decision not to include these areas in the analysis is the lack of consistent boundaries between municipal boundaries and Census boundaries. Type As shown in Tables 3-1, 3-2 and 3-3, approximately one third (5,223) of the residential units in the City are single-family detached units, whereas nearly one-half of the units in Broward County are of this type. Consequently, the City of Oakland Park, with 8,999 units, has a larger percentage of multi-family units as compared to Broward County. In 2000, the City had 305 mobile home units, 821 units in duplexes and 906 units in three or four unit buildings. A large number of the City’s multifamily units, 4,146, are located in buildings of 20 or more units, with 3,126 units in medium sized buildings of five to nineteen units. Table 3-1 – Number of Units by Type, 2000 Place Single-family (1 att./ detach.) Multi-family (2 or more) Mobile Home Other Total Broward County 360,764 352,349 26,834 1,096 741,043 Oakland Park 5,223 8,999 305 13 14,540 Source: 2000 Census. Table 3-2 – Percentage of Units by Type, 2000 Place % Single- family (1 att./ detach.) % Multi- family (2 or more) % Mobile Home % Other Broward County 48.7 47.5 3.6 0.1 Oakland Park 35.9 61.9 2.1 0.1 Source: 2000 Census. City of Oakland Park Housing Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 3-2 Table 3-3 - Units by Type, Detailed, 2000 Place 1, detached 1, attached 2 3 or 4 5 to 9 10 to 19 20 or more Mobile Home or Trailer Other Total Broward County 303,357 57,407 20,225 33,347 41,120 53,717 203,940 26,834 1,096 741,043 Oakland Park 4,646 577 821 906 1,540 1,586 4,146 305 13 14,540 Source: 2000 Census. Tenure According to the Census, 6,709, or nearly half, of the City’s occupied dwelling units housed renters, whereas renters occupied only 30 percent of the units countywide in 2000. Table 3-4 - Tenure of Units, 2000 Households by Tenure, 2002 Place Owner Renter Total Broward County 467,415 203,608 671,023 Oakland Park 6,948 6,709 13,657 Source: 2000 Census. Age The City of Oakland Park is one of the older suburban communities in Broward County and 2,899 of the City’s units, nearly one out of every five, were built before 1960. Less than one in every eight units in Broward County was built before 1960, with the largest increase in the number of units occurring in the 1970s, when 220,745 units were built. Over one half of the City’s units were built in the 1960s and 1970s, in roughly equal amounts of 3,887 and 3,823 units respectively. The City added 1,150 units, just under eight percent of its total inventory, in the 1990s, whereas one fifth (19.5 percent) of the County housing supply was built in the 1990s. Table 3-5 - Number of Dwelling Units by Year Built, 2000 Place 1999- March 2000 1995- 1998 1990- 1994 1980- 1989 1970- 1979 1960- 1969 1940- 1959 1939 or Earlier Broward County 19,130 60,852 64,154 157,319 220,745 127,699 83,382 7,762 Oakland Park 143 243 764 2,781 3,823 3,887 2,662 237 Source: 2000 Census. City of Oakland Park Housing Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 3-3 Table 3-6 - Percentage of Dwelling Units by Decade Built, 2000 Share by Decade 1990s (%) 1980s (%) 1970s (%) 1960s (%) Before 1960s(%) Broward County 19.5 21.2 29.8 17.2 12.3 Oakland Park 7.9 19.1 26.3 26.7 19.9 Source: 2000 Census. Vacancy and Occupancy In the City of Oakland Park, 523 units or 3.7 percent of units are vacant, which is slightly smaller than the 4.6 vacancy rate for Broward County. When seasonal units are included, the City’s vacancy rate of 6.9 percent is nearly 5 percent lower than the countywide figure of 11.7 percent. Lower vacancy rates in the City as related to Broward County are to be expected because of the lower housing values and rental costs. Table 3-7 - Units by Vacancy and Occupancy Status, 2000 Place Occupied Vacant Total Vacancy Rate (%) Vacant Seasonal, etc. Units Total Units Vacancy Rate Total Units (%) Broward County 654,445 31,740 686,185 4.6 54,858 741,043 11.7 Oakland Park 13,502 523 14,025 3.7 484 14,509 6.9 Source: 2000 Census. Rent Over half (3,667) of the rental units in the City of Oakland Park identified gross rent of $500 to $749, and over two-thirds of rental units in the City have gross rents less than $750. The City has 1,909 units with gross rents from $750 to $999, and 488 units with gross rents of $1,000 or more. Of note is the low number of higher rent units as compared to Broward County. In Broward County, nearly 18 percent of rental units require $1,000 or more in gross rent. In the City of Oakland Park, less than 6 percent of the units have such high rents. City of Oakland Park Housing Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 3-4 Table 3-8 - Gross Rent, 2000 Place <$200 $200- $299 $300- $499 $500- $749 $750- $999 $1000- $1499 $1500 or More NO Cash Rent Total Broward County 3,892 3,515 17,640 69,173 62,862 28,298 7,376 6,809 199,565 Oakland Park 34 66 527 3,667 1,909 382 9 97 6,691 Broward County 2.0% 1.8% 8.8% 34.7% 31.5% 14.2% 3.7% 3.4% 100.0% Oakland Park 0.5% 1.0% 7.9% 54.8% 28.5% 5.7% 0.1% 1.4% 100.0% Source: 2000 Census. Specified renter-occupied units include all renter-occupied units except one-unit attached or detached houses on ten acres or more. Value Housing values in the City are generally lower than those in Broward County as a whole*. Almost three-fourths, or 72 percent, of the City’s single-family owner occupied units had values less than $150,000, versus 62 percent of similar units for the County in 2000. Over seven (7) percent of the County’s units were valued at $300,000 or higher in 2000 while the City had less than two (2) percent of its units in this range. Table 3-9 - Values of Owner-Occupied Units, 2000 Place <$50,000 $50,000- $99,999 $100,000- $149,999 $150,000- $199,999 $200,000- $299,999 $300,000- $499,000 $500,000- $999,999 >$1,000,000 Total Broward County 5,428 90,604 90,622 54,293 15,769 5,596 7,376 1,580 298,725 Oakland Park 51 1,306 1,602 732 341 61 11 0 4,104 Broward County 1.8% 30.3% 30.3% 18.2% 5.3% 1.9% 2.5% 0.5% 100.0% Oakland Park 1.2% 31.8% 39.0% 17.8% 8.3% 1.5% 0.3% 0.0% 100.0% Source: 2000 Census. Specified owner-occupied units include only one-family houses on fewer than ten acres without a business or medical office. In 2006, the Broward Housing Partnership undertook a Housing Needs Assessment, prepared by The Metropolitan Center at Florida International University. The study shows that in 1993, the average price of all homes and condominiums sold in Broward County was $105,210. By 2002, the average price had risen 73 percent to $181,591. During the same time period, median household income in Broward had only risen by 36 percent. Therefore, in nine years, housing costs in Broward increased at approximately twice the rate of household income. The average sales price of a new single family home in Broward County in 2003 was $383,000, and for all housing types, $206,012. This trend is expected to continue as projected deficits in housing * Since the 2000 Census, housing prices in Broward County have soared. Although the values have increased, it is unlikely that the County/City comparisons have significantly changed. City of Oakland Park Housing Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 3-5 units are realized in the city and the county through 2010. While these increases have positive implications for the City’s tax base, they have negative implications for both the existing and potential workforce populations and therefore, on the economy. Monthly Costs of Owner-Occupied Units The City has larger percentages of owner-occupied units paying moderate monthly costs than those countywide. The City has 921 units that are not mortgaged and 19 units with costs less than $500. The City’s percentage of non-mortgaged units is four percent higher than the percentage for Broward County, and the 0.5 percentage of households, low costs under $500 in the City is slightly lower than Broward County’s 1.5 percent. The City has 2,405 units with monthly costs between $700 and $1,499, or 58.6 percent of such units; whereas, Broward County has only 48.4 percent of owner occupied units with costs in this range. A larger percentage of owner occupied units in Broward County versus the City have monthly costs $1,500 or higher, with 26.8 percent and 14.0 percent, respectively. Table 3-10 - Monthly Costs of Owner-Occupied Units, 2000 Owner Costs (Mortgage Status and Selected Monthly Costs), 2000 With a Mortgage Specified Owner-Occupied Housing Units Place <$300 $300- $499 $500- $699 $700- $999 $1000- $1499 $1500- $1999 >$2000 Sub Total Not Mort- gaged Total Units Broward County 552 3,942 14,323 53,572 91,265 45,215 34,945 243,814 54,911 298,725 Oakland Park 0 19 186 838 1,567 409 164 3,183 921 4,104 Broward County 0.2% 1.3% 4.8% 17.9% 30.6% 15.1% 11.7% 81.6% 18.4% 100.0% Oakland Park 0.0% 0.5% 4.5% 20.4% 38.2% 10.0% 4.0% 77.6% 22.4% 100.0% Source: 2000 Census. Specified owner-occupied units include only one-family houses on fewer than ten acres without a business or medical office. Rent and Cost to Income Ratios The percentage of household income spent on housing in the City of Oakland Park is comparable with percentages countywide for both renter and owner occupied units. The Florida Department of Community Affairs considers a rent- or cost-to-income ratio in excess of 30 percent to be a sign of excessive housing costs. Such households are deemed “cost burdened”. Approximately 47 percent of renter households in Oakland Park and Broward County, regardless of income, spend more than 30 percent of their incomes on housing. The percentage of cost burdened owner occupied housing units is approximately 32 percent in the City and the County. City of Oakland Park Housing Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 3-6 Table 3-11 - Renter Household Income Spent on Housing, 2000 Place <20% 20%- 24% 25%- 29% 30%- 34% 35% or More Not Computed Total Cost Burden 30% or More Broward County 51,186 26,370 21,821 16,105 70,862 13,221 86,967 Oakland Park 1,728 900 752 502 2,514 295 3,016 Broward County 27.5% 14.2% 11.7% 8.6% 38.0% 46.7% Oakland Park 27.0% 14.1% 11.8% 7.8% 39.3% 47.2% Source: 2000 Census. Income is from 1999. Table 3-12 - Owner Household Income Spent on Housing, 2000 Place <20% 20%- 24% 25%- 29% 30%- 34% 35% or More Not Computed Total Cost Burden 30% or More Broward County 120,880 47,012 34,596 23,143 69,818 3,276 92,961 Oakland Park 1,627 629 469 325 988 66 1,313 Broward County 40.9% 15.9% 11.7% 7.8% 23.6% 31.5% Oakland Park 40.3% 15.6% 11.6% 8.0% 24.5% 32.5% Source: 2000 Census. Income is from 1999. Condition of Housing Units The City defines substandard units to be those that lack complete plumbing, lack complete kitchen facilities, or lack central heating. The City also tracks overcrowded units (those defined as having more than one person per room residing in the unit) because such conditions can lead to premature deterioration of units based on increased use. In the City, 458 units, or 3.3 percent of the units, lack heating, plumbing or kitchen facilities. As a percentage, the City’s figure is slightly lower than the 3.9 percent of units countywide lacking such services. However, the City has a larger percentage of units with more than one person per room, with 1,248 occupied units or 9.2 percent as compared to 7.4 percent in Broward County. City of Oakland Park Housing Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 3-7 Table 3-13 - Housing Conditions, 2000 Place Persons per Room House Heating Fuel Kitchen Facilities Plumbing Facilities 1.01 or More Persons per Room % of Occupied Units No Fuel Used % of Occupied Units Lacking Complete Facilities % of Units Lacking Complete Facilities % of Units Broward County 48,389 7.4 19,952 3.0 3,342 0.5 2,617 0.4 Oakland Park 1,248 9.2 369 2.7 74 0.5 15 0.1 Source: 2000 Census. Assisted Housing There is one renter-occupied housing development, Bridgewater Place, located at 2800 NW 44 Street, that receives federal or state subsidies. There are 312 units in the development and all units receive financial assistance. The targeted population for these units is families. The housing programs used to provide support include bonds, guarantees and housing credits. The City does not have a housing authority; however, federal rental vouchers provided by housing authorities in other local governments may be transferred and used in the City of Oakland Park. Given the large number of rental units in the City and the relatively low costs of monthly rents, it is likely vouchers are used with private landlords in the City. It is not possible for the City to track such units without cooperation from other housing authorities. In 2006, the City requested letters of interest from developers to construct dwelling units that will be deed restricted for low income families on the Watts Estates Plat within the Community Redevelopment Area. In response, a multi-family rental apartment project is proposed and will provide 74 units for a mix of incomes that will be targeted for very low- and low-income households. Group Homes The following list shows group homes in the City that are licensed by the Florida Department of Children and Families. The name, general location and capacity are provided below. All, except one, are Category Three (3) facilities, consisting of adult congregate living facilities, nursing homes, or community residential home with more than fourteen residents. Howell’s Retirement Home is a Category Two (2) facility licensed to serve seven to fourteen clients. City of Oakland Park Housing Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 3-8 Table 3-14 - Group Homes, 2007 Name Location Capacity Abundant Care Retirement Residence 201 NE 40 Court 36 Good Hope Manor, Inc. 2251 NW 29 Court 100 Howell’s Retirement Home 179 NW 40 Court 12 Mission Manors Inc. 460 NW 40 Court 26 Palms Villas Retirement Home 2131 NW 28 Street 21 Paradise Manor 365 NW 43 Court 30 Treemont on the Park 3881 NE 3 Avenue 34 Source: City of Oakland Park, Planning Services Division. Mobile Homes The City has one mobile home park and one RV park in southwest portion of City which are as follows: i Sunshine Holiday R.V. & Mobile Home Park (370 spaces), 2802 W. Oakland Park Blvd. i Paradise Island RV Resort (232 spaces), 2121 NW 29 Court Historically Significant Housing Figure A7 identifies the 150 sites in the City of Oakland Park listed in the Florida Master Site File. As shown in Figure S2, Existing Land Uses, a significant number of these sites are residential. Construction Activity The City estimates approximately 806 units have been added to the housing stock from 1999 through 2005. The single-family units added since 2000 primarily have been constructed on infill parcels. Similarly, many of the multi-family developments have been constructed on smaller parcels, consisting of three to twenty units. Larger development projects in the western portion of the City have occurred in 2005 and 2006. Table 3-15 - Net Number of Units Receiving Certificates of Occupancy (1999-2005) Type of Unit 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005** Unit Total Single Family 46 26 0 8 5 -6 -- 79 Multi-Family* 32 148 312 4 12 -1 -- 507 Yearly Unit Total 78 174 312 12 17 -7 220 806 *Includes townhomes. ** Estimate by City of Oakland Park Development Services Department. Source: City of Oakland Park, Housing and Structure Inventory Survey, 1999-2004. City of Oakland Park Housing Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 3-9 Housing Analysis As mentioned in the Future Land Use Element when discussing population projections, for the past 15 years, Broward County staff have projected the County’s population for a thirty-year period, using the Broward County Population Forecasting Model (BCPFM). This model has been certified by the Department of Community Affairs for use in Broward County. The population projections for the City are given below along with the projected number of dwelling units required to support the population. The projections are directly from the BCPFM, except for those identified for the CRA, which have been estimated. Table 3-16 - City of Oakland Park Population Projections 2010 to 2030 2006 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 City 19,235 19,738 20,806 21,910 23,043 23,978 CRA 4,005 4,130 4,464 4,803 5,143 5,376 City 503 1,571 2,675 3,808 4,744 CRA 125 458 798 1,138 1,371 City 43,729 45,873 49,752 53,523 57,280 60,121 CRA 10,158 10,734 11,865 13,111 14,290 15,026 City 2,143 6,023 9,793 13,551 16,391 CRA 575 1,707 2,953 4,131 4,868 City 2.43 2.48 2.53 2.57 2.60 2.60 City 6.6% 6.1% 5.5% 4.8% 4.2% 3.7% Notes: Difference above 2006 Persons per Household 1) The projections were provided by Broward County (dated 02/09/07). Difference above 2006 Dwelling Units Source: Broward County Population Forecasting Model (as revised February 9, 2007) and Carter & Burgess, Inc. Vacancy Rate 2) The CRA projections are determined by evaluating the existing land use patterns and aerial photos to assess the amount of residential in a TAZ. 3) Population projections for the CRA are based on the persons per household and vacancy rates determined by Broward County for the specific TAZ. Population Growth Factors City of Oakland Park Housing Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 3-10 Several factors relate to the City being able to accommodate the projected population in 2030: i Population growth in the City will be accommodated through redevelopment and infill. Many infill lots in the City are being developed with small townhome projects of three to twenty units. i Mixed-use projects are being encouraged in commercial areas and additional residential units are anticipated. i The City is seeing a decreasing trend in the seasonal population as the growth in the number of retirees moving to the area slows. Seasonal units are instead being used by permanent residents. i The demographic changes of the population include households with larger numbers of children and extended families, and the average number of persons per household will increase to 2.60 in 2030 from the 2.43 estimate for 2006. i The vacancy rates of units countywide will decrease, which will also help house the expected population. The Florida Housing Data Clearinghouse (FHDC) (also known as University of Florida’s Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing) provides various data on population, housing, income and affordability. Unfortunately, the data for the areas annexed on September 15, 2005, is unavailable. Therefore, other than the review of population growth in general, this assessment focuses on the previous boundaries of the City. The following table shows the needs assessment through 2025 provided by the FHDC. The total number of units projected as the 2025 demand is 18,463, which is 771 units fewer than the 2006 dwelling unit estimate of 19,234 provided by the Broward County model. Table 3-17 - Projected Housing Needs 2005 to 2025 Year Projected Demand for Housing (# of Units) Projected Additional Units Needed Number of Cost Burdened Households 2005 14,829 758 5,023 2010 15,768 1,697 5,346 2015 16,679 2,608 5,642 2020 17,594 3,523 5,933 2025 18,463 4,392 6,232 Source: Florida Housing Data Clearinghouse Housing cost burden is defined by the Florida Housing Data Clearinghouse (FHDC) as the percentage of household income spent for mortgage or gross rent. According to HUD programs, households spending more than 30 percent of income for these housing costs are considered to be cost burdened. Households spending more than 50 percent are considered to be severely City of Oakland Park Housing Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 3-11 cost burdened. According to the FHDC, housing is generally considered to be affordable if the household spends less than 30 percent of its income on housing. The number of cost burdened households consistently represents approximately 35 percent of the City’s households, with approximately 14 percent of the households designated as severely cost burdened (spending more than 50% of their income on housing). Table 3-18 provides additional information from the FHDC on affordable housing needs in the City, for those who are spending more than 50 percent of their income on housing costs. As shown in Table 3-18, by 2025, 1,513 renter- and 883 owner-occupied households with incomes less than 80 percent of the area median are projected to be spending 50 percent or more of the income on housing. The construction need for new units to address the situation is nearly half of the number of severely cost-burdened households and one fourth of the 4,392 new units required. The construction need by income level is shown in Table 3-19. For Broward County, nearly 40 percent of the construction demand is for households with incomes 120 percent or more of the area median income level. Whereas, for the City, 38 percent of the construction need is for that income range. Table 3-20 shows projected housing needs by household size and, in general, the households in Oakland Park are projected to be smaller, as percentages, than those countywide. For example, in 2025, two thirds of Broward County households will consist of one or two people, whereas nearly three fourths, or 71 percent, of households in Oakland Park will be that size. Table 3-21 shows the projected number of households by unit type, single- or multi-family, through 2025, and Table 3-22 shows the construction need by type for the same period. The percentages of single- and multi-family units are projected to be the same for each five-year period as in 2005. In Broward County, 55 percent of households are single family and a slight increase in that percentage is projected through 2025. In the City of Oakland Park, only 38 percent of households are single family and the same percentages of single- and multi-family units are projected through 2025. The City would prefer its mix of units be more consistent with Broward County. City of Oakland Park Housing Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 3-12 Table 3-18 - Affordable Housing Needs for Oakland Park 2005-2025 Source: Florida Housing Data Clearinghouse Tables 3-23 and 3-24 show projected housing need by tenure for the City and Broward County and the net new units needed. Of note is that the owner and renter percentages are projected to be the same for each five-year period as in 2005. In Broward County, 70 percent of households are owner-occupied and that same percentage is projected through 2025. In the City of Oakland Park, only 51 percent of households are owner-occupied and the same percentages of renter and owner-occupied units are projected through 2025. The City would prefer to increase the percentages of owner-occupied units to be more consistent with Broward County. This increase in ownership may occur in multi-family or single-family units. 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 32,740 34,455 35,728 36,489 37,277 <20% 184 201 223 249 272 20-29.9% 108 118 134 151 171 30-39.9% 101 112 122 134 145 40-49.9% 77 82 87 96 100 50-59.9% 64 69 75 78 80 60-79.9% 97 102 105 109 115 TOTAL 631 684 746 817 883 <20% 397 421 443 459 472 20-29.9% 266 285 301 319 338 30-39.9% 294 312 327 340 353 40-49.9% 161 171 177 184 190 50-59.9% 79 84 84 87 89 60-79.9% 60 63 67 69 71 TOTAL 1,257 1,336 1,399 1,458 1,513 1,888 2,020 2,145 2,275 2,396 <20% 49 61 111 125 171 20-29.9% 30 37 72 81 121 30-39.9% 40 50 93 105 150 40-49.9% 39 49 88 100 139 50-59.9% 46 60 105 121 161 60-79.9% 91 114 205 229 317 295 371 674 761 1,059 Year Projected Population Total Number of Severely Cost Burdened Households with Income <80% AMI Total Construction Need for Households with Income Less than 80% AMI Number of Severely Cost Burdened Households with Income <80% AMI by Tenure and Income Level Owner Renter Construction Need for Severely Cost Burdened Households by Income Level City of Oakland Park Housing Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 3-13 Table 3-19 - Construction Need by Income as a Percentage of AMI 2005-2025 Place Household Income as % of AMI 2002- 2005 2002- 2010 2002- 2015 2002- 2020 2002- 2025 Broward County <20% 2,627 7,198 12,501 18,957 25,374 Broward County 20-29.9% 1,925 5,270 9,332 14,638 20,515 Broward County 30-39.9% 2,385 6,502 11,380 17,546 24,120 Broward County 40-49.9% 2,288 6,231 10,806 16,490 22,391 Broward County 50-59.9% 2,585 7,110 12,358 18,718 24,985 Broward County 60-79.9% 5,178 14,134 24,474 36,972 49,404 Broward County 80-119.9% 9,566 25,995 44,505 66,234 87,035 Broward County 120+ % 18,920 51,422 87,198 128,356 166,755 Broward County Total 45,474 123,862 212,554 317,911 420,579 Oakland Park <20% 49 110 172 236 296 Oakland Park 20-29.9% 30 67 109 153 202 Oakland Park 30-39.9% 40 90 143 198 255 Oakland Park 40-49.9% 39 88 137 188 239 Oakland Park 50-59.9% 46 106 165 226 282 Oakland Park 60-79.9% 91 205 319 434 546 Oakland Park 80-119.9% 169 376 575 773 958 Oakland Park 120+ % 295 654 990 1,315 1,614 Oakland Park Total 759 1,696 2,610 3,523 4,392 Source: Florida Housing Data Clearinghouse Table 3-25 provides information related to the provision of housing for migrant workers in Broward County. Given the urbanized nature of the County, the decrease in the need for units is understandable. City of Oakland Park HousingComprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 3-14Table 3-20 - Projected Housing Needs 2005 to 2025 - Households by Household Size All Households Place Size 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 Broward County 1 to 2 408,916 62.5% 447,862 62.5% 498,804 63.0% 562,247 64.2% 638,870 65.5% 714,365 66.6% Broward County 3 to 4 183,649 28.1% 202,114 28.2% 220,387 27.9% 236,313 27.0% 253,535 26.0% 269,428 25.1% Broward County 5 and more61,583 9.4% 66,940 9.3% 72,063 9.1% 76,704 8.8% 82,679 8.5% 88,589 8.3% 654,148 100.0% 716,916 100.0% 791,254 100.0% 875,264 100.0% 975,084 100.0% 1,072,382 100.0%Oakland Park1 to 2 9,207 68.3% 9,764 68.4% 10,442 68.8% 11,194 69.7% 11,954 70.6% 12,677 71.3% Oakland Park3 to 4 3,280 24.3% 3,455 24.2% 3,620 23.8% 3,707 23.1% 3,770 22.3% 3,860 21.7% Oakland Park5 and more999 7.4% 1,062 7.4% 1,125 7.4% 1,165 7.3% 1,213 7.2% 1,250 7.0% 13,486 100.0% 14,281 100.0% 15,187 100.0% 16,066 100.0% 16,937 100.0% 17,787 100.0%Source: Florida Housing Data Clearinghouse Table 3-21 - Projected Housing Needs 2005 to 2025 - Households by Household Type, Total Permanent (Non-Seasonal) Housing - Projected Demand By Type 2005-2025 PlaceEst. Housing Units By Type 2002 Projected Demand By Type 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 SingleFamily Multi-Family SF MF SF MF SF MF SF MF SF MF BrowardCounty 390,495 316,735 416,769 335,935 463,789 367,303 518,149 401,636 584,589 440,551 649,007 478,801Oakland Park5,405 8,666 5,694 9,135 6,055 9,713 6,405 10,274 6,756 10,838 7,090 11,373 Source: Florida Housing Data Clearinghouse City of Oakland Park HousingComprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 3-15Table 3-22 - Projected Housing Needs 2005 to 2025 - Households by Household Type, Construction Need Projected Construction Need By Type Place2002-2005 2002-2010 2002-2015 2002-2020 2002-2025 SF MF SF MF SF MF SF MF SF MF Broward County 26,274 19,200 73,294 50,568 127,654 84,901 194,094 123,816 258,512 162,066 Oakland Park 289 469 650 1,047 1,000 1,608 1,351 2,172 1,685 2,707 Source: Florida Housing Data ClearinghouseTable 3-23 - Projected Housing Needs 2005 to 2025 - Households by Tenure, Total Projected Demand by Tenure Place2002 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 Owner Renter Owner Renter Owner Renter Owner Renter Owner Renter Owner Renter BrowardCounty 467,415 203,608 525,090 227,614 581,595 249,496 645,866 273,919 722,640 302,500 797,297 330,511 Oakland Park6,948 6,709 7,544 7,285 8,021 7,747 8,485 8,194 8,950 8,644 9,392 9,071 Source: Florida Housing Data ClearinghouseTable 3-24 - Projected Housing Needs 2005 to 2025 - Households by Tenure, Net Projected Growth in Households by Tenure Place2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 Owner Renter Owner Renter Owner Renter Owner Renter Owner Renter Broward County 57,675 24,006 114,180 45,888 178,451 70,311 255,225 98,892 329,882 126,903 Oakland Park 596 576 1,073 1,038 1,537 1,485 2,002 1,935 2,444 2,362 Source: Florida Housing Data Clearinghouse Table 3-25 - 1995 Estimation of Migrant Workers and Migrant Worker Housing – Broward County Demand: Unaccompanied Migrant & Seasonal Households Supply: DOH-Permitted Camps Need for Single Person Beds Demand Accompanied Migrant & Seasonal Households Supply: Section 514/516 and FHFC-Assisted Family Units Need for Family Units 584 0 -584 248 176 -72 Source: Florida Housing Data Clearinghouse City of Oakland Park Housing Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 3-16 Land Requirements to Address Housing Need In 1998 the City was looking to redevelop and to establish greater variety in the socio-economic status of its residents. To that end in regards to housing, the 1998 Plan focused on increasing the number of single family units and the number of owner-occupied units. The City has historically been an affordable housing area for the County, with approximately 68 percent of its housing stock consisting of townhomes or multifamily units. (Broward Housing Partnership Housing Needs Assessment, The Metropolitan Center at Florida International University, March 1, 2006). The 1998 Plan did not anticipate the recent increase in housing prices that was unaccompanied by increases in household income. The City does not track estimated sales price or ownership patterns for proposed residential units, and therefore, it is assumed most new units will be market rate housing. To address the escalating housing costs, the City is considering establishing an inclusionary housing ordinance for the CRA and potentially citywide. In the more immediate future, within the CRA, the City has identified a developer to construct 74 multi-family rental units that will be available (per deed restriction) for low-income families on the Watts Estates Plat. The City’s population projections indicate that 4,900 new units will be needed in the City by 2030. Future households will be accommodated in existing housing units plus new housing units, through infill development, redevelopment, and development of the remaining vacant parcels. The City’s CRA Plan identifies several changes that are directed towards meeting this need. The proposed land use changes identified in the CRA Plan and the number of units that would be established are listed below. A total of 3,183 units are anticipated through these redevelopment projects. The amount of land required to meet the additional housing need of 1,717 units will depend on the market forces working under the constraint of reasonable land development regulations. Based on the specified number of units, the Downtown Local Activity Center will accommodate an additional 742 units, not already identified above as part of Park Place or Eastside Village. The Commons at Cypress Creek project near I-95 is currently anticipated to request 413 dwelling units be located on site. City of Oakland Park Housing Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 3-17 Table 3-26 – Proposed CRA Land Use Changes and Potential New Units, 2007 Area Proposed Use Net New Units East Harlem McBride Medium density residential uses, up to 16 units per acre 395 Oakland Festival Center Mixed residential and commercial/office uses; up to 30 units per acre 337 (at 25 units per acre) 404 (at 30 units per acre) H and S Subdivision Medium density residential uses, up to 16 units per acre 62 NE 12th Terrace Mixed residential and commercial/office uses; up to 30 units per acre 165 (at 25 units per acre) 198 (at 30 units per acre) Central Park Industrial Area Medium density residential uses, up to 16 units per acre 500 Kmart Site Mixed residential and commercial/office uses; up to 30 units per acre 335 (at 25 units per acre) 402 (at 30 units per acre) Park Place Mixed residential and commercial/office uses; up to 50 units per acre 412 units Eastside Village Lofts Mixed uses; 34 townhouses, 612 high-rise units and retail 646 units Watts Estates Affordable Multi-family rental 74 units TOTAL 3,183 (maximum density) The City also has some infill, vacant parcels that are designated residential on the future land use map. As shown below, development of these lands at the maximum density allowed will support an additional 547 units. Type of Residential Vacant Acres Potential Units Low Density Residential (5 units per acre) 42.32 211 Low Medium Density Residential (10 units per acre) 7.09 70 Medium Density Residential (16 units per acre) 16.58 265 Medium High Density Residential (25 units per acre) 0.05 1 TOTAL 547 The total the number of units being proposed with redevelopment, new development, and infill development is 4,885 units, which is just 15 units fewer than the projected demand for the year 2030. The City has 135 units allocated by the Broward County Land Use Plan as affordable units, which the City proposes to use as bonus density incentives for developers creating affordable units. As of December 2006, the City also has 835 reserve units – the difference in units permitted by the Broward County Land Use Plan and the City’s future land use map – available for allocation in areas in the City, and available reserve units account for another 176 units. City of Oakland Park Housing Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 3-18 While the City does not have an over abundance of available land to support the projected population, the above analysis indicates sufficient resources and options are available to meet the projected demand. The private sector housing delivery process is complex. Its major participants include landowners, developers, lenders, contractors and manufacturers. Lawyers, architects, engineers, surveyors, brokers, title and casualty insurers, and municipal planning and zoning officials also play a role. The private market normally does a very effective job of coordinating the many participants in the housing delivery process. Slow-downs in the process come from normal market cycles and other factors, all of which are usually beyond the ability of local public policy in a municipal government, including Oakland Park. There are some aspects of the private sector housing delivery process in Oakland Park which are affected by local public policy. These include: 1. Land Availability: Not only does the Oakland Park zoning ordinance provide for a range of housing types and densities, but through the County CDBG program (and a City land bank program) lots are made available for private developers to build houses for low and moderate income families. 2. Land Development Regulations: City policy controls the rigorousness of land development regulations and the speed with which the land development approval process operates. Oakland Park does not cause undue delays in development application processing. 3. Public Facilities and Services: City policy takes a leading role in the provision of necessary public facilities and services; Oakland Park has been extending infrastructure as new development occurs. Some cities attempt to facilitate housing delivery by lenient planning, zoning, and other land development code policies. Oakland Park contends that it is better to maintain and enforce consistent, preferably high, development standards over long periods of time. Such consistency reinforces the predictability and stability of the private market. Means for Accomplishment Provision of Adequate Housing Oakland Park public policy facilitates the provision of housing for the projected population by designating and zoning land for a range of residential densities consistent with the anticipated City of Oakland Park Housing Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 3-19 population. Densities must be limited to those which can be accommodated by projected infrastructure. Provision of Low and Moderate Income Housing Oakland Park has begun a program which transfers City-owned lots to qualifying households who must agree to construct a single-family house. The City controls additional lots which are available for this program. In addition, the City participates in the Broward County Community Development Block Grant Program (CDBG). This program is discussed more fully in the section titled Elimination of Substandard Housing but the County Community Development Division builds new low and moderate-income houses to replace dilapidated units in their redevelopment area. Other potential courses of action include: x Housing trust funds for low interest financing. A local Housing Trust Fund would provide low or no interest financing for the purpose of new construction, land purchases made pursuant to a land banking program, and second mortgages for housing rehabilitation to supplement the existing City and County programs. If organized as a revolving fund, developers and mortgagees could pay back the fund to provide ongoing funding for affordable housing. x Zoning which requires developers to construct housing units for low and moderate- income households. The local development code could be amended to require developers to build a certain percentage of affordable units in each project. As an alternative to actually constructing units, developers could be required to pay a fee into a citywide housing trust fund. The trust fund could finance the construction of affordable units elsewhere in the City. x Zoning which provides incentives to construct housing units for low- and moderate- income households. Density bonuses could be given to compensate builders of low- and moderate-income units. The City has 135 affordable housing bonus units, allocated by the Broward County Land Use Plan that it proposes to use for the purpose of creating affordable units along transit corridors. x Public land banks. The City already has a small version of this. Land banking allows acquisition when prices are lower or by tax foreclosure or surplus City land. It makes sense if the community is willing to speculate that the cost of holding the land will be substantially lower than the increase in acquisition cost over the period the land is held. x More lenient area and bulk zoning regulations. The zoning code may include area and bulk requirements with the minimums necessary to protect the public health, safety and City of Oakland Park Housing Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 3-20 welfare. Reduction of such standards may facilitate construction of affordable housing in certain circumstances. x More lenient building code regulations. The building code may include requirements which go beyond minimum health, safety and public welfare standards and which add to the cost of housing. Such requirements might include energy saving insulation requirements, fire retardation requirements, electric service requirements, floor slab thickness requirements, and minimum room size requirements. x Fee waivers. Impact fees could be amended to allow waivers for houses sold for less than a specified amount to qualified buyers with incomes of 80 percent or less of the City’s median. The City already waives fees for the CDBG construction program. x Fast-track development order processing. Fast track processing involves accelerated municipal review for projects that directly or indirectly contribute to the supply of affordable housing. x City and County financing and assistance of not-for-profit developers. Not-for-profit developers can be encouraged by providing them with CDBG seed-money for land purchases and pre-development costs, by giving them priority in obtaining City land bank property, by supporting their efforts with technical assistance and by coordinating other County CDBG expenditures with not-for-profit developments. x Participation in the Broward County Housing Finance Agency program. Rental units constructed with financing by this agency (or its State counterpart) must include a 20 percent “set-aside” for moderate-income households. Elimination of Substandard Housing The City participates in the county administered CDBG Project Impact program. The program provides for construction of new single-family houses as a replacement for dilapidated units. The City also attempts to prevent substandard housing by vigorous code enforcement which is particularly important where housing units are older as in the eastern area of Oakland Park. As units age, they sometimes fall into disrepair. Housing Demolition, Conservation and Rehabilitation Housing conservation and rehabilitation is expected to be a joint public-private function in Oakland Park. As discussed earlier, the City participates in the CDBG Project Impact program. As the worst housing is replaced by new housing, the City and County will consider shifting the program emphasis to rehabilitation of less substandard units. This would be supplemented by housing code enforcement. City of Oakland Park Housing Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 3-21 The City does not now have a formal historic preservation program for housing since no houses have been designated significant. However, given the age of the housing stock some consideration will soon need to be given to historic preservation. Provision for Group Homes and Related Facilities Group homes, foster care homes, and related facilities can be accommodated in areas designated for multiple family housing by right and in single family zones with conditional approval. Condominium Conversions With the increase in housing prices and residential construction activity that occurred in the early 2000s, owners of rental projects converted their developments to condominiums. This change then reduced opportunities for residents preferring to rent their own home or unable to purchase one. Some communities are establishing regulations on condominium conversions and the City will consider what actions, if any, it will elect to undertake. 4 Sanitary Sewer, Solid Waste, Drainage, Potable Water, and Natural Groundwater Recharge Element City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan City of Oakland Park Infrastructure Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 4-1 Introduction This Element of the City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan deals with the basic physical components of the City’s urban services system. A continued source of pure water, facilities to dispose of waste water and solid waste and adequate property drainage are all concerns fundamental to the prosperity and livelihood of a community. This Element can be collectively referred to as the Infrastructure Element. It includes separate discussions and analyses of the facility supply and disposal needs for water, wastewater, solid waste, drainage and groundwater recharge. Due to the age, size and central location of Oakland Park in the densely settled Broward urban area, and local, state and federal pollution control regulations, the City generally relies on other governmental entities to manage the supply and treatment of many infrastructure components. This has been accomplished through a series of interlocal agreements with Broward County, the City of Fort Lauderdale and other agencies. These agreements provide for large user status to the City or for the provision of retail customer service by the other jurisdictions. Since the City is maturely developed, future planning activities will be oriented to maintaining existing agreements and local service facilities, and to improving certain facilities where appropriate and feasible. On the following pages, discussions of the various infrastructure sub- elements are presented. Sanitary Sewer Service Areas There are no wastewater treatment facilities in the City of Oakland Park. However, the City is provided sanitary sewer service from two outside governmental entities: the City of Fort Lauderdale and Broward County. The City of Fort Lauderdale constitutes the largest service area operator within the City. The Fort Lauderdale service area is generally the area east of I-95 and south of Prospect Road and all areas west of I-95 except for the Rock Island Road area south of Oakland Park Boulevard and the northwest section of the City immediately south of Commercial Boulevard. Broward County Office of Environmental Services (BCOES), formerly known as Broward County Utilities, provides service in the northern and westernmost portions of the City as well as the North Andrews Gardens portion of the City. The North Andrews area is being retrofitted with wastewater service by Broward County as part of the interlocal annexation agreement and service will be available in 2008. Of the remainder of the City, only a portion is presently not in a sanitary sewer service area. There are three pockets of non-serviced areas. The areas are located west of I-95 in the southern portion of the City (Rock Island area), in the vicinity of I-95 and Prospect Road (Twin Lakes South), and west of City of Oakland Park Infrastructure Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 4-2 Old Dixie Highway north of Prospect Road. All new developments in these areas are required to provide wastewater service. Figure S5 in Volume III, the Map Series, depicts the sanitary sewer service areas within the City as of May 2007. Table 4-1 summarizes the service area acreage and percentage share associated with each entity in 2007. More details about each service area are provided below. Table 4-1 - Sanitary Sewer Service Areas, 2007 Agency Area (acres) Area (sq. mile) % of Total Broward County 895.92 1.40 25.7% City of Fort Lauderdale 2,506.42 3.92 71.8% Unserved (Broward Co.) 61.49 0.10 1.8% Unserved (Fort Lauderdale) 28.69 0.04 0.8% TOTAL 3,492.52 5.46 100% Note: The service area above excludes roads and waterbodies that account for 2.7 square miles of the City’s land area. The area calculations are different from actual due to estimation during evaluation and rounding. Source: Service area GIS map (April 2007), City of Oakland Park Public Works Department, Carter & Burgess, Inc. Existing Sanitary Sewer Facilities As previously noted, the City of Oakland Park does not provide wastewater treatment services. The City, however, does provide and maintain a sanitary sewer collection system serving a large portion of the local jurisdiction. Figure S6 in Volume III, the Map Series, identifies the major sanitary sewer collection facilities within the City (As mentioned above, providing wastewater service to the North Andrews areas is underway). On the following pages, each operational entity is reviewed with regard to existing facilities, current facility loadings, capacity and levels of service. City of Fort Lauderdale (Oakland Park Service Area): The wastewater collected in Oakland Park by the City of Fort Lauderdale Utilities Department is pumped to the G.T. Lohmeyer Sewage Treatment Plant, which was also designated as the Central Broward Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant in the Federal 201 Plan. This treatment plant is located at Port Everglades in the City of Fort Lauderdale. Table 4-2 shows the existing land uses within the Fort Lauderdale service area. Low density residential uses comprise the largest amount of land in the service area, and over half, or 52.5 percent, of the total service area has residential uses. Industrial and commercial uses account for a quarter, or 25.3 percent, of the service area, with the remaining quarter consisting of community facilities, utilities, parks and recreation, conservation, and vacant lands. The area above excludes the unserved areas of the City that will be served in the future by the City of Fort Lauderdale. City of Oakland Park Infrastructure Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 4-3 Table 4-2 – Existing Land Uses Within the Fort Lauderdale Service Area, 2007 Land Use Category Area (acres) Area (sq. mile) Percentage Low Density Residential 799 1.25 31.9% Low Medium Density Residential 216 0.34 8.6% Medium Density Residential 264 0.41 10.5% Medium High Density Residential 36 0.06 1.5% Commercial 349 0.55 13.9% Park/Recreation 178 0.28 7.1% Industrial 283 0.44 11.3% Community Facility 169 0.26 6.8% Utility 26 0.04 1.0% Conservation 51 0.08 2.0% Vacant 135 0.21 5.4% TOTAL 2,506 3.92 100.0% Note: The service area above excludes roads and waterbodies. The area calculations are different from actual due to estimation during evaluation and rounding. Source: Service area GIS map (April 2007), City of Oakland Park Public Works Department, Carter & Burgess, Inc. The G.T. Lohmeyer Plant has a current permitted capacity of 55.7 million gallons per day (MGD) and a planned capacity for 2015 of 61 MGD. The plant is a pure oxygen, activated sludge, secondary treatment plant. Effluent discharges are injected into the boulder zone at a depth of approximately 3,000 feet. The facility also provides service to the Cities of Fort Lauderdale, Wilton Manors and portions of Tamarac, Broward County and Port Everglades. During 2005 the plant’s average daily flow was approximately 47 MGD. Based on an operating capacity of 55.7 MGD, the demand on the facility was approximately 84 percent. The City of Oakland Park has a large user agreement with Fort Lauderdale that accounts for about 9.9% of the wastewater treated by the G.T. Lohmeyer Plant. During Fiscal Year 2005/2006, the City’s wastewater consumption was 2,293 million gallons, or 6.28 million gallons per day (MGD) and 11.3 percent of average daily flows to the plant. For a 2006 population of 43,729, this usage equates to approximately 144 gallons per person per day. The large user agreement with the City of Fort Lauderdale for wastewater treatment expires December 31, 2021. Broward County Office of Environmental Services (Oakland Park Service Areas): Wastewater collected in Oakland Park by the Broward County Office of Environmental Services is transported ultimately to the Broward County North Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant (NRWWTP), located at Copans Road and Powerline Road in the City of Pompano Beach. In the northern portion of the City, wastewater is collected at the site of the former Palmdale Utilities Plant and pumped via force main to the Regional Plant. In the western portions of the City, City of Oakland Park Infrastructure Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 4-4 wastewater is collected and sent via the Lauderdale Lakes/Broward County Office of Environmental Services facility to the Regional Plant. The NRWWTP utilizes an activated sludge treatment process for liquid treatment and an anaerobic digestion system for handling the sludge produced from the liquid treatment process. After digestion, the sludge is dewatered and disposed of by landfilling and landspreading. The effluent from the liquid treatment process is chlorinated and either pumped through the outfall pipe into the Atlantic Ocean, disposed of in on-site deep injection wells, or filtered via the County’s 10 MGD reclaimed water system. The reclaimed water is used for irrigation and industrial process water at the North Resource Recovery Plant (Solid Waste Incinerator) and the NRWWTP, and for landscape irrigation at a nearby commerce center. The North Regional Facility also provides service to the Cities of Coral Springs, Coconut Creek, Deerfield Beach, Lauderhill, North Lauderdale, Pompano Beach, Plantation and portions of the unincorporated area of the County. The plant has a permitted treatment capacity of 84 MGD. Current (2005) average day flows are 69.9 MGD, or 83% of plant capacity. The City of Oakland Park had a total flow of 571.3 million gallons for 2005, for an average daily flow of 1.57 MGD. The Broward County agreement for wastewater treatment has no expiration date, instead the City has a reserve capacity for treatment and transmission of 1.52 MGD, or 1.8% of the plant’s operating capacity. Table 4-3 shows the existing land uses within the Broward County service area. Low density residential uses comprise the largest amount of land in the service area, at over half, or 56.0 percent, of the total service area. Nearly 70 percent of the service area consists of residential uses. Commercial uses account for 12.0 percent of the service area, community facilities 9.7 percent, and industrial uses are 2.6 percent. The remaining service area contains utilities, parks and recreation, conservation, and vacant lands. The area above excludes the unserved areas of the City that will be served in the future by Broward County. With respect to Broward County, the City is provided a combination of large user and individual customer retail service. City of Oakland Park Infrastructure Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 4-5 Table 4-3 – Existing Land Uses Within the Broward County Service Area, 2007 Land Use Category Area (acres) Area (sq. mile) Percentage Low Density Residential 501 0.78 56.0% Low Medium Density Residential 9 0.01 1.0% Medium Density Residential 103 0.16 11.5% Medium High Density Residential 13 0.02 1.4% Commercial 108 0.17 12.0% Park/Recreation 11 0.02 1.2% Industrial 23 0.04 2.6% Community Facility 87 0.14 9.7% Utility 6 0.01 0.7% Conservation 3 0.00 0.3% Vacant 32 0.05 3.6% TOTAL 896 1.40 100.0% Note: The service area above excludes roads and waterbodies. The area calculations are different from actual due to estimation during evaluation and rounding. Source: Service area GIS map (April 2007), City of Oakland Park Public Works Department, Carter & Burgess, Inc. Non-Serviced Portions of the City A small portion of the City (2.6%), is currently not served by wastewater collection or advanced treatment systems. This calculation excludes the portion of the City’s land area located in waterbodies or roadways. The vast majority of the remaining unserved areas in 2007 include the Garden Acres and Rock Island neighborhoods, and the areas annexed in 2005 that are being retrofitted with wastewater service by Broward County, namely Twin Lakes South and the North Andrews neighborhoods. Table 4-4 shows the existing land uses for the unserved areas remaining in the City. Of the 90 acres in the City lacking wastewater treatment service, 61 acres will be serviced by Broward County in the future and 29 acres will receive service from the City of Fort Lauderdale. In the future Broward County area, over 90 percent of the land uses are residential, with the remaining 10 percent split between vacant acreage, industrial and park and recreation uses. The area slated to be served by Fort Lauderdale had residential uses for 69 percent of the area and industrial uses comprise 26.3 percent. The remaining 4.7 percent, approximately one acre, has commercial uses. City of Oakland Park Infrastructure Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 4-6 Table 4-4 – Existing Land Uses Within Unserved Areas of the City, 2007 Broward County Service Area Land Use Category Area (acres) Area (sq. mile) Percentage Low Density Residential 53 0.08 85.9% Low Medium Density Residential 3 0.00 4.2% Park/Recreation 1 0.00 1.0% Industrial 2 0.00 3.4% Vacant 3 0.01 5.6% TOTAL 61 0.10 100.0% Fort Lauderdale Service Area Land Use Category Area (acres) Area (sq. mile) Percentage Low Density Residential 16 0.02 54.6% Low Medium Density Residential 4 0.01 13.5% Medium Density Residential 0 0.00 1.0% Commercial 1 0.00 4.7% Industrial 8 0.01 26.3% TOTAL 29 0.04 100.0% Note: The service area above excludes roads and waterbodies. The area calculations are different from actual due to estimation during evaluation and rounding. Source: Service area GIS map (April 2007), City of Oakland Park Public Works Department, Carter & Burgess, Inc. Active land uses within the non-serviced areas rely on septic tank wastewater disposal systems. While soil conditions vary as to the suitability of these areas to accommodate septic systems, sites have typically been modified to provide for this type of wastewater disposal. The Broward County Soil Conservation Service 1976 Survey identifies the soil association and their limitations (suitability) for use in drainfields. The Survey found these soils (and limitations) in the City’s septic tank areas: Basinger Fine Sand (severe), Duette-Urban Land Complex (moderate), Immokalee - Limestone - Urban Land Complex (severe), Immokalee-Urban Land Complex (severe), Pennsuco Silty Clay Loam (severe), Udorthents - Shaped (severe), and Udorthents- Urban Land Complex (severe). Additional soils analysis and discussion can be found in the Drainage section of the Infrastructure Element. While these areas have not been identified as major sources of groundwater contaminants, the potential for this situation, particularly among non-residential uses, poses some concern. Increased government regulation provides some motivation to seek alternative methods of wastewater disposal in some of the non-serviced areas. For these reasons, the City has embarked on a multi-year process to install sewer collection systems in most of these areas. Additional discussion in this regard is found in the City’s Capital Improvements Element. Regulatory Conditions Several agencies are involved in the permitting and regulation of wastewater discharges and groundwater recharge activities. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) through the Clean Water Act of 1977 enforces the discharges of sewage treatment plants. Chapter 17-6 of City of Oakland Park Infrastructure Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 4-7 the Florida Administrative Code provides that the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) permit wastewater treatment facilities and set standards for treatment. The Broward County Environmental Protection Department (EPD), through the Broward County Charter, is responsible for licensing wastewater treatment plants and sets standards for plant operation. Finally, the Florida Department of Health and Rehabilitation Services through Chapter 1OD-6 uses the Broward County Health Department to regulate the installation of septic tanks and permit sanitary sewer collection facilities. The implementation of the 201 Plan (required for EPA funding) and the regionalization of wastewater treatment and disposal has significantly reduced the number of point sources of pollution. For example, the Oakland Park treatment plant was closed and outfall discharges into the Pompano Canal were halted. The 201 Program has had a positive effect on surface and groundwater pollution. Finally, the transfer of Broward County Water Resources to EPD due to 1988 Charter revision, further strengthened the monitoring and enforcement activities which protect groundwater and aquifer protection. Facility Conditions The Fort Lauderdale and Broward County regional treatment plants are considered to be in excellent operating condition. The life span of the Fort Lauderdale facility extends beyond the City’s 2012 planning horizon. The Broward County Water and Wastewater Annual Report (FY2005) reports that the North District Regional System is well maintained. The facility was operating properly at the time of inspection and is currently undergoing expansion construction. Lift stations and collection and transmission lines are for the most part considered to be efficiently operated and well maintained. A portion of the City’s sewer line system has been rehabilitated through the installation of slip linings into the existing pipes. Video monitoring of the City lines has also been recognized as a need in order to identify problem locations and to avert more costly long term repairs. Problems and Opportunities In general, the City of Oakland Park has avoided problems in the provision of wastewater services through its inclusion in the regional disposal system and the reliance on treatment by other government jurisdictions. Except as previously noted, lift stations and sewer transmission lines are in good condition, with only continued maintenance or limited line rehabilitation considered necessary. However, a more extensive inspection of existing line conditions may be desirable. Non-serviced areas of the City present both the most significant problem and opportunity. Through a combination of grants, tax revenues and special assessments, the City is actively working to extend sewer services in these areas. The completion of this multi-year program will City of Oakland Park Infrastructure Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 4-8 enable the City to focus efforts on other capital improvements, and will significantly improve the equality of local groundwater recharge. Future Conditions Based on population projections contained in the City’s plan, the City is anticipated to increase in population from 43,729 in 2006 to 49,752 in 2015 and 60,121 in 2030. Table 4-5 presents projected flows for all areas within the City. In line with population projections, the Table indicates that wastewater demand City-wide will increase by 0.90 million gallons per day (MGD) between 2006 and 2015, and 2.46 MGD by 2030 at the adopted level of service standard. . The projected average daily City loadings for wastewater treatment at Broward County are 2.28 MGD and 2.68 MGD for the years 2015 and 2030. The increased flow demand is 0.20 MGD by 2015 and 0.61 MGD by 2030. The bulk of the City-wide demand occurs in the City of Fort Lauderdale service area, with projected average daily loadings of 5.18 MGD and 6.33 MGD for the years 2015 and 2030. The population projections for the service areas are estimated based on the traffic analysis zone (TAZ) projections prepared by Broward County and adopted by the City. Except for one zone, which was split evenly between the two service areas, the population for each zone was included in only one service area. Table 4-5 - Projected Wastewater Flow Demand City-Wide & By Service Area, 2015 & 2030 2006 2015 2030 City-Wide Population 43,729 49,752 60,121 MGD at 150 gallons per resident 6.56 7.46 9.02 MGD increase from 2006 0.90 2.46 Broward County Service Area Population 13,858 15,223 17,897 MGD at 150 gallons per resident 2.08 2.28 2.68 MGD increase from 2006 0.20 0.61 Fort Lauderdale Service Area Total Population 29,872 34,529 42,223 MGD at 150 gallons per resident 4.48 5.18 6.33 MGD increase from 2006 0.70 1.85 Source: Broward County Population Forecasting Model (02/09/07). Service area GIS map (April 2007), City of Oakland Park Public Works Department, Carter & Burgess, Inc. Based upon the capacity analysis for the two treatment plants which provide service to the City, adequate capacity is expected to be available to serve the City of Oakland Park through the City of Oakland Park Infrastructure Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 4-9 2012 planning horizon The City continues to work with its providers to ensure adequate capacity is planned and implemented to meet the projected needs for 2030. In terms of future actions, the City should continue efforts to provide sewer service in the unserviced areas. In addition, the City should maintain existing service agreements with the outside providers of treatment facilities. Where feasible, specific plant capacity allocations should be stipulated in these agreements to ensure the City has adequate reserve capacity. These agreements should also be periodically reviewed, and revised as necessary, to account for any modified projection of future local needs. Solid Waste Service Areas There are no solid waste disposal facilities in the City of Oakland Park. The City, however, does provide for solid waste collection services for all residents and commercial users within the City Limits. The following Table 4-6 identifies the land uses served within the City. Table 4-6 – Existing Land Uses Within Oakland Park Service Area, 2007 Land Use Category Area (acres) Percent Share Low Density Residential (L5) 1,368 26.2% Low-Medium Density Residential (LM) 231 4.4% Medium Density Residential (M) 367 7.0% Medium-High Density Residential (MH) 49 0.9% Commercial (C) 460 8.8% Industrial (I) 316 6.0% Utilities (U) 33 0.6% Community Facilities (CF) 255 4.9% Parks/Recreation (P/R) 187 3.6% Conservation (CON) 53 1.0% Water (W) 512 9.8% Roads 1,224 23.4% Vacant 171 3.3% TOTAL 5,226 100.0% Source: Existing land use GIS map (April 2007), City of Oakland Park Development Services Department, Carter & Burgess, Inc. Existing Solid Waste Services The City provides single-family residential solid waste collection services twice weekly, with monthly collection of bulk items. The City also performs commercial and multi-family solid waste collection services, at frequencies appropriate to the user. Weekly curbside recycling of newspapers, glass, aluminum, steel, and certain plastics is offered to both residential and commercial customers. City of Oakland Park Infrastructure Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 4-10 Regional Solid Waste Facilities There are no solid waste terminal disposal sites within the City. Solid waste collected by the City is transported to County-managed facilities. Broward County, through an interlocal agreement with the City, is responsible for the management of solid waste, including treatment and disposal of solid waste and the coordination of recyclable material collected in the solid waste collection process. The County also handles collection and disposal of household hazardous wastes. Problems and Opportunities The City has not experienced any problems regarding solid waste collection and disposal. Future Conditions Future population projections for the two planning periods were developed for the City as discussed previously. Using existing per capita generation rates, projections of future demand were performed and compared with the programmed capacity of the regional solid waste facilities. This information is presented in Table 4.7. The adopted level of service (LOS) for solid waste is eight (8) pounds per capita per day with bi- weekly pickup. In 2004, 1,167 tons of recyclable materials were delivered to the materials recovery facility and 38,018 tons of refuse was delivered to disposal sites. This figure includes bulk trash, residential refuse, and commercial refuse. For the 2004 population estimate of 31,810 persons, the total amount of materials collected equates to 6.75 pounds per capita per day, well under the eight (8) pounds per capita per day level of service standard. Table 4-7 – Projected Solid Waste Demand, 2015 and 2030 2006 2015 2030 Population 43,729 49,752 60,121 Tons per year at 8 lbs per resident per day 63,844 72,638 87,777 Increase from 2006 8,794 23,933 Tons per year at 6.75 lbs per resident per day 53,869 61,288 74,062 Increase from 2006 7,420 20,193 Source: Broward County Population Forecasting Model (02/09/07). At the adopted level of service standards, the amount of solid waste collected is projected to increase by 8,794, or an increase of approximately 977 tons per year, by 2015 and 23,933, or 997 tons per year, by 2030. Based on a total capacity of 18,200,000 tons and an average yearly demand of approximately 1,000,000 tons, the Regional Resource Recovery Facility located near Pompano Beach is City of Oakland Park Infrastructure Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 4-11 expected to have adequate capacity to serve the needs of Broward County until the Year 2020 (Broward County’s Integrated Waste Management Division). The City has contractually pledged its total solid waste stream to the regional plants by executing an interlocal agreement with Broward County. The agreement stipulates the resource recovery facility will accommodate the City’s solid waste generation assigning a specific allocation of the plant’s capacity. These plants have been designed based on countywide population projections. Contracts between the County and the operating vendors obligate them to receive and process all of the waste generated by participating jurisdictions. These efforts will ensure adequate local facility capacity through the two planning horizons. Improvements in collection technology could also be explored for their relevance or desirability at the local level. In order to make informed local decisions, the efficiencies of new technology should be evaluated on the basis of the costs of purchasing new equipment, of retrofitting older equipment, and modifying the size of the local collection work force. Drainage As with most coastal south Florida municipalities, the City of Oakland Park depends on the efforts of County and regional water management agencies for area wide drainage and flood control. With little topographic relief, coastal area water management and flood control activities are based on maintaining surface and ground water elevations through a complex system of lakes, canals and waterbodies which ultimately drain into the Atlantic Ocean. Individual properties are developed in a manner which, based on agency review, reflect government requirements for on-site water retention or detention, or allow for off-site discharge into the regional drainage bodies. Depending on the age of construction, portions of the City are characterized by developments with excellent drainage features or, in some of the earliest developed areas, by intermittent flooding in high rainfall periods. Service Areas The City of Oakland Park is not within any specific drainage or flood control improvement district. There are two major drainage canals in the City, both lead to the Intracoastal Waterway and eventually drain into the Atlantic Ocean. The C-13 Canal parallels the southern boundary of the City and is almost centrally located west of Interstate 95. The C-13 Canal also provides drainage to the Cities of Lauderdale Lakes, Lauderhill and Sunrise. All municipalities which discharge into the C-13 Canal have similar discharge limitations and a portion of the canal’s capacity is not allocated to any one City or service area. The C-14 Canal is located at the northernmost boundary of the City. The C-14 Canal also provides drainage for the Cities of Pompano Beach, Fort Lauderdale, Coconut Creek, Margate, North Lauderdale, Tamarac and City of Oakland Park Infrastructure Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 4-12 Coral Springs. All municipalities which discharge into the C-14 Canal have similar discharge limitations and a portion of the canal’s capacity is not allocated to any one City or service area. Both the C-13 and C-14 Canals are the maintenance and operational responsibility of the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD). Table 4-8 identifies service area land use. Table 4-8 – Existing Land Uses Within the Oakland Park Service Area, 2007 Land Use Category Area (sq. ft) Area (acres) Percent Share Low Density Residential (L5) 59,572,817 1,368 26.2% Low-Medium Density Residential (LM) 10,056,616 231 4.4% Medium Density Residential (M) 16,003,175 367 7.0% Medium-High Density Residential (MH) 2,141,749 49 0.9% Commercial (C) 20,018,920 460 8.8% Industrial (I) 13,766,620 316 6.0% Utilities (U) 1,426,465 33 0.6% Community Facilities (CF) 11,100,953 255 4.9% Parks/Recreation (P/R) 8,162,120 187 3.6% Conservation (CON) 2,314,399 53 1.0% Water (W) 22,312,533 512 9.8% Roads 53,298,894 1,224 23.4% Vacant 7,448,935 171 3.3% Total Area 227,624,197 5,226 100.0% Source: Existing land use GIS map (April 2007), City of Oakland Park Development Services Department, Carter & Burgess, Inc. Existing Drainage Facilities The SFWMD has established the maximum amount of runoff into the C-13 and C-14 primary drainage canals. The C-13 Canal is restricted to 75.9 cubic feet per second per square mile (CSM). The C-14 Canal is limited to 69.2 CSM. The current capacity of the canals is the basis for establishing the maximum runoff or discharge rate. The existing primary system is in good condition and has, with proper maintenance, a life span that should extend beyond the Plan’s long-term horizon of 2030. In addition to the C-13 and C-14 Canals, a variety of secondary drainage facilities exist within the City. The secondary drainage system is also in good condition and with proper maintenance has an expected life beyond the year 2030. Figure A2 in Volume III, the Map Series, illustrates the major drainage facilities within the City. One Broward County drainage system interconnects Royal Palm Lake to the City of Tamarac to the north and to the North Fork of the Middle River at Powerline Road. Another drainage system also connects Three Lakes in the eastern part of the City to the North Fork of the Middle River. This river flows into the Intracoastal Waterway several miles east of the City. Major roadways have also had drainage systems installed during reconstruction or widening. These include Oakland Park Boulevard, US 1, Andrews Avenue, Prospect Road, NE 38th Street, and Powerline Road. These systems provide for collection of highway runoff and distribution to the canal drainage system through outfall pipes. Generally pretreatment of initial runoff is City of Oakland Park Infrastructure Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 4-13 performed to lessen pollutant loadings. Many residential and business developments also include catch basins, dry wells or French drain systems, or drainage outfalls which terminate at local canals or other waterbodies. The existing primary drainage facilities in the City were not developed based upon a design capacity but rather a discharge rate based upon the total area that drains into the specific canal. For this reason, there is no existing level of service for drainage except that which reflects the allowable discharge rate into the primary drainage canals. Topographic, Natural Drainage Features and Soil Conditions The City of Oakland Park is situated on the relatively flat coastal plain of south Florida. Property elevations range between 2 and 12 feet above mean sea level (msl). Predominant elevation ranges between 5 and 10 feet above msl; most properties have been modified to minimum 6 foot elevations in order to conform with local or federal flood elevation requirements. Figure A6 in Volume III, the Map Series, identifies contours from the U.S.G.S. quadrangle sheet covering the City. The only natural drainage features in the City are portions of the North Fork of the Middle River Canal. This natural drainage feature is located in the southeast portion of the City. Soil types in the City of Oakland Park range from highly organic, poorly drained soils to sandy, well-drained associations. Figure A5 in Volume III, the Map Series, provides a generalized map of local soils associations as prepared by the U.S. Soil Conservation Service. Due to the area’s generally low elevations and mature stage of urban development, soil erosion problems are not considered significant. Flood Zones The City of Oakland Park is a participant in the Federal Flood Insurance Program. Residential flood insurance is generally required by mortgage lenders; requirements follow the flood elevation criteria depicted in the local maps prepared by the Federal Emergency Management Association (FEMA). Figure A3 in Volume III, the Map Series, identifies the flood plain contours in the FEMA map covering the City. As can be seen in the Figure, except for the North Andrews area, which is in Zone X, virtually the entire City lies within the “AE” zone. This is the zone of potential flooding in a 100-year storm, such that base floor elevations are required to be met in order to qualify for federal flood insurance. Problems and Opportunities Due to low property elevations, lack of drainage waterbodies and the generally older age of development, certain areas of the City experience drainage deficiencies. This situation was City of Oakland Park Infrastructure Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 4-14 noticeable during short duration, high intensity periods of rainfall. Minor street flooding and ponding occurred in some areas. In the adopted Plan in 1989 there were some areas within the City noted to be experiencing intermittent flooding. The areas that were experiencing intermittent flooding include the area between Andrews Avenue and Dixie Highway and the area between Oakland Park Boulevard and Prospect Road. During the 1988-1995 planning period, a series of improvements were made to improve drainage. An outfall system connection was made from the Central Drainage Area (Phase I improvements). As part of the Dixie Highway widening project, drainage facilities were installed (Phase III improvements). Additional improvements in the Central Drainage Area are needed (Phase II improvements); however, at this time a funding mechanism has not been identified. To address periodic flooding conditions, the City completed a Master Drainage Plan in 1998. This plan identifies thirty drainage deficient areas and fourteen potential area projects, including projects previously identified in the comprehensive plan. The City began the design and permitting process for several projects and started construction on a stormwater trunk line to drain the Central Area of the City. As of 2007, improvements have been constructed in the Kimberly Lakes area and along NW 38th Street, and design is underway for improvements near NE 21 Avenue. As part of modifications to the Royal Palm Park and the Oakland Bark Park, drainage improvements were included. The 1998 Stormwater Master Plan is aggressive regarding the projects to be undertaken and the City is actively working to obtain funding for expediting design and construction. Potential funding sources include stormwater utility fees, Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) mitigation grant programs, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) grants such as the Special Projects Authorization Process, and other revenue sources available to the City. Broward County-financed Community Redevelopment Program funds may also be used to assist in correcting drainage deficiencies in the City’s Community Redevelopment Area (CRA), which is in an older section of the City. Stormwater discharge to the C-13 Canal has been restricted to a maximum of 72.6 cubic feet per second by the SFWMD. While efforts have been made to increase the discharge allocation, regulated via a control structure at the Middle River, other local drainage improvements will require additional dry wells and French drains. Future Conditions and Analysis of Existing Regulations Over the last several years, development projects in the City of Oakland Park, as throughout all of Broward County, have been conditioned upon drainage system design approvals of Broward County Water Management Division and/or the South Florida Water Management District. Large City of Oakland Park Infrastructure Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 4-15 projects require approvals from both of the agencies and must comply with the SFWMD permitting requirements as specified in Volume IV - Management and Storage of Surface Water Permit Information Manual. Small projects generally require approval of the County authorities. Very small projects are omitted from other agency approval, but are still required to meet City drainage requirements as set forth by the Building Department. The existing regulations provide adequate control of project development activities to ensure onsite retention, aquifer recharge and comply with the discharge requirements of the SFWMD. Drainage requirements are based on three criteria: the need to meet minimum finished floor elevations greater than anticipated water levels in a major storm event, the ability to retain a specific amount of water on-site, and the ability to detain a specific amount of water on-site prior to discharge in the regional drainage system. Based on these criteria, the minimum local level of service standards for drainage will be for future development to meet the 100 year finish floor elevations as established by Broward County, and for projects to retain the first inch of rainfall or runoff from a one-hour, three year rainfall event. While there are no primary drainage improvements scheduled in the short term, the City should continue to implement the current local program of neighborhood and business area drainage improvements. The City implemented a citywide Stormwater Utility fee in 1989, to provide for a continuous, reliable local funding source for drainage improvements which will also be supplemented through CDBG revenues. Major drainage improvements proposed under the City program are listed in Table 4-9. Table 4-9 – Proposed Drainage Improvements, 2007 Improvement Estimated Cost (TBD) NE 32 St NE 11th Ave to NE 10th Ave north Prospect Gardens East NW 42nd & 43rd St & 43rd Ct from NW NW 17th Terr W OPB to NW 29th St Lloyd Estates NW 35th Ct NW 36th St & NW 37th St NW 36th Ct East of NW 18th Ave & north of C- NW 39th St Alley west of Andrews Source: City of Oakland Park Engineering and Construction Management Department The City should continue to monitor the management and maintenance activities of the regional water management agencies, particularly as these relate to the City’s major canals and agency flood control structures. City of Oakland Park Infrastructure Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 4-16 Continued coordination is required with the county and regional water management agencies with respect to development approvals. Future coordination with these agencies will also need to address the designation of the Middle River as Impaired Waters, due to the unacceptable levels of fecal coliform and chlorophyll a detected in recent years. In addition, the City should continue efforts to increase outfall discharge allocations into the Middle River. The success of this effort could reduce the overall cost of providing alternative drainage system designs in existing deficient areas. Potable Water Supply An adequate source of potable water supply is a fundamental requirement of any urban area. As is the case with wastewater collection, the City of Oakland Park has service agreements with other jurisdictions for the treatment and provision of finished water for local consumption. While individual wells exist on some local properties, these are used for irrigation purposes only. The South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD) plays a pivotal role in resource protection as the state agency responsible for water supply in the Lower East Coast planning area. As pressure increased on the Everglades ecosystem resource, the Governing Board initiated rule making to limit increased allocations dependent on the Everglades system. As a result, the Regional Water Availability Rule was adopted by the Governing Board on February 15, 2007 as part of the SFWMD's Consumptive Use Permit Program. This reduced reliance on the regional system for future water supply needs, mandates the development of alternative water supplies, and increasing conservation and reuse. These issues were addressed in the Oakland Park Water Supply Facilities Work Plan, attached as Exhibit 1. The intent of the City’s Work Plan is to meet the statutory requirements and to coordinate water supply initiatives with the Lower East Coast Water Supply Plan Update, prepared by the South Florida Water Management District. The following sections describe the water service areas within the City limits, existing water facility capacity, potable water demand, identified problems and opportunities, future needs, and projects and programs identified by the work plan to ensure an adequate supply of potable water for future growth. Service Areas The City of Oakland Park is provided potable water supply service from two entities: the City of Fort Lauderdale and Broward County. However, the City also acts as a distributor, servicing a majority of the City. The Broward County Office of Environmental Services (BCOES) is responsible for the northernmost and western most portions of the City, while the City of Fort Lauderdale services the remaining areas. Figure S3 in Volume III, the Map Series, depicts the potable water supply service areas within Oakland Park. Table 4-10 summarizes the City City of Oakland Park Infrastructure Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 4-17 acreage served by each entity by future land use designation along with the percentage share of the total City area. Existing Potable Water Facilities The City of Oakland Park maintains the water distribution system, but purchases its potable water as a large user from either Fort Lauderdale or the Broward County Office of Environmental Services (BCOES), as it does not own or operate any water supply, treatment, or storage facilities. The City’s transmission system is in generally good condition. In this section, each entity with operational responsibility is reviewed relative to existing facilities, land use in the respective geographic service area, system capacity, current loadings and level of service standards. City of Fort Lauderdale: The majority of the potable water purchased by Oakland Park from Fort Lauderdale Utilities Department is treated at the Fiveash Water Treatment Plant. This facility is located entirely within the City of Oakland Park on enclave property of the City of Fort Lauderdale. The plant location is just west of I-95 between Northeast 38th Street and Prospect Road. The Fiveash Water Treatment Plant has a capacity of 70 MGD as of 2006. The Fiveash Water Treatment Plant serves the jurisdictions of Fort Lauderdale, Wilton Manors, Lauderdale-by-the- Sea, and portions of Tamarac, Davie and Broward County (including Port Everglades). The City of Fort Lauderdale also has an additional 18 MGD capacity at its Peele/Dixie Water Plant. Interconnections between the two plants provide for back-up capacity in periods of high demand or plant maintenance shutdowns. As a result, the overall water system capacity of the City of Fort Lauderdale is 90 MGD. The City of Fort Lauderdale maintains two active wellfields: the Prospect Wellfield and the Peele-Dixie Wellfield. The Prospect Wellfield, located north of Commercial Boulevard adjacent to the Florida Turnpike, holds twenty-four wells. The installed capacity of this wellfield is 87 MGD. The Peele-Dixie Wellfield, located near the intersection of Davie Boulevard and State Road 7 has an installed capacity of 18 MGD. Both wellfields are permitted by the South Florida Water Management District under Consumptive Use Permit (CUP) No. 06-00123-W, allowing a maximum average withdrawal of 67.3 MGD (combined). In 2008, a CUP renewal application was being processed by the SFWMD. As part of the Water Supply Plan, additional water sources will be identified and enhancements programmed, as necessary. City of Oakland Park Infrastructure Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 4-18Table 4-10 Future Land Uses within all Potable Water Supply Service Areas, 2007 Future Land Use Category Service Area (acres) Service Area (sq miles) Percentage of Land Use for all Service Areas OaklandPark FortLauderdaleBroward County OaklandPark FortLauderdaleBroward County Low Density Residential 1,099.69 67.40 500.47 1.72 0.11 0.78 30.8%Low-Medium Density Residential 215.38 14.74 29.85 0.34 0.02 0.05 4.8%Medium Density Residential 253.39 2.69 52.17 0.40 0.00 0.08 5.7%Medium-High Density Residential89.04 0.00 32.47 0.14 0.00 0.05 2.2%Commercial 424.79 11.44 107.47 0.66 0.02 0.17 10.0%Industrial239.19 24.64 6.37 0.37 0.04 0.01 5.0%Utilities17.16 0.00 0.00 0.03 0.00 0.00 0.3%Community Facilities 127.55 0.00 86.91 0.20 0.00 0.14 4.0%Parks/Recreation178.97 131.11 0.00 0.28 0.20 0.00 5.7%Conservation 18.85 0.00 0.00 0.03 0.00 0.00 0.3%Local Activity Center 106.00 0.00 0.00 0.17 0.00 0.00 2.0%Sub-Total (by land use) 2,770.02 252.02 815.72 4.33 0.39 1.27 70.8%Sub-Total (all service areas) 3,837.75 6.00 70.8%Roads and Water 1,581.63 2.47 29.2%City of Oakland Park Total 5,419.38 8.47 100.0%Note: The area calculations may vary from slightly from actual due to estimation during evaluation and rounding. Source: Water Service Area GIS Data and City of Oakland Park Future Land Use Parcel GIS Data (May 2008), City of Oakland Park Public Works Department, Carter & Burgess, Inc. City of Oakland Park Infrastructure Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 4-19 Broward County: Broward County Water and Wastewater Services (BCWWS) owns and operates two regional wellfields that supply water to a variety of large users. The Broward County retail service area within the City receives water supply from the BCWWS District 1 wellfield, which has a total capacity of 23.5 MGD. The current SFWMD CUP No. 06-00146-W for the District 1 wellfield is being renewed in 2008. The Broward County treatment plant is being expanded to increase capacity from 84 MGD to 100 MGD (Broward County Water and Wastewater Annual Report (2005)). Further plant analysis can be found in the planning documents of the service jurisdictions. Water Demand City of Fort Lauderdale While the City has a large user agreement with Fort Lauderdale for providing potable water, Fort Lauderdale does not allocate plant capacity, but agrees to meet City water demands. The current agreement with the City of Fort Lauderdale expires October 31, 2023. During FY 2005/2006, the City’s average daily demand amounted to 4.4 MGD or 9.2 percent of total average flows, as shown in Table 4-11. Additional information about the City of Fort Lauderdale’s overall water demand is provided in the Exhibit 1, Appendix B. Table 4-11 –Wholesale Water Purchased from Fort Lauderdale by Oakland Park Year Annual (gal) Average Daily (MGD) 2000 1,777,039,000 4.86 2001 1,596,103,000 4.37 2002 1,769,553,020 4.85 2003 1,604,562,000 4.4 2004 1,656,736,000 4.54 2005 1,645,074,000 4.51 2006 1,635,036,000* 4.48 Source: Oakland Park Water Supply Facilities Work Plan, 2008. *Billing error corrected in 2007. Broward County Broward County does not allocate plant capacity, but agrees to meet City water demands. Based on historical conditions, the anticipated average withdrawals from the District 1 wellfield is 9.5 MGD, 1.3 to 1.34 specifically for the Oakland Park service areas. BCWWS has requested a temporary permit for an allocation of 10.9 MGD for through 2013. Additional information about Broward County’s overall water demand is provided in Exhibit 1, Appendix C. City of Oakland Park Infrastructure Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 4-20 Problems and Opportunities The City of Oakland Park has not had problems with potable water supply due to the service agreements with other jurisdictions. Treatment plants are operating below capacity and are considered to be in good condition according to the Fort Lauderdale Infrastructure Element and the Broward County Water and Wastewater Annual Report (2005). The Fort Lauderdale treatment plants have a life expectancy beyond the year 2010 and except for maintenance activities, do not require expansion. For FY 2001/2002, the plant experienced an average usage of 44.59 MGD, which is approximately half of the plant’s capacity. With respect to almost all eastern Broward County jurisdictions, the most significant problem in the supply of fresh water concerns the threat of wellfield pollution through salt-water intrusion. Due to a variety of circumstances, perhaps most notably the continued growth of the County’s western areas, eastern jurisdictions have been faced with increased difficulties in the provision of large quantities of fresh water. The City maintains portions of the water distribution system and recently completed an analysis of the ability of this distribution system to continue to provide adequate service to City residents. The analysis found that the existing distribution system is adequate to handle average daily, maximum daily, and peak hourly demands. In addition to evaluating the ability to provide adequate water supply to residents and businesses, the analysis also addressed the adequacy of existing fire hydrant locations and fire flow pressures. The analysis indicates that the City needs to add 392 fire hydrants and improve fire flow pressures in several areas. It was also previously recommended that several possible interconnection locations be considered with Broward County. Recommended improvements included in the water distribution analysis were classified into four categories. Priority 1 areas have sub standard pressures during fire flow and require the addition of 8-inch Ductile Iron Pipe (DIP) to improve fire protection. Priority 2 areas have pressures that meet minimum standards for fire flow but that are still less than desirable, where upgrades from 2- to 6-inch pipe will be required. Priority 3 areas will provide even more pressure distribution throughout the City and will require upgrading from 2- to 6-inch pipe. Priority 4 areas are where non-essential 2-inch water mains need to be replaced with 4-inch pipe throughout the City. Priority 1 and 2 areas should be addressed within the next five years, Priority 3 within five to ten years, and Priority 4 within ten to fifteen years. Future Conditions Projections of the City’s future population by water service area were developed for multiple planning horizons. The City’s Service Area population projections were carried out using the TAZ projections from Broward County Planning TAZ projections. Linear interpolation was City of Oakland Park Infrastructure Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 4-21 conducted to project intermediate year populations that were not included in the TAZ projections. In a cooperative effort with Broward County and the City of Fort Lauderdale, the per capita needs for the City of Oakland Park City Limits has been projected downward and kept below the threshold of 150 GPD. The per capita and water use projections from Broward County factor in a slight decrease in per capita usage over the next 20 years from 146 GPD down to 144 GPD. The per capita usage in the Oakland Park and Fort Lauderdale retail service area has been reduced from 150 GPD to 148 GPD, in order to comply with the Water Supply Facilities Work Plan. Table 4-12 summarizes daily flows in the City of Oakland Park for multiple years. In 2015, the projected demand is 7.34 MGD, or a 0.78 MGD increase from 2006 levels. In 2030, the projected demand is 8.84 MGD, or a 2.28 MGD increase from 2006 levels. The projected average daily City demand for water treatment at Broward County is 1.86 MGD and 2.08 MGD for the years 2015 and 2030. For the City of Fort Lauderdale service area, the projected average daily demand is 0.52 MGD and 0.58 MGD for the years 2015 and 2030. The South Florida Water Management District would prefer a pre-determined level of service for both residential and non-residential water users. However, due to the variety of uses for all non- residential users, and the current data available, it is difficult to determine differentiated levels of service. There are currently five categories of water customers in the Oakland Park Service Area billing system: commercial, government, hotel, multi-family residential and single-family residential. Currently both residential types utilize 61.6% of the water supply, while those non- residential customers utilize 38.4% of the water supply. In terms of future activities, the City needs to maintain and, as appropriate, modify continuing contracts with the City of Fort Lauderdale and Broward County. For portions of the City served on a retail customer basis by other jurisdictions, the City has no immediate plans to but may want to consider shifting these areas into the City’s large user agreement service area. City of Oakland Park Infrastructure Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 4-22Table 4-12—Projected Potable Water Supply Demand Service Provider Area 2006 2008 2010 2013 2015 2018 2020 2025 2030 City of Oakland Park Population -- 30,146 30,334 32,329 33,509 35,436 36,720 39,712 41,784MGD at 148 gallons per resident -- 4.46 4.49 4.77 4.96 5.24 5.43 5.88 6.18 City of Fort Lauderdale Population -- 2,588 3,307 3,449 3,542 3,581 3,607 3,722 3,926 MGD at 148 gallons per resident -- 0.38 0.49 0.51 0.52 0.53 0.53 0.55 0.58 Broward County Population -- 12,153 12,232 12,513 12,701 12,998 13,196 13,846 14,441MGD at 144/146 gallons per resident -- 1.77 1.78 1.83 1.86 1.90 1.92 2.01 2.08 Entire Area Population 43,729 44,887 45,873 48,201 49,752 52,015 53,523 57,280 60,121MGD at 148 gallons per resident 6.56* 6.61 6.76 7.11 7.34 7.67 7.88 8.44 8.84 MGD increase from 2006 NA 0.05 0.20 0.55 0.78 1.10 1.32 1.88 2.28 Source: Broward County Population Forecasting Model (02/09/07). Service area GIS map (April 2007), City of Oakland Park Public Works Department, Carter & Burgess, Inc. *2006 calculations were based on 150 MGD City of Oakland Park Infrastructure Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 4-23 Water Supply Projects and Programs In compliance with the City’s Water Supply Plan, the City of Oakland Park will need to consider water use conservation techniques such as graduated water rates, requiring low-flow devices in new construction, and public education campaigns. Estimated overall system loss of 12 percent may be the result of faulty water meters, “unaccounted for” water purchased from the City of Fort Lauderdale, and leaky pipes. To reduce this overall system loss to 10 percent or less, the City is going to replace outdated water meters. Additional strategies to address system-wide losses include the improvement of accounting for “unbilled uses” of water and system-wide leak detection. An explanation of “unaccounted for” water is provided below. Table 5-3 of the Water Supply Facilities Work Plan (see Exhibit 1) indicates the difference between water volume purchased from Fort Lauderdale and the volume billed to the Oakland Park Retail Customers. This percentage difference has been categorized in the past as water loss or “unaccounted for” water. The City will begin to implement a monthly accounting process to better identify “unbilled water uses/unaccounted for uses” that have previously been part of the gross category as water loss. While some tracking of unbilled water has been taking place, a more detailed accounting program will be implemented to identify and quantify “unbilled uses”. These “unbilled uses” will include: • Water Main Flushing • Fire Hydrant Testing, Leakage, or Usage • Water Main Breaks • Emergency Flows Sent To Others • Water Main Pressure Testing • Sewage Pump Station Wash Downs • Gravity Sewer Main Cleaning • Storm Drain Cleaning and Flushing The City has a number of routine activities that utilize treated water, but the volume of usage isn’t currently metered or estimated. One of the main current activities using “unbilled” water involves the routine use of the three City Vactor trucks. One truck is used for gravity sewer manhole and line cleaning, and two trucks are used for cleaning and flushing storm drainage system manholes, catch basins, and lines. Another such use is for Fire hydrant testing, usage, and main flushing. The City will now begin to actively track water usages in these areas and periodically take a windshield tour of City to look for leaking fire hydrants or evidence of main leakage. In FY2009 the City will begin a monthly detailed accounting of “unbilled water use” that used to be considered as lost water, but will now be considered as “accounted for” water and added to “billed water” such that a new more accurate accounting of water loss can be ascertained. City of Oakland Park Infrastructure Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 4-24 The following are the alternative water supply sources identified by the City’s potable water providers in their respective water supply facilities work plans. Fort Lauderdale The City of Fort Lauderdale has identified the Floridan Aquifer as an alternate water source an has developed a preliminary plan for the implementation of a 6 MGD (finished water capacity) reverse osmosis (RO) facility at the existing Peele-Dixie Water Treatment Plant. This project includes the construction of 10 MGD of Floridan Aquifer water supply wells at the Dixie Wellfield to supply raw water to the reverse osmosis facilities. This is projected to meet the City’s water demands through the year 2023. Broward County Broward County Water and Wastewater Services, District 1, has identified and plans to construct a treatment plant that uses the Floridan Aquifer as its alternative water supply. The treatment plant is planned to be located at the existing District 1 treatment site. BCWWS wants the treatment plant and its source of supply to last at least 10 years before a subsequent expansion is required. The first phase of the treatment plant will be designed to produce a minimum 4.5 MGD of finished water (maximum day basis), and will be designed so that it is expandable to a minimum of 5.5 MGD. According to demand projections, the initial Floridan treatment plant combined with the Biscayne treatment plant should meet demands to the year 2023. The expansion would meet demands until after 2030. If the actual increase in flow is slower than projected, the expansion can be delayed. If the actual increase in flow is faster that projected the expansion would be required sooner. On-Going Collaboration The City’s large user agreement with the City of Fort Lauderdale requires an annual meeting to discuss water use. The City has also agreed to participate in the Broward County Water Resource Task Force that was created to identify potential environmentally, economically, and technically feasible strategies and solutions for future water resource needs. In addition, the City agrees to meet with each of its water suppliers on an annual basis to review population projections, planned annexations, alternative water supply projects and best practices in water conservation. These annual meetings will be scheduled to occur prior to the adoption of the fiscal budget so that resulting projects and programs identified can be properly funded. Natural Ground Water Aquifer Recharge As of 2007, the sole source of potable water for Broward County is the Biscayne Aquifer. The Biscayne Aquifer extends beneath Broward County, decreasing in depth as it approaches the eastern Conservation Areas. The upper level of the aquifer is controlled mainly by the amount of surface and subsurface recharge and discharge. City of Oakland Park Infrastructure Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 4-25 The most important factor in recharge of the aquifer is natural rainfall. Because a majority of the rainfall within the county is lost either by discharge into the Atlantic Ocean or evaporation or transpiration into the atmosphere, maintaining ground water recharge areas is important. The primary recharge areas of the aquifer in Broward County are located outside of the City of Oakland Park in Conservation Areas 2A and 2B. A topographic map of the City is provided in Figure A6 in Volume III, the Map Series. Figure A4 in Volume III, the Map Series, shows groundwater recharge rates in the City. It should be noted that there are no regionally significant recharge areas designated within Oakland Park. Recharge areas within the City are limited due to the extent of urbanization. The most important recharge areas include the fresh water canals and lakes such as the C-13 Canal, Lake Jubilee, Oakland Lake, Summer Lake, Lake Pointe and Bates Lake. Virtually any pervious area in the City also provides for recharge activity. Open space and recreation areas, as well as yards and swales throughout the City’s residential and non-residential developments, allow for subsurface recharge. Development projects in the City of Oakland Park are conditioned upon drainage system design approvals of the Broward County Water Management Division and/or the South Florida Water Management District. Large projects (40 acres or more) require approvals from both of these agencies and must comply with the SFWMD permitting requirements as specified in Volume IV Management and Storage of Surface Water Permit Information Manual and the wellfield protection requirements of Broward County. Small projects (less than 10 acres) generally require approval of Broward County. Very small projects (less than one acre) are omitted from other agency approval, but are still required to meet City drainage requirements as set forth by the Building Department. The existing regulations provide adequate control of project development activities to ensure on-site retention, aquifer recharge and wellfield protection. One of the most important factors concerning aquifer recharge is to provide for uncontaminated flows from the surface. While underlying sandy soils provide some filtering protection, long term leaching of pollutants associated with urban development can lead to severe negative groundwater impacts. Historically, the relatively low regulation of chemical users has resulted in some concern over the long-term potential impact on groundwater resources. In light of this problem, Broward County has enacted a countywide Wellfield Protection Ordinance which prohibits or regulates the use of certain potential groundwater contaminants in all areas proximate to existing or proposed wellfields. Based on complex modeling of groundwater movement, a series of rings, or zones, have been identified and mapped. Zones are labeled numerically from 1 to 3 around each well site; these define areas of increased importance in terms of regulation. Zones 1 and 2 City of Oakland Park Infrastructure Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 4-26 prohibit or restrict the use of potential contaminants; the Zone 3 area is oriented towards the registration of potential contaminant users. The City of Fort Lauderdale is served by wellfields which are located near Oakland Park on Executive Airport property. While these wellfields are relatively close to the City boundary, there are no wellfield protection areas in Oakland Park. 5 Coastal Management Element City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan City of Oakland Park Coastal Management Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 5-1 Introduction By virtue of the City of Oakland Park’s inland location, approximately three miles from the Ocean at its closest point, and due to its minimal tidal shoreline and vegetation area, only a small portion of the City is applicable for coastal management analysis. Coastal Area The City of Oakland Park is, at best, only minimally associated with the recreational or resource management activities of the coastal area. On a straight line basis, the easternmost portion of the City is almost two miles inland from the ocean coastline. At its closest point, the City’s approximate mile of Middle River shoreline is almost three miles from the Intracoastal Waterway. According to the Broward County Comprehensive Plan, the definition of the Broward County’s coastal area is the land and water situated east of U.S. 1. The entire City of Oakland Park is located west of U.S. 1. The City includes approximately one mile of shoreline on the north side of the North Fork of the Middle River. This river was once a natural flowing waterbody traversing various wetland vegetative areas, including freshwater cypress swamps and estaurine marsh and mangrove communities. Urbanization of eastern Broward County was based on the development of areawide canal drainage systems, dredging and filling, and installation of bulkheads and drainage control structures. These activities have eliminated most native attributes of the Middle River and associated tributaries. Several drainage lakes and canals also connect with the Middle River in the eastern area of the City. Unlike canals and lakes further west, these surface water bodies are very slightly tidally influenced and do not include dams or other water control structures which minimize chloride levels and preclude the existence of estuarine communities. Pursuant to requirements of the Florida Administrative Code, the City of Oakland Park must include a Coastal Management Element in its Comprehensive Plan. While portions of the City technically meet the coastal definition in Chapter 380.24 of the Florida Statutes, minimal estuarine vegetation and wildlife and low chloride levels in local waterways effectively limit this situation to only a very small portion of the City. With respect to these points, and the previous discussion of countywide coastal planning efforts, only the area situated south of Oakland Park Boulevard and east of regional water control structures has been selected for analysis. This area includes the only water dependent use in the City. The western portion of the North Fork Middle River west of Andrews Avenue was excluded due to the absence of tidal flows, it is not designated as an estuary by the U.S. City of Oakland Park Coastal Management Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 5-2 Department of Interior and because this area is more than one and one-half miles west of the Broward County defined coastal area. The coastal management area is approximately 300 acres in size and represents less than six (6) percent of the total City area. This area is depicted on Figure S16. Natural Resources of the Coastal Area The coastal area of the City is almost entirely comprised of urban land uses. The Land Use Element indicates that 99% of this area is already developed. The coastal area has been cleared of indigenous vegetation. While approximately 90% of the City’s coastal area shoreline has been bulkheaded, isolated mangrove vegetation species can be found in one or two locations along the western portions of the North Fork Middle River. The majority of the vegetation along the shoreline in the coastal area is not natural but exotic species such as Brazilian Pepper (Florida Holly). While a bottom sampling survey was not available, marine grasses would not be expected within the coastal area of the City. Countywide vegetation inventory efforts performed in 1977 and 1987 found no areas of significant natural vegetation in the City’s coastal area. In those areas with unbulkheaded shorelines, invasion and succession by exotic upland species has occurred. Brazilian Pepper is the dominant invasive species. Because the coastal area is primarily developed urban land uses and free of natural vegetation or wildlife habitats, maps on vegetative cover and wildlife habitats are not applicable. Within the Middle River and adjacent tributary canals, the following types of fish might be encountered: catfish, toadfish, snook snapper, grunts, sheepshead, mullet and puffer fish. Crabs and other bottom dwellers can also be found. The listed species identified in Table 6-3 of the Conservation Element may be found in the City’s coastal area. Existing Land Use Inventory and Analysis Figure S16 depicts the existing land uses within the City’s coastal area. Virtually the entire area adjacent to the Middle River and connecting water bodies has been developed into urban land uses. Residential uses include detached single family and attached multifamily uses at low medium and medium densities. Non-residential uses include community facilities, retail businesses, and industrial warehousing activities. Only one or two isolated small lots are currently vacant. Water Dependent and Water Related Use Analysis The only water dependent use in the City is a public boat launching ramp (see Figure S16). The City of Oakland Park Coastal Management Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 5-3 lack of vacant shoreline property limits the City’s ability to easily increase its current amount of water dependent and water related uses. Acquisition of existing developed properties would pose a considerable financial challenge to the City, particularly in light of the City’s current efforts to develop recreational sites along several local lakefront sites. While riverfront property would be desirable, practical limitations to the use of this property can be associated with the distance of this area from many City residents and to oceanic inlets, and the three fixed bridges which dictate the use of small watercraft. Shoreline Land Use Conflicts The main shoreline use conflicts in the City relate to a lack of public recreational and access opportunities to waterfront areas. The vast majority of the coastal area is in private residential ownership. The City’s only public access point, a small boat launching ramp and parking area, is at the foot of a warehouse commercial area. Improvement in the amount and/or quality of City shoreline recreational opportunities should be considered. Redevelopment and Economic Base Most residential housing stock in the coastal area is in good condition; some multifamily properties appear somewhat neglected and require, at a minimum, some cosmetic improvement. Community facilities, primarily churches and related small private schools, appear to be in excellent condition. Other non-residential buildings appear in good repair, though cosmetic improvements and increased code enforcement could provide some benefit. Single family neighborhoods of the coastal area appear to be in good condition; properties are well maintained and structural rehabilitation and cosmetic improvements have also been observed throughout. However, due to the age and condition of certain properties in the multifamily and industrial/warehouse commercial areas near Dixie Highway, it is possible that some redevelopment could occur. This circumstance may be limited by the potential desirability and land assembly costs of property accessed mainly by the heavily traveled Oakland Park Boulevard arterial. There is one parcel in the coastal planning area that is undergoing redevelopment. The site was the former home of a restaurant and is now under development for 102 dwelling units, known as The Pointe at Middle River. Since much of the City’s coastal area is comprised of residential and community facility land uses, the remaining non-residential uses do not contribute greatly to the City’s overall economic base. The dominant employment sector is retail service related, and includes a host of small commercial businesses and offices located in several small highway commercial centers and City of Oakland Park Coastal Management Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 5-4 isolated small office buildings. In the warehouse/commercial areas, various warehousing uses and enterprises such as vehicle repair shops predominate. Based on socio-economic data planning efforts of the Broward County Planning Council and Office of Planning, approximately 1,500 total people are employed within the City’s coastal area. Slightly more than 85% of the total area associated with retail and service employment categories, the remainder would include industrial or domestic employees. Due to the scarcity of vacant property; and the lack of any concerted public or private redevelopment effort, little growth or change in the character of employment is anticipated. Impacts of Projected Development As currently proposed, the Future Land Use Element perpetuates the existing categories and pattern of development in the coastal area. Since this area of the City is essentially fully developed, the continuation of this arrangement will not pose additional impacts on natural vegetative or wildlife resources. The entire coastal area is located in the AR flood zone according to the Federal Emergency Management Administration (see Figure 5.6 in the Infrastructure Element). This area is subject to a 100 year storm event. The base flood elevation in the coastal area is six (6) feet. There are no areas within the coastal area that are subject to the velocity effects of wave action. The City should require future development to be consistent with the minimum floor elevation to be at or above the base flood evaluation. This practice will ensure that future development will not be impacted during a 100 year storm event. Estuarine Pollution The North Fork of the Middle River is a waterway that is largely influenced by urban activities. The waterway receives discharge from drainage outfalls as well as from various fresh water canals located up river to the west. Salt water interaction occurs based on the river’s connection with the Intracoastal Waterway and Atlantic Ocean at coastal inlets. The closest inlets to the City are the Hillsboro Inlet and Port Everglades Inlet. Generally, the water quality of the Intracoastal Waterway and connecting water bodies degrades based on increased distance from coastal inlets. Several water quality sampling stations have been established within the County by the Broward County Environmental Protection Department (EPD). The current program provides quarterly sampling at forty-seven locations (three locations within the study area). Water quality stations 11 and 12 are located near the western boundary of the City’s coastal area in one of the principal feeder canals to the North Fork of the Middle River. Water quality station 112 is located near the eastern boundary of the City’s coastal area in the North Fork of the Middle River. Samples are analyzed for physical, chemical and biological parameters in order to characterize City of Oakland Park Coastal Management Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 5-5 water quality. Testing results at the above stations can be found in the City’s Conservation Element. Information was not available on the accumulation of contaminants in the sediments of the North Fork of the Middle River. It should be noted, that a host of environmental factors strongly influence the level of different contaminants found at various times. The most significant of these include the amount of water released from upstream water control structures, periods of high drainage runoff and, with respect to precipitation amounts, the season of the year. Additionally, non-point sources of pollution such as storm run-off from areas within the coastal area and other portions of the City which front on the major canals may also be impacted by fertilizers. The Middle River was designated as Impaired Waters by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection on February 15, 2006, as a result of fecal coliform, nutrient and chlorophyll a levels. A standard of 400 colonies per 100 milliliters of a sample is the standard for Impaired Waters. Low dissolved oxygen and high nutrient levels appear to be a problem in both marine and freshwater portions of the C-13 Canal as well as the North Fork of the Middle River. Other than discharge outfalls associated with local drainage systems, the City does not have any known major point sources of water pollution. The fact that the City is served with sanitary sewer collection facilities may contribute to this favorable situation. The field inventory of local waterways and adjacent upland areas indicates that litter and dumping of miscellaneous debris is a problem in some locations. This is particularly apparent in those areas where dense shoreline vegetation fosters this activity. This problem may also be associated with vagrants or other local transient populations. Impact of Proposed Land Uses and Facilities in Estuaries and Analysis of Needed Remedial Actions It is likely that implementation of the Future Land Use, Infrastructure and Transportation Elements of the Comprehensive Plan may result in some increased negative environmental impacts. This will be primarily due to the increase in non-point sources of pollution associated with road improvements, conversion of vacant property to urbanized land use and areawide improvements in property drainage. With some increased local coordination, the existing regulatory efforts of the County’s EPD are considered to adequately address users of potential contaminants. Current practices of requiring on-site drainage systems, “best management” approaches to storm drainage facility design and turbidity barriers during construction periods are all anticipated to minimize further environmental degradation. City of Oakland Park Coastal Management Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 5-6 The amount of local shoreline which is already developed and privately owned and maintained tends to limit the amount of remedial actions which can be practically implemented. However, remedial activities that warrant consideration include programs to eliminate/replace shoreline exotics with indigenous species, to promote and participate in periodic waterway clean-up efforts, and to promote improved shoreline stability designs in areas with deteriorating or no. existing stabilizing structures. Maintenance of spillways or culverts and limited dredging in certain areas would also benefit drainage and flushing actions. State, Regional and Local Regulatory Programs to Reduce Estuarine Pollution Several agencies are responsible for water quality and pollution regulation with the City. These include the State’s Departments of Environmental Protection and Health and Rehabilitative Services; the County’s Environmental Protection Department; and the South Florida Water Management District. Information on the specific involvement of each agency can be found in the Intergovernmental Coordination Element. Beach and Dune Systems/Analysis of Protection Measures There are no beach or dune systems in the City of Oakland Park. Archaeological and Historic Resources of the Coastal Area There are no known archaeological sites within the coastal area of the City of Oakland Park. There are approximately four (4) sites on the Florida Master Site File within the coastal area of the City. These sites are in the vicinity of NE 34th Court and NE 16th Avenue. Historical resources are shown in Figure A7. Hurricane Preparation/Evacuation The current Lower Southeast Florida Hurricane Evacuation Study (Lower SE FL HES) was prepared for the Broward County Emergency Preparedness Division by the Army Corps of Engineers, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, NOAA National Hurricane Center, and the Florida Department of Community Affairs in 1991. This section of the Coastal Management Element summarizes portions of that study as they relate to the coastal area of the City of Oakland Park. Storm Characteristics and Phasing of Warnings Hurricanes are potentially devastating occurrences. The combined factors of the County’s coastal location, the unpredictability of storm paths, and short term variations in strength all City of Oakland Park Coastal Management Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 5-7 contribute to complications in hurricane preparation. Major hurricane damage characteristics include strong winds, flooding associated with rains and tides and storm surges. Due to the City’s inland, upstream location, only potential wind and flood damage are locally applicable. The National Hurricane Center of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) provides data on individual storms and official predictions/recommendations relative to Hurricane Watches and Warnings. Based on the predicted severity of a particular hurricane, selective evacuations may be required from coastal and low-lying areas. In Broward County, only those areas east of US 1 have been identified for areawide evacuation. With the redevelopment of the mobile home park in the coastal area of Oakland Park, there are no areas targeted for selective evacuation by the 1991 study. A “Hurricane Watch” is issued by the National Hurricane Center if hurricane conditions are a possible threat to a certain area. The Hurricane Watch is usually given 24 to 48 hours before a hurricane eye reaches landfall and can cover a fairly extensive area. A “Hurricane Warning” is issued by the National Hurricane Center when winds of at least 74 miles per hour, high rainfall amounts and/or a stormwater surge are expected to reach a specific area within a period of 24 hours. Implications associated with the issuance of a hurricane warning are such that a shorter notice period and a smaller area are targeted for this announcement. Local Evacuation Plan The local evacuation plan published by the Emergency Management Agency consists of two scenarios for addressing a potential storm situation. The first instance is Plan “A”, which provides for the appropriate response to a storm rated as “Category 1-2” on the Saffir/Simpson scale of hurricane intensity. This category of storm might include a surge of four to seven feet above mean sea level and winds ranging between 74 and 110 miles per hour. Plan “A” necessitates the evacuation of all mobile home residents, residents beside tidal waterways and in low-lying areas, and all residents east of the Intracoastal Waterway. The second and more intense level of response is known as Plan “B”. This scenario is associated with a potential storm rating Category 3, 4 or 5 on the Saffir/Simpson scale of storm intensity. A storm of this sort might include a storm surge of seven to twenty feet above mean sea level with wind speeds ranging from 111 to over 155 miles per hour. Plan “B” calls for the evacuation of all residents east of the U.S. 1. Lower SE FL HES Relationship with the City of Oakland Park The modifications to the local evacuation plan resulting from the Lower SE FL HES mean that City of Oakland Park Coastal Management Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 5-8 no portions of the City of Oakland Park are required to evacuate during a hurricane. While mandatory evacuation may not be an issue, the City should continue to participate in emergency preparedness training with Broward County and adjacent cities since voluntary evacuations may still occur and mandatory evacuees from points east may pass through the City. Post Disaster Planning Concerns and Coastal High-Hazard Areas Due to the City’s inland, upstream location, the City’s coastal area is not considered to be a high hazard area. The Broward County Comprehensive Plan defines the coastal high-hazard area as the area east of the Intracoastal Waterway. The coastal area of Oakland Park is located more than one and one-half miles from this location and is not defined to have any locations of velocity damage due to wave action. Some localized flooding and wind related storm damage may occur, though the potential in the City’s coastal area does not appear to be any more significant than that associated with the remainder of the City. Public Access and Coastal Recreation Facilities - Inventory As discussed earlier in the Land Use section of this Element, the City has minimal coastal related recreational facilities. A small (less than 0.3 acre) recreational facility, consisting of a single small boat launching ramp, a picnic table, and attendant parking for approximately ten vehicles is the only formal public access site. This area is at the foot of a warehouse industrial area, and is not particularly conducive to quality recreational opportunities. The Recreation and Open Space Element does not propose expansion of the boat launching ramp or other facilities in the coastal area. There are a couple of locations where public rights-of-way are adjacent to waterways. There are no known public access points to the shoreline through private property which are open to the general public. In general, the lack of available parking or other facilities obviates the use of these areas except for local bicyclists or pedestrians. Because the coastal area is ninety-nine (99) percent developed and because the City’s coastal area does not have the same recreational and open space potential as the more eastern coastal areas, additional public access points, fishing piers and boat ramps are not necessary. Future Needs and Demand Analysis for Wetslips The only wetslips or docking areas in the City of Oakland Park are those associated with private residential uses. Temporary dock space is available at the City’s boat launching area and is able to accommodate approximately three small boats at one time. City of Oakland Park Coastal Management Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 5-9 Since the City is largely developed, increases in local demand for wetslips are not considered to be significant. The relatively distant location of the City from major navigable waters such as the Intracoastal Waterway and the Atlantic Ocean, and the occurrence of at least two fixed bridges prior to reaching these waters, tends to reduce the demand for local dockage facilities. The lack of available property suitable for this activity also effectively limits expansion opportunities. For these reasons, no expansion plans are contemplated. Coastal Area Infrastructure - Roadway Facilities Oakland Park Boulevard, Dixie Highway and Northeast 16th Avenue are all regionally significant roadways in the City’s coastal area. Oakland Park Boulevard and Dixie Highway are, respectively, 6 lane and 4 lane divided State arterial facilities; Northeast 16th Avenue is a two lane collector roadway. Where these roadways and the Middle River or associated tributary waters intersect, waterways have been channeled into culverts or roadways cross on slightly elevated fixed bridges. Given the central location of the City’s coastal area within the County, all of these roadways serve transportation needs for the entire City and adjacent jurisdictions. As a result further information as to existing and projected traffic volumes, levels of service, programmed or planned improvements, etc., can be found in the City’s Transportation Element. Existing and Future Sanitary Sewer/Potable Water Facilities A full discussion of the City’s water and sewer system facilities can be found in the Infrastructure Element of the Comprehensive Plan. The coastal area of the City is within the retail service area of the Oakland Park Utilities Department. The entire coastal area of the City is served by sanitary sewer collection and potable water transmissions lines. Sanitary sewerage flows are collected via a system of gravity and small force mains and sent via master force main to the City of Fort Lauderdale. Sewage effluent is treated at the T. 0. Lohmeyer Treatment Plant and ultimately disposed by deep well injection. The City’s coastal area sewer collection lines and lift stations are considered to be properly sized and in good condition. Since the area is essentially fully developed, with minimal increases projected in local demand, ongoing inspection and maintenance activities are considered to be the only activities necessary to ensure continued successful operation. City of Oakland Park Coastal Management Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 5-10 Retail potable water service is provided by the Oakland Park Utilities Department. The City has a large user agreement with the City of Fort Lauderdale for the provision of treated water. Most if not all of the water supplied to the City’s coastal area is treated at the Five Ash Treatment Plant, a large facility located in a City of Fort Lauderdale enclave within the north central area of Oakland Park. Most potable water transmission lines in the coastal area are considered to be in good condition, though some lines maybe slightly undersized relative to peak demand requirements. Line replacement in certain locations may be necessary. A detailed analysis of this situation should occur prior to implementation of improvements. As with sewer flows, however, little increase in demand is anticipated. Existing and Future Drainage Facilities Drainage facilities consist of a variety of dry wells and small drainage outfalls which terminate into coastal area waterbodies. Improvements in drainage may be required in areas adjacent to the coastal area of the City; it is possible that improvement designs may include additional outfalls into coastal area waterbodies. In this respect, efforts to maximize on-site holding capabilities and minimize outfall pollutant loadings should be practiced. In addition, the City may want to consider developing a program to retrofit pollution control baffles or other devices in older storm drainage facilities. In some cases, this may require the replacement of older manholes or drainage lines. 6 Conservation Element City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan City of Oakland Park Conservation Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 6-1 Introduction The purpose of the conservation element is to identify and guide the thoughtful use and management of the natural resources in the City of Oakland Park. With respect to the advanced state of local urban development, techniques to reduce consumption levels and minimize pollution should be considered. In other cases, methods to improve resource attributes or secure additional natural areas may also be desirable. Environmental Setting The City of Oakland Park is located in the coastal region of Southeast Florida. The City is situated in the east central area of Broward County and is surrounded by urban uses of the Cities of Fort Lauderdale, Wilton Manors, Lauderdale Lakes, Tamarac and the unincorporated area. Figure S1 in Volume III, the Map Series, depicts the City’s regional location within Broward County and the State of Florida. Winter temperatures in the area are among the mildest in the country, with only one or two nights per year characterized by near freezing temperatures. Summers are long, warm and humid. Average precipitation amounts exceed 60 inches per year. Due to the extent of urban development, the City is presently characterized by very few pristine or ecologically diverse communities. Water bodies in the City are manmade or are former natural riverine, palustrine or estuarine systems which have been significantly altered through prior development practices. Current Situation As noted in the City’s land use element, population growth in the City of Oakland Park and Broward County, occurred primarily in the late 1960’s and early 1970’s. Population growth slowed during the 1980’s and 1990’s. The average annual growth rate was 1.71 percent between 1994 and 2000. Between 2000 and 2004, the average annual growth rate slowed to 0.68 percent. A significant increase (37.5 percent) in the population occurred in 2005 with the annexation of several adjacent areas. Future population growth is also anticipated to be slow, similar to the growth experienced between 1994 and 2000, due to a lack of substantial vacant property available for first stage development. While redevelopment activities are anticipated, overall population growth associated with this circumstance is considered to be relatively minor. The City’s resident population was estimated to be 43,729 in 2006, and is expected to increase by approximately 37.5 percent (16,391 persons) by the year 2030. With regard to vegetation and wildlife communities, most development in Oakland Park and eastern Broward County occurred prior to any significant areawide resource planning efforts. Regional water management efforts, while successful in terms of overall drainage and flood City of Oakland Park Conservation Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 6-2 control, have substantially altered natural drainage and vegetation systems. The cumulative impact of these occurrences is an absence of major vegetative or wildlife sites or, in small vestige areas, some degradation of natural system attributes. In terms of air surface and groundwater resources, the City of Oakland Park is impacted by its central location within a large urbanized area. While good management practices should occur to minimize negative impacts to these resources, areawide measures are also necessary to have any substantial positive effect on resource quality. Thus, the emphasis of the Conservation Element is to identify actions which can be developed to best preserve remaining natural resources, and to consider means to expand and improve this resource base. Surface Water Resources The City of Oakland Park includes several surface waterbodies. Most of these consist of subdivision drainage lakes or inactive rock pits which were formerly used as a source for lime rock fill. Water depths of these manmade lakes vary between 10 and 60 feet. Due to their manner of creation, shoreline slopes are generally shallow but quickly steepen to almost vertical dimensions. Depending on their location, shorelines are either bulkheaded or vegetated with ornamental garden or lawn species. The C-13 canal, a major drainage waterbody of the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD), traverses the central portion of the City in a generally east-west direction. Smaller drainage canals are also laced throughout the City; these generally inter-connect the various drainage lakes to the C-13 canal. The C-13 canal eventually terminates by discharging into the North Fork of the Middle River. In the City’s eastern areas, the local drainage canals discharge directly into the North Fork of the Middle River. The Middle River is an estuarine waterbody which flows into the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway in the City of Fort Lauderdale. This former natural river has been mostly bulkheaded and is bordered by urbanized residential and non-residential uses. Generally, the distinction between salt water and fresh water is based on distance from coastal inlets and inland drainage control structures. Most water bodies seaward of any control structure have salinity contents which are at least slightly brackish. Save for the Middle River, most City canals and lakes are in the “fresh to slightly brackish” range in chloride levels. Water depths of the City’s canal system range between few and twenty feet; the Middle River and immediately adjacent canals are tidally influenced. Shoreline or adjacent upland vegetation is either non-existent, or reflects some combination of ornamental treatment. In a few areas, wetland vegetation such as mangroves or marsh grass/cattails has established a shoreline foothold. Exotic upland species such as Brazilian Pepper (Florida Holly) are also prevalent in many areas. City of Oakland Park Conservation Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 6-3 In Broward County, various agencies conduct studies with respect to water quality. The County’s Department of Environmental Protection (EPD) is considered the lead agency in local water quality testing and analysis. This agency works with other groups such as the SFWMD and the US Geological Survey in cooperative testing and monitoring data efforts. Several water quality sampling stations have been established within the County by EPD. Initially started in 1973 with 88 stations, the current program provides quarterly sampling at forty seven locations (three locations in Oakland Park). The samples are analyzed in terms of physical, chemical and biological parameters in order to characterize water quality conditions. One testing area concerns the concentration of dissolved oxygen in the water column. This concentration is important in identifying whether adequate oxygen is available for fish and aquatic organisms. High or low concentrations may indicate an imbalance in the production of oxygen as a by-product of photosynthesis or in the direct utilization of oxygen by microbial respiration. Aquatic animals are not believed to inhabit water with less than 5.0 milligrams per liter (mg/L) for extended periods of time. The EPD standard is 5.0 mg/L in the fresh and marine waters. The availability of nutrients can be a limiting factor in biologic growth or aquatic organic production. The nutrients which may limit plant production in water are phosphorous and nitrogen. Phosphorous stimulates the growth of algae and rooted aquatics. High concentrations of phosphates are indications of sewage, agriculture runoff and industrial wastewater discharges. The EPD maintains a 0.05 mg/L water quality standard for total phosphorous in marine or estuarine environments and 0.02 mg/L for freshwater environments. The total nitrogen content of the water column can indicate several conditions. In some instances, it can be a by-product of microbiological activity, indicating runoff from urban areas due to fertilizer, industrial pollution or fecal waste pollution. High concentrations of nitrogen stimulate the growth of algae and rooted aquatic plants. While this can have positive impacts, it can also reduce the ability of the water to support wildlife. The present EPD standard is 1.5 mg/L in marine waters. Bacteriological levels are an indication of pollution origins and the ambient bacteriological quality. The EPD monitors three groups of bacteria: total coliform, fecal coliform and the fecal streptococcal group. The amount of each group is an indication of the potential for pathogenic organisms to be present. The Fecal Coliform group is indicative of fecal population. The Middle River was designated as Impaired Waters by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection on February 15, 2006, as a result of fecal coliform, nutrient and chlorophyll a levels. A standard of 400 colonies per 100 milliliters of a sample is the standard for Impaired Waters. City of Oakland Park Conservation Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 6-4 Table 6-1 presents historical data from EPD monitoring of the C-13 Canal and associated tributary waterways near the Middle River. The table reveals that water quality in City waters is generally within local standards for turbidity and fecal coliform. Low dissolved oxygen and high nutrient levels appear to be a problem in both marine and freshwater portions of the C-13 Canal as well as the North Fork of the Middle River. City of Oakland Park ConservationComprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 6-5 Table 6-1 - Water Quality Trends (1998 to 2003) Turbidity % of StdDissolved Oxygen % of StdFecal Coliform % of StdTotal Nitrogen % of StdTotal Phosphorus % of StdTest Date (ntu) (mg/L) (col/100 ml) (mg/L) (mg/L)Standards < 10 --• 5 -- < 400 -- < 1.5 -- < 0.05 --January-98 1.20 12.0% 5.62 112.4% 81 20.3% 1.245 83.0% 0.023 46.0%April-98 1.00 10.0% 6.80 136.0% 96 24.0% 0.689 45.9% 0.027 54.0%July-98 1.30 13.0% 6.34 126.8% 110 27.5% 0.979 65.3% 0.063 126.0%October-98 2.00 20.0% 11.60 232.0% 290 72.5% 1.394 92.9% 0.024 48.0%January-99 2.00 20.0% 4.91 98.2% 210 52.5% 1.962 130.8% 0.054 108.0%April-99 1.60 16.0% 6.26 125.2% 96 24.0% 1.102 73.5% 0.072 144.0%July-99 3.10 31.0% 4.73 94.6% 300 75.0% 1.976 131.7% 0.038 76.0%October-99 2.25 22.5% 4.05 81.0% 130 32.5% 1.227 81.8% 0.119 238.0%January-00 1.20 12.0% 8.36 167.2% 210 52.5% 1.505 100.3% 0.024 48.0%April-00 1.50 15.0% 7.16 143.2% 37 9.3% 1.653 110.2% 0.020 40.0%July-00 0.80 8.0% 2.89 57.8% 81 20.3% 1.205 80.3% 0.012 24.0%October-00 0.80 8.0% 6.41 128.2% 190 47.5% 1.742 116.1% 0.021 42.0%January-01 0.60 6.0% 9.75 195.0% 1300 325.0% 0.910 60.7% 0.043 85.0%April-01 3.15 31.5% 6.94 138.8% 730 182.5% 0.942 62.8% 0.143 286.0%July-01 1.00 10.0% 6.08 121.6% 250 62.5% 0.905 60.3% 0.058 116.0%November-01 1.20 12.0% 4.45 89.0% 2400 600.0% 1.583 105.5% 0.029 58.2%January-02 1.40 14.0% 6.67 133.4% 170 42.5% 1.156 77.1% 0.028 55.2%April-02 1.40 14.0% 4.86 97.2% 67 16.8% 0.773 51.5% 0.089 178.6%July-02 1.60 16.0% 4.01 80.2% 130 32.5% 1.291 86.1% 0.020 39.0%October-02 1.50 15.0% 8.30 166.0% 59 14.8% 0.879 58.6% 0.140 280.0%February-03 0.90 9.0% 6.47 129.4% 200 50.0% 0.710 47.3% 0.022 43.6%April-03 0.95 9.5% 7.86 157.2% 37 9.3% 0.789 52.6% 0.114 228.0%August-03 2.00 20.0% 5.14 102.8% 470 117.5% 1.208 80.5% 0.014 28.0%October-03 1.30 13.0% 4.72 94.4% 560 140.0% 1.388 92.5% 0.015 30.0%indicates times when water quality failed to meet standardSite # 11 (marine) - C-13 Feeder Canal at NW 21st Avenue City of Oakland Park ConservationComprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 6-6 Turbidity % of StdDissolved Oxygen % of StdFecal Coliform % of StdTotal Nitrogen % of StdTotal Phosphorus % of StdTest Date (ntu) (mg/L) (col/100 ml) (mg/L) (mg/L)Standards < 10 -- ? 5 -- < 400 -- < 1.5 -- < 0.02 --January-98 1.00 10.0% 4.68 93.6% 59 14.8% 1.352 90.1% 0.017 85.0%April-98 1.00 10.0% 6.25 125.0% 74 18.5% 1.415 94.3% 0.019 95.0%July-98 1.20 12.0% 4.55 91.0% 15 3.8% 1.157 77.1% 0.056 280.0%October-98 1.70 17.0% 8.58 171.6% 81 20.3% 1.463 97.5% 0.018 90.0%January-99 2.05 20.5% 4.74 94.8% 200 50.0% 1.890 126.0% 0.045 225.0%April-99 1.00 10.0% 8.09 161.8% 7 1.8% 1.502 100.1% 0.031 155.0%July-99 1.80 18.0% 4.13 82.6% 100 25.0% 1.299 86.6% 0.005 25.0%October-99 2.80 28.0% 3.51 70.2% 120 30.0% 1.169 77.9% 0.047 235.0%January-00 1.80 18.0% 7.85 157.0% 130 32.5% 1.742 116.1% 0.013 65.0%April-00 1.50 15.0% 6.94 138.8% 74 18.5% 1.580 105.3% 0.003 12.5%July-00 1.20 12.0% 2.12 42.4% 130 32.5% 1.234 82.3% 0.003 12.5%October-00 1.00 10.0% 6.63 132.6% 52 13.0% 1.302 86.8% 0.003 12.5%January-01 0.50 5.0% 10.20 204.0% 270 67.5% 1.375 91.7% 0.005 25.0%April-01 1.10 11.0% 6.99 139.8% 15 3.8% 1.328 88.5% 0.036 180.0%July-01 1.00 10.0% 6.03 120.6% 2800 700.0% 0.896 59.7% 0.029 145.0%November-01 0.90 9.0% 6.02 120.4% 22 5.5% 1.414 94.3% 0.020 101.5%January-02 0.73 7.3% 8.31 166.2% 37 9.3% 1.207 80.5% 0.015 74.0%April-02 0.90 9.0% 7.32 146.4% 200 50.0% 1.015 67.7% 0.010 52.0%July-02 1.90 19.0% 3.85 77.0% 59 14.8% 1.143 76.2% 0.005 25.0%October-02 0.75 7.5% 6.27 125.4% 15 3.8% 1.266 84.4% 0.065 323.0%February-03 0.70 7.0% 9.46 189.2% 59 14.8% 1.546 103.1% 0.005 22.5%April-03 0.90 9.0% 9.84 196.8% 22 5.5% 1.789 119.3% 0.009 46.0%August-03 2.10 21.0% 5.43 108.6% 160 40.0% 1.210 80.7% 0.013 65.0%November-03 1.70 17.0% 4.81 96.2% 350 87.5% 1.151 76.7% 0.010 50.0%indicates times when water quality failed to meet standardSite # 12 (freshwater) - C-13 Canal at NW 31st Avenue City of Oakland Park ConservationComprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 6-7 Turbidity % of StdDissolved Oxygen % of StdFecal Coliform % of StdTotal Nitrogen % of StdTotal Phosphorus % of StdTest Date (ntu) (mg/L) (col/100 ml) (mg/L) (mg/L)Standards < 10 -- ? 5 -- < 400 -- < 1.5 -- < 0.05 --January-01 0.40 4.0% 7.10 142.0% 37 9.3% 0.707 47.1% 0.005 10.0%April-01 1.50 15.0% 4.20 84.0% 81 20.3% 0.645 43.0% 0.073 146.0%July-01 1.40 14.0% 4.20 84.0% 620 155.0% 0.705 47.0% 0.094 188.0%November-01 1.60 16.0% 4.01 80.2% 900 225.0% 1.541 102.7% 0.049 98.8%January-02 0.94 9.4% 7.02 140.4% 130 32.5% 0.963 64.2% 0.044 87.0%April-02 1.60 16.0% 3.69 73.8% 74 18.5% 0.646 43.0% 0.085 169.4%July-02 2.30 23.0% 4.73 94.6% 270 67.5% 1.605 107.0% 0.062 124.8%October-02 1.30 13.0% 6.93 138.6% 74 18.5% 0.905 60.3% 0.114 228.0%February-03 0.70 7.0% 6.37 127.4% 67 16.8% 0.885 59.0% 0.053 106.6%April-03 0.90 9.0% 7.13 142.6% 96 24.0% 0.693 46.2% 0.062 124.0%August-03 1.90 19.0% 4.65 93.0% 320 80.0% 1.323 88.2% 0.037 74.0%November-03 1.60 16.0% 5.46 109.2% 7200 1800.0% 1.258 83.9% 0.055 110.0%indicates times when water quality failed to meet standardSite # 112 (estuarine) - North Fork of Middle River at NE 16th Avenue City of Oakland Park Conservation Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 6-8 Floodplains Development practices and flood control efforts of SFWMD have to some extent obviated natural floodplain concepts as they relate to Oakland Park. The City is essentially a continuous plain, with natural ground elevations ranging between two and twelve feet. However, building floor elevations are generally set at approximately six feet to conform to FEMA flood insurance requirements. Figure A3 in Volume III, the Map Series, provides a depiction of the local FEMA map. The City adopted a flood plain ordinance (#087-14) on March 18, 1987. This ordinance superseded a previous ordinance and provides that building floor elevations must meet the FEMA base flood elevation requirements. As noted in the Drainage portion of the Infrastructure Element, surface water levels are based on a complex system of canals and drainage control structures which are used to govern the amount and rate of flow from the inland communities to the tidal discharge water bodies. Facility management is based on the sometimes conflicting objectives of providing for adequate drainage while attempting to maintain adequate freshwater elevations to thwart the inland migration of salt water. While areas adjacent to drainage lakes, canals and the Middle River would be expected to have periodic flooding problems, most local deficiencies relate to the lack of drainage systems in the central area of the City. Since the City is essentially fully urbanized, with minimal agricultural uses, an analysis of alluvial soil conditions has not been performed. A general analysis of soils and drainage conditions can be found in the City’s Infrastructure Element. Groundwater Resources The City of Oakland Park relies on freshwater supplied by Broward County and the City of Fort Lauderdale. Both jurisdictions draw their freshwater from the Biscayne Aquifer; a shallow coastal aquifer which has been called one of the most productive in the world. In 1979, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) designated the Biscayne Aquifer as the sole source of drinking water for the tri-county area of Dade, Broward and Palm Beach Counties. The Biscayne Aquifer is a very permeable sediment body of varied thickness, ranging from approximately 200 feet near the coast to less than 80 feet in the County’s western conservation areas. Since the aquifer is unconfined, water from wells must be pumped rather than rising vis- à-vis artesian conditions. The Biscayne Aquifer is recharged by a combination of local rainfall and surface water released from Lake Okeechobee through the regional water management canal system. It has been estimated that, of the approximate 60 inches of rainfall occurring annually, less than 20 inches City of Oakland Park Conservation Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 6-9 of rainfall is available to supply local surface and groundwaters. The remainder is lost due to evapotranspiration, interaction with salt water and other losses. In spite of the high rate of productivity, the Biscayne Aquifer has been placed under increased stress through a variety of natural and manmade factors. The combined impact of heavy withdrawal, salt water or chemical contamination and periodic droughts has placed a considerable burden on this water source. In light of the fragile nature and the dependence of the urban area on this resource, a major area of local concern is the long-term vitality of the Biscayne Aquifer. The 2002, 2004 and 2005 Legislature strengthened the coordination of water supply and land use planning in Florida. For the first time, a direct linkage was created between water management district Regional Water Supply Plans and Local Government Comprehensive Plans. Local government must now develop and adopt a minimum 10-year Water Supply Facility Work Plan to address their future water supply needs, water supply sources and the building of all required public, private and regional facilities needed to serve existing and new development. Local governments must incorporate into their comprehensive plan local government water supply projects selected from those listed in a Regional Water Supply Plan or propose to the water management district alternative water supply options sufficient to meet their future needs. The City of Oakland Park is located within the Lower East Coast Water Supply Planning Area, which published its regional water supply plan update in 2007 that identifies future water supply needs. Based on that and other relevant plans and data, the City adopted its Water Supply Facilities Work Plan in 2008. As discussed in the Infrastructure Element, the City of Oakland Park will, through interlocal agreement continue to rely on other jurisdictions for the provision of treated freshwater. Projections of future consumptive demand can be found in the Potable Water section of the Infrastructure Element. Flora and Fauna Inventory A great variety of ecological communities exist within Broward County. Since Oakland Park is arranged on a lengthy east/west axis and includes former palustrine and riverine systems, many of the ecological communities found in Broward County also occur in the City. However, extensive urban development has resulted in significant loss in the amount and quality of these communities. Only minimal amounts of certain communities remain. This fact is particularly evident with regard to freshwater or estuarine vegetation areas, and tropical hammock communities. Historical descriptions of various local community types have been condensed from various areawide references and are presented below. City of Oakland Park Conservation Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 6-10 Upland Communities 1. Pine Forests Pine Forests were located on north/south ridges in eastern Broward County. These ridges were divided by transitional swamps (i.e., Middle River area) which allowed water to flow from the Everglades eastward to the coast. There are two types of pine forests: scrub pine forests and pine flatwoods. a. Scrub Pine Forests are generally found in eastern ridge areas on upland, well drained, sandy soils. The acidic, low organic soils essentially provide for a desert-like condition, with plant and animal adaptations developed to survive in the low moisture environment. Dense, low stands of scrub vegetation such as Sand Pine, Saw Palmetto, Myrtle Oak; Sand Live Oak, Chapman Oak, Shiny Lyonia, Rusty Lyonia, Tallowwood, Curtis Milkweed, Nodding Pinweed and various wildflowers predominate. Dominant animal species include Gopher Tortoise, Florida Scrub Lizard, and the Florida Scrub Jay. An example of this type of community is located in the southwest portion of the City. b. Pine Flatwoods formed in the western areas of the Pine Forests. This pyro- climatic community is characterized by a low humidity and a relatively open understory. Underlying soils consist of poorly drained fine sands which are underlain by calcified material such as limestone or marls. South Florida Slash Pine Saw Palmetto, Cabbage Palm, Wax Myrtle, Gallberry and open plains grasses constitute the dominant vegetative species. Wildlife species such as Great Horned Owls, various woodpeckers, Box Turtles, Southern Toads, Tree Frogs and various snakes and lizards are also found in the Pine Flatwoods. There are no remaining areas of the City which can be classified as this type of community. 2. Hammock Forests Hammock forests in the eastern Broward area could be easily identified based on their relatively dense and luxuriant vegetation. Two general types occur: the Tropical Hammock and the Low Hammock. a. Tropical Hammocks are small areas of hardwood and palm forest usually dominated by broad leafed, evergreen trees. Originally situated on high upland, or seasonally flooded soils, a wide variety of south temperate and tropical species could be found in these areas. Typical vegetation might include Cabbage Palm, Mastic, Pigeon Plum, Poisonwood, Satinleaf, White Stopper, Gumbo Limbo, Wild Lime, Wild Coffee, Paradise Trees and various ferns. City of Oakland Park Conservation Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 6-11 b. Low Hammock vegetation is generally the same as that found in Tropical Hammock areas. The principal difference is associated with lower elevations and varied soil composition, such that the low hammock has higher soil moisture content than the Tropical Hammock areas. More wetland species might be found, particularly in depression areas or lowland perimeter/transitional areas adjacent to swamp or marshes. In addition to previously mentioned species, other characteristic vegetation would include Live Oak, Strangler Fig, Laurel Oak and Red Maple species. Animals which may be found in these areas include Raccoons, Bobcats, Opossums, Armadillos, Foxes and various Squirrels. John Easterlin Park is an example of both Tropical and Low Hammock communities. Wetland Communities 1. Cypress/Transitional Swamp While most of the County’s Cypress Swamp area originally occurred west of the City of Oakland Park, this community also occurred along the upstream reaches of the Middle River, or in isolated depression pockets. Dominant vegetation types include Bald Cypress, Red Maple, Coco Plum, Willow, Wax Myrtle, Pond Apple, Red and Sweet Bay, Laurel Oak and Carolina Ash. Animal species include Raccoon, Opossum, Armadillo, Screech Owl, Box Turtles and various snakes, frogs and birds. 2. Marsh/Estuarine Areas A mixture of salt water and fresh water vegetation occurs along the inland rivers of the County; the prevalence of salt water versus fresh water types is dependent upon distance from the ocean. In general, most vegetation east of any water control structure would be associated with a brackish or estuarine environment. While chloride levels downstream of these facilities may be low in certain periods, the intermittent nature of this occurrence is such that salt-water species are more prevalent. Because of the bulkheading that has occurred in the City, there are no remaining pockets of this type of vegetation in the City. a. Freshwater vegetation species would include Sawgrass, Coastal Plain Willow, Wax Myrtle, Elderberry, Cattail, Canna Lily and various ferns. Wildlife species would include Alligator, Snail Kite, Apple Snail, Largemouth Bass and various water snakes and frogs. An example of this type of community (primarily cattails) can be found in Oakland Lake. b. Estuarine vegetation species would include Red, Black and White Mangrove; Buttonwood, Salt grass, Cord grass, Bunch Switch Grass or Black Rush. Animal species include Fiddler Crab, Heron, Egret, Spoonbill, Osprey, Manatees, Snook, various types of juvenile game and commercial fish, mollusks, crustaceans and assorted bottom dwellers. Because of the bulkheading that has occurred in the City of Oakland Park Conservation Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 6-12 City, there are no significant pockets of this type of vegetation remaining in the City. A few locations along the western portion of the North Fork of the Middle River south of Oakland Park Boulevard do however have some mangrove species. Updated information on ecological communities in Oakland Park was not available at the time of this plan update. In most cases, examples of the different ecological communities found in the City occur as vestige islands of greenery surrounded by urban development. These areas range in size from almost 100 acres (former rock pits with minimal shore vegetation) to individual lots or parcels less than one acre in area. Except for John Easterlin Park, no other natural areas were sited within the City by the county. Figure A4 in Volume III, the Map Series, shows the locations of wetlands within the City. The following Table 6-2 provides a listing of bird species which have been identified as occurring in the City. Most of these have been sighted in Broward County’s Easterlin Park, a diverse wilderness park located in the south central portion of the City. Species abundance notations are in accord with the “Checklist of Southern Florida Birds” booklet compiled by Dr. Ira J.Abramson and Dr. Oscar T. Owre for the Tropical Audubon Society. Analysis As previously mentioned, urban development activities have for the most part resulted in the loss and/or degradation of major habitat areas in the City. Native pine forests, cypress swamps and wetlands have been virtually eliminated. Vestige species can be found in the City’s residential areas interspersed among ornamental species. Where vestige parcels remain, the quality or ability of these areas to support wildlife has been significantly diminished due to clear cutting of the understory. Invasion of exotic vegetation species is also a common problem. Australian Pine, Punk or Melaleuca and Brazilian Pepper species were often found along perimeters or cleared trails within fairly undisturbed sites. Due to their adaptability and ability to survive in a low moisture environment, these species are able to thrive at the expense of native vegetation. Areawide drainage programs and/or local development practices have contributed to the draining of remaining isolated cypress wetlands. Generally, topographic modifications have eliminated site characteristics necessary for species regeneration. The evolution of development review requirements is also apparent in terms of ornamental vegetation practice. While new projects, or significant redevelopment of existing properties, must comply with fairly extensive landscaping requirements, some areas of the City are virtually absent of native or ornamental vegetation. City of Oakland Park Conservation Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 6-13 Sightings or other evidence indicates that some wildlife species may occur in the City which is currently listed on endangered or threatened lists. This information is from the Florida Natural Areas Inventory Biodiversity Matrix, and all of the species are “likely elements” meaning that they are known to occur in the vicinity and are considered likely because: i their documented occurrence overlaps with the area but their precise location is not noted, or i there is a documented occurrence in the vicinity and there is suitable habitat for the species within the area. Table 6-3 provides a listing by common name of endangered or threatened species which may exist in the City. City of Oakland Park Conservation Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 6-14 Table 6-2 - Local Bird Species Abundance Bird Name Classification Abundance Bird Name Classification Abundance Bird Name Classification Pied Bill Grebe American Anhinga Great Blue Heron Green Backed Heron Little Blue Heron Cattle Egret Great Egret Snowy Egret Tri-color Heron Yellow Crowned Night Heron Blue-winged Teal Ring Necked Duck Red Tailed Hawk Red Shouldered Hawk Broad Winged Hawk Osprey Peregrine Falcon Merlin American Kestrel Common Moorhen American Coot Killdeer Spotted Sandpiper Solitary Sandpiper Greater Yellowlegs Lesser Yellowlegs Black-Necked Stilt Ring-billed Gull Laughing Gull Forster’s Tern Little Tent Black Skimmer Rock Dove Ground Dove Red Fronted Amazon Yellow-billed Cuckoo Black-billed Cuckoo Smooth-billed Ani Common Screech Owl Chuck-will’s-widow Whip-poor-will Common Nighthawk Chimney Swift Ruby Throated Hummingbird U C C C C C C C C C C C U C C C U U C C C U C U C C C C C C C C C C R C U C C C C C R U w r r r r r r r r r w w r r m r w w w r w r w m w w s w r w s r r r r s m r r r w s m w Belted Kingfisher Common Flicker Pileated Woodpecker Red-bellied Woodpecker Yellow-bellied Sapsucker Downy Woodpecker Eastern Kingbird Western Kingbird Eastern Phoebe Great Crested Flycatcher Eastern Pewee Tree Swallow Rough Winged Swallow Barn Swallow Purple Martin Blue Jay Fish Crow House Wren Carolina Wren Northern Mockingbird Gray Catbird Brown Thrasher American Robin Wood Thrush Hermit Thrush Swainson’s Thrush Grey-checked Thrush Veery Blue-gray Gnatcatcher Ruby-crowned Kinglet Cedar Waxwing European Starling White-eyed Vireo Yellow-throated Vireo Solitary Vireo Black-whiskered Vireo Red-eyed Vireo Black-and-white Warbler Prothonotary Warbler Swainson’s Warbler Worm-eating Warbler Tennessee Warbler Orange-crowned Warbler C C U C C U C U C C U C C C C C C C C C C U C R U U U U C U C C C C C C U C U R U R U w r r r w r m w w r m w w m m r r w r r w r w m w m m m w w w r r r r s m w m m m m w Nashville Warbler Northern Parula Warbler Yellow Warbler Magnolia Warbler Cape May Warbler Black-throated Blue Warbler Yellow-rumped Warbler Chestnut-sided Warbler Bay-breasted Warbler Blackpoll Warbler Prairie Warbler Palm Warbler Ovenbird Northern Waterthrush Louisiana Waterthrush Kentucky Warbler Connecticut Warbler Common Yellowthroat Yellow-breasted Chat Hooded Warbler Wilson’s Warbler Canada Warbler American Redstart House Sparrow Bobolink Red-winged Blackbird Spotted Oriole Northern Oriole Boat-tailed Grackle Common Grackle Stripe-headed Tanager Western Tanager Scarlet Tanager Summer Tanager Northern Cardinal Rose-breasted Grosbreak Blue Grosbreak Indigo Bunting Painted Bunting American Goldfinch Rufous-sided Towhee Savannah Sparrow Swamp Sparrow R C U U C C C U U C C C C U U U R C U U U U C C C C C C C C R R R R C C U C C C U C C m w r m m m w m m m w w w w w m m r w w m m m r m r r r r r o o o o r m m w w w r w r NOTES: C Common; often seen or heard in appropriate habitat. r summer visitor (including spring and fall). U “Uncommon usually present but not always heard or seen.” w Winter visitor (including spring and fall). K Rare; present only in small numbers - seldom seen or heard. o Occasional or casual visitor. R Resident present all year - abundance may vary with season. m Migrant ordinarily present only during migration. City of Oakland Park Conservation Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 6-15 Table 6-3 - Endangered and Threatened Species, 2007 SPECIES NAME FEDERAL LISTING STATUS STATE LISTING STATUS PLANTS Burrowing Four-o’clock Endangered Coastal Vervain Endangered Cutthroat Grass Endangered Florida Royal Palm Endangered Florida Filmy Fern Endangered Johnson’s Seagrass Threatened Large-flowered Rosemary Threatened Nodding Pinweed Threatened Banded Wild-pine Threatened Pineland Jacquemontia Threatened Silver Palm Threatened West Indies Mahogany Threatened REPTILES Hawksbill Sea Turtle Endangered Endangered Eastern Indigo Snake Threatened Threatened Gopher Tortoise Species of Special Concern AMPHIBIANS Gopher Frog Species of Special Concern FISH Mangrove Rivulus Species of Special Concern BIRDS Florida Burrowing Owl Species of Special Concern MAMMALS Manatee Endangered Endangered Florida Bonneted Bat Endangered Source: Florida Natural Areas Inventory, Biodiversity Matrix Query Results, 2007 Air Quality In general, air quality in the South Florida region is considered to be good based on the prevailing trade winds and flat topography of the area. These characteristics minimize air stagnation, which is a principal factor in high pollution levels in an urbanized, auto-dominated environment. In addition, average annual rainfall amounts of some 60 inches also contribute to the cleansing of particulates through scrubbing action. With respect to air quality, the City of Oakland Park benefits from its eastern coastal location and associated coastal breezes. Due to a lack of heavy industry, there are no known major point sources of air pollution. However, central and western portions of the City are negatively impacted by auto pollutant emissions from nearby arterial and expressway facilities. City of Oakland Park Conservation Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 6-16 As noted in the Traffic Circulation Element, Oakland Park Boulevard, Commercial Boulevard and I-95 are characterized by high daily traffic volume and poor levels of service. While most traffic is comprised of through trips, local temporary inversion conditions, vehicle idling and acceleration results in heightened local levels of carbon monoxide and ozone. The Broward County Environmental Protection Department (EPD) does not maintain any air quality monitoring stations in the City of Oakland Park. Four stations are located in adjacent areas to the north, south and west of the City. Two stations monitor carbon monoxide levels only; the remaining two monitor carbon monoxide as well as nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxides and total suspended particulates. Data compiled at these sites indicate that air quality in the overall vicinity of the City has been consistently in the “Good” or better range over the last several years. Between 2001 and 2003, the countywide air quality was “Good” for more than 90 percent of each year. Beginning in 2004, the percentage of “Good” days shows a slight decline, with 2006 experiencing “Good” days only 81.79 percent of the year. Further, the number of “Unhealthy for Sensitive Group” days increased from zero to two between 2005 and 2006. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has designated the Dade/Broward/Palm Beach area as a single air shed. In April of 1995 the EPA reclassified the Tri-County area as an “Attainment Maintenance” area (as opposed to the “Non-Attainment Classification in 1994’). Broward County was designated as an Attainment Area for ground level ozone, effective April 15, 2005. Commercially Valuable Minerals At the present time, there are no known commercially valuable minerals in the City of Oakland Park. Historically, the only local mining activities which have occurred in the City involve the mining of lime rock for roadway, parking lot or building foundations. Currently, there are no active or proposed rock pit mines in the City. The Future Land Use Map designates these sites for water use. The sites can be used for recreation, open space and drainage purposes. Soil Erosion Due to minimal topographic relief, and the lack of agricultural land uses, soil erosion is not considered to be a problem in the City of Oakland Park. Shoreline erosion, around the City’s waterbodies, is a problem due in part to steep banks and lack of shoreline vegetation. Increases in local maintenance funding may be necessary in these areas mainly to improve drainage conditions. In addition, current land development requirements should be maintained that include provisions to minimize erosion or pollution associated with airborne soil particulates or turbidity screens along waterways. City of Oakland Park Conservation Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 6-17 Commercial Uses of Natural Resources There are no commercial uses of local natural resources in the City of Oakland Park. Historically, rock pit mining and limited agricultural or lumbering activities constitute the extent of commercial uses of resources which are known to have occurred. Conservation/Recreational Use of Natural Resources While there are a host of local parks and one county recreational facility in the City, most of these cater to urban recreational activities such as children’s playgrounds or baseball/football fields. Discussions of the urban recreational areas can be found in the Open Space and Recreation Element of the City’s Plan. Discounting water bodies, the largest natural recreational area in the City is the County owned and operated Easterlin Park. Serving as the operations base of the County’s Parks and Recreation Division, this 41-acre park features camping and various outdoor nature oriented activities. Due to its original natural setting along the former upper reaches of the Middle River, this park features a multitude of ecological communities including tropical and low hammock areas, marsh wetlands and vestige cypress swamp vegetation. Bounded on two sides by major arterial facilities, the park is an urban wilderness oasis. The City’s Parcours Park at NE 38th Street/NE 6th Avenue is situated on former scrub property. While many mature sand pine trees remain, clearing of the understory has largely diminished the site’s ability to serve as a wildlife habitat. The relatively small size of this parcel does not lend itself to substantial reclamation or mitigation activities to support wildlife. Royal Palm Park is situated along two of the City’s drainage lakes and was largely devoid of native vegetation. In 2006, the City had an extensive replanting program and native species such as Bald Cypress, Live Oak, Gumbo Limbo, Sabal Palms and Royal Palms were planted in the park. However, the shoreline area is still largely devoid of native vegetation and littoral plantings should be installed. The City owns and operates the resource-based park Lakeside Sand Pine Preserve. This site is comprised of approximately five acres of native sand pine scrub forest and offers visitors a nature trail, outdoor classroom and observation deck. In 2006, Oakland Bark Park, a dog park, opened. As part of its replanting program, the City installed Bald Cypress, Live Oak, Silver Buttonwood, Sabal Palms, and Thatch Palms in this park. City of Oakland Park Conservation Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 6-18 The City developed Veteran’s Park along portions of NW 21st Avenue during the 1988-1995 planning period. The shoreline was severely eroded during Hurricane Wilma in 2005 and is currently being rehabilitated with natural riprap and native vegetation. Managed Major Natural Areas There are no major plant or wildlife management areas in the City of Oakland Park. Development Pressures Since the City is almost fully developed, or has been subject to some previous clearing or development activity, very few undisturbed sites remain for potential acquisition or, at a minimum, application of more sensitive development techniques. Projected Water Needs The projected City water needs for industrial and potable water use are developed in the lnfrastructure Element. Since the City does not have agriculture as a proposed use in the Future Land Use Plan, no future agriculture demands are projected. The total projected water needs for 2015 and 2030 are 7.34 and 8.84 millions of gallons per day, respectively. The City has large user agreements with the City of Fort Lauderdale and Broward County for the provision of fixture potable water. Based on the analysis provided in the Infrastructure Element, the City of Fort Lauderdale and Broward County have adequate capacity to provide sufficient potable water to meet the City’s needs. Surface Water Pollution As discussed earlier in this Element, surface water quality n the Oakland Park area-generally falls within the standards for turbidity and fecal coliform. High nutrient levels, particularly phosphorus, and low dissolved oxygen levels are problems for the surface waters tested by Broward County. Pollutant loadings in local waters are usually associated with non-point sources which include run-off from highway and urbanized property uses. Fertilizer run-off from adjacent residential uses may also contribute to higher nutrient levels in local canals and waterways. Dumping is also recognized as a minor problem, particularly in those areas accessible by some public right- of-way. Vagrants living in some areas near densely vegetated shorelines may also contribute to this situation. The City has modified its land development regulations to improve the quality of storm water discharges. Additionally, the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permitting process requires improvements to discharges, increased monitoring and analysis. As a result of the designation of the Middle River as Impaired Waters, Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) may be established for the waterway. According to information from the Florida City of Oakland Park Conservation Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 6-19 Department of Environmental Protection, it will be 2010 or 2011 before these TMDLs are established. At that time, Oakland Park will have to work with other stakeholders (Wilton Manors, Lauderdale Lakes, Fort Lauderdale and the Department of Transportation) to develop a Basin Management Action Plan. Groundwater Pollution and Hazardous Waste Groundwater pollutant levels in the City of Oakland Park have not been thoroughly researched to this date. The USGS has several monitoring wells in the City which are used mainly to determine the amount and extent of the inland migration of salt water. Local monitoring wells are also found at various locations where underground storage tanks are located pursuant to requirements of the County EPD. The main emphasis of EPD/USGS groundwater monitoring effort has been targeted to the vicinity of major raw water wellfields. In this respect, it should be noted that raw water wells in the City are used only for local irrigation. While the City does not have any heavy industrial land uses, a number of industrial and commercial users of potential pollutants do exist. These are concentrated along various collectors or arterial roads such as Dixie Highway, Prospect Road and Northeast 6th Avenue in the central area of the City. Historically, it is possible that improper use or disposal of certain products may have resulted in current cases of local groundwater pollution. The County’s EPD has instituted seven related programs to deal with the regulation of hazardous waste as it relates to surface and groundwater quality. These include license requirements for industrial wastewater pretreatment and/or treatment facilities (primarily sewage treatment plants), users of hazardous material, hauler and transporting forms, transfer facilities and firms with hazardous materials storage tanks in excess of 500 gallons. The last program is a hazardous waste assessment inventory, a major on-going effort developed to identify unknown potential users of hazardous waste. It is apparent that the widespread use of pollutant materials creates difficulties in regulation by EPD. While this agency can focus on major problems, staff and budget limitations and partial reliance on a user “honor” system all contribute to some problems remaining undetected. Broward County continues to utilize a licensing procedure for the regulation of hazardous wastes as one means to improve the hazardous waste situation in Oakland Park. Air Quality Plan Broward County was designated as an “Attainment Area” for ground level ozone in April 2005. As redevelopment occurs, the City should remain apprised of the air quality situation through ongoing interaction with the County’s Metropolitan Planning Organization. While additional development activity in the City is anticipated to be relatively minor in scale, the City should carefully review development proposals relative-to locations near or along major City of Oakland Park Conservation Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 6-20 highway corridors. Potential point sources of air pollution should also be evaluated with respect to impacts on residential areas and, where feasible, should include a coordinated review by the County EPD. Water Quality Plan The City’s surface waters provide an excellent recreational and aesthetic amenity. While the City does not have any potable water wellfields, high transmissivity rates of the Biscayne Aquifer suggest that local actions could potentially affect the integrity of the areawide water supply. Efforts to maintain and improve the quality of local water resources should be given a high priority. The City facilitates EPD’s familiarity with local users of potential surface or groundwater pollutants through occupational licensing requirements conditioned upon review by EPD. Field review and coordination with EPD to identify suspected problem sites is another action which is practiced by City personnel and the general public. City promotion and participation in areawide waterway clean-up activities is desirable. Increased code enforcement activities as they relate to waterfront property could possibly improve the character and appearance of some areas. Dredging of strategic canal areas may increase tidal, cleansing characteristics as well as improve drainage flows in the event of a major rainstorm. The City has implemented comprehensive storm drain improvements throughout the central and eastern area. Some of these improvements entailed installation or tie-ins to drainage outfalls. Pollution control devices are typically incorporated into new drainage facilities. The City may also want to consider developing a program to retrofit older structures or facilities with various devices. A program to install upland or shoreline vegetation in some locations, with the potential to cleanse pollutants prior to entering waterways, should also be considered. At the present time, EPA has not yet recognized any device as being able to satisfactorily remove “heavy metals” or other contaminants occurring on streets and highways. Prototype devices have been developed which better perform this function. In light of the heavy traffic volume on many city roadways, the City should stay apprised of advances in this technology and, if feasible, undertake or support efforts to acquire proven devices for local and/or areawide use. Wetlands Since few viable wetlands remain in the City, several efforts could be undertaken to create and/or improve wetland conditions. Platting activities in the City require review by Broward County; this activity includes requirements to significant identified areas of wetland vegetation. State or federal permitting or City of Oakland Park Conservation Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 6-21 design requirements also apply in those instances where certain wetland species are known to exist. Most site plan approvals, however, are based entirely upon local review and do not include specific requirements to preserve or mitigate onsite wetland characteristics. The City has modified local subdivision regulations to require sensitive design or mitigation practices in those ‘areas where wetland vegetation or soil types occur. Requirements to eliminate exotic trees species, to preserve or improve local vegetation and water flows, and in some cases to reintroduce a variety of wetland species to encourage habitat development, are desirable. Further, regulations requiring the mechanical removal of nuisance aquatic vegetation should be considered. The current method of spraying the vegetation and leaving it to rot is both unsightly and lowers the dissolved oxygen levels. The City could also consider developing an areawide program to eliminate exotic tree species near wetland areas, and to promote the reintroduction of preferred native wetland species in applicable existing developed areas. Open canopy trees, such as slash pine, should be planted adjacent to waterbodies, when possible, to provide water bird habitat. This program would apply to privately owned properties as well as City parks or right-of-ways. Water Conservation Recognizing that a sufficient fresh water supply is critical to any urban area, and that areawide development increases pressure on the productiveness of the sole source Biscayne Aquifer, it is imperative that efforts to minimize overall water consumption be given a high priority. A variety of methods to accomplish this objective are already established; local implementation of these methods is necessary. The South Florida Water Management District has estimated that approximately 50% of the total annual water demand in urban areas is associated with supplemental irrigation of public greenspace and private landscape. In much of the City of Oakland Park ornamental landscaping and/or lawn grass is found in naturally arid areas which were formerly associated with scrub vegetation. In order to rectify this situation, the “Xeriscape” landscaping concept has been recognized as having applicability throughout south Florida. The Xeriscape concept essentially provides for water conservation through the proper landscape watering techniques and through the use of appropriate drought tolerant landscape species. Eliminating large areas of grass or other water intensive vegetation, and replacing with mulch, ground covers or more suitable drought resistant vegetation is the thrust of the program. Proper site contouring, designation of a few, high profile water oriented areas, efficient irrigation systems and practices are also recommended as part of a successful program. City of Oakland Park Conservation Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 6-22 The City works with the South Florida Water Management District to promote or sponsor activities to locally implement xeriscape techniques, and is a member of Broward County’s Naturescape Irrigation Service. The Naturescape Irrigation Service was created by an interlocal agreement between the County and 13 other municipalities in 2005. Its goal is to reduce water consumption. The program is designed to help people learn about, create, and maintain attractive, low maintenance, low impact, healthy landscapes that reflect and help protect Florida's natural resources. The City promotes other conservation methods such as modifying or replacing residential irrigation and plumbing fixtures with more efficient mechanisms. Consideration of local ordinances to limit irrigation during high evapotranspiration periods or periods of high residential consumption would also have beneficial impact. Although the local potable water is provided by other jurisdictions, the City should also remain apprised of continued developments in the effort to regionalize raw water withdrawal areas. The City has a concern in this situation in that it could be financially impacted by implementation of this proposal. A knowledgeable position in the event that some political action is required is desirable. Per the City’s Water Supply Facilities Work Plan, the City will take steps towards several conservation measures including: an inverted tiered rate structure, the purchase and distribution of Pre-Rinse Valves and Water Conservation Kits, a Water Meter Replacement Program, continued monitoring of losses and benefits of conservation practices, and compliance with regulatory requirements for watering limits. Soil Erosion Plan While soil erosion is not considered to be a significant local problem, continued enforcement of local best management practices in developing areas should be maintained. Development of local programs to landscape or mulch private or public areas which are presently devoid of vegetative ground cover would also positively contribute in this respect. As noted earlier, shoreline erosion is a significant problem. The City should continue and enhance its efforts to revegetate and otherwise naturally stabilize these areas. Flora and Fauna Plan The City of Oakland Park has suffered from the impact of poor historical development practices. Few high quality habitat locations exist or are available for potential acquisition. Given the broad diversity of habitat originally existing within the area, the City may want to consider the feasibility of acquiring additional property for recreational, educational and habitat development purposes. Introduction of native canopy and understory vegetation species throughout the City would also promote the development of local habitat areas for wildlife. While not as applicable to the City’s industrial and commercial areas, the barren appearance of some locations suggests that requirements to introduce and/or upgrade vegetation and irrigation in these areas may be City of Oakland Park Conservation Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 6-23 desirable. Several communities have enacted requirements of this type which generally include multiple year implementation periods to reduce the financial impacts on property owners. Efforts to sensitively develop the few forested areas remaining in the City should also be followed. Modifications to the City’s existing subdivision regulations, zoning code or other vegetation protection requirements may be necessary. Improved coordination with other permitting agencies may also be required. Programs to eliminate exotic tree species, particularly Brazilian Pepper and exotics located along waterways, should be implemented. The complete removal of exotic species is the most effective way to eliminate them from the City’s open spaces. The City’s Land Development Regulations require the utilization of xeriscape principles and a minimum of one half of required trees must be of a native species. A Countywide tree ordinance is now in place which regulates tree removal and contains provisions to stop abuse such as ‘Hat racking”. This ordinance helps to improve the appearance and healthy development of vegetation throughout the City. Hazardous Waste Management Plan Given the large amount of industrial and commercial uses in the City, it is realistic to expect hazardous material users also exist. Since the County’s Environmental Protection Department has many of the resources and expertise to effectively manage this situation, the principal responsibility of the City should be to continue to coordinate efforts with this agency. Mechanisms to improve EPD knowledge of users in the City have been developed. One such method to accomplish this objective has been the review and sign-off by EPD of certain types of occupational licenses at the time of application or renewal. 7 Recreation &Open Space Element City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan City of Oakland Park Recreation & Open Space Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 7-1 Introduction The City of Oakland Park provides for a wide range of recreational activities by maintaining parks and open space throughout the City. The Parks and Recreation Department is responsible for administering these facilities and programs. It is the intent of the City that this plan element set forth a comprehensive framework for guiding policy and investment decisions in a manner consistent with the City's goals and objectives for recreation program development and site acquisition. This element will be coordinated with other city plan elements to ensure its financial feasibility. The State of Florida has mandated that each local government prepare a recreation and open space element as an integral part of the comprehensive plan required by Chapter 163, Florida Statutes. The section of Rule 9J-5 in the Florida Administrative Code addressing the requirements for this element was repealed. The element envisions a comprehensive system of public and private sites for recreation, including, but not limited to, natural reservations, parks and playgrounds, parkways, open spaces and other recreational facilities. Background Public parks, recreation programs and open space are related aspects of the urban environment. They perform essential functions for defining the built environment and supporting a satisfactory quality of life for City residents. Public spaces and recreational opportunities that are responsive to the demands of city residents are a vital asset for any community. Oakland Park has always had a strong commitment to recreation. City leaders have come to realize that historically open space and recreational opportunities have had a major influence on how residents and visitors alike perceive their community. The linkage of parks and recreational facilities to open space is based on the desire by most people to have opportunities for the enjoyment of the natural environment in an urban setting. The physical and psychological benefits of these activities are well-accepted values. Open space and recreational lands, however, are recognized for more than their individual benefits. There are broad public values in the purification of air and reduction of noise provided by these spaces, in addition to the visual relief from the clutter of the urban environment. The City of Oakland Park will continue to provide programmed activities and maintain and acquire land and facilities to meet the recreational needs of its residents. Organization The purpose of this element is to provide an overview of the existing parks and recreation system in Oakland Park. The element examines the various operations, performance and level of service of parks and open space areas. The element analyzes current and projected future capacity so that the City's recreational needs are met. While there are several jurisdictional City of Oakland Park Recreation & Open Space Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 7-2 components of the recreation delivery system, the element concentrates on the provision of park sites, facilities and programs under the jurisdiction of the City. The analysis begins with a thorough review of applicable recreation definitions and standards. An inventory of recreational opportunities available to City residents follows. The element concludes with an analysis of the City's projected recreational needs. The section, addressed in terms of community demand, is focused on the City of Oakland Park’s Park and Recreation Department, which was assumed to be the most critical or central factor in the assessment. Parks and Open Space Standards and Definitions Park Requirements of the Broward County Land Use Plan Broward County has enacted a land use plan which regulates development of both incorporated and unincorporated areas of the County. The Broward County Land Use Plan requires individual municipalities to provide not less than three acres of Community Park land per 1,000 population. The following are the types of facilities which may be used by local government units to meet this requirement. 1. All neighborhood, community and urban level park facilities that are owned by the unit of local government and zoned for open space use. Broward County Land Use Plan defines neighborhood, community and urban level parks as set forth in the following section of this element. 2. Recreational facilities that are part of the educational facilities of the School Board and either are leased by the unit of local government for public recreational purposes or are made available to the public by other agreement with the School Board. Since the School Board may, at some time in the future choose to terminate the lease or other agreement and/or sell the property, the local land use plan must include provisions for the replacement of the lost recreational land needed to meet the required park standards within three years. 3. The total area of the beaches that are owned by the unit of local government as measured from the high water line. 4. Up to 50 percent of the total acreage of publicly owned golf courses that are zoned for recreational use and private or semi-public golf courses that are either zoned and deed- restricted for open space or zoned and restricted by a development order, such as site plan or subdivision approval for open space use. However, golf course acreage may satisfy no more than 15 percent of the total Community Park requirement. City of Oakland Park Recreation & Open Space Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 7-3 5. Other private recreation facilities or open space areas over 0.5 acres that are zoned and deed restricted for open space use, including a mixture of active and passive recreational facilities. Up to 100 percent of the total acreage may be counted provided the area does not exceed 3 acres per 1,000 resident sharing facilities. 6. Public or private Regional Parks located within municipal jurisdictions limited to 10 percent of the total acreage with a maximum of 10 acres per park if owned by a separate jurisdiction or agency. 7. If the purchase of park land was/is a joint venture of Broward County and a local government, the local government is entitled to its proportionate share of the acreage to apply towards the Community Parks requirements. Acreage which has been used to satisfy the Community Parks requirements under the provisions of 6 above may not be counted under these provisions for joint ventures. 8. Former landfill sites shall not be counted towards the Community Parks requirement until they are properly reclaimed and environmentally sound. Park Definitions Used in the Broward County Land Use Plan The Broward County Land Use Plan defines the following types of outdoor recreation and open space: 1.Community Park - means acreage listed in the "Community and Regional Parks" subsection of the Plan Implementation Requirements Section of the Broward County Land Use Plan that is utilized by local governments to meet the community level parks requirement of the Broward County Land Use Plan. 2.Neighborhood Park means a park which serves the population of a neighborhood and is generally accessible by bicycle or pedestrian ways. 3.Regional Park - means acreage listed in the "Community and Regional Parks" subsection of the Plan Implementation Requirements Section of the Broward County Land Use Plan that is utilized by the Broward County Board of County Commissioners to meet the regional level parks requirement of the Broward County Land Use Plan. City of Oakland Park Recreation & Open Space Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 7-4 Inventory of Existing Public Recreation Facilities The principal public recreation provider in the City is the City of Oakland Park Parks and Recreation Department. The Department has the responsibility of administering the recreation facilities provided by the City. The City provides neighborhood and community parks for City residents. Most are activity-based parks with facilities for sports and other recreation functions. Other agencies and jurisdictions providing recreation service to the City are the Broward County Parks and Recreation Division (BCP&R) and the State of Florida Division of Recreation and Parks. The BCP&R provides community and regional park facilities for county residents. The State provides recreation facilities for a multi-county region. State parks are generally large resource based facilities. All of these facilities are summarized on Table 7-1. 1.City-Owned Park and Recreation Facilities: All park and recreation facilities which are owned by the City of Oakland Park are inventoried on the following pages and summarized in Table 7-2. 2.Broward County Regional Parks: All regional parks which are owned by Broward County and which are classified as regional parks by the County are inventoried in Table 7-1. These Broward County regional facilities are located throughout the County. Approximately 4,617 acres of County owned land and facilities are located within or in near proximity to serve the residents of Oakland Park. They are all within a reasonable regional-park commuting distance. Non-regional facilities owned by Broward County are not included in the Table. These non-regional facilities are intended to serve the local population of unincorporated portions of the County and therefore do not meet any recreation needs of Oakland Park. 3.State of Florida Regional Recreation Facilities: All three State of Florida recreational facilities which are located in Broward County are inventoried in Table 7-1. These three State-owned facilities are considered to be regional facilities. They are intended to be accessible to residents of a multi-county area. Approximately 439 acres of land and facilities are available to the residents of Oakland Park. They are all within a reasonable regional-facility commuting distance. Oakland Park Recreation Facilities Described and Evaluated The City of Oakland Park owns seven activity-based and eight passive recreation facilities. In addition, outdoor facilities at two area schools are available to City residents. These facilities are described in detail in this section and shown on Figure S16 in Volume III, the Map Series. The condition of these facilities has not been evaluated recently; however the City is planning to City of Oakland Park Recreation & Open Space Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 7-5 complete a parks master plan effort in the next few years that will evaluate all existing park and recreational facilities. Table 7-1 - City-Owned Park Facilities, 2007 Neighborhood Parks: Acres z Wimberly Athletic Complex/Collins Community Center 14.00(2) z Spiher Recreation Center/Greenleaf Park 2.00(2) z Dr. Carter G. Woodson Park 0.85(2) z Oakland Park Athletic Complex East/Stevens Field 3.00(2) z Cherry Creek Park (leased) 2.91 z Giusti Heart Parcours (leased) 5.00 z Lloyd Estates Park 0.42 z Mini-Park 0.12 z North Andrews Gardens Neighborhood Park 1.03 z North Andrews Gardens Community Center 6.23 z Shad Park 0.14 z Northeast High School (leased) 5.00 Subtotal (0.93 acres per 1,000 residents(3))(2) 40.70(2) Community Parks: z Royal Palm Park 52.00(1) z City Boat Ramp 0.22(2) z Veterans Park 82.20(2) z Oakland Bark Park 2.25 z Lakeside Sand Pine Preserve 5.00 Subtotal (3.25 acres per 1,000 residents(3))( 2 141.67(2) Total (4.17 acres per 1,000 residents(3)) 182.37 (2) Land Only (1.47 acres per 1,000 residents(3)) 64.37(2) Land Only Non-Leased (1.18 acres per 1,000 residents(3)) 51.46(2) Notes: (1) Includes 42 acres of water (2) Includes 76 acres of water (3) Based on 2006 population estimate of 43,739 residents. Sources: Oakland Park Parks and Recreation Department 2007. Carter & Burgess, Inc., 2007 RESOURCE-BASEDACTIVITY-BASED Acreage (Total/Water) Picnic Facilities Fishing Canoeing Nature Trail Jogging Trail Horseback Riding Boat Ramp Beach Access SwimmingCamping Bicycle Path Community /Game Room Inline Skating/Hockey Baseball/SoftballFootball Basketball Tennis Handball Pool Playground WaterslideVolleyball 14.0 z zz4 1 1 7 zeaf 2.0 z z 1 2 z2.91 z 0.85 z z1z52.0/42.0 zzzz144 z 1t 3.0 z 2 5.0 z5.0 z0.42 z5.0 112.25 z z0.22 z 82.2/76 zzz0.12 ood 1.03 z zy 6.23 z 0.14 46.6 z zzzz66.7 zzzzzzzz43.0zz zzzzzzz90.0 zz zzzz37.0 z540.0 zzzzzz44 zz256.0 zz zzzz1390.0/88.0 zzzz44 z254.0 z z180.0 1360.0 zz zzzzz 320.0 zz zzzzzzzzzzzz 180.0 zzzzz244.0 z zz15.0 z zz (4) Denotes number of courts or fields City of Oakland Park Recreation & Open Space Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 7-7 Activity Based City Facilities 1.Wimberly Athletic Complex/Collins Community Center 3901 NE 5th Avenue Park Type: Neighborhood Area: 14 acres Facilities: Indoor community facility - 5,184 square feet Concessions stand - 800 square feet Batting Cage 4 Softball fields 1 Football Field 7 Tennis courts 1 Basketball court Balance beam Swing set Spring animal play equipment Climbers Slide Pavilion Inline hockey rink Comments: The facility houses the City's Parks and Recreation Department and has 161 parking spaces. 2.Spiher Recreation Center in Greenleaf Park 1246 NE 37th Street Park Type: Neighborhood Area: 2 acres Facilities: 2 Tennis courts 1 Volleyball court 1 Basketball court 2 Picnic grills Swing set 1 Climber 1 Slide Playground Indoor center Comments: This area includes indoor community center pool tables and other recreation facilities. City of Oakland Park Recreation & Open Space Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 7-8 3.Dr. Carter G. Woodson Park 390 NE 34th Court Park Type: Neighborhood Area: 0.85 acres Facilities: Basketball court - lights 3 Picnic tables 3 Barbecue grills Pavilion Parcours Play equipment Racquetball court Note: Over $100,000 was spent on upgrades to Woodson Park in FY 96-97 using a combination of CDBG funds and City money. 4.Royal Palm Park 1700 NW 41st Street Park Type: Community Area: 10.0 acres land, 42.0 acres water Facilities: Pavilion - 722 square feet Activity building - 2,236 square feet 11 Picnic tables 2 Grills 44 Parking spaces 1 Basketball court - lights 4 Racquetball courts - lights 1 Volleyball court 4 Tennis courts 2 Bocce courts Lighted walk path with limited exercise stations Floating dock Restrooms Playground City of Oakland Park Recreation & Open Space Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 7-9 5.Oakland Park Athletic Complex East (Stevens Field) 598 NE 6th Avenue Park Type: Neighborhood Area: 3 acres Facilities: 54 Parking spaces Field house - 1,696 square feet 2 Baseball fields - lights 6.North Andrews Gardens Community Center 250 NE 56th Court Park Type: Neighborhood Area: 6.23 acres Facilities: Multipurpose meeting rooms 7.Oakland Bark Park 971 NW 38th Street Park Type: Community Area: 2.25 acres This facility is a dog park that includes separate play areas with equipment for small and large dogs and agility equipment. For human visitors, pavilions with seating are provided in each area. 8.Cherry Creek Park (leased) 1701 E. Oakland Park Boulevard Park Type: Neighborhood Area: 2.91 acres Facilities: Jogging trail Passive City Recreation and Open Space Facilities 1.City Boat Ramp 2960 NE 12th Terrace Park Type: Community Area: 0.22 acres land Comments: The City maintains a boat access ramp into the north fork of the New River. City of Oakland Park Recreation & Open Space Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 7-10 2.Veterans Park 3601 NW 21st Avenue Park Type: Community Area: 6.2 acres land, 76.0 acres water Facilities: Passive nature trail and benches Playground Observation deck/boardwalks 3.Giusti Heart Parcours 600 NE 38th Street Park Type: Neighborhood Area: 5 acres This facility consists of a 20 station lighted parcours that is one mile in length. 4.Lakeside Sand Pine Preserve 2820 NW 27th Avenue Park Type: Neighborhood Area: 5.00 acres This is a preserved sand pine scrub forest with a nature trail, observation deck, and outdoor classroom. 5.Mini-Park Park Type: Neighborhood Area: 0.12 acres This is a neighborhood open space area. 6.North Andrews Gardens Neighborhood Park 300 NW 56th Street Park Type: Neighborhood Area: 1.03 acres This facility includes playground equipment and a picnic area. 7.Shad Park Park Type: Neighborhood Area: 0.14 acres This is a neighborhood open space area. City of Oakland Park Recreation & Open Space Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 7-11 8.Lloyd Estates Park Park Type: Neighborhood Area: 0.42 acres Located adjacent to an elementary school, this park provides play equipment. Specialized City Facilities 1. Active Adult Center 250 NE 33rd Street This facility is used for active adult programming. 2.Oakland Park Library The City of Oakland Park contains a municipally funded library system consisting of a 12,000 square foot main library located at 1298 North 3rd Street. Library service in the City dates back to 1958 when it was initiated by the Oakland Park Woman's Club. In August 1963, the City took over this service and opened what is now the main library facility in a smaller building than now exists. This building was expanded in 1972 and again in 1987 to its present size. Volumes in the City library collection total 50,000. The library has established the following goal and related objectives: Goal: To improve the existing library program so it will meet the informational, educational, cultural, recreational and rehabilitative needs of the residents and businesses of Oakland Park. Objectives: 1. Make available in sufficient quantities, a range of print and non-print materials in various formats necessary to meet accepted standards as contained in the Florida Library Association's "Standards and Guidelines for Florida Public Library Services" and the needs and interest of Oakland Park residents. 2. Provide a full range of library services and programs to all age groups and organizations. 3. Provide competent professional and support staff in sufficient numbers as identified in "Standards and Guidelines for Florida Public Library Services" ... as funding becomes available to facilitate optimum uses of resources and services. City of Oakland Park Recreation & Open Space Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 7-12 4. Extend and improve library service through the use of available technologies, such as automation, to include managerial and day-to-day operations and participation in interlibrary cooperation and resource sharing on the local, regional and state level. 5. Continue promoting effective public awareness of library resources and services through cooperation with federal, state and local library, educational and community organizations. Public School Outdoor Recreation Facilities 1.Northeast High School Area: 16 acres Facilities: 5 Basketball courts 2 Baseball/softball fields 2 All-purpose fields 1 Outdoor swimming pool 2.Oakland Park Elementary Area: 8 acres Facilities: 1 Soccer field 1 Baseball field 1 Basketball court 1 Play area Auditorium Private Recreation Facilities Available to the Public Oakland Park contains no private recreation facilities available to the general public. The Oak Tree Country Club, located in northern Oakland Park, is available to members. The course includes an 18-hole golf course, driving range and club. Private Recreation Facilities Not Available to the Public Several multifamily developments provide recreation facilities such as pools, indoor clubhouses and weight rooms. City of Oakland Park Recreation & Open Space Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 7-13 Recreation and Open Space Analysis Population The City's population is expected to increase slowly over the next 20 years. The City's population, currently estimated at approximately 43,739 (total population including seasonal population) peak day residents, is projected to increase to about 49,752 in 2015 and 60,121 by 2030. Additional population growth will depend upon redevelopment as the City is largely built out. In 1990, the median age was 33.9. The 1990 Census reported that 28 percent of the population was under 24 years of age, 59 percent was between 25 and 64 and only 12 percent was over 64. The 2000 Census reported a median age of 35.8, with 30 percent under the age of 25, 60 percent between the ages of 25 and 64, and 10 percent 65 or over. Proposed Facilities The City has identified one proposed park facilities, which is shown in Figure S18 in Volume III, Map Series. It is the new Downtown park, Jaco Pastorius Park, located on the north side of NE 38th Street, between Dixie Highway and the FEC Railroad. The area of the park will be 1.37 acres. It will be passive green space and serve as a gateway to the Downtown area. It is anticipated that this park will be completed before 2015, and therefore this additional acreage is included Tables 7-3 and 7-4 that examine future park needs. Methodologies for Measuring Recreation Demand The Florida Outdoor Recreation Plan states: There is no consensus in the field of recreation planning as to the most appropriate means of measuring current and future demand for outdoor recreation resources and facilities. Since public recreation resources and facilities are generally felt to be "free" goods and services, "demand", as an economic concept,cannot readily be adapted for practical application. Attempts to measure recreation demand inevitably translate into attempts to set standards by which the adequacy of recreation facilities is measured. Attempts to set standards usually involve the following five considerations: 1. The quantity and quality of existing facilities. 2. Public preferences for existing facilities as measured by frequency of use. City of Oakland Park Recreation & Open Space Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 7-14 3. Public opinion about existing facilities as measured through formal questionnaires or informal sampling procedures. 4. Public opinion about non-existent facilities as measured through formal questionnaires or informal sampling procedures. 5. The standards recommended by professional organizations and also the standards incorporated by other jurisdictions. As a practical matter, the methodology by which standards are set usually consists of a juggling process in which all of the above considerations are accommodated. The following paragraph, from a hypothetical recreation element which has been widely circulated in Florida, illustrates this point. The recreation standards ... were developed as follows: 1) a survey was taken to measure demand for recreation activities and facilities; 2) the National Recreation and Parks Association minimum standards were examined, 3) standards from five middle-sized southern communities were examined; and 4) based on the survey and the standards from the five southern communities, the National Recreation and Parks Association minimum standards were adjusted to reflect the needs of residents and visitors. In this recreation element, the minimum acreage for provision of local parks has been set by Broward County. Broward County requires that all local governments provide three acres of local park and open space per 1,000 residents. Broward County Parks County parks are designed to serve two purposes. The County's regional parks are designed to serve the County population as a whole. County community parks are designed to serve residents of the unincorporated areas, for whom the County is the local provider. All County residents are eligible to use both types of facilities. Oakland Park residents have two County parks within easy access. Easterlin Park is a regional resource-based park that provides passive recreational opportunities. Allswell Park is a County community park with active recreational facilities. Figure S17 in Volume III, the Map Series, depicts the County and State Parks. While the City has no formal role in the selection and siting of County parks, they remain committed to encouraging the County to consider the municipal situation. Oakland Park will keep abreast of what is done by other jurisdictions and lobby for actions beneficial to the City. City of Oakland Park Recreation & Open Space Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 7-15 Acreage Adequacy The Broward County Charter, upon amendment in 1977, established the framework for the delivery of parks and recreation services by local governments. Included in the functions was a provision of an open space standard to be met County-wide. The County land use plan made mandatory the provision of some open space Of the County-wide mandated provision of 10 acres/thousand persons, 4 acres is provided based on the combined availability of Federal, State and County, 3 acres per thousand population is provided by the County owned/operated regional park system and the remaining 3 acres per thousand population must be provided by the local government. Oakland Park, like all other communities in Broward County, has to provide the minimum amount of park lands. Table 7-3 shows that the City will continue to far exceed the Broward County minimum park acreage requirements if the current supply is retained for municipal recreation use. Table 7-3 - 2006, 2015, and 2030 Local Park Acreage Need/Demand and Deficiencies/(Surplus) Based on Local Park Acreage Standards in the Broward County Land Use Plan Total Acreage of Parks in Oakland Park in 2005 182.37 acres Total Acreage of Parks in Oakland Park in 2015 183.74 acres Broward County Standard 3.0 acres/1,000 residents Year Population Need/Demand (in acres) Deficiency/(Surplus) (in acres) 2006 43,739 131.22 (51.15) 2015 49,752 149.26 (34.48) 2030 60,121 180.36 (2.01) Source: Carter & Burgess, Inc., 2007 Note: Based on population estimates and projections as shown in the Future Land Use Element. Tables 7-2 and 7-3 show that Oakland Park exceeds the County’s adopted level of service standard of three acres per 1,000 residents, when leased land and water areas are included in the calculations. As shown in Table 7-2, if water areas are omitted from the calculation, only 1.48 acres per 1,000 residents is provided. Removing leased lands from the calculation reduces the acreage provided to 1.31 acres per 1,000 residents. Table 7-2 also separates neighborhood parks from community parks, which indicates that the majority of the park land provided for Oakland Park residents is community parks (3.25 acres per 1,000 residents). Since large vacant parcels of land are very limited in Oakland Park and based on the City’s focus on redevelopment, the City should shift its park development focus towards providing a greater number of neighborhood parks. The City has adopted a policy to require a minimum of two acres per 1,000 residents for neighborhood parks. The City also adopted a park impact fee to assist in meeting the projected demand for neighborhood parks in the future. City of Oakland Park Recreation & Open Space Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 7-16 The following Table 7-4 provides an assessment of future neighborhood park needs and their associated capital costs, excluding property acquisition costs. Table 7-4 – Neighborhood Park Impact Fee Analysis for 2006, 2015 and 2030 Neighborhood Park Goal: Two (2) acres per 1,000 residents Average park construction costs* per acre: $100,000 2006 2015 2030 Neighborhood Park Acreage 40.7 42.1 -- Population 43,742 49,752 60,121 Neighborhood Park Demand (acres)87.5 99.5 120.2 Neighborhood Park Deficit (46.8) (57.4) (79.5) Anticipated Costs to Meet Demand $4.68 million $5.74 million $7.95 million Number of Households 19,234 20,806 23,978 Fee/Household based on Deficit $243.32 $275.88 $331.55 Fee/Household if Previous Goal Met -- $57.67 $86.33 *Does not include land acquisition costs. Source: Carter & Burgess Inc., 2007 Conclusion The City will continue to adequately meet the mandatory Broward County acreage Standards shown in Tables 7-2 and 7-3. However, the City desires to move towards meeting the adopted level of service standard for parks with facilities that are land based, which is reflected in the plan policies. 8 Intergovernmental Coordination Element City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan City of Oakland Park Intergovernmental Coordination Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 8-1 Introduction According to Chapter 9J-5 of the Florida Administrative Code, the Intergovernmental Coordination Element has two main purposes: x To identify and resolve those incompatible goals, objectives, policies and development proposed in the City's Plan with the Comprehensive Plans of adjacent municipalities and regional and state agencies; and x To determine and respond to the needs for various coordination processes and procedures with adjacent local governments and regional and state agencies. In 1996, the Florida Legislature adopted amendments to Chapter 163 Florida Statutes (F.S.) requiring local governments to address additional coordination mechanisms and/or issues including; Joint Planning Areas, Collaborative Planning for Multi-Jurisdictional Issues, Voluntary Dispute Resolution Processes, Special District Coordination, and Coordination with Campus Master Plans. Based on these requirements, this Element has been developed to indicate existing and future areas of planning coordination with various groups. A summary matrix of this effort is provided in Table 8-1. Note that individual Cities, agencies and committees are highlighted in the narrative by bold letters. Adjacent Municipalities Figures and discussions throughout the City's Plan refer to the City's central location in eastern Broward County. The City of Fort Lauderdale is located on the northern, eastern and southern boundaries of the City. The City of Wilton Manors shares the North Fork of the Middle River portion of the City's southern boundary. The Cities of Tamarac and Lauderdale Lakes share the western boundary of the City. Both Broward County (through its Water and Wastewater Services Division) and the Cities of Fort Lauderdale currently provide various municipal services to Oakland Park. The City's sewer lines are linked to both of these systems, which in turn provide for transmission to the North County Regional Treatment Plant and the T. G. Lohmeyer Plant operated by these respective jurisdictions. City of Oakland Park Intergovernmental Coordination Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 8-2Table 8-1 - Intergovernmental Coordination Matrix, 2007 ZoningPlattingDRI ReviewPlanningHighway ConstructionRight of WayAlignmentsLong Range PlanningAccess ControlTransitHousing AssistanceRedevelopmentAreawide PlansEqual OpportunityWater ManagementWater QualityAir QualityNoise ImpactHistoricalSchoolsHealth CareParksOpen Space AreasElectric PowerSolid WasterSeptic TanksWater Facility DevelopmentWastewater TreatmentWater Use PermitsWastewater ManagementA95 ReviewInteragencyRegional PlansTransportation Departmentxxxx xxxxxx xxMass Transit DivisionxxxxCommunity Development Divisionxxxx xxxx x xWater Management Divisionxxxx xx xUrban Planning and Redevelopment Departmentxxxx xxxx xx xxx x xx xx x xxxParks and Recreationxx x xx xx xSolid Waste DivisionxxxWater and Wastewater Services Divisionxxxx x xx x xDepartment of Transportationx xx xxxxxx xxx x xDepartment of Community Affairsx xx xxx xxx x xxxDepartment of Environmental Protectionxx x xxx xxxxxx x xDepartment of State, Division of Historical ResourcesxxxxBroward County Health Departmentxx x xFlorida Inland Navigation DistrictxxBroward County Historical CommissionxBroward County Human Rights BoardxBroward County Metropolitan Planning Organizationx x xxxxxx xx xBroward County Planning Councilxxxx xxxx x x x xBroward County School Boardxxxx x xx xBroward County Natural Resources Protection Dept.Florida Power & Light CompanyxHealth Planning and Development CouncilxxxNorth Broward Hospital DistrictxSouth Florida Regional Planning Councilxx xx x x x xSouth Florida Water Management Districtxx xx x x xCity of Fort Lauderdalexx x xx x xCity of Wilton Manorsxx xxCity of Lauderdale Lakesxx xCity of Tamarac xx xxCountyStateOther Agencies City of Oakland Park Intergovernmental Coordination Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 8-3 With respect to billing, sanitary sewer services provided by Broward County are based on retail, or individual customer, service. Almost all of the sanitary service provided by the City of Fort Lauderdale is performed through a large user agreement between the two municipalities. Pockets of the City, primarily in the southwestern area, are provided with retail service by the City of Fort Lauderdale. In general, maintenance responsibility of the various water and sewer lines is linked to the entity providing service at the retail customer level. Thus, the City of Oakland Park, the City of Fort Lauderdale and Broward County are all responsible for maintenance of selected portions of local water and sewer lines. Since the eastern area of Broward County is mostly built out, ongoing coordination with respect to individual parcel land use or zoning issues is somewhat limited. A variety of year round single and multifamily residential uses, highway commercial and industrial areas characterize the neighboring jurisdictions. Adjacent land uses along the City's borders are largely compatible. Pursuant to the Broward County Charter, the City of Oakland Park's Future Land Use Plan, as well as the Land Use Plans of all municipalities in Broward County, is required to be consistent with the Broward County Future Land Use Plan. The City of Oakland Park coordinates with the Broward County Planning Council (BCPC) in the processing of proposed Plats and proposed Comprehensive Plan amendments to insure consistency with the Broward County Future Land Use Plan as well as to insure compatibility with existing land uses along shared borders. The cities of Wilton Manors,Lauderdale Lakes and Tamarac do not provide any municipal services to Oakland Park similar to Broward County and the City of Fort Lauderdale. The cities have executed joint agreements for backup services for police and fire. Since the City of Wilton Manors and Lauderdale Lakes share portions of the North Fork of the Middle River, joint cooperation among these cities and Oakland Park should be initiated in efforts to improve the water quality by minimizing non-point sources of pollution. The City of Oakland Park cooperates with these Cities in land use, zoning and issues adjacent to City borders, as well as the level of service on the regional roadway network, adequacy of public school facilities and other multi-jurisdictional issues through participation on the Broward County Metropolitan Planning Organization's Technical Coordinating Committee and informal comprehensive planning workshops coordinated by Broward County’s Urban Planning and Redevelopment Department and the South Florida Regional Planning Council. City of Oakland Park Intergovernmental Coordination Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 8-4 In the recent past, all of these jurisdictions have common interests with respect to annexation of unincorporated areas. The majority of unincorporated parcels in Broward County near the City of Oakland Park were annexed by municipalities in 2006. The City of Oakland Park has no plans for any additional annexations except to address small unincorporated enclaves and to “square off” the City’s boundaries. The Broward County Legislative Delegation's (BCLD) policy is for all unincorporated areas to be annexed into municipalities prior to the year 2010. The annexation process adopted by the BCLD includes coordination of municipal services and interlocal agreements with Broward County and the annexing municipality as well as an extensive public hearing process with the BCLD. The areas annexed by the City of Oakland Park in 2005 are scheduled to receive water, wastewater and other infrastructure improvements financed by Broward County. The City coordinates with the Water and Wastewater Services Division on the provision of this infrastructure. Other areas of future coordination potential between the City and adjacent municipalities concern population projections, traffic and road improvements, environmental quality programs, well field protection, regional water, sewer or solid waste programs (including joint infrastructure service areas), and back-up emergency service. Coordination with other local governments on these issues has usually been on an informal or ad hoc case basis. This arrangement has been satisfactory due to centralized regulatory authorities on many issues and lack of major points of disagreement. In terms of future conditions, the current practices are still largely relevant and useful. However, more unified lobbying and coordination efforts by the local jurisdictions might result in the implementation of mutually beneficial capital improvements with particular regard to highway needs and preferred designs, and dredging or other waterway improvements. Amendments to Chapter 163, F.S., adopted by the Florida Legislature in 1996, require the City of Oakland Park to consider the establishment of agreements to formalize coordination mechanisms with adjacent municipalities, the County and other governmental units or agencies providing services within, adjacent to, or benefiting the City of Oakland Park. The City and neighboring jurisdictions have determined a more formalized process is not needed and will continue to establish ad hoc committees when coordination on specific issues is desired. The City of Oakland Park is substantially burdened by through traffic on several local arterial highways. In many cases, these roadways are considered to be already built-out, with adjacent development limiting potential expansion opportunities. While the County has considered capital improvements such as grade separations at selected high volume intersections, a strengthened local position on specific projects will be necessary if implementation of these improvements is ever to occur. Contrarily, the City may want to City of Oakland Park Intergovernmental Coordination Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 8-5 better establish its position against these proposals if local impacts are considered to be too severe. Alternative methods to handling traffic problems should also be supported and, where appropriate, applied locally. Increased transit utilization, car or van pooling, ride sharing, staggered work hours and a host of employer related incentives are all areawide efforts which could have local benefits. Many of these measures are already in place, but continued local promotion and support is required to have any meaningful positive impact. The City monitors the short range and long range plans of Broward County, FDOT, the MPO and the actions of adjacent jurisdictions in order to remain aware of and support the timely implementation of improvements to parallel roadway facilities impacting the City of Oakland Park in other jurisdictions. Besides providing for direct traffic relief to those areas, the City benefits through the provision of improved alternatives to local arterials. Broward County and the majority of municipalities in the County have adopted a transit oriented transportation concurrency system. Transit oriented concurrency is established on a district-wide basis instead of for each roadway facility and coordination among all local governments in the district is needed when modifying or selecting projects covered by transit oriented concurrency fees. The City coordinates with Broward County Development Services Division on implementation and modifications. Prior to issuing a building permit, the City ensures the applicant has received approval from the Development Services Division. Other municipalities with property in the Central District are the Cities of Sunrise, Plantation, Lauderhill, Tamarac, Lauderdale Lakes, North Lauderdale, Wilton Manors, Fort Lauderdale, Sea Ranch Lakes, the Town of Lauderdale-by-the-Sea, and the Village of Lazy Lake. Level of Service Standards for the provision of potable water should continue to be identified and recognized in updated agreements with Fort Lauderdale and Broward County. The City should also include, or periodically update, long term demand and flow information into the contracts for water and wastewater services with these jurisdictions. In order to insure the continued provision of potable water service, the City should inform the local service providers of any changing conditions which may alter the City's existing or future anticipated demand for potable water. To address these issues, the City will meet with its water suppliers on an annual basis, prior to adoption of the next fiscal year budget. The City should also coordinate with both Fort Lauderdale and Broward County when updating the Oakland Park Water Supply Facilities Work Plan. As potable water supply is directly related to water conservation, the City should seek grants from the South Florida Water Management District, through their Water Savings Incentive Program (SIP), for the purchase and distribution of water conservation kits and pre-rinse valves. City of Oakland Park Intergovernmental Coordination Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 8-6 Since the City indirectly relies on coastal area wellfields which are threatened by salt-water intrusion, the City should continue to coordinate with the Broward County Environmental Protection Department in support of County regional wellfield proposals. The City shall also continue to coordinate as necessary with other jurisdictions with respect to the designation and enforcement of wake free zones along the Middle River. Broward County At the current time, the City has several active coordination mechanisms with Broward County on many different planning issues. Coordination efforts extend to the following Broward County agencies or divisions: Broward County Planning Council, the Department of Transportation, the Division of Mass Transit, the Community Development Division, Water Resources Division, the Park and Recreation Division, Solid Waste Division, Broward County School District and the Charter Review Commission. As discussed, contractual agreements are in place with respect to local infrastructure services, local option gasoline tax revenue sharing, and for public school facilities planning. Other areas of coordination are oriented to the planning and development of regional capital improvements, education facility needs and the regulation of land use and individual development projects. The Broward County Charter Review Commission is responsible for considering revisions to the Broward County Charter. The Charter was approved in 1975 by the voters of the County. On a periodic basis, the Review Commission provides a detailed review and analysis of existing county operations, intergovernmental activities and governmental efficiencies. While no official coordinating mechanism is available or necessary, the City should monitor activities of the Commission and provide timely input on regional issues that affect the City. By virtue of the revised Charter passed in 1975, the County has areawide authority on the regulation of future land uses and individual property development where platting is required. Land use planning is governed by the Broward County Planning Council such that the City Land Use Plan must first be certified as being substantially in conformance with the Broward County Land Use Plan in order for the City Land Use Plan to take precedence. The reservation of future right-of-way for most of the City's collector and arterial roadways is also based on the Planning Council's overall Traffic ways Plan. Since a major goal of the City's Comprehensive Plan is to maintain certification by the Broward County Planning Council, the City should continue to coordinate comprehensive planning activities with the council. The Broward County Urban Planning and Redevelopment Department coordinates bi- monthly comprehensive planning workshops to bring local government planners and representatives from regional and state agencies as well as interested groups and City of Oakland Park Intergovernmental Coordination Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 8-7 consultants together to address pertinent issues. The South Florida Regional Planning Council also coordinates workshops on areas of interest to Broward County planners. These workshops address proposed County Comprehensive Plan Elements, statutory amendments affecting growth management, and related technical issues affecting the individual municipalities, Broward County, the South Florida Region and the State of Florida. Each informal group provides a forum for the individual municipalities to coordinate with Broward County and other regulatory agencies (such as the South Florida Regional Planning Council (RPC), the Broward County School District, Broward County Planning Council (BCPC), the Broward County Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO), Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT), the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD), and the State of Florida Department of Community Affairs (DCA), etc.) to discuss multi-jurisdictional, countywide, regional and statewide issues. The City's attendance at these workshops offers the City the opportunity to keep abreast of the plans of adjacent municipalities, Broward County, and other agencies or units of government within the region, and allows for the identification of issues including possible effects or impacts on the City of Oakland Park. The City of Oakland Park actively participates in these workshops and should continue to attend. The Broward County Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) is the policy body charged with developing Broward County's long-range transportation program. It is also responsible for adopting the short-range (five year) transportation improvement program and recommending improvement and program priorities to the Florida Department of Transportation. The membership to the MPO is based on City population. The Technical Coordinating Committee (TCC) is the technical reviewer of various issues and provides the recommendation on various items to the MPO. The City actively participates in the bi- monthly meetings of the TCC. The City should continue this activity. With respect to land development practices, the mature stage of the City's development tends to limit the level of ongoing City interaction with the County. The City does support the County's platting requirements for vacant property and is continuing to secure required rights-of-way for the traffic ways corridors. The City participates with the Broward County Department of Transportation in review of platting requirements and the incorporation of roadway improvements through individual plat approval. Additionally, the City cooperates with the Division of Mass Transit relative to bus route needs for Broward County Transit (BCT)and in the provision of local bus service within the City of Oakland Park. The Broward County Mass Transit Division is the primary provider of mass transit service within Broward County. The South Florida Regional Transportation Authority (SFRTA) provides commuter rail service in Palm Beach, Broward and Miami-Dade Counties, with a station located adjacent to the City’s northwest municipal boundary. The Oakland Park Transportation Element details coordination activities to be undertaken by the City, City of Oakland Park Intergovernmental Coordination Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 8-8 individually and in conjunction with Broward County to achieve increased mass transit use. As provided for in the City's Transportation Element, the City monitors the existing level of service provided by the Broward County Mass Transit Division via existing bus routes serving the City. Based upon anticipated development or identified community needs, the City of Oakland Park recommends improvements to Broward County in route location or frequency which may improve the existing level of service provided. Coordination of any changes or additions to bus scheduling and routing is coordinated through the Community Development Department. The City of Oakland Park and Broward County have designated a portion of the City as a Chapter 163, Florida Statutes Community Redevelopment Area (CRA). As part of this effort, Redevelopment Plans were prepared and funding has been provided to improve housing and infrastructure facilities. Broward County directed the CRA be established without the ability to raise funds through tax increment financing. Instead, the County encourages CRAs to request funding to implement projects from the Redevelopment Capital Program (RCP) administered by the Urban Planning and Redevelopment Department. The RCP is open to all municipalities in Broward County for redevelopment activities/projects within or outside of existing CRA boundaries. Applications for funding may be submitted at any time and are evaluated for eligibility as they are received. The County will examine the proposed redevelopment project or activity to determine the extent to which it achieves the County's funding criteria. The Broward County Parks and Recreation Department main office and administrative complex is located in the City just east of Easterlin Park, a regional County Park and Conservation facility. The City coordinates with the County relative to park dedications during plat review and in instituting recreation programs of joint interest. Easterlin Park is a 46-acre facility that provides picnic facilities and a nature trail. The park is also a prime example of a Tropical-Low Hammock and is designated as an Urban Wilderness Area. The City should continue to coordinate with the Department on recreational programs provided at Easterlin Park and in the recreational requirements during residential plat review. Other individual County agencies review individual development proposals with respect to specific engineering practices. The County's Water Resource Management Division reviews applications for the storage and treatment of storm water drainage. Their role is to guide the selection of project floor elevations relative to 100-year flood criteria, and to regulate the amount of storm water retention and volume and quality of discharge. The City supports and will cooperate in this regulatory activity. The Environmental Protection Department (EPD) acts on behalf of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) to monitor and enforce air and water quality regulations, and to review project development proposals with respect to proper City of Oakland Park Intergovernmental Coordination Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 8-9 sanitary sewer main collection or septic system design. Since the City is in the process of implementing sewer improvements in several areas, direct local coordination will be necessary. Direct coordination is also required with respect to wetland development, shoreline modifications and construction of docks or bulkheads along the Middle River. The City should continue to cooperate in the local enforcement of best management construction practices in these projects. If the City embarks on a program to modify shoreline attributes, construct/improve dockage facilities, or dredge local canals or waterbodies, permit coordination with EPD and/or the state will be required. As discussed in the Conservation Element, the City has improved coordination procedures with EPD with respect to identifying and monitoring local users of potentially hazardous materials through coordination of review of applications for occupational licenses. Broward County School District:The Broward County School District controls, organizes and administers the public schools of Broward County. The City coordinates review of proposed development with Broward County through the development review process to address the need for public school’s facilities. The City Building Department provides monthly reports on permit activity to the Broward County Property Appraisers office and they provide monthly reports on certificates of occupancy to the Urban Planning and Redevelopment Department. Broward County, in turn, provides annual growth and construction projections to assist the School District in planning new facilities. Broward County Hazard Mitigation Task Force: In 1999, the State of Florida Department of Community Affairs (DCA) initiated the establishment of a comprehensive program in partnership with the State's local governments and private organizations to reduce community vulnerability to all types of disasters. As of 1999, the State of Florida has established a statewide permanent process of community-based hazard mitigation planning through the preparation of "Local Mitigation Strategies." Local Mitigation Strategies define what must be done in each community to lessen or avoid the impacts of future disasters. In 1998-99, the City of Oakland Park coordinated with the Broward County and the State of Florida Divisions of Emergency Management to complete Local Mitigation Strategies for Broward County. The City's Director of Development Services has represented the City at Local Mitigation Strategy Workshops with the Broward County Emergency Management Agency and continues to coordinate with Emergency Management staff, as necessary. In July of 1999 a draft of the Local Mitigation Strategy was completed and a final document was adopted by Broward County. The City of Oakland Park must maintain a close relationship between the City and Broward County's Emergency Management Agency to keep the public and public officials informed of planned procedures for hurricane City of Oakland Park Intergovernmental Coordination Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 8-10 evacuation and to coordinate with the implementation of the proposed Local Mitigation Strategy. The Broward County Health Department acts on behalf of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection to monitor and evaluate overall health concerns and to review development proposals with respect to the lay-out and design of water main facilities. Other areas of existing coordination include countywide wellfield protection, local option gas tax revenue, the provision of local educational facilities, solid waste, historic information and human rights. Regarding wellfield efforts, individual local users of potential groundwater contaminants are required to register with the County as to the amount and method of disposal of harmful substances. The City has no wellfield "cone of influence" areas in its jurisdiction, but it is critical that the City support all of these regulatory actions to ensure a source of uncontaminated water. There are several public school facilities in Oakland Park. An overall County trend has been one of increased overcrowding of the existing public school’s facilities. Based on historical population trends and projected growth, local facilities are not anticipated to be adequate to support expected growth. In April 2003, the School Board of Broward County, Broward County Commission and 26 municipalities in Broward County, including the City of Oakland Park, entered into an interlocal agreement addressing Public School Facility Planning. A joint working group comprised of staff representing the parties was formed to discuss and formulate recommendations regarding the coordination of land use and school facilities planning. In particular, the City coordinates with the School Board on land use decisions affecting schools through the inclusion of a non-voting School Board representative on the Planning and Zoning Board. The interlocal agreement also provides procedures for coordinating plan amendments, rezonings and development approvals and the establishment of an oversight board to monitor the agreement. The 2005 Growth Management Legislative changes require local governments to adopt public schools concurrency and establish a Public Schools Facility Element. The School Board and the Broward County Urban Planning and Redevelopment Department are leading the effort to define school facility concurrency and prepare model elements for local governments to adopt in their comprehensive plan. Revisions to the existing interlocal agreement are anticipated. The City of Oakland Park will continue to monitor and participate in these activities to ensure the needs of residents are met. Broward County presently levies the maximum six-cent local option gas tax based on a distribution agreement with local cities. The City presently supports this arrangement and uses their share of funds primarily for highway related maintenance activities. City of Oakland Park Intergovernmental Coordination Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 8-11 The Broward County Solid Waste Division is responsible for areawide solid waste disposal and in implementing the Regional Resource Recovery Program. The City needs to maintain support and written agreements to participate in the solid waste resource recovery program. Support of these efforts will be necessary to maintain local levels of urban service to the City's year round and seasonal residents. The Broward County Historical Commission is responsible for fostering historic preservation efforts in Broward County. The City has a Historic Society which was instrumental in getting the Oakland Park Elementary School on the National Registry of Historic Places. While there is no formal coordinating mechanism, the City's Historic Society should coordinate with the Broward County Historical Commission in identifying local historic places and landmarks. The Broward County Human Rights Commission is responsible for equal opportunity efforts in Broward County for employment and housing. While the City does not have a formal coordinating mechanism with the Commission, the City should monitor activities and efforts of the Commission. In terms of future conditions, the City should review and take positions on issues such as proposed regional wellfields, area highway needs, and sewer and solid waste disposal. Specific areas of interest include the disposition of arterial and intersection improvements along Dixie Highway, Powerline Road, Oakland Park Boulevard and regarding regional wellfield efforts. The Broward County Planning Council has established an ad hoc affordable housing committee to evaluate existing affordable housing needs and make policy recommendations. The South Florida Regional Planning Council also has enhanced housing provisions in the Strategic Regional Policy Plan. The provision of affordable (or workforce) housing is a regional issue and it is appropriate for county and regional agencies to lead the effort. The City of Oakland Park participates in these meetings and has its own policies to address the provision and retention of affordable housing units in the City. Taxing Districts The City of Oakland Park is included within several special taxing districts which levy taxes on City property. The various districts are presented in the following Table 8-2. City of Oakland Park Intergovernmental Coordination Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 8-12 Table 8-2 - Oakland Park Special Taxing Districts Source: Craig A. Smith & Associates Note: The Millage Rates for the individual Taxing Districts are established by the Taxing Districts and may change from year to year. Coordination mechanisms and issues concerning Broward County and the Broward County School Board were discussed previously. Regarding the South Florida Water Management District, the City's existing level of interaction in some ways is comparable to that of the County Water Management Division. Since the District reviews development proposals in detail for sites with greater than two acres of impervious area, the City generally has less interaction in this category than with the County. The City also benefits from District areawide water management and flood control efforts throughout the inland areas of the County. The City's Development Services Department and Building Department coordinate with South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD) to achieve consistency in the permitting of drainage facilities and enforcing minimum first floor building and street elevations to ensure flood protection. In addition, the City coordinates with EPD through participation in the Broward County Joint Municipal National Pollution Discharge Elimination Systems Permit (NPDES) Program relating to stormwater management. The North Broward Hospital District provides for the continued development and maintenance of major public health facilities. Facilities include North Broward Medical Center, the Broward General Medical Center and, closest to the City, the Imperial Point Medical Center. The continued maintenance and operation of these community health facilities to serve local residents is clearly in the City's best interest and the City supports this effort. The Health Planning and Development Council is responsible for reviewing the various applications for expansion of hospital facilities. This agency is used to ensure that adequate and cost efficient health facilities will be available to serve the existing and future residents of Broward County. The City should monitor activities of this Council and participate when appropriate on issues that impact the health services provided by the City. Tax District District Area Board of County Commissioners Countywide Broward County School Board Countywide South Florida Water Management District Countywide North Broward Hospital District North County Florida Inland Navigational District Countywide City of Oakland Park Intergovernmental Coordination Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 8-13 Regional and State Government The City has a variety of ongoing coordination mechanisms with different regional and state agencies. The relationship with the South Florida Water Management District was previously addressed. The City is within the jurisdiction of the South Florida Regional Planning Council located in Hollywood. This agency is charged with setting regional planning goals and priorities, and with the review of major developments of regional impact. While the City was not involved in the development of the Regional Policy Plan developed by the Council, the Plan was utilized in the development and amendment of the Comprehensive Plan. The City coordinates with the SFRPC in the review of all proposed Comprehensive Plan amendments to insure consistency with the Regional Policy Plan. With regard to developments of regional impact, the City has participated in the review and approval of several projects. SFRPC also performs several emergency management functions, such as overseeing periodic disaster preparation training, and the City continues to coordinate with SFRPC as needed in this regard. The Florida Department of Transportation has jurisdiction over many City segments of major collector and arterial roadways. This arrangement provides for FDOT to review and approve driveway connections and road alteration permits on these facilities. The City needs to continue to work with FDOT with regard to drainage and capacity improvements to Dixie Highway. Future coordination is also required with respect to I-95 improvements, and various intersection or smaller scale road improvements that affect local highway facilities. During preparation of the City's Transportation Element the City coordinated closely with FDOT. The City's Transportation Element contains policies for the continued coordination with the Short Range and Long Range Plans of FDOT in order to insure the City's existing and anticipated future transportation needs are addressed. The City will continue to implement the coordination activities provided in the Goals, Objectives and Policies of the City's Transportation Element to insure that necessary interaction with FDOT is achieved. The activities of the Florida Department of Community Affairs (DCA) affect the City of Oakland Park in many ways. First, DCA is responsible for the review and compliance determination of the City's Comprehensive Plan. DCA is also involved in establishing the criteria for Developments of Regional Impact. Since the DCA is responsible for regulating the requirements for Comprehensive Planning and DRIs, the City should monitor activities and proposed changes in legislation and formally respond in writing the City's position on proposed regulations. The Florida Division of Historical Resources houses the State Historical Preservation Officer and is responsible for identifying and preserving historical and archaeological City of Oakland Park Intergovernmental Coordination Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 8-14 features. While a formal coordinating mechanism is not in place, the City should coordinate with this division through the local Historical Society. Additionally, the City should communicate with this division in the inventory of historical features suggested in the Conservation Element. Other groups with which the City has coordination activities include the Florida Inland Navigational District (FIND) and the Florida Marine Patrol. The City supports the activities of FIND to provide for safe navigation along area waterways. With respect to the Marine Patrol, the City supports efforts of this group to enforce all safe boating procedures. The Florida Power and Light Company is not a governmental agency, but rather a provider of areawide electric power. This company was included because of the major role it provides in existing activities and future development. The City should continue to coordinate with FP&L during the review of proposed development to protect existing and future easements, transmission lines and subdistrict stations from construction activities and encroachment. Analysis of the Effectiveness of Existing Coordination Mechanisms The City of Oakland Park has a varied relationship with different agencies in local and areawide community affairs. The nature of the existing coordination mechanisms ranges from formal written agreements with public and private service providers to informal communication or actions with outside agencies and individuals. In almost all instances, the existing coordination mechanisms have been effective. An example is the Technical Coordinating Committee (TCC). The TCC has improved the coordination of short and long-range transportation programs. This committee was also involved in establishing the level of service standards and procedures for evaluating roadway capacity. In terms of future efforts, the City should continue to maintain contractual service agreements with all existing providers. The City should also continue written agreements regarding the regional provision of certain services, particularly with respect to solid waste, sanitary sewer, regional wellfields and potable water facilities. Because the SFWMD has reduced or capped many consumptive use permits in South Florida, the City will need to be proactive in its coordination with Broward County and the City of Fort Lauderdale with respect to water supply planning. The City should continue to support area road improvements through the Broward Metropolitan Planning Organization. Coordinated efforts by affected municipalities to expedite North Dixie Highway corridor improvements have provided benefits to the City of Oakland Park Intergovernmental Coordination Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 8-15 operation of NE 6th and NE 16th Avenues. Improvements to I-95, while posing some long- term relief, may increase congestion on parallel arterials as well as near interchange approaches. Low cost and capital intensive improvements will be necessary to adequately accommodate existing and future traffic volumes on many local roadways. This is particularly evident in eastern portions of the City, where many arterial intersections reflect poor operation due to heavy volumes, outdated designs and/or a lack of exclusive turn lanes. Comprehensive Plan Element Coordination Needs There are limited problems that were identified in the various Comprehensive Plan Elements that could be improved by additional intergovernmental coordination. Table 8-3 below identifies the various Plan Elements, problem areas that could benefit from improved coordination and the means to resolve the problem area. Table 8-3 - Intergovernmental Coordination Needs, 2007 Plan Element Problem Area Suggested Program Public Schools Facilities and Land Use Public Schools Coordinate with Broward County School District Infrastructure Water Supply Coordinate with Broward County and City of Fort Lauderdale Housing Affordable Housing Coordinate with Broward County Planning Council, SFRPC, and municipalities Transportation Congestion on Oakland Park Boulevard Coordinate with UPRD and FDOT Source: Carter & Burgess, Inc., 2007. Consistency with the Regional Policy Plan The South Florida Regional Planning Council's Regional Policy Plan for South Florida was reviewed for consistency relative to the City's Comprehensive Plan during preparation and adoption of the 2006 Evaluation and Appraisal Report (EAR). The review of the Regional Policy Plan does not suggest additional planning coordination over that currently identified in the City's Comprehensive Plan. Additional Coordination Mechanisms Joint Planning Areas Definition: A Joint Planning Area (JPA) is an area where one jurisdiction provides services to another jurisdiction or two jurisdictions provide services to the same area or a jurisdiction intends to provide services to an area which is proposed to be annexed. The intent of establishing a joint planning area is to achieve increased efficiency and effectiveness of providing services to an area through coordination in efforts by one or more jurisdictions. City of Oakland Park Intergovernmental Coordination Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 8-16 Chapter 163, F.S., requires the Intergovernmental Coordination Element to include provisions to establish Joint Planning Areas especially for the purposes of joint infrastructure service areas, annexation and municipal incorporation. Joint Infrastructure Service Areas As referenced previously in this Element and discussed in detail in the Infrastructure Element of this Comprehensive Plan, the City of Oakland Park currently coordinates with Broward County and the City of Fort Lauderdale for the provision of utility service. It is recommended that in addition to considering the Capital Improvements Schedules of adjacent jurisdictions and other governmental units, the City should provide information relating to the City's anticipated capital improvements to be completed within, adjacent to or benefiting adjacent jurisdictions or governmental units for their consideration during preparation of their respective Capital Improvement Schedules and Budgets. Annexation and Municipal Incorporation As referenced previously, with the 2005 annexations, the City of Oakland Park shall only pursue voluntary annexations of unincorporated parcels. The City will also consider voluntary annexation of Fort Lauderdale enclaves (with the exception of the Fort Lauderdale water treatment plant adjacent to I-95) at the request of the land owner and with agreement of the City of Fort Lauderdale. Joint Processes for Collaborative Planning and Decision Making for Multi-Jurisdictional Issues Chapter 163.3177, F.S., requires that local governments use joint planning processes for collaborative planning and decision-making in preparing population projections, public school siting, the location and extension of public facilities subject to concurrency, and the siting of facilities with countywide significance including locally unwanted land uses. The following is a brief description of the existing and recommended joint processes used (or recommended to be used) by the City of Oakland Park to address these issues. Population Projections The City of Oakland Park provides information relating to development to the Broward County Planning Council and Property Appraiser's Office to allow for the preparation of population estimates and projections which accurately reflect the existing or anticipated development within the City of Oakland Park. The City reviews the population estimates and projections prepared by the Broward County Urban Planning and Redevelopment Department (UPRD) to identify whether or not the estimates and projections accurately reflect the existing and anticipated conditions within the City of Oakland Park. In the event that the City determines the estimates and projections prepared by the UPRD do not reflect conditions within the City of Oakland Park, the City's Development Services Department should provide supplemental information to UPRD relating to development conditions City of Oakland Park Intergovernmental Coordination Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 8-17 within the City to facilitate adjustment of the estimates or projections. The population projections prepared by UPRD are consistent with those used for transportation and public school facilities planning in Broward County. Public School Siting The City strives to coordinate with the School District in order to collocate public facilities such as parks, libraries and community centers with schools to the extent possible and has been successful in the collocation of such facilities and implementation of joint use agreements relating to those facilities, as described elsewhere in this Comprehensive Plan. The City of Oakland Park coordinates with the Broward County School District on issues relating to the siting of public schools, as appropriate. The City will continue to coordinate with the Broward County School District relating to the location and collocation of public school facilities in order to assist the School District in the provision of an adequate amount of public schools to meet with the City's identified needs. Location and Extension of Public Facilities Subject to Concurrency The City of Oakland Park uses the coordination mechanisms described previously in this element relating to the provision of public facilities subject to concurrency. The City will pursue formalized coordination mechanisms identified in this element through the establishment of joint use agreements in order to comply with the requirements of Chapter 163.3177, F.S. through continued coordination with individual service providers. Siting of Facilities With Countywide Significance Including Locally Unwanted Land Uses The City currently addresses the need for facilities with countywide significance through the bi-monthly comprehensive planning workshops coordinated by Broward County Urban Planning and Redevelopment Department, which provide a forum for the municipalities, Broward County, regulatory agencies and service providers within Broward County to address multi-jurisdictional issues which would include the location of locally unwanted land uses. Therefore, it is recommended that the City continue to attend and participate in these workshops. Voluntary Dispute Resolution Processes The City of Oakland Park strives to participate in the intergovernmental processes described in this element by considering the impacts of Comprehensive Plan amendments proposed by the City (or as proposed by other jurisdictions) and future development and redevelopment within the City on the ability of the City of Oakland Park and other jurisdictions to implement their Comprehensive Plans and to address areawide land use needs. City of Oakland Park Intergovernmental Coordination Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007 8-18 All municipalities are required by the Broward County Charter to be consistent with the Broward County Future Land Use Plan, which prevents development from occurring that would be inconsistent with the Broward County Future Land Use Plan. The City currently coordinates with the Broward County Planning Council (as do all municipalities in Broward County) to maintain consistency between the City's Future Land Use Plan and the Broward County Future Land Use Plan. Special District Coordination The City coordinates with the Special Districts located within, providing services to or benefiting the City of Oakland Park, through the mechanisms discussed previously in this element. In all cases where Special District Public Facility Reports are required to be prepared by the South Florida Water Management District, and the Broward County Solid Waste Disposal District, the City shall review the facility report prepared by the district and consider amendment of the City's Comprehensive Plan as may be necessitated by the content of the facility report. In the event that conflicts arise as a result of the content of a facility report, the City shall coordinate with the governing board of the appropriate district to resolve any identified conflicts. Coordination with Campus Master Plans Not applicable, at this time. There are no portions of the State University System located within the City of Oakland Park. Therefore, coordination with Campus Master Plans prepared pursuant to Chapter 240.155, F.S. is not necessary.  9 Capital Improvements Element City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan City of Oakland Park Capital Improvements Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 9-1 Introduction According to Chapter 9J-5 of the Florida Administrative Code, the purpose of the Capital Improvements Element is to evaluate the need for public improvements as identified in other plan elements, to estimate the cost for which the City is responsible, to analyze local fiscal capability to implement improvements, and through adoption of financial policies, to schedule the funding of improvements. The Capital Improvements Element serves to specify the various types and/or individual improvements identified as necessary or desirable in the other elements of the City’s comprehensive plan. This Element provides a summary inventory of improvement needs, existing and projected financial resources and local policies that will be used in the implementation of the City’s plan. The City of Oakland Park Capital Improvements Element is not the City’s Capital Improvements Program. As one portion of the City’s comprehensive plan, this element is oriented to satisfy short- and long-term needs for relatively high cost, infrastructure services, including potable water, sanitary sewer, drainage, solid waste, transportation, and parks, recreation and open space facilities. Thus, capital needs in the referenced subject areas with projected costs of at least $10,000 are discussed in this element. Additional needs for such items as civic buildings and equipment, or for lower cost facilities, are not included in this element. The funding of these items must be addressed in the context of the City’s overall Capital Improvements Program and annual budget. Because the majority of the City is already developed, the Future Land Use Element identifies a mixture of redevelopment and infill development as the patterns that will dominate in the short- and long-term planning periods. Some new development will occur in western portions of the City, likely in the near future. As such, major new capital improvement needs are not proposed in the future, except in the areas of recreation facilities and parks and stormwater drainage. The emphasis of the Capital Improvements Program and Capital Improvements Element is maintenance of existing public facilities and improvements necessary to improve existing services. Two infrastructure improvements to achieve level of service standards within the short-term planning horizon of five years are identified in the City's comprehensive plan, and both are related to potable water supply and are extra-jurisdictional. All other projects listed in the Capital Improvements Program, including the recreation and stormwater drainage projects, are designed to maintain existing levels of service while accommodating redevelopment. City of Oakland Park Capital Improvements Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 9-2 Capital Improvement Planning The City of Oakland Park is a maturely developed urban community and future development will consist of infill development and redevelopment. This development scenario has been established throughout the various elements of the City’s comprehensive plan. In terms of capital improvements, the City has consistently relied on the private sector to extend utility service lines where none previously existed. This policy is anticipated to continue. With regard to infill development, the City has basic water and wastewater infrastructure in place to provide services. Installation costs of individual service lines and/or other required system modifications also are considered to be a private sector responsibility. There is one exception, whereby Broward County is currently in the process of providing infrastructure improvements for areas of the City annexed in 2005. Since the City does not provide for potable water or wastewater treatment and major water and wastewater lines already exist, the City’s capital agenda for water and wastewater system improvements is concentrated on maintenance and rehabilitation, and in some locations, to the elimination of septic systems. Drainage conditions in some areas remain a major local concern. A previous objective in the comprehensive plan called for the City to develop a Master Drainage Plan, which was completed in 1998. This plan identifies thirty drainage deficient areas and fourteen potential area projects, including projects previously identified in the comprehensive plan. The City began the design and permitting process for several projects and started construction on a stormwater trunk line to drain the Central Area of the City. The 1998 Stormwater Master Plan is aggressive regarding the projects to be undertaken and the City is actively working to obtain funding for expediting design and construction. Potential funding sources include stormwater utility fees, Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) mitigation grant programs, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) grants such as the Special Projects Authorization Process, and other revenue sources available to the City. Broward County-financed Community Redevelopment Program funds may also be used to assist in correcting drainage deficiencies in the City’s Community Redevelopment Area (CRA), which is in an older section of the City. There are no solid waste terminal disposal sites within the City and solid waste collected by the City is transported to County-managed facilities. Broward County, through an interlocal agreement with the City, is responsible for the management of solid waste, including treatment and disposal of solid waste and the coordination of recyclable material collected in the solid waste collection process. The County also handles collection and disposal of household hazardous wastes. As such, the City’s capital improvements programming for solid waste City of Oakland Park Capital Improvements Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 9-3 infrastructure is limited to the addition or replacement of vehicles and, consequently, is a small segment of the Capital Improvements Program. Local and neighborhood collector street improvements will continue to be a local funding priority. Resurfacing programs are anticipated to continue at current levels based on the availability of gasoline tax revenues. Intersection improvements and median and landscaping improvements also are anticipated to be implemented consistent with the objectives and policies of the City’s comprehensive plan. However, because the City emphasizes preserving the character and integrity of local neighborhoods, roadway and intersection improvements fostering traffic growth in these areas will be discouraged. Similarly, as part of the City’s neighborhood planning program, the City will work with community groups to address traffic circulation issues through traffic calming, where appropriate and desired. As such, roadway funding in the Capital Improvements Program includes these types of improvements. The City’s Recreation and Open Space Element has established that the City meets the adopted level of service standard of three acres of park land for each one thousand residents. However, the standard of two acres per 1,000 residents for neighborhood parks is not met and the City is working on acquiring additional recreational lands and facilities. Furthermore, much of the City’s park land consists of water and the City is desirous of acquiring other parcels in order to support active recreation activities. In terms of Education planning, the Broward County School Board is responsible for the planning and funding of adequate educational facilities in the City of Oakland Park. In April 2003, the School Board of Broward County, Broward County Commission and 26 municipalities in Broward County, including the City of Oakland Park, entered into an interlocal agreement addressing Public School Facility Planning. A joint working group comprised of staff representing the School Board, Broward County and 26 municipalities was formed to discuss and formulate recommendations regarding the coordination of land use and school facilities planning. Based on the 2005 Growth Management legislative changes introduced with Senate Bill 360, public schools are subject to concurrency determinations. The working group is in the process of preparing recommendations on the implementation of public school facility concurrency and future updates to the comprehensive plan are anticipated, including adding School District projects to the City’s capital improvement program as appropriate. The City’s Small Town Renaissance Program represents a commitment to a revitalization effort that encompasses the downtown district, citywide infrastructure improvements, and park development. The City has invested over $5 million in property acquisitions for open space and demonstration projects. Additionally, streets continue to be reconstructed with new lighting, sidewalks, drainage, and landscape improvements. City of Oakland Park Capital Improvements Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 9-4 The City is moving forward with its Community Redevelopment Plan for the 1,000-acre Community Redevelopment Area, focusing on strengthening neighborhoods and the downtown area. Oakland Park’s capital improvements program will provide the infrastructure upgrades necessary to facilitate the City’s redevelopment efforts. The opportunity for investment in the area continues to draw interest from many parties and the City is desirous of establishing public/private partnerships to leverage public funding. Inventory of Capital Improvement Needs Recent years saw the completion of several important projects for the City of Oakland Park. Perhaps the most visible of these is the beautification of the FEC Corridor. This coupled with the demolition of buildings and clearing of several critical locations should serve as a catalyst for the renaissance of the City’s Downtown. The NE 38 Street Reconstruction project was started and is well underway with a target completion of 2007. Other projects, which have been recently completed, nearing completion, or are soon to be under construction include the Downtown Water System Improvements, Royal Palm Park Regional Improvements, Kimberly Lakes Basin Drainage, NE 12 Ave Reconstruction, and NE 6th Ave Drainage. Other projects undertaken annually are inflow and infiltration repairs of existing sewers as well as road resurfacing in some areas of the City. Capital Improvements to maintain the level of service standards adopted in the comprehensive plan are identified in four categories: i Neighborhood and Citywide – including transportation related improvements. i Recreation and Cultural – including recreation and open space acquisitions and improvements. i Water and Sewer – including the provision and maintenance of water distribution and wastewater collection systems. i Stormwater – including stormwater infrastructure improvements and rehabilitation. Table 1 of Volume I, Goal, Objectives and Policies, provides a listing of proposed capital improvement projects for which the City is responsible for implementation. (Note: All of the tables referred to in this section are located in Volume I.) Table 2 provides capital improvement projects within the City that are identified in the Broward County Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) Five-Year Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) or the Florida Department of Transportation’s Five-Year Adopted Work Program (AWP). Similarly, transit oriented transportation concurrency is funded through the Broward County Transit Development Plan and projects needed for concurrency are shown in Table 2. City of Oakland Park Capital Improvements Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 9-5 The capital improvement program is oriented toward meeting existing deficiencies as well as preparing for the extension and expansion of services for infill development and redevelopment. Stormwater improvements and recreation and open space enhancements are the City’s main focus. Water and wastewater rehabilitation and maintenance remain a continuing concern. Table 6 provides expenditures planned for the next five years for each project per funding source. Table 11 provides the list of projects and five-year capital improvements program by category identified above. Table 8 provides expenditures as related to the various elements of the comprehensive plan. Because financing is being used for some capital improvements, Table 7 identifies the expenses associated with debt service. Except for recreation and open space capital improvements, the projected operating costs of the proposed capital improvements are not expected to have a measurable effect on existing operating costs. In most instances, the programmed capital improvements are in response to existing needs or deficiencies that have high operating and maintenance costs. Examples include the wastewater inflow and infiltration improvements and on-going stormwater improvements and rehabilitation. Table 9 projects the increased operating costs associated with the capital improvements identified in Tables 6 and 8. Table 12 identifies the extra-jurisdictional projects required to ensure adequate water supply is available for future growth. Financial Resources The State of Florida, by constitution, does not have a state personal income tax and therefore, the State operates primarily using sales, gasoline, and corporate income taxes. Local governments (cities, counties, and school boards) primarily rely on property and a limited array of permitted other taxes (sales, telecommunication, gasoline, utilities services, etc.) and fees (franchise, building permits, occupational license, etc.) for their governmental activities. There are a limited number of state-shared revenues and recurring and non-recurring (one-time) grants from both the state and federal governments. For the business-type and certain governmental activities (building inspections, recreational programs, etc.) the user pays a related fee or charge associated with the service. At the end of fiscal year of 2004, the assets of the City exceeded liabilities by $54.9 million. This represents the net assets of the City. Of this amount, $26.1 million was from governmental funds (program and general revenues) and $28.8 million was from business-type activities (water, sewer, solid waste and stormwater). As of September 30, 2004, the City’s governmental combined funds reported ending fund balances of $18.4 million. Approximately 44%, or $8.1 million, was from the general fund. Of this amount, $5.1 million was designated, $346,000 was reserved, and $2.7 million was undesignated and unreserved. City of Oakland Park Capital Improvements Comprehensive Plan, Volume II December 12, 2007, February 2009 9-6 At September 30, 2004, the City had several debt issues outstanding, reflecting a $23.6 million balance. Included in this debt is a new $1.8 million loan with the Florida Municipal Loan Council for water and sewer improvements, a $3.3 million balance on $5.5 million in revenue bonds (entered into in 1994), $948,000 in capital leases, and a $17.6 million balance on an $18.5 million loan (entered into in 2000) with the Florida Municipal Loan Council for stormwater projects ($5.5 million) and general government projects ($13.0 million). All required payments for these debts were made during the year. All cash not needed for current operations is deposited into a pooled investment account, invested through the State Board of Administration (SBA) Local Government Surplus Funds Trust Fund, as authorized by Florida Statute 166.261. The SBA rate at September 30, 2004 was 1.7%. The adopted budget for the General Fund for fiscal year 2005 at $29.2 million represents a 6.2% increase over fiscal year 2004. Revenues increases are primarily expected from property taxes, benefiting from increases in assessed valuations as well as new property. For the expenditure budget, the most significant increase comes from the General Fund’s contribution to the capital projects programs. The operating millage rate for calendar year 2004, collected in fiscal year 2005, is 5.8868 per thousand dollars of taxable value, representing a decrease from the prior year’s 5.9715 millage rate. Table 3 provides the revenue sources available to the City of Oakland Park. Table 4 provides the fund accounts for these revenue sources for the current budget year and Table 5 represents these sources’ revenue projections for the next five years. Table 10 provides a fiscal assessment of the five-year capital improvement program, identifying the fund balances for each revenue source being used. Table 11 provides the City’s five-year capital improvements program, identifying all projects funded through the City.  10 Public School Facilities City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan City of Oakland Park Public School Facilities Comprehensive Plan, Volume II February 2008 10-1 Introduction Over the past decade the Florida Legislature has progressively strengthened the ties between school planning and general land use and comprehensive planning through amendments to Chapters 163 and 1013, Florida Statutes. The 2005 Legislature mandated that the availability of public schools be made a prerequisite for the approval of residential construction and directed a closer integration of planning for school capacity with comprehensive planning. Under the provisions adopted with Senate Bill 360: x Existing Interlocal Agreements between school boards and local governments will be updated and expanded to comply with the legislation. x Each local government1 is to adopt a Public School Facilities Element as part of its comprehensive plan. x Mandates school concurrency. x Local governments must update their Intergovernmental Coordination Element and Capital Improvements Element to coordinate public school planning. x Procedures for comprehensive plan amendments. x Establish a process and uniform methodology for proportionate share mitigation. Public School Facilities Element Requirements The law requires that local governments adopt a public school facility element as a part of their comprehensive plans to establish a framework for the planning of public schools. (§163.3177(12), F.S.). Local governments were granted approximately three years to adopt a public school facilities element. As directed by the legislation, the Florida Department of Community Affairs has established a phased schedule for adoption of the elements with each local government adopting no later than December 1, 2008. This schedule established due dates which are staggered throughout the course of the 2008 calendar year. Broward County is required to adopt it no later than February 1, 2008. In addition, the Legislature established enforcement mechanisms should a local government and school district fail to adopt a public school concurrency program. The legislation prescribed the following minimum content requirements for goals, objectives, and policies: x procedure of annual update process; x procedure for school site selection; x procedure for school permitting; x provision of infrastructure necessary to support proposed schools; x provision for collocation of other public facilities in proximity to public schools; City of Oakland Park Public School Facilities Comprehensive Plan, Volume II February 2008 10-2 x provision for location of schools proximate to residential areas and to complement patterns of development; x measures to ensure compatibility of school sites and surrounding land uses; and x coordination with adjacent local governments and the school district on emergency preparedness issues. In addition, the element is to include one or more future conditions maps which generally depict; x the anticipated location of educational and ancillary plants anticipated over the five- year and long-term planning period. x depict the anticipated location of educational and ancillary plants, including the general location of improvements to existing schools or new schools anticipated over the 5-year or long-term planning period; and x out of necessity, the maps will be general for the long-term planning period and more specific for the 5-year period. Maps indicating general locations of future schools or school improvements may not prescribe a land use on a particular parcel of land. The data and analysis portion of the Public School Facilities Element must address: x how level-of-service standards will be achieved and maintained; x the interlocal agreement adopted pursuant to s. 163.31777 and the 5-year school district facilities work program adopted pursuant to s. 1013.35; x the educational plant survey prepared pursuant to s. 1013.31 and an existing educational and ancillary plant map or map series; x projected future population and associated demographics, including development patterns year by year for the upcoming 5-year and long-term planning periods; and x Anticipated educational and ancillary plants with land area requirements. x information on existing development and development anticipated for the next 5 years and the long-term planning period; x an analysis of problems and opportunities for existing schools and schools anticipated in the future; x an analysis of opportunities to collocate future schools with other public facilities such as parks, libraries, and community centers; x an analysis of the need for supporting public facilities for existing and future schools; and x an analysis of opportunities to locate schools to serve as community focal points. City of Oakland Park Public School Facilities Comprehensive Plan, Volume II February 2008 10-3 Concurrency Management System (CMS) The concurrency management system for Broward County is an intergovernmental effort that is grounded in the provisions of the Broward County Charter, which provide for county- wide planning processes implemented through the County's Land Development Code. The public school facility Concurrency Management System operates according to the state mandated requirements (§163.31777 F.S. and 163.3180 F.S.) for the implementation of school concurrency and the adopted School Board’s Interlocal Agreement for Public School Facility Planning (Interlocal Agreement). These require Broward County, the School Board and non-exempt municipalities to ensure that the adopted Level of Service Standard (LOS) to be achieved and maintained for each school type and Concurrency Service Area (CSA). Unlike existing concurrency services (roads, sanitary sewer, solid waste, drainage, potable water, recreation and mass transit) which are the responsibility of local governments, the School Board, by constitutional mandate, has the responsibility of providing educational facilities to meet the needs of current and future students as represented in the School Board’s adopted Five Year District Educational Facilities Plan (DEFP). The local governments, therefore, do not have control of the funding sources or the allocation of funds for new or renovated schools which would add student capacity. However, since the School Board isn’t empowered to implement a Concurrency Management System on its own, it must rely upon the local governments to do so through their Land Development Regulations. The Broward County Land Development Code contains the County's Concurrency Management System. The Code requires plat approval of all parcels of land prior to receiving a Development Order. Plat approval applies to land within the municipal boundaries as well as that in the unincorporated areas. Per State requirements, the point of review for Public School Concurrency is at plat or site plan (or functional equivalent). When a development application is reviewed for school concurrency, it must be determined if the development is exempted or vested (as per Section 8.11 of the Interlocal Agreement) or has been issued a School Capacity Availability Determination Letter (SCAD) by the School Board indicating that adequate school capacity exists. If so, it can be accepted by the County for further processing. If the development application is not exempted or vested, it is subject to school concurrency and the applicant must submit a Public School Impact Application (PSIA) to the applicable local government for review by the School District according to the provisions and processes outlined in Section 8.13 of the Interlocal Agreement. City of Oakland Park Public School Facilities Comprehensive Plan, Volume II February 2008 10-4 Collaborative Planning Process & Intergovernmental Coordination The collaborative planning process has greatly increased with the passage of the 2005 Infrastructure and Planning Act (SB 360) which mandated the adoption of a Broward County Public School Facility Element and implementation of public school concurrency by February, 2008. Since the beginning of 2006, School Board staff has been working collaboratively with the County and municipalities through the School Board’s Staff Working Group and Oversight Committee to form consensus on the amendments to the Interlocal Agreement and the preparation of a model Public School Facilities Element. Several Staff Working Group Subcommittees were also established to deal with issues including collocation of school facilities, land use changes and developing urban school standards. These committees continue to meet on a regular basis in order to implement the state mandated requirements to coordinate and collaborate on updates to the District Educational Financially Feasible Plan (DEFP), Concurrency Service Areas (CSAs) and amendments to the Comprehensive Plans of the County and non-exempt municipalities for the implementation of public school concurrency. Level of Service Standard Methodology The level of service standard is based upon the capacity of the school facility, which is the number of pupils to be served by the facility. The level of service is expressed as the percentage (ratio) of student enrollment to the student capacity of the school. The level of service is standard and is expressed in terms of Florida Inventory of School Houses (FISH) capacity. FISH capacity is determined by Florida Department of Education guidelines and represents a measure of the physical capacity of the facility itself. FISH capacity includes satisfactory student stations in permanent classrooms. The level of service standard is uniformly set at 110 percent for each school type (elementary, middle, high and special purpose schools) throughout Broward County’s School District. The relationship of enrollment to capacity, for individual schools and for concurrency service areas, is derived directly from the five-year schedule of capital improvements that incorporates the Five-Year District Educational Facilities Work Program adopted annually by the School Board. The school capacity and level of service analysis is assigned in a capacity/enrollment and level of service table. This table provides a year-by-year projection of capacity, enrollment, levels of service and available capacity, illustrating surpluses and deficiencies, based on the financially feasible capital program adopted by the school district. Student enrollment is projected annually based on the specific function of the educational facility and the characteristics of the school attendance area, historical trends, the current and projected pace of development and the potential of vacant lands. City of Oakland Park Public School Facilities Comprehensive Plan, Volume II February 2008 10-5 Other factors such as students attending schools outside their assigned attendance areas due to reassignments, magnet programs, charter schools and other educational choices are factored into the methodology for enrollment projections and for allocating school capacity. Student enrollment projections are designated geographically using local development trend data and the school district student enrollment data. School-by-school enrollment projections by concurrency service areas are applied. General locations of future public schools to be constructed within the district over five years are applied to concurrency service areas relative to the location serving the anticipated capacity deficit. In addition, School Board Policy 5000 allows a variety of options to reduce or avoid the need for additional permanent student stations including, but not limited to: redistricting, reassignment, expanded capacity utilization (e.g. year round schools), and other options. School enrollments exceeding the available capacity resulting in a level of service greater than 110% in the first fiscal year achieve the level of service standard by the fifth year due to planned capital improvements not yet available until the final year. Problems and Opportunities for Existing and Future Schools Land Availability A major issue facing the School Board is land availability. Existing schools recovering from the last thirty years of rapid growth have seen the school sites become crowded with classroom additions and relocatables. Additions/relocatables have taken over playfields, playgrounds, green space, and parking areas. The demand for larger water retention areas and more parking facilities has also reduced the useable area for the educational program. In addition, with current legislation demanding more accountability in the area of physical education schools face the dilemma of needing playfield areas to meet new Sunshine Standards for Education. Due to this land crisis, the School Board is developing strategies to reduce the site size requirement to build new schools and expand an already aggressive collocation model. By designing a tighter building footprint, sharing parking and playfields, as well as exploring the use of parking garages verse surface parking, this will be possible. In addition, as a standard practice, the School District tries to purchase school sites adjacent to parks and recreation areas. Construction Costs & Revenue Sources Another major issue is the shrinking of capital revenue and the rising cost of construction. The School Board annually tackles the tough task of balancing the needs for capacity City of Oakland Park Public School Facilities Comprehensive Plan, Volume II February 2008 10-6 additions versus capacity maintenance at the existing schools. In a district that must maintain an estimated 34 million square feet of space the need is great to fund the life cycle replacement of major infrastructure systems such as roofing, air conditioning, plumbing, and electrical distribution. The School Board has the challenge to not only add capacity but to maintain the existing capacity and its infrastructure. Declining Enrollment Projections Declining enrollment has also offered some unique challenges to the district. First and foremost the decline is not uniform in nature as local communities go through their aging cycle at different rates. The district is still experiencing growth in certain areas of the county that has stressed the educational facility capacities in that area. Planning based on sound enrollment projections has proven to be a crucial component especially in times of financial The updated five-year student enrollment projections provide a basis for determining capital needs. Table 10-1 below, summarizes the projected enrollment, by level, for the 2007-2008 and 2011-2012 school years. The enrollment projections are compared to the 20th day figures for the current (2006-2007) school year. As indicated in the table, a decrease of 3,357 students is projected for 2007-2008. Table 10-1: Summary of Enrollment Projections School Type 2006-2007 20th Day Enrollment 2007-2008 Projected School Year 2007-2008 Increase over 20th Day 2011-2012 Projected School Year 2011-2012 Increase over 20th Day Pre- Kindergarten 3,876 3,878 2 3,878 2 Elementary (K-5)109,337 107,060 (2,277) 106,756 (2,581) Middle 55,955 54,611 (1,344) 54,362 (1,593) High 72,633 71,819 (814) 70,665 (1,968) Centers 4,715 4,785 70 4,785 70 Charters 16,100 17,106 1,006 17,318 1,218 TOTAL 262,616 259,259 (3,357) 257,764 (4,852) Source: School Board of Broward County, 2007 The District is projected to decrease by 4,852 total pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade students, including those in centers and charter schools, by the 2011-2012 school year. Enrollment in charter schools is 16,100 this year, with six additional charter schools anticipated in 2007-2008. Over 1,000 additional public school students will be enrolled in charter schools by the 2011-2012 school year. The increase in charter school enrollment will reduce the number of potential students that will need to be housed in existing or new District facilities. If the charter school trend does not continue, then these projected students will impact the capital needs of other public schools in the District. Recent trends and current birth data indicate that elementary (pre-kindergarten through grade 5) enrollment in District City of Oakland Park Public School Facilities Comprehensive Plan, Volume II February 2008 10-7 owned facilities will decrease over the next five years by 2,579 students. Middle school enrollment in District owned facilities is projected to decrease by 1,593 students and high school enrollment will decrease by 1,968 students. By the end of the five-year period, Broward County School District’s enrollment will total over 257,500 students. Class Size Reduction Requirements Class size reduction is another major issue that the district is focusing much of its financial and human resources on to achieve the constitutional amendment goal. In November 2002, Florida voters approved the Class Size Reduction Amendment. Class Size Average was set at 18 students for Grades Pk-3, 22 students for Grades 4-8, and 25 students for Grades 9- 12 and was designed to be implemented in three phases. For fiscal years: x 2003-04 through 2005-06, class size average was set at the district level; x 2006-07 and 2007-08, class size average was set at the school level; and x 2008-09 and thereafter, class size average will be calculated at the individual classroom level. Consequences for Not Meeting Class Size Targets Districts not in compliance with class size targets during the October student membership survey transfer undistributed funds proportionate to the amount of class size reduction not accomplished from the district's class size reduction operating categorical to an approved fixed capital outlay appropriation for class size reduction in the affected district. The amount of funds transferred would be the lesser of the amount verified or the undistributed balance of the district's class size reduction operating categorical. However, if there was evidence indicating that a district had been unable to meet class size reduction requirements, despite appropriate effort to do so, the Commissioner of Education could recommend that the Legislative Budget Commission approve an alternative amount of funds to be transferred from the district's class size reduction operating categorical to its approved fixed capital outlay account for class size reduction. Further, FDOE enforcement authority could develop a constitutional compliance plan for non-compliant districts. The constitutional compliance plan included, but was not limited to, the redrawing of school attendance zones to maximize use of facilities while minimizing the additional use of transportation, unless the district came into compliance based upon the February student membership survey. Strategy for Class Size Reduction Impacts To ensure that BCPS will accurately address the period-by-period Class Size Reduction Amendment implementation in 2008-09, the Superintendent has directed that a Class Size Reduction Action Committee (CSRAC) be established. The committee is comprised of Principals and District Administrative staff from Facilities, Budget, Curriculum, and City of Oakland Park Public School Facilities Comprehensive Plan, Volume II February 2008 10-8 Instructional Staffing. The CSRAC has met to prepare the groundwork for period-by-period implementation of Class Size Reduction legislation. The following tasks have been undertaken: x Determine District resources (Budget, Personnel Staffing, Facilities, Boundaries, ETS system modifications) necessary for the period-by-period implementation of the 2008- 2009 class size reduction requirements. x Modify the monitoring tool to more accurately align District calculations to FDOE average class size calculations. x Develop a new method of forecasting teacher/classroom needs that takes into account classroom scheduling and space utilization considerations. Additional factors that have been integrated in this school-by-school analysis include: teacher hiring, programs, scheduling, and classroom student-station utilization. This analysis will: o Take into consideration the current plans for new classroom additions to schools, and make recommendations to facilitate each school’s implementation of the 2008- 2009 period-by-period class size reduction requirements. o Consider the five-year projection for each school, and make personnel staffing and facility recommendations. o Determine additional funding required for period-by-period implementation of the 2008-2009 class size reduction requirements. o Five schools are scheduled for early full class size implementation and will provide information on challenges the district may face in 2008-09 when all schools will be mandated for period-by-period full class size. The five schools scheduled for early full class size implementation include: Mirror Lake Elementary, Westglades Middle, Falcon Cove Middle, Monarch High, and Hallandale High Schools. Options for Reducing Capacity Broward County Schools has considered options to optimize the usage of educational facilities within the District. Each year the District undergoes an extensive boundary process and considers the effectiveness of programs that are being utilized as an alternative to adding capacity. x Boundary Process: Each year the District undergoes a boundary process that considers the demographic changes in student populations, available and future facility capacity, programming components, as well as the diversity at each school. As part of the annual boundary process the District relies on input from the communities and stakeholders. Through the boundary process, every effort is made to maintain equal educational opportunities. x Multi-track Scheduling: Broward County Schools has utilized multi-track schedules for an elementary school successfully. In that school, this multi-track schedule City of Oakland Park Public School Facilities Comprehensive Plan, Volume II February 2008 10-9 accommodated up to 150% of the school’s FISH capacity in the 2005-06 school year. The community was content with the multi-track scheduling and has shown increases in student achievement, attendance and less discipline situations. The District has continued to utilize this method to increase the utilization of schools. x Grade Level Organization: Various grade level configurations are examined to reduce capacity. Presently we have one primary school with grade levels of K-3. Some elementary schools are utilizing off campus annexes as temporary facilities while permanent capacity is being built. At one high school an off campus ninth grade center has been implemented. x Block Scheduling: Broward County Schools have been in the forefront of implementing and evaluating block scheduling. Broward County Schools utilize block schedules at several schools. x High School Options: Dual enrollment gives high school juniors and seniors the opportunity to take college level courses and receive credits towards high school graduation. If a student qualifies for this it can free up capacity while benefiting student achievement. The early admissions and 18 credit diploma option allows for high school students to apply for early graduation, which will also relieve enrollment at our high schools. x Other Alternatives: Broward County Schools has also been using creative alternative methods to assist in distributing the student population by allowing parents and students the choice of school assignment. Some examples are: o Magnet Schools: The District offers magnet programs in several locations largely in schools where space is available. These programs offer a thematic educational program; which entices students/parents to choose a school and fill available seats. They have been a popular choice alternative option. o Charter Schools: The District has led the state in the number of students attending charter schools. During the 1999-00 school year 3,873 students attended charter schools. Since that time charter school enrollment has increased an additional 12,227 students, enrolling a total of 16,100 students during the 2006-07 school year. Six more charters are expected to open for the 2007-08 school year and provide parents additional choice. City of Oakland Park Public School Facilities Comprehensive Plan, Volume II February 2008 10-10 Table 10-2: Charter Schools Serving Elementary, Middle and High School Students Charters Serving Elementary School Students Charters Serving Middle School Students: Charters Serving High School Students: Advantage Academy Broward (New) Ben Gamla Charter (New) Broward Community Charter Broward Community Charter West Central Charter School Chancellor at North Lauderdale Elementary Chancellor at Weston Charter Institute Training Center Charter Institute Training Center Annex Charter School of Excellence Dayspring Elementary Charter (New) Eagles Nest Excelsior Charter of Broward Florida Intercultural Hollywood Academy North Broward Academy of Excellence Paragon Elementary City of Pembroke Pines Charter Elementary - Central Campus City of Pembroke Pines Charter Elementary - East Campus City of Pembroke Pines - Forman Campus City of Pembroke Pines Charter Elementary - West Campus Somerset Academy Somerset Academy Davie Somerset at Miramar Somerset Neighborhood Sunrise Community Charter Sunshine Academy Davie West Sunshine Elementary Charter Susy Daniels Ben Gamla Charter (New) Broward Community Charter Chancellor at North Lauderdale Middle City of Coral Springs Charter Discovery Middle Charter (New) Downtown Academy of Technology & Arts Eagle Academy Eagles Nest Florida Intercultural (New) Hollywood Academy International School of Broward (New) North Broward Academy of Excellence Paragon Academy City of Pembroke Pines Charter Middle - Central Campus City of Pembroke Pines - Forman Campus City of Pembroke Pines Charter Middle - West Campus Pompano Charter Somerset Academy Middle Somerset at Miramar Smart School Middle Sunshine Academy Touchdowns4Life City of Coral Springs Charter International School of Broward (New) Life Skills North Lauderdale Academy Parkway Academy City of Pembroke Pines Charter High Smart School Institute Somerset Academy High Somerset Conservatory Source: School Board of Broward County, 2007 Need to Support Public Facilities for Existing and Future Schools Public & Private Partnerships The Broward County Public Schools understands how essential community involvement is to the success of its students. Developing partnerships with private as well as public entities helps to insure that the entire community becomes a part of and enhances the educational process for both K-12 and adult students. The school system has identified community involvement as one of the key areas within the school system's strategic plan. The district believes that community involvement is vital to student achievement. The district's has more than 45,400 volunteers and 2350 school level partners that support Broward Schools. Broward County Public Schools has launched the Speakers Bureau offering businesses, community groups and organizations the opportunity to have education City of Oakland Park Public School Facilities Comprehensive Plan, Volume II February 2008 10-11 experts speak about Broward County Public Schools. The Speakers Bureau is a component of the District’s Strategic Communications Plan. It is designed to facilitate an understanding of the purpose, structures and effectiveness of Broward County Public Schools. This outreach project will increase the dissemination of positive information about the District and enhance relations with the community. The Speakers Bureau takes the dissemination of information to a personal level that allows discussion and encourages community input. The district also coordinates educational programs with the Museum of Discovery and Science, the Broward County Library System, as well as Broward County and local parks and recreation departments. Student Enrichment in the Arts (SEAS) The Student Enrichment in the Arts (SEAS) program was formed from collaboration between Broward County Public Schools and the Broward Center for the Performing Arts in March 1990. According to the partnership, the school system has a forty-year rent-free lease, which includes exclusive use of the Broward Center Amaturo Theater during the day throughout the school year. The SEAS program offers a different style of learning by integrating theatrical performances, such as music, dance and drama into the students’ education. Since inception of the program, over 1.7 million students have attended. The Broward County Public School system and the Broward Center for the Performing Arts continue to be on the cutting edge of education. To complement SEAS, the Reading Residency program was designed to improve reading and verbal understanding for economically disadvantaged students. Population and Housing Conditions Population Growth in Broward County As displayed in Table 10-3 below, Broward County has experienced significant population growth since 1970. In 1970 Broward County had a population of 620,100 and in 2005 the population was 1,765,855, a growth of almost 285%. Though the County is approaching “build-out”, expectations are that growth will continue. The future pace of growth will be less than in past years, both in terms of percentage and in absolute growth as Broward makes the transition from large tracts of “Greenfield” development to “redevelopment”. At the same time the demographics of the population will continue to change. A larger percentage of growth will come as result of in-migration from abroad. Generally, migrants are younger and less likely to have a family. The “Median Age” and “% 65 or over” columns are indicators of this change. Broward’s median age increased as it became home to larger numbers of retirees during the 1970’s and early 1980’s. Since that time, the median age decreased and is expected to continue to do so. The population ages 65 or greater peaked in the early 1980’s with 22%; but, as international migration to Broward increases that percentage drops City of Oakland Park Public School Facilities Comprehensive Plan, Volume II February 2008 10-12 significantly to 14% in 2005. At 13% of the total in 2010, it approaches its lowest level since 1960, before the migration of the retirees. Table 10-3: Population Broward County 1970-2015 School Age Population As with population growth in general, Broward’s school age population has experienced considerable growth since 1970. In some ways it reflects the overall demographics of the population growth. The influx of retirees through the early 1980’s caused a drop in the Kindergarten through 12th Grade population to decrease by more than 5% of the total. The decline continued into 1990; but, by 2000 the K-12 population’s percentage of the total increased. As the population grows larger the K-12 population is expected to stabilize at around 19% of the total population through 2015. By 2015, the school age population (elementary through high school) will have grown by 30%. Most of the growth will occur in the elementary and middle school age groups as the younger in-migrating population begins establishing families. The Higher Education-age group grows more rapidly in the short-term and by 2015 is nearly 70% larger. More than anything, this large growth reflects a lower than average 2000 count of population for this age group in conjunction with the younger, international migration. According to the American Community Survey for 2005, this is happening in Broward County (though to a lesser degree than displayed by the Broward County Population Forecasting Model); a change that is consistent with neighboring counties and with the State of Florida as a whole. Year Total Preceding Years' Average Annual Change Median Age % 18 or Under % 65 or over Percent Population 1970 620,100 8.6% 28,615 38.7 29% 18% 1980 1,018,257 6.4% 39,816 38.7 22% 22% 1990 1,255,531 2.3% 23,727 37.8 21% 21% 2000 1,623,018 2.9% 36,749 37.8 24% 16% 2005 1,765,855 0.9% 14,284 36.5 26% 14% 2010 1,905,271 0.8% 13,942 36.0 26% 13% 2015 2,038,381 0.7% 13,311 35.8 26% 14% Note: Populations for years 2005, 2010, and 2015 are taken from the Broward County Population Forecasting Model, 2005 City of Oakland Park Public School Facilities Comprehensive Plan, Volume II February 2008 10-13 Table 10-4: School Age Population Broward County, 1970-2015 Year School Age Population Percent of Total Population K-12 Higher Ed. Total K-12 Higher Ed. Total 1970 141,289 43,859 185,148 22.8% 7.1% 29.9% 1980 175,546 86,963 262,509 17.2% 8.5% 25.8% 1990 190,563 89,584 280,147 15.1% 7.1% 22.3% 2000 298,243 99,026 397,269 18.4% 6.1% 24.5% 2005 329,696 139,243 468,939 18.7% 7.9% 26.6% 2010 361,604 158,247 519,851 19.0% 8.3% 27.3% 2015 392,304 166,471 558,775 19.2% 8.2% 27.4% Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, Decennial Census for years 1970, 1980, 1990, and 2000 Broward County Population Forecasting Model for years 2005, 2010 and 2015 Note: All populations are for April 1. K-12 is the population ages 5 through 18, Higher Education population consists of 19 through 24 Housing Characteristics While Broward’s housing inventory once was dominated by the single-family, detached home; that no longer is the case. The housing industry responded to the influx of retirees during the 1970’s and 1980’s by building large numbers of multi-family condominiums and apartments. Between 1970 and 1990, single family homes grew by nearly 88,000. During that same time period, multi-family homes grew by 264,000 units (averaging 13,000 per year). Expansion in the southwest and northwest portions of Broward brought about an increased emphasis on single-family homes. They increased by nearly as much during the decade of the 1990’s as they did for the twenty years prior. Still, there are 33% more multi- family units than single-family. Despite the changes in housing unit type, the percentage of owner-occupied units remains relatively stable at between 68% and 72.8%. As more multi-family homes are built, the tendency has been for the percentage of renter to increase; but, only slightly. Reported vacancy rates are influenced primarily by the number of seasonally-occupied units and magnitude of current residential construction. Because Broward has been a destination for many seasonal residents and these units have been counted as vacant regardless of the actual status, the vacancy rate is higher in Broward than is traditionally thought of as acceptable. Also keeping the vacancy rate high is the U.S. Bureau of the Census practice of counting incomplete homes as vacant. At times of elevated building activity with significant numbers of units nearing completion, the Bureau may count them as vacant even though they are not yet ready for occupation. Both these influences on vacancy rates are expected decrease; costs of maintaining seasonal units are beyond what many could previously afford and future residential construction will seldom reach the level of activity experienced during the previous decades. City of Oakland Park Public School Facilities Comprehensive Plan, Volume II February 2008 10-14 Table 10-5: Housing Characteristics Broward County, 1970-2005 Year Total Units Single Family % Single Family Multi- Family Other Owner Occupied Renter Occupied % Vacant % Owner Occupied 1970 253,325 149,447 59.0% 94,017 9,861 161,962 60,601 12.1% 72.8% 1980 477,468 202,898 42.5% 258,987 15,583 299,730 117,787 12.6% 71.8% 1990 628,660 236,321 37.6% 358,665 33,674 359,570 168,872 15.9% 68.0% 2000 741,043 303,357 40.9% 409,756 27,930 454,750 199,695 11.7% 69.5% 2005 790,308 329,142 41.6% 436,313 24,853 481,133 206,198 13.0% 70.0% Source: 2005 American Community Survey, U.S. Bureau of the Census All other years U.S. Bureau of the Census, Decennial Census Development Trends As Broward County approaches “build-out” while still feeling the pressure of population growth; new residential construction will be predominantly multi-family. Table 10-6 on the following page depicts forecasted Certificates of Occupancy, prepared by applying housing unit growth rates to municipally-provided data on unit type, shows that approximately 90% of dwelling unit growth will be multi-family. While the actual numbers will deviate from this, the general trend will apply. Most new units will be in the form of “redevelopment”; attempting to maximize the number of households accommodated and, at the same time, attempting to minimize the costs of construction. Table 10-6: Residential Building Permits Issued by Type 2005-2015 Year, Beginning April 1st Residential Certificates of Occupancy Single Family Multi- Family Total Change from Previous Year 2005 1,137 3,568 4,705 N/A 2006 1,646 4,658 6,304 1599 2007 685 5,865 6,550 246 2008 575 5,974 6,549 (1) 2009 594 6,027 6,621 72 2010 395 5,918 6,313 (308) 2011 256 6,046 6,302 (11) 2012 343 6,388 6,731 429 2013 326 6,059 6,385 (346) 2014 335 6,226 6,561 176 2015 321 5,977 6,298 (263) Total 6,613 62,706 69,319 Source: Broward County Planning Service Division, 2007 City of Oakland Park Public School Facilities Comprehensive Plan, Volume II February 2008 10-15 Current Profile of Broward County Public Schools Summary Profile of Public Schools in Broward County The numbers of school buildings, student stations and classrooms are reflected in Table 10- 7. The majority of buildings and student stations are utilized for elementary students, 44% and 40% respectively as compared to the total for the School District. Middle Schools have the highest level of relocatable stations (10,468) and high schools have the highest level of relocatabe classrooms (704). As noted in Table 10-8, most of the school facility buildings were constructed in the last 10 years. Map S20 in Volume III depicts the locations of all Public Schools and ancillary locations in Broward County. Table 10-7: Summary Profile of School Capacity School Type Permanent Buildings Relocatable Buildings Permanent Stations Relocatable Stations Permanent Classrooms Relocatable Classrooms Permanent Net Sq. Ft. Relocatable Net Sq. Ft. Elementary 1,182 496 110,664 8,897 6,517 704 14,257,074 430,090 Middle 387 625 57,995 10,468 2,526 479 7,061,352 504,333 High 487 350 75,614 7,900 2,964 534 9,196,602 294,054 Special 74 102 3,703 1,654 263 95 70,9607 89,208 Charter 95 5 18,799 0 801 18 140,7562 15,900 Total 2,225 1,578 266,775 28,919 13,071 1,830 32,632,197 1,333,585 Source: School Board of Broward County, 2007 Table 10-8: Age of School Facility Buildings School Type % of sq.ft. % of sq.ft. % of sq.ft. % of sq.ft. % of sq.ft. % of sq.ft. 1-10 years 11-20 years 21-30 years 31-40 years 41-50 years over 50 years Elementary Schools 32% 40% 4% 15% 8% 1% Middle Schools 32% 33% 4% 23% 7% 1% High Schools 32% 14% 7% 32% 12% 3% Special Schools 18% 15% 28% 23% 15% 1% Charter Schools 77% 7% 9% 7% 0% 0% Source: School Board of Broward County, 2007 Elementary Schools There are 138 public elementary schools in Broward County as of 2006. The School Board plans to open ten (10) elementary schools within the next five years. A profile of the existing schools is depicted in Table 10-9. Elementary school locations and attendance zones/ concurrency service areas (CSAs) are illustrated in Map S20.Elementary school enrollment for 2006/2007 was 112,789 students. There are 47 elementary schools with enrollment greater than 110% of their permanent FISH capacity, which is the adopted LOS standard (LOS). For the 2006/2007 school year, this translates into 34% of elementary schools in Broward County not meeting the LOS. City of Oakland Park Public School Facilities Comprehensive Plan, Volume II February 2008 10-16 Middle Schools There are 42 public middle schools in Broward County as of 2006. The School Board plans to open three (3) middle schools within the next five years. A profile of these schools is shown by Table 10-10. Middle school locations and attendance zones/ concurrency service areas (CSAs) are illustrated in Map S20. Middle school enrollment for 2006/2007 was 61,924 students. There are 15 middle schools with enrollment greater than 110% of their permanent FISH capacity, which is the adopted LOS standard (LOS). For the 2006/2007 school year, this translates into 36% of middle schools in Broward County not meeting the LOS. High Schools There are 31 public high schools in Broward County as of 2006. The School Board plans to open two (2) new high schools within the next 5 years. A profile of these schools is shown by Table 10-11. High school locations and attendance zones/ concurrency service areas (CSAs) are illustrated in Map S20. High school enrollment for 2006/2007 was 70,917 students. There are 8 high schools with enrollment greater than 110% of their permanent FISH capacity, which is the adopted LOS standard (LOS). For the 2006/2007 school year, this translates into 26% of high schools in Broward County not meeting the LOS. Charter Schools There are 47 charter schools operating in Broward County as of 2006/2007. It is anticipated six (6) additional charter schools will open in the near future. The profiles of these schools are shown in Table 10-12. Charter school locations are illustrated in Map S20. They have a district-wide attendance zone/concurrency service area, which means their LOS is measured on a county-wide basis. Charter school enrollment for 2006/2007 was 15,922 students. There was only one charter school with enrollment greater than their permanent FISH capacity. For the 2006/2007 school year, this translates into just 2% of charter schools not meeting their LOS. Special Schools There are 20 special schools in Broward County as of 2006/2007. Special schools are comprised of vocational and educational centers. There are no additional special schools planned in the near future. A profile of these schools is shown by Table 10-13. Special school locations are illustrated in Map S20. Similar to charter schools, special schools also have a district-wide attendance zone/concurrency service area. Current City of Oakland Park Public School Facilities Comprehensive Plan, Volume II February 2008 10-17 enrollment for 2006/2007 for the Broward County special schools is 1,811. Of the 20 special schools in Broward County, 5 had enrollment greater than their permanent FISH capacity. For the 2006/2007 school year, this translates into 25% of special schools not meeting their LOS. Ancillary Facilities Ancillary facilities provide general support for the operation of the district, not related to individual schools. There are 27 ancillary facilities in Broward County. Locations of these facilities are list in Table 10-14 and illustrated in Map S20. City of Oakland Park Public School Facilities Comprehensive Plan, Volume II February 2008 10-18 Table 10-9: Current Profile- Broward County Elementary Schools 2006/2007 Facility NameSiteSize(Acres) Age Range Permanent Buildings Relocatable Buildings Current Enrollment(20 Day) 100% Perm. FISH(Student Capacity) LOS(110% of FISH)% of CapacityAtlantic West Elementary 81974-2004 6 13 964 759 2 127.0%Banyan Elementary 10 1980-2004 3 15 958 747 2 128.2%Bayview Elementary 21958-2000 4 0 523 500 1 104.6%Bennett Elementary 81952-2003 11 0 453 542 1 83.6%Bethune, Mary Elementary 18 1961-2006 12 19 753 1,144 1 65.8%Boulevard Heights Elementary 10 1961-2003 13 0 884 821 1 107.7%Broadview Elementary 10 1965-2006 7 9 877 926 1 94.7%Broward Estates Elementary 10 1957-2004 17 7 693 691 1 100.3%Castle Hill Annex 31965-1965 1 0 0 398 n/a 0.0%Castle Hill Elementary 91969-2001 7 22 786 533 2 147.5%Central Park Elementary 13 1990-2004 10 10 1,178 939 2 125.5%Challenger Elementary 82000-2004 3 8 1,215 1,000 2 121.5%Chapel Trail Elementary 10 1994-2003 7 6 1,153 1,054 1 109.4%Coconut Creek Elementary 10 1969-2002 6 3 888 755 2 117.6%Coconut Palm Elementary 12 2000-2000 2 13 1,071 820 2 130.6%Colbert Elementary 10 1952-2007 12 18 664 1,030 1 64.5%Collins Elementary 10 1957-2005 13 2 361 371 1 97.3%Cooper City Elementary 10 1970-2006 4 10 945 701 2 134.8%Coral Cove Elementary 12 2004-2004 2 0 871 830 1 104.9%Coral Park Elementary 11 1989-2004 12 9 692 615 2 112.5%Coral Springs Elementary 10 1974-2006 7 2 807 925 1 87.2%Country Hills Elementary 15 1990-2004 10 15 988 849 2 116.4%Country Isles Elementary 91987-2004 13 6 993 980 1 101.3%Cresthaven Elementary 10 1992-2004 8 0 682 705 1 96.7%Croissant Park Elementary 12 1992-2003 8 2 672 802 1 83.8%Cypress Elementary 13 1969-2006 10 2 759 873 1 86.9%Dania Elementary 71962-1992 10 7 533 569 1 93.7%Davie Elementary 14 1977-2003 7 6 927 741 2 125.1%Deerfield Beach Elementary 14 1927-2000 12 1 807 717 2 112.6% City of Oakland Park Public School Facilities Comprehensive Plan, Volume II February 2008 10-19 Facility NameSiteSize(Acres) Age Range Permanent Buildings Relocatable Buildings Current Enrollment(20 Day) 100% Perm. FISH(Student Capacity) LOS(110% of FISH)% of CapacityDeerfield Park Elementary 11 1978-2002 9 0 655 787 1 83.2%Dillard Elementary 10 1994-1994 7 0 802 751 1 106.8%Dolphin Bay Elementary 12 2005-2005 3 0 574 830 1 69.2%Drew Elementary 15 1990-1990 9 0 609 579 1 105.2%Driftwood Elementary 10 1960-2002 13 13 717 558 2 128.5%Eagle Point Elementary 12 1994-2006 8 4 1,265 1,246 1 101.5%Eagle Ridge Elementary 12 1991-1994 7 0 931 872 1 106.8%Embassy Creek Elementary 14 1991-2002 7 0 852 745 2 114.4%Endeavour Primary Learning Center 12 2002-2002 2 2 477 468 1 101.9%Everglades Elementary 10 1998-2005 4 8 1,063 1,060 1 100.3%Fairway Elementary 11 1968-2005 11 0 956 970 1 98.6%Flamingo Elementary 14 1975-2005 5 9 829 631 2 131.4%Floranada Elementary 11 1999-1999 2 0 721 814 1 88.6%Forest Hills Elementary 81975-2004 4 2 682 795 1 85.8%Foster, Stephen Elementary 91962-1995 15 9 665 503 2 132.2%Fox Trail Elementary 26 1997-2004 4 7 1,228 1,178 1 104.2%Gator Run Elementary 12 1998-2004 3 16 1,272 1,140 2 111.6%Griffin Elementary 10 1979-1991 4 1 601 615 1 97.7%Hallandale Elementary 12 2003-2003 3 1 1,228 812 2 151.2%Harbordale Elementary 41959-2006 15 2 359 380 1 94.5%Hawkes Bluff Elementary 12 1990-2006 11 11 1,004 852 2 117.8%Hollywood Central Elementary 71992-1995 9 1 685 687 1 99.7%Hollywood Hills Elementary 12 1959-2006 9 19 831 927 1 89.6%Hollywood Park Elementary 12 1969-1991 4 0 557 593 1 93.9%Horizon Elementary 81974-2001 6 9 889 663 2 134.1%Hunt, James Elementary 13 1973-2004 6 0 943 841 2 112.1%Indian Trace Elementary 12 1990-1990 9 10 761 669 2 113.8%King, Martin Luther Elementary 11 1968-2005 8 4 563 809 1 69.6%Lake Forest Elementary 11 1961-2006 10 9 941 732 2 128.6% City of Oakland Park Public School Facilities Comprehensive Plan, Volume II February 2008 10-20 Facility NameSiteSize(Acres) Age Range Permanent Buildings Relocatable Buildings Current Enrollment(20 Day) 100% Perm. FISH(Student Capacity) LOS(110% of FISH)% of CapacityLakeside Elementary 12 1997-2001 3 3 958 734 2 130.5%Larkdale Elementary 10 1961-1993 14 6 482 623 1 77.4%Lauderdale Manors Elementary 13 1954-2004 13 4 620 754 1 82.2%Lauderhill, Paul Turner Elementary 11 1995-1995 6 0 718 872 1 82.3%Liberty Elementary 12 2001-2004 3 0 1,123 1,260 1 89.1%Lloyd Estates Elementary 71968-2001 7 9 513 593 1 86.5%Manatee Bay Elementary 72001-2004 3 5 1,363 1,140 2 119.6%Maplewood Elementary 11 1980-2004 7 8 852 843 1 101.1%Margate Elementary 91962-2006 17 1 1,028 1,305 1 78.8%Markham, Robert C Elementary 91967-2004 11 4 579 637 1 90.9%Marshall, Thurgood Elementary 81991-2002 7 0 552 745 1 74.1%McNab Elementary 10 1993-2002 8 0 747 713 1 104.8%Meadowbrook Elementary 15 1958-2006 15 15 633 706 1 89.7%Miramar Elementary 10 1991-2004 7 1 850 947 1 89.8%Mirror Lake Elementary 13 1969-2002 9 7 615 625 1 98.4%Morrow Elementary 10 1976-2004 6 2 671 795 1 84.4%Nob Hill Elementary 81975-2004 4 7 821 723 2 113.6%Norcrest Elementary 10 1958-2000 13 0 707 1,032 1 68.5%North Andrews Gardens Elementary 10 1996-2006 8 0 763 874 1 87.3%North Fork Elementary 10 1965-2007 10 3 584 731 1 79.9%North Lauderdale Elementary 13 1974-2006 7 0 971 988 1 98.3%North Side Elementary 31927-2001 8 0 526 608 1 86.5%Nova, Blanche Forman Elementary 10 1965-2003 6 6 819 774 1 105.8%Nova, Eisenhower D D Elementary 10 1969-2003 8 0 846 777 1 108.9%Oakland Park Elementary 71927-2004 13 0 656 828 1 79.2%Oakridge Elementary 81959-1993 13 6 787 605 2 130.1% City of Oakland Park Public School Facilities Comprehensive Plan, Volume II February 2008 10-21 Facility NameSiteSize(Acres) Age Range Permanent Buildings Relocatable Buildings Current Enrollment(20 Day) 100% Perm. FISH(Student Capacity) LOS(110% of FISH)% of CapacityOrange Brook Elementary 92006-2006 2 4 763 830 1 91.9%Oriole Elementary 91971-2001 4 2 771 722 1 106.8%Palm Cove Elementary 12 1992-2005 10 9 1,031 889 2 116.0%Palmview Elementary 10 1969-2004 7 3 671 657 1 102.1%Panther Run Elementary 12 1997-1997 2 1 791 814 1 97.2%Park Lakes Elementary 15 2000-2006 6 5 1,149 1,474 1 78.0%Park Ridge Elementary 10 1972-2001 6 5 503 546 1 92.1%Park Springs Elementary 12 1990-2004 10 0 953 1,201 1 79.4%Park Trails Elementary 12 2000-2005 4 0 1,328 1,276 1 104.1%Parkside Elementary 10 1999-1999 2 2 869 820 1 106.0%Pasadena Lakes Elementary 10 1971-2004 8 7 818 739 2 110.7%Pembroke Lakes Elementary 81976-1990 4 4 772 653 2 118.2%Pembroke Pines Elementary 91965-1999 6 6 664 527 2 126.0%Perry, Annabel C Elementary 10 1969-2005 10 9 740 917 1 80.7%Peters Elementary 11 1958-1992 19 21 677 647 1 104.6%Pines Lakes Elementary 10 1979-2002 6 4 837 705 2 118.7%Pinewood Elementary 10 1979-2001 7 9 954 854 2 111.7%Plantation Elementary 12 1999-1999 2 0 761 814 1 93.5%Plantation Park Elementary 10 1967-2002 5 0 545 597 1 91.3%Pompano Beach Elementary 19 1992-1992 9 2 643 571 2 112.6%Quiet Waters Elementary 18 1990-2004 12 17 1,226 904 2 135.6%Ramblewood Elementary 10 1977-2004 5 20 974 985 1 98.9%Riverglades Elementary 10 1991-1991 6 8 920 669 2 137.5%Riverland Elementary 10 1991-2006 7 6 636 633 1 100.5%Riverside Elementary 10 1987-2001 12 0 860 731 2 117.6%Rock Island Elementary 14 2001-2001 2 0 604 580 1 104.1%Royal Palm Elementary 12 1971-2004 10 8 897 892 1 100.6%Sanders Park Elementary 12 1965-2004 9 7 528 661 1 79.9%Sandpiper Elementary 14 1989-2006 12 7 895 909 1 98.5%Sawgrass Elementary 12 1993-2004 8 0 992 1,184 1 83.8% City of Oakland Park Public School Facilities Comprehensive Plan, Volume II February 2008 10-22 Facility NameSiteSize(Acres) Age Range Permanent Buildings Relocatable Buildings Current Enrollment(20 Day) 100% Perm. FISH(Student Capacity) LOS(110% of FISH)% of CapacitySea Castle Elementary 12 1990-2004 11 1 1,043 1,091 1 95.6%Sheridan Hills Elementary 71971-2001 6 0 651 607 1 107.2%Sheridan Park Elementary 13 1966-2004 6 8 741 810 1 91.5%Silver Lakes Elementary 12 1997-1997 2 5 882 778 2 113.4%Silver Palms Elementary 14 1995-2001 3 6 1,014 806 2 125.8%Silver Ridge Elementary 13 1989-2004 13 9 1,040 882 2 117.9%Silver Shores Elementary 12 2002-2003 3 0 739 820 1 90.1%Stirling Elementary 91991-2004 6 2 719 701 1 102.6%Sunland Park Elementary 41992-1994 3 1 486 517 1 94.0%Sunset Lakes Elementary 12 2002-2002 3 0 1,057 820 2 128.9%Sunshine Elementary 91964-2002 15 3 942 803 2 117.3%Tamarac Elementary 81974-2004 7 0 1,122 1,324 1 84.7%Tedder Elementary 91964-2004 14 8 675 1,232 1 54.8%Tradewinds Elementary 17 1995-1995 2 17 1,073 746 2 143.8%Tropical Elementary 10 1971-2001 5 6 840 709 2 118.5%Village Elementary 12 1968-2005 13 9 928 816 2 113.7%Walker Elementary 10 1959-2006 7 5 783 1,026 1 76.3%Watkins Elementary 10 1995-1995 2 3 751 814 1 92.3%Welleby Elementary 13 1991-2004 7 8 865 809 1 106.9%West Hollywood Elementary 11 1991-1991 5 5 748 597 2 125.3%Westchester Elementary 10 1976-2004 11 8 1,083 1,074 1 100.8%Westwood Heights Elementary 91958-1997 11 4 778 773 1 100.6%Wilton Manors Elementary 81995-1998 5 0 601 615 1 97.7%Winston Park Elementary 12 1990-2004 13 0 1,172 1,191 1 98.4%Young, Virginia Shuman Elementary 81993-1993 7 0 743 669 2 111.1%Total 1,493 1,062 703 112,789 111,507 Source: School Board of Broward County, 2007 City of Oakland Park Public School Facilities Comprehensive Plan, Volume II February 2008 10-23 Table 10-10: Current Profile - Broward County Middle Schools 2006/2007 Facility Name SiteSizeAcres Age Permanent Buildings Relocatable Buildings Current Enrollment(20 Day 100% of Perm. FISH (Student Capacity) LOS(110% of FISH)% of Capacity Apollo Middle 15 1969-1994 7 29 1,253 923 2 135.8% Arthur R. Ashe, Jr Middle 24 2001-2001 2 0 877 1,050 1 83.5% Attucks Middle 24 1960-1997 8 0 991 1,246 1 79.5% Bair Middle 10 1975-1993 4 16 1,194 1,238 1 96.4% Coral Springs Middle 19 1975-2005 4 0 1,337 1,957 1 68.3% Crystal Lake Middle 14 1971-2002 4 15 1,482 1,342 2 110.4% Dandy, William Middle 19 1991-1995 19 8 1,337 1,131 2 118.2% Deerfield Beach Middle 32 1960-2003 11 12 1,437 1,442 1 99.7% Driftwood Middle 22 1961-2005 17 9 1,572 1,669 1 94.2% Falcon Cove Middle 21 1999-1999 2 39 2,245 1,343 2 167.2% Forest Glen Middle 20 1990-2004 19 9 1,447 1,645 1 88.0% Glades Middle 20 2006-2006 4 0 1,697 1,897 1 89.5% Gulfstream Middle 71959-2002 16 17 291 634 1 45.9% Indian Ridge Middle 26 1995-2005 5 28 2,122 1,727 2 122.9% Lauderdale Lakes Middle 14 1969-1976 4 16 1,043 900 2 115.9% Lauderhill Middle 22 1969-1995 7 9 830 983 1 84.4% Lyons Creek Middle 22 1999-2006 3 14 1,989 1,858 1 107.1% Margate Middle 23 1966-1990 9 6 1,216 1,333 1 91.2% McNicol Middle 12 1997-1997 2 0 1,115 1,314 1 84.9% Millennium Middle 11 2001-2006 5 0 1,451 1,618 1 89.7% New Renaissance Middle 20 1999-1999 4 0 1,809 1,467 2 123.3% New River Middle 18 1995-1995 3 6 1,479 1,383 1 106.9% Nova Middle 14 1962-1999 11 21 1,209 875 2 138.2% Olsen Middle 20 1954-1991 28 0 1,308 1,696 1 77.1% Parkway Middle 15 1958-1997 25 15 1,337 1,667 1 80.2% Perry, Henry D Middle 20 1990-1990 6 9 1,211 1,175 1 103.1% Pines Middle 21 1993-2005 3 29 1,343 1,769 1 75.9% Pioneer Middle 16 1975-1991 5 14 1,674 1,175 2 142.5% Plantation Middle 22 1969-2004 5 9 1,107 1,385 1 79.9% Pompano Beach Middle 12 1964-1976 8 10 1,070 937 2 114.2% City of Oakland Park Public School Facilities Comprehensive Plan, Volume II February 2008 10-24 Facility Name SiteSizeAcres Age Permanent Buildings Relocatable Buildings Current Enrollment(20 Day 100% of Perm. FISH (Student Capacity) LOS(110% of FISH)% of Capacity Ramblewood Middle 17 1976-2004 4 20 1,282 1,305 1 98.2% Rickards, James Middle 13 1968-2004 5 13 1,030 1,068 1 96.4% Sawgrass Springs Middle 20 1995-1998 7 14 1,387 1,215 2 114.2% Seminole Middle 21 1958-2001 7 11 1,286 1,085 2 118.5% Silver Lakes Middle 20 1983-2002 16 11 1,036 1,095 1 94.6% Silver Trail Middle 22 1995-1995 3 30 1,785 1,430 2 124.8% Sunrise Middle 18 1991-1999 15 8 1,270 1,202 1 105.7% Tequesta Trace Middle 23 1990-2006 19 15 1,639 1,382 2 118.6% Westglades Middle 24 2001-2001 4 0 1,445 1,458 1 99.1% Westpine Middle 18 1990-2006 19 9 1,417 1,330 1 106.5% Young, Walter C Middle 30 1987-2006 16 30 1,874 1,421 2 131.9% Total 781 367 501 61,924 54,770 Source: School Board of Broward County, 2007 City of Oakland Park Public School Facilities Comprehensive Plan, Volume II February 2008 10-25 Table 10-11: Current Profile - Broward County High Schools 2006/2007 Facility Name Site SizeAcres Age Range Permanent Buildings Relocatable Buildings CurrentEnrollment(20 Day 100% Perm.FISH (Student Capacity) LOS(110% of FISH)% of Capacity Anderson, Boyd High 32 1972-2001 13 5 2,656 2,851 1 93.2%Atlantic Tech. (Bldg 24) N/A2004-2004 1 N/A 578 546 1 106.0%Coconut Creek High 40 1964-2000 12 34 2,600 2,186 2 118.9%College Academy @ BCC N/AN/AN/A N/A 325 N/A N/A N/ACooper City High 30 1971-2006 30 20 2,393 2,677 1 89.4%Coral Glades High 45 2003-2005 4 0 2,459 2,723 1 90.3%Coral Springs High 37 1975-2005 8 13 2,488 2,993 1 83.1%Cypress Bay High 45 2001-2004 9 131 5,330 3,396 2 156.9%Deerfield Beach High 41 1969-2003 15 22 2,286 2,434 1 93.9%Dillard High 51 1959-2001 14 0 2,209 2,822 1 78.3%Ely, Blanche High 34 1952-2002 25 7 2,240 2,842 1 78.8%Everglades High 45 2002-2002 4 22 3,701 2,539 2 145.8%Flanagan, Charles W High 45 1995-1995 11 31 3,063 2,384 2 128.5%Fort Lauderdale High 27 1958-2007 16 16 1,654 2,741 1 60.3%Hallandale High 28 1976-1976 5 1 1,534 1,722 1 89.1%Hollywood Hills High 30 1968-2007 8 25 2,174 2,328 1 93.4%McArthur High 40 1958-2002 30 5 2,546 2,302 2 110.6%McFatter Technical N/A1997-1997 1 N/A 577 546 1 106.0%Miramar High 38 1969-2005 13 30 3,133 2,651 2 118.2%Monarch High 55 2002-2005 5 10 2,133 2,208 1 96.6%Northeast High 52 1958-2004 28 3 2,046 2,442 1 83.8%Nova High 51 1962-2003 26 15 2,127 1,630 2 130.5%Piper High 30 1971-2002 17 45 2,825 2,698 1 104.7%Plantation High 35 1963-2006 25 29 2,667 2,732 1 97.6%Pompano Beach Inst. Int'l Studies 18 1952-2002 17 0 1,199 1,260 1 95.2%South Broward High 25 1947-2001 27 0 2,410 2,373 1 101.6%South Plantation High 32 1969-2006 15 9 2,589 2,482 1 104.3%Stoneman Douglas High 45 1990-2001 12 44 3,054 2,360 2 129.4%Stranahan High 38 1951-2004 27 9 1,935 2,486 1 77.8%Taravella, J P High 31 1980-2005 10 18 2,961 3,488 1 84.9%Western High 40 1979-2006 11 30 2,505 2,438 1 102.7%Total 1060 439 574 72,072 71,280 Source: School Board of Broward County, 2007 City of Oakland Park Public School Facilities Comprehensive Plan, Volume II February 2008 10-26 Table 10-12: Current Profile – Broward County Charter Schools 2006/ 2007 Facility Name & Location Capacity CurrentEnrollment 2006/07 Surplus orDeficitCapacity ProjectedEnrollment 2011/12 Broward Community Charter West 11401 NW 56th Drive, Coral Springs 274 252 22 274 Broward Community Charter Elementary 201 University Drive, Coral Springs 151 151 0 360 Broward Community Charter Middle 201 University Drive, Coral Springs 66 42 24 198 Central Charter School4525 N SR 7, North Lauderdale 570 550 20 570 Chancellor Charter at North Lauderdale Elementary 1395 S SR 7, North Lauderdale 525 504 21 525 Chancellor Charter at North Lauderdale Middle 1395 S SR 7, North Lauderdale 225 199 26 225 Charter School of Excellence 1217 SE 3 Ave, Fort Lauderdale 314 311 3 311 City of Coral Springs Charter School 3205 N University Drive, Coral Springs 1,600 1,606 (6) 1,610 Downtown Academy of Technology and Arts 101 SE 3 Ave, Fort Lauderdale 132 95 37 264 Eagle Academy 3020 NW 33 Ave, Lauderdale Lakes 400 325 75 400 Eagles' Nest Elementary 1840 NE 41st St, Pompano Beach 300 125 175 300 Eagles' Nest Middle 1840 NE 41st St, Pompano Beach 175 90 85 175 Early Beginnings West 3117 SW 13th Court, Fort Lauderdale 18 6 12 36 Charter Institute Annex 5420 N SR 7, North Lauderdale 264 50 214 1,200 Excelsior Charter of Broward 10046 W McNab Rd, Tamarac 108 37 71 108 Florida Intercultural Academy 1704 Buchannan St, Hollywood 300 119 181 300 Hollywood Academy of Arts and Science Elem 1720 Harrison St, Hollywood 450 438 12 650 Hollywood Academy of Arts and Science Middle 1720 Harrison St, Hollywood 225 190 35 450 Chancellor Charter School at Weston 2500 Glades Circle, Weston 1,000 1,000 0 1,000 City of Oakland Park Public School Facilities Comprehensive Plan, Volume II February 2008 10-27 Facility Name & Location Capacity CurrentEnrollment 2006/07 Surplus orDeficitCapacity ProjectedEnrollment 2011/12 Life Skills 2360 W Oakland Park Blvd, Oakland Park 400 315 85 400 North Broward Academy of Excellence Middle 8200 SW 17th St, North Lauderdale 150 130 20 new constrNorth Broward Academy of Excellence Elem 957 SW 71 Ave, North Lauderdale 370 369 1 new constrCity of Pembroke Pines Charter Elem East Campus 10801 Pembroke Road, Pembroke Pines 600 600 0 600 City of Pembroke Pines Charter Middle West 18500 Pembroke Road, Pembroke Pines 600 600 0 600 City of Pembroke Pines Charter High 17189 Sheridan St, Pembroke Pines 1,864 1,700 164 1,800 Paragon Academy of Technology 2210 Pierce St, Hollywood 198 121 77 198 Paragon Elementary 3311 N Andrews EXT, Pompano Beach 232 129 103 232 Parkway Academy 7451 Riviera Blvd, Miramar 550 365 185 525 City of Pembroke Pines Charter Elem Central 12500 Sheridan St, Pembroke Pines 600 599 1 600 City of Pembroke Pines Charter Elem West 1680 SW 184 Ave, Pembroke Pines 600 600 0 600 City of Pembroke Pines Charter Middle Central 12350 Sheridan St, Pembroke Pines 600 598 2 600 Pompano Charter Middle 3311 N Andrews EXT, Pompano Beach 132 35 97 132 Smart School Institute High 3020 NW 33 Ave, Lauderhill 500 405 95 600 Smart School Middle - #5071 3698 NW 15 St, Lauderhill 484 285 199 484 Somerset Academy - Davie #5211 3788 SW Davie Road, Davie 156 144 12 156 Somerset Conservatory 20807 Johnson St, Pembroke Pines 22 20 2 22 Somerset Academy Elem 20803 Johnson St, Pembroke Pines 910 883 27 910 Somerset Academy High School 20801 Johnson St, Pembroke Pines 568 524 44 568 Somerset Academy Middle School 20803 Johnson St, Pembroke Pines 710 653 57 710 City of Oakland Park Public School Facilities Comprehensive Plan, Volume II February 2008 10-28 Facility Name & Location Capacity CurrentEnrollment 2006/07 Surplus orDeficitCapacity ProjectedEnrollment 2011/12 Somerset Academy Miramar Elem 12425 SW 53rd St, Miramar temp 140 temp tempSomerset Academy Miramar Middle 12425 SW 53rd St, Miramar temp 26 temp tempSomerset Neighborhood School 12425 SW 53rd St, Miramar 80 77 3 77 Sunrise Community 7100 Oakland Pp Blvd, Sunrise 350 109 241 350 Sunshine Academy 7130 Pembroke Rd, Miramar 450 75 375 450 Sunshine Elementary 2210 Pierce St, Hollywood 116 60 56 116 Susie Daniel Charter Elementary 2201 SW 42nd Ave, West Park 300 165 135 300Touchdowns 4 Life 10044 W McNab Rd, Tamarac 160 105 55 150 Total 18,799 15,922 3,043 20,136 Source: School Board of Broward County, 2007 City of Oakland Park Public School Facilities Comprehensive Plan, Volume II February 2008 10-29 Table 10-13: Current Profile - Broward County Special Schools 2006/2007 Facility Name Site SizeAcres Age Range Permanent Buildings Relocatable Buildings Current Enrollment(20 Day) 100% of Perm. FISH(Student Capacity) Surplus or (Deficit)Capacity % of CapacityAtlantic Tech Center* 30 1972-2004 24 32 578 546 (32) 105.9%Bright Horizons Center 6 1977-1995 5 0 125 325 200 38.5%Broward Fire Academy 15 1980-2005 5 0 N/A 68 N/A N/A Cross Creek Center 15 1990 6 4 127 132 5 96.2%Cypress Run Alt Excep Center 8 1955 1 29 78 0 N/A N/A Dave Thomas Education Center** 3 1997 1 0 527 330 (197) 159.7%Dave Thomas Education Center-West 10 2003 3 0 N/A 629 N/A N/A Drew, Charles Resource Center 10 1960-1998 12 21 N/A 352 N/A N/A Hallandale Adult Center* 24 1964-2001 19 14 690 1,131 441 61.0%Lanier-James Education Center 5 1960-1986 10 8 219 285 66 76.8%McFatter, William Tech Center* 34 1985-2001 11 1 577 546 (31) 105.7%Old Dillard Community School (Museum) 1 1933 1 0 N/A 0 N/A N/A Pine Ridge Center 5 2005 1 0 89 253 164 35.2%Seagull School 3 1961-2004 4 27 568 538 (30) 105.6%Sheridan Tech Center 18 1967-1987 18 3 51 1,098 1047 4.6%Sunset Learning Center 13 1996 2 0 192 213 21 90.1%The Quest Center 9 1977-1993 4 0 194 303 109 64.0%Whiddon Rogers Ed Center 15 1959-2004 20 0 477 1,645 1168 29.0%Whispering Pines Ex Ed Center 16 1990 7 2 169 132 (37) 128.0%Wingate Oaks Center 20 1974-1991 5 0 71 357 286 19.9%Total 260 159 141 1,811 8,883*Adult enrollment is not reflected **Includes Charles Drew Resource Center, Dave Thos-West Source: School Board of Broward County, 2007 City of Oakland Park Public School Facilities Comprehensive Plan, Volume II February 2008 10-30 Table 10-14: Ancillary Facility InventoryFacility Address CityB.E.C.O.N. 6600 SW Nova Dr DavieCoral Springs Aquatic Ctr 12441 Royal Palm Blvd Coral Springs E.C.I.A / Title 1 701 NW 31 Ave Oakland Park HORTT Admin 1700 SW 14 Ct Fort Lauderdale ITV Relay Hammondville & Turnpike Coconut Creek KC Wright 600 SE 3 Ave Fort Lauderdale KC Wright / HRD 600 SE 3 Ave Fort Lauderdale Lockhart Stadium 5301 NW 12 Ave Fort Lauderdale M.E.T.R.I.C. - Multilingual/ 1441 S Federal Hwy Fort Lauderdale North Area Bus Complex 2200 NW 18 St Pompano Beach North Area Bus Garage 2600 NW 18 Terr Pompano Beach North Area Maint.& Warehouse 6501 NW 15 Ave Fort Lauderdale North Area Superintendent-Pomp. 1400 NE 6 St Pompano Beach North Central Super. Office 7770 W Oakland Park Blvd Sunrise Rock Island Annex (Prof Dev Ctr) 2301 NW 26 St Oakland Park South Area Bus Garage 900 S University Dr Pembroke Pines South Area Maintenance 1295 N 21 Ave Hollywood Pioneer MS Annex 5400 SW 90 Ave Cooper City South Area Portable Annex 201 SW 172 Ave Pembroke Pines South Central Area Super. Office 1619 NE 4 Ave Fort Lauderdale Southwest Area Bus Complex 20251 Stirling Rd Pembroke Pines Tech & Support Srvs 7770 W Oakland Park Blvd Sunrise Twin Lakes Admin 4200 NW 10 Ave Oakland Park Twin Lakes Annex 4140 NW 10 Ave Oakland Park Twin Lakes Warehouse & Transportation 3810 NW 10 Ave Oakland Park West Central Bus Compound 2500 College Ave Davie Edgewood Admin (Whiddon Rogers) 1300 SW 32 Ct Fort Lauderdale Source: School Board of Broward County, 2007 City of Oakland Park Public School Facilities Comprehensive Plan, Volume II February 2008 10-31 Projected 5 Year (S/T) School Enrollment, Capacity, LOS & Improvement Costs The analysis of the current and five (5) year projected data of school facilities is compiled in the Proposed Level of Service Plan (Attachment D) and Table 11 attached as Attachment G. They both represent information for the years 2006/2007 through 2011/2012, except the table contains detail costs associated with capacity improvements. The table shows the current & projected enrollment; permanent Florida Inventory of School Houses (FISH) capacity; Level of Service (LOS) percentage; surplus/deficit capacity to attain the permanent FISH; improvement strategy; the cost; cost per student station; and the school district’s funding source. The current and projected enrollment is shown for each school. Schools are sorted by administrative area (North, North Central, South Central, and South) and by grade level (elementary, middle, and high). The LOS was calculated for each school and for each year of the five year period. The district’s major improvement strategy is to add new schools and additions to the existing schools. Classroom additions are being added to 44 of the district’s 138 elementary schools; 19 of the district’s 42 middle schools; and 9 of the district’s 31 high schools. Using this strategy of adding permanent additions along with the School District’s Policy 5000, the data confirms that the all schools will meet the LOS within the five year planning period. It should be noted that school centers are not listed that is because the enrollment at the centers is relatively constant since the enrollment can be controlled by capping to insure they do not exceed their capacities. Maps S21 through S26 in Volume III depict district level of service analyses for the school years 2007-2008 and 2011-2012. As an improvement strategy to meet the LOS the school district will add a total of 997 classrooms over the five year period (2006/07 - 2011-12) at a cost of an estimated $222 million dollars, averaging approximately $13,100 per student station to be funded from the School District’s Capital Fund. The breakdown by grade level is as follows: School Level Classroom Addition Average Cost per Student Station Elementary 533 $12,635 Middle 254 $11,521 High 210 $15,303 All cost estimates are collected from the School District’s Adopted Educational Facilities Plan (DEFP) 2006-2007 to 2010-2011. They will be updated later this year to reflect the adopted 2007-2008 to 2011-2012 DEFP which was recently adopted on August 1, 2007. Concurrency Costs – Affected Parties The costs associated with achieving and maintaining the LOS during the five (5) year period are paid for and shared by public and private funding sources. Table 10-19 details the primary public and private entities which pay for the capacity improvements. These include; City of Oakland Park Public School Facilities Comprehensive Plan, Volume II February 2008 10-32 Millage - funds collected through property taxes which are the primary revenue source. In addition,Certificates of Participation (COPs) which are similar to tax exempt municipal bonds. These are publicly offered bonds paid back though millage revenue. Public Education and Capital Outlay (PECO) is another source which is a fund allocation by the State. This is the third largest revenue source for the School Board. These are funds based on bonding capacity provided by the State from gross receipts tax. Impact Fees/Mitigation Funds is another source collected from developers to address capacity improvement costs. The cost associated with the capacity additions for those school facilities not currently meeting the LOS are depicted in Table 11 which is attached as Attachment G. The improvement costs are derived from the financially feasible DEFP. There may be additional costs to meet concurrency which are addressed through Proportionate Share Mitigation provisions. These provisions and requirements are outlined in the Interlocal Agreement, specifically, Sections 8.14 and 8.15. Land Area Requirements The estimated land area requirements necessary to support the capacity improvements planned over the five year period 2006/2007 to 2011/2012 for the school district are depicted in Table 10-15 below. The estimated acres needed are calculated using an average acre amount; 11 acres per elementary, 21 acres per middle and 40 acres per high school. Capacity improvements which only involve building additions to existing school sites do not require additional land. Table 10-15: Land Area Requirements School Type Improvement Type # of Improvements Estimated Acres Needed Elementary New school 10 111 Middle New School 3 63 High New School 2 80 Special None 0 0 Total 15 254 Source: School Board of Broward County, 2007 The School Board is developing new “urban school” standards intended to reduce the acreage amounts required to build schools given the diminishing availability of land in Broward County. Student Membership Projection Methodology The School District's primary projection tool for enrollment projections is a geographically based Cohort Survival model, which projects future students by grade. The Cohort Survival method is considered a very reliable procedure and is utilized by the State of Florida in their projections and the U.S. Census Bureau for their projections and reports. The model uses City of Oakland Park Public School Facilities Comprehensive Plan, Volume II February 2008 10-33 an "aging" concept that moves a group or cohort of people into the future and increases or decreases their numbers according to past experience through history. Years of historical student enrollment data is used to create the survival ratio. That ratio is then used to project future students. The survival projection of kindergarten is more speculative and requires a different approach. Kindergarten is projected using a linear regression technique. Simply put, the linear regression is based upon what the numbers have been for the kindergarten population historically and this trend is continued into the future. The student projections by Traffic Analysis Zone (TAZ) or neighborhood from the model are aggregated to individual schools based upon the neighborhoods (TAZs) that are located within school boundaries. This data is then carefully scrutinized. In some instances, individual TAZs are hand corrected to reflect changes in growth which are not picked up in the projection model's histories. These changes are checked and recorded. The overall projections are compared and tested for reasonableness with other models such as the Florida Department of Education (DOE) projections, the Broward County Department of Urban Planning and Redevelopment population projections and the School District Cohort (grade by grade) model which is based upon current and historical 20th day enrollment counts. The Principals' projections are compared as well. Checks of reasonableness are performed on the model output by utilizing other techniques such as a cohort survival of one for a given population, attrition rates, and adding children which are anticipated to be the result of new residential development. District staff continues to gather all information which assists in making projections. For example, each year the planning directors of municipalities in Broward County are contacted to discuss growth in their cities and provide current and forecasted building permits and certificates of occupancy. Staff also talks regularly with developers in the County and growth is monitored through the Facility Management, Planning, and Site Acquisition Department. All of this information is also used in determining the adjustments to the cohort model and as a "check" of the model. At any given time the following factors may have an effect on the projections: 1. changes in the rate of new housing development within the county could lead to "over" projections; 2.changes in the rate of new housing development within the county (i.e. high interest rates or a recession may slow new housing starts and growth) could lead to "over" projections; 3. economic conditions (i.e. the creation of jobs usually means families are moving City of Oakland Park Public School Facilities Comprehensive Plan, Volume II February 2008 10-34 in) this can lead to "under" projections; 4. immigration; and 5. natural phenomena (i.e. Hurricane Andrew) which relocates people very quickly. There are also decisions made within the district, which may have a dramatic affect upon projections. These include: 1. the location and number of bilingual clusters; 2. the location and number of ESE clusters; 3. the start of magnet programs (first year projections are difficult because of the lack of a "track record"); and 4. reassignments - beginning in 1996, the "open door" reassignment policy transfers have had impact the district projections; 5.choice - in addition to reassignments, magnets, and Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP), there are choice areas where students have a choice to attend more than one school; 6.vouchers - these programs allow transfers between schools which can affect projections; 7. Charter schools – opening/closing of charter school facilities throughout the year. In essence, the model derives a growth factor or ratio for student survival to the next grade based upon previous survival numbers to the same grade of students in each Traffic Analysis Zone (TAZ), the basic geographic area for the model. In most cases, TAZs represent neighborhoods. There are over 900 TAZs in Broward County. The permanent FISH capacity data was extracted from the Florida Department of Education facilities and space inventory …FISH. The FISH capacity at each school indicates the current design capacity of the school. The FISH data is updated every time a new addition or major remodeling and renovation takes place at a school. The LOS of each school was determined by taking 110% of the school’s permanent capacity. Projected 10 Year (L/T) School Enrollment, Capacity, LOS & Improvement Costs The long-term planning period for school facilities is ten years. Table 10-16, below, represents capacity needs information for the end of the ten year period through 2016/2017. The data compares the School District’s LOS by grade level and Planning Area to the 2016 – 2017 projected student enrollments and the needed permanent capacity. As mentioned earlier, the LOS is calculated at 110% of permanent FISH capacity. The cumulative information presents a total permanent capacity of 295,518 versus a projected enrollment of City of Oakland Park Public School Facilities Comprehensive Plan, Volume II February 2008 10-35 259,770 or an excess of 35,748 seats. This gap is a result of the projected declining enrollment that is occurring now and is projected to continue. Table 10-16: Projected 10 Year School Facilities by Planning Area and District-Wide Planning Area School Type LOS (110% Perm. Capacity) Projected Enrollment 2016-17 Surplus or (Deficit) Capacity Improvement Strategy Projected Cost Projected Added Capacity Area A Elementary School 16,324 14,317 2,007 None N/A N/A Middle School 8,919 8,212 707 None N/A N/A High School 13,710 11,960 1,750 None N/A N/A Charter N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Special School 0 0 0 None N/A N/A Area B Elementary School 24,244 18,719 5,525 None N/A N/A Middle School 9,581 9,380 201 None N/A N/A High School 12,624 10,024 2,600 None N/A N/A Charter N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Special School 2,158 1,341 817 None N/A N/A Area C Elementary School 19,106 16,485 2,621 None N/A N/A Middle School 9,277 9,374 (97) Classroom Addition $1,500,000 99 High School 10,913 7,858 3,055 None N/A N/A Charter N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Special School 0 0 0 None N/A N/A Area D Elementary School 18,117 16,890 1,227 None N/A N/A Middle School 9,496 9,283 213 None N/A N/A High School 14,903 14,823 80 None N/A N/A Charter N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Special School 278 125 153 None N/A N/A Area E Elementary School 14,143 11,665 2,478 None N/A N/A Middle School 7,559 5,907 1,652 None N/A N/A High School 9,799 5,772 4,027 None N/A N/A Charter N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Special School 3,986 1,657 2,329 None N/A N/A Area F Elementary School 24,415 23,768 646 None N/A N/A Middle School 10,635 12,250 (1,615) New School $50,000,000 1,754 High School 13,587 12,887 700 None N/A N/A Charter N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Special School 145 124 21 None N/A N/A City of Oakland Park Public School Facilities Comprehensive Plan, Volume II February 2008 10-36 Planning Area School Type LOS (110% Perm. Capacity) Projected Enrollment 2016-17 Surplus or (Deficit) Capacity Improvement Strategy Projected Cost Projected Added Capacity Area G Elementary School 19,504 16,795 2,709 None N/A N/A Middle School 8,712 8,134 578 None N/A N/A High School 10,037 10,243 (206) Classroom Addition $2,400,000 200 Charter N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Special School 3,346 1,777 1,569 None N/A N/A District- Wide Elementary School 135,852 118,639 17,213 None N/A N/A Middle School 64,180 62,540 1,640 New School & Addition $51,500,000 1,853 High School 85,572 73,567 12,005 Classroom Addition $2,400,000 200 Charter N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Special School 9,914 5,024 4,890 None N/A N/A Total 295,518 259,770 35,748 $53,900,000 2,053 Source: School Board of Broward County, 2007 There are slight seat deficiencies in Planning Area C in the middle school level capacity and Planning Area G in the high school level. A major deficiency of 1,615 middle school seats is projected to occur in Planning Area F. The range of seat availability by grade level is depicted in Table 10-17 below. Table 10-17: Analysis of Planning Area / Seat Availability School Level Planning Area Seat Availability Range Elementary B 5,525 High F646 Low Middle E 1,652 High F (1,615) Low/Seat Deficit High E 4,027 High G (206) Low/Seat Deficit Special E 2,329 High A & C 0 Low Source: School Board of Broward County, 2007 Long Term Impact on Ancillary Facilities With an increase of student enrollment comes the increase in operational costs to provide the needed support. School buses, custodial support, utility charges, and maintenance staff are all impacted as students and square footages increase. The school district owns 26 administrative sites totaling 648,960 square footage of permanent space. This space houses the district and area staffs. The total includes six bus lots that house approximately 1,546 school buses. City of Oakland Park Public School Facilities Comprehensive Plan, Volume II February 2008 10-37 Collocation of School Facilities The collocation of public school facilities with local government public/civic facilities, and shared use is used in the context of this analysis as public facilities collocated or located adjacent to each other, and used by both the School Board and local governments. Shared use facilities are facilities that are not located adjacent to each other, but owned by either the School Board or the local government, but shared by both parties through mutual agreement or understanding. The School Board, Broward County and local governments currently have numerous collocated facilities, and the 2004 Annual Report on the implementation of the Interlocal Agreement indicated that further study might be needed to determine how the collocation of such facilities can be enhanced in Broward County. The Report further required an inventory of existing collocated facilities to determine if such a study is needed. Existing Collocated Public School Facilities with Local Government Public/Civic Facilities, and Shared Use Facilities The Collocation of Public School Facilities with Local Government Public/Civic facilities and Shared Use Report indicate that there are approximately two hundred and twelve (212) existing instances where public school facilities are collocated with local government public/civic facilities, and include shared use. Of this number, the School Board or local governments share use of one hundred and forty-six (146) public school facilities or local government public/civic facilities. However, majority of such facilities are School Board owned facilities. Also, sixty-five (65) of the 212 facilities are collocated/shared use facilities, and one is a collocated facility (P.A.L. Stadium collocated with Plantation High School). Attachment E lists the existing collocation/shared use facilities. Map S27 in Volume III depicts the location of collocation/shared use facilities Potential Sites for the Collocation/Shared Use of Public School Facilities with Local Government Public/Civic Facilities and Shared Use Facilities Information provided by the local governments did not identify any potential sites that might enable the collocation/shared use of public school facilities with local government public/civic facilities. Further, the information provided lists twenty (20) instances that might potentially allow for the shared use of public school facilities and local government public/civic facilities. Ten (10) of the facilities are County owned, eight (8) are School Board owned and two (2) are municipal owned. City of Oakland Park Public School Facilities Comprehensive Plan, Volume II February 2008 10-38 Currently there are few existing public school facilities that are collocated with local government pubic/civic facilities. Additional potential sites are needed to enable the collocation/shared use of public school facilities with local government public/civic facilities. A study by a consultant to determine how the collocation of public school facilities with local government public/civic facilities can be enhanced in Broward County is currently being pursued. Such a study as it relates to these facilities may enable the most efficient use of public investment in the community’s public infrastructure. Attachment F lists the potential collocation/shared use facilities. Map S28 in Volume III depicts the location of potential collocation/shared use facilities Opportunities to Locate Schools to Serve as Community Focal Points Schools can act as an anchor in the community. They are a symbol of a neighborhood’s stability and attract families to the community. They transmit knowledge to new generations, advance knowledge, display the achievements of society, plus bring neighbors together for Parent Teacher Association meetings, school plays, and sporting events. They offer their classrooms and media centers to residents for adult education classes, and community and club meetings. They are key determinants of the quality of life and are valued symbols of community identity and achievement. Moreover, the community is often evaluated on the basis of the quality of its schools. Historically, the School District and the County’s municipalities have successfully worked together to utilize school facilities for community purposes. A Reciprocal Use Agreement (RUA) is the mechanism used to accomplish shared use between the municipalities and the School District. Several municipalities have RUAs with the School District. These municipalities include: Cooper City, Coral Springs, Fort Lauderdale, Hallandale Beach, Lauderhill, Miramar, North Lauderdale, Oakland Park, Parkland, Pembroke Pines and Pompano Beach. The agreements enable the entities to exchange use of their facilities without entering into a lease for such use. The agreements address each party’s liability, operating and maintenance costs, scheduling of use, and other issues that may arise. School facilities are often used as meeting places for community associations and house several community programs such as summer youth programs. City of Oakland Park Public School Facilities Comprehensive Plan, Volume II February 2008 10-39 Emergency Shelters New educational facilities located outside a category 1, 2 or 3 evacuation zone are required to have core facility areas designed as Enhanced Hurricane Protection Areas unless the facility is exempted based on a recommendation by the local emergency management agency or the Department of Community Affairs. Certain factors are considered to qualify for the exemption, such as low evacuation demand, size, location, accessibility and storm surge. For example, schools within the county that have adequate shelter capacity may be exempt. Table 10-18 is an inventory of schools within Broward County that serve as emergency shelters. Map S29 in Volume III depicts the location of the emergency shelter. Table 10-18: List of Emergency Shelters City of Oakland Park Public School Facilities Comprehensive Plan, Volume II February 2008 10-40 Funding Sources for Capital Improvements The School Board of Broward County has total projected revenue, and financing sources of $3,487,371,000 for public school capital improvements for the 5 year period ending 2011- 2012 as depicted in Table 10-19. The major source of revenue is millage, which is collected from local property taxes and comprises 56% of total revenue. The projected appropriations for those funds are depicted in Table 10-20. The primary appropriation is for debt service, which comprises 31% of total appropriations. Table 10-19: Estimated Revenue and Financing Sources (stated in thousands) Source: The School Board of Broward County 2007-2008 Adopted 5-Year DEFP, 2007 Table 10-20: Estimated Appropriations (stated in thousands) Source: The School Board of Broward County 2007-2008 Adopted 5-Year DEFP, 2007 City of Oakland Park Public School Facilities Comprehensive Plan, Volume II February 2008 10-41 The projected capital outlays, by school facility for the 5 year period are depicted in Appendix E, Schedule 5 of the Adopted 5-Year DEFP, Attachment B. The projected millage rate and debt capacity over the 5 year period are included in Table 10-21 below. Operating Cost Considerations Transportation costs to operate the 1,546 buses which transport more than 81,000 students to and from school every day are significant in the operation of school facilities. Over the next five years it is estimated the district will spend approximately $484.1 million dollars on transportation and $1.6 billion dollars on maintenance. Utility costs are included as part of the maintenance estimate. Square footage increases also impact the budget guidelines for calculating custodial staff at every school site. The administrative sites also include the housing for four area maintenance departments, a district maintenance staff as well as the facilities and construction management departments that totals over a thousand employees. City of Oakland Park Public School Facilities Comprehensive Plan, Volume II February 2008 10-42Table 10-21: Estimated Expenditures - Debt Service/Capacity Source: The School Board of Broward County 2007-2008 Adopted 5-Year DEFP, 2007 2007 Comprehensive Plan Adopted December 12, 2007 Revised February 2009 Volume II: Support Documents Exhibit I: Water Supply Facilities Work Plan Mayor Larry Gierer Vice Mayor Layne Dallett Walls Commissioner Allegra Webb Murphy Commissioner Steven Arnst Commissioner Suzanne Boisvenue Prepared by: The Engineering and Community Development Staff with assistance from City of Oakland Park Water Supply Facilities Work Plan FINAL REVISED REPORT January 2009 Table of Contents Table of Contents MWH SECTION 1 -INTRODUCTION 1.0 General ..................................................................................................... 1-1 1.1 Background .............................................................................................. 1-1 1.2 Purpose .................................................................................................... 1-2 1.3 Services Provided By Oakland Park ......................................................... 1-2 SECTION 2 -WATER SERVICE AREA 2.0 Water Service Area ............................................................................................. 2-1 2.1 Location Description ................................................................................ 2-1 2.2 Water Service Providers ........................................................................... 2-1 2.2.1 Service Agreements .................................................................... 2-3 2.3 Private Suppliers ...................................................................................... 2-6 SECTION 3 -EXISTING FACILITIES 3.0 Existing Facilities...................................................................................... 3-1 3.1 Water Supply Facilities............................................................................ 3-1 3.2 Water Treatment Facilities........................................................................ 3-2 3.3 Finished Water Storage ............................................................................ 3-2 3.4 Water Transmission and Distribution System .......................................... 3-3 SECTION 4 –HISTORIC POPULATION DATA 4.0 Historic Population Data .......................................................................... 4-1 4.1 Population Projections ............................................................................. 4-2 SECTION –5 DEMAND PROJECTIONS 5.0 Demand Projections ................................................................................. 5-1 5.1 Historical Water Use ................................................................................ 5-1 5.2 Per Capita Usage ...................................................................................... 5-1 5.3 Water Demand Projections ....................................................................... 5-4 5.4 Customer Types ....................................................................................... 5-4 5.5 Seasonal Demand ..................................................................................... 5-5 SECTION –6WORKPLAN 6.0 Water Supply Facilities Work Plan ........................................................... 6-1 6.1 Infrastructure Element ............................................................................. 6-1 6.2 Traditional Water Supply Projects............................................................ 6-2 Table of Contents MWH 6.3 Alternative Water Supply Projects ........................................................... 6-2 6.4 Conservation Programs ............................................................................ 6-3 6.5 Reuse Program ......................................................................................... 6-6 6.6 Capital Improvements Element ................................................................ 6-7 6.7 Intergovernmental Coordination Element ................................................ 6-7 6.8 Goals, Objectives, and Policies and Proposed Amendments To Incorporate The WSFWP 6-12 6.8.1 Existing Goals Objectives and Policies 6-12 Future Land Use Element 6-12 Infrastructure Element 6-14 Coastal Management 6-16 Conservation 6-16 Intergovernmental Coordination 6-17 Capital Improvements 6-18 6.8.2 Proposed Amendments to Incorporate the WSFWP 6-20 Introduction 6-20 General 6-20 Future Land Use 6-20 Infrastructure 6-21 Coastal Management 6-24 Conservation 6-24 Intergovernmental Coordination 6-24 Capital Improvements 6-25 APPENDICES Appendix A Growth Management Statute and Rule Requirements Related to Water Supply Planning Appendix B City of Fort Lauderdale 10-Year Water Supply Facilities Work Plan Appendix C Broward County 10-Year Water Supply Facilities Work Plan Appendix D First Amendment To Agreement Between The City of Fort Lauderdale and The City of Oakland Park Table of Contents MWH LIST OF TABLES Table Number Title Page 2-1 City of Oakland Park, Master Meter Connections with Fort Lauderdale 2-3 3-1 Fire Hydrant Flow Test Results 3-5 4-1 Estimated Historical Population: Within Current City Limit* 4-1 4-2 Future Population Projections 4-2 5-1 Summary Oakland Park Wholesale Water Purchased from Fort Lauderdale 5-1 5-2 Per Capita Usage in Oakland Park Retail Service Area (RSA) 5-2 5-3 Potable Water Loss Oakland Park Service Provider Area 5-3 5-4 City of Oakland Park Treated Water Demand Projections City Wide 5-4 5-5 Billing Service Types 5-4 5-6 City of Oakland Park Water Consumption 5-5 5-7 City of Oakland Park Hotel/Motel Water Consumption 5-6 6-1 Pre-Rinse Spray Valves Water Savings (Per Unit) 6-4 6-2 Water Conservation Kits Savings per Kit 6-5 6-3 Current and Projected Treated Water Supply Needs 6-8 6-4 Water Supply Facilities Work Plan Projects and Programs 6-9 6-5 City of Oakland Park Capital Improvements Required to Meet Projected Water Service Area Growth through 2018* 6-10 6-6 City of Oakland Park System Improvements, Renewal and Replacements*** 6-11 12 Water Supply Facilities Work Plan Projects and Programs 6-29 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Number Title Page 1-1 City of Oakland Park Location Map 1-3 2-1 City of Oakland Park City Limits and Retail Service Providers 2-2 2-2 Transmission and Distribution System Including Fort Lauderdale Interconnection Locations 2-5 3-1 Oakland Park Transmission and Distribution System Map 3-4 3-2 Peak Hour Flow Conditions; Pressure Contours 3-6 Section 1 Section 1 Introduction MWH Page 1-1 1.0 GENERAL The State of Florida has introduced revised legislation over the past few years to strengthen the linkage between growth and water availability based on specific demands identified in the water supply planning process. In some cases actual growth has exceeded previously projected growth resulting in increased strain on existing water supplies that has been further exacerbated by the ongoing drought. This 10-Year Water Supply Facilities Work Plan (Work Plan) has been prepared for the City of Oakland Park (City), located within Broward County (County). It has been prepared in response to the requirements for local governments to revise their Comprehensive Plan within 18 months after the date of the South Florida Water Management District’s (SFWMD) Regional (Lower East Coast – LEC) Water Supply Plan is adopted. 1.1 BACKGROUND Beginning in 2002 and continuing in 2004 and 2005, the State of Florida Legislature has taken steps to improve the coordination of the Regional Water Supply Plan developed by a Water Management District and individual local government land use planning activities. This strengthened coordination started requiring local governments having responsibility for all or a portion of their water supply facilities and located within an area that had a Regional Water Supply Plan, to prepare a 10-Year Water Supply Facilities Work Plan (Work Plan). Now all local governments are required to submit a Work Plan to ensure linkage between the Regional Water Supply Plan and their individual local comprehensive plans. Each Work Plan should address infrastructure, conservation, capital improvements, intergovernmental coordination in addition to water supplier coordination. The City of Oakland Park is a “Receiver” and not a “Supplier “ of potable water to other water purveyors. The Growth Management Statute and Rule Requirements Related to Water Supply Planning, provides a summary of regulatory requirements that impact local governments and their water supply planning efforts. See Appendix A for a copy of “management Statute and Rule Requirements Related to Water Supply Planning”. As a result of their required regional water supply planning efforts, the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD) evaluated the adequacy of existing water supplies to meet existing and future water demands and determined that traditional water supply would not be adequate to meet future demands. Their Lower East Coast Regional Water Supply Plan (LEC Plan) adopted, February 15, 2007, indicates most future water supply needs will have Section 1 - Introduction MWH Page 1-2 to be met by the implementation of alternative water supply sources. All local governments located within the LEC Plan regional area are now required to develop a Work Plan to ensure linkage between the regional water supply plan and their individual local comprehensive plans by August 15, 2008. 1.2 PURPOSE The purpose of this Work Plan is to present an implementation plan that will guide the City’s efforts to develop and maintain sustainable sources of water for its overall service area in coordination with the LEC Plan. A description of the City’s existing and proposed transmission and distribution facilities to satisfy projected water demands is included. Oakland Park does not have raw water or treatment facilities; thus, treated water for the citizens of Oakland Park comes from Fort Lauderdale and Broward County (Suppliers). Part of the City’s purpose is to assure that the “Suppliers” have adequate plans to enable Oakland Park to progress and grow without water supply and treatment issues. As required, it is anticipated that this Work Plan will be updated every five years or within 18 months of a revision to the LEC Plan. 1.3 SERVICES PROVIDED BY OAKLAND PARK The City of Oakland Park supplies (retail) treated water services to approximately 30,000 residents in the City. The City does not operate and maintain any water supply wells or treatment facilities. However, the City is able to provide such service to all its residents by purchasing wholesale potable water from the City of Fort Lauderdale and having portions of its incorporated area provided retail service by Broward County and Fort Lauderdale. In addition to the roughly 30,000 city citizens provided retail service by the City another 13,000 city citizens receive retail service direct via Fort Lauderdale and Broward County. Oakland Park no longer provides either bulk or retail sales outside of its City Limits. In addition to providing normal potable water service to customers within the City Limits, it is the City’s intent to provide adequate fire flow to both residential and non-residential customers. The location of Oakland Park is shown in Figure 1-1. The City currently does not provide reuse water service to its customers. Section 1 - Introduction MWH Page 1-3 Figure 1-1 City of Oakland Park Location Map Section 2 Section 2 Water Service Area MWH Page 2-1 2.0 WATER SERVICE AREA ȱ The City’ was established approximately 80 years ago with the abolishment of the Town of Floranada, reestablishing the water service areas boundaries to approximately the west side of U.S. 1 west to N.W. 31st Avenue and the north fork of Middle River north to what is now Prospect Road. The City currently provides potable water service for use to over 30,000 people in the City’s retail water service area. The City Limits covers approximately 5,128 acres. See Figure 2-1 for City Limits and Retail Services provided by the City, by the City of Fort Lauderdale, and by Broward County. Another 13,000 people within the City Limits receive retail service from Broward County and Fort Lauderdale. 2.1 LOCATION DESCRIPTION The City has been in a transition period since 2000 with annexation and service area changes primarily taking place between 2005 and 2007. Pressures within the County to gradually incorporate all the unincorporated areas have lead the City of Oakland Park to annex several adjacent areas. Some of the annexed areas had previous water service from Oakland Park, while other areas had water service from Broward County. There have also been “neighborhood improvement projects” completed within some of the annexed areas. Part of the neighborhood improvement areas north of Prospect Rd, East of Interstate 95 and south of Commercial Blvd had previously been provided service by Oakland Park as retail customers. This area is now within the City of Oakland Park city limits, but is now being provided potable water service from Broward County. The current City potable water service area is comprised roughly of the area bounded by Commercial Blvd and Prospect Rd to the north, North Federal Highway to the east, Oakland Park Blvd and NW 26 St to the south, and NW 31st Avenue to the west. 2.2 WATER SERVICE PROVIDERS The City is supplied with potable water from the City of Fort Lauderdale and Broward County Water and Wastewater Services (BCWWS). Within the City limits the retail service is subdivided into three areas by retail service providers: the City of Oakland Park retail service area, the City of Fort Lauderdale retail service area and Broward County retail service area. Figure 2-1 shows the City of Oakland Park city limits and its retail service providers. The Oakland Park retail service area receives potable water via wholesale purchases of treated water from the City of Fort Lauderdale. Section 2 - Water Service Area MWHPage 2-2 Figure 2-1 City of Oakland Park City Limits and Retail Service Providers Section 2 - Water Service Area MWH Page 2-3 2.2.1 SERVICE AGREEMENTS The City of Oakland Park has an agreement with City of Fort Lauderdale for them to provide wholesale (bulk) potable water service to the residents within the City of Oakland Park retail service area. The service agreement between the City and Fort Lauderdale was signed in 1994 and extends until 2023. The City purchases water from the City of Fort Lauderdale through master meters at twelve separate interconnect locations through out the distribution system. Nine of these interconnects are currently open and active. See Figure 2-2 for a location map showing the transmission and distribution system along with the Fort Lauderdale interconnection locations. See Table 2-1 below for exact interconnection locations. Table 2-1 City of Oakland Park, Master Meter Connections with Fort Lauderdale Ok Park Meter # Ft. Laud ID # Ft. Laud. Account # Meter Size Location of Master Meters 1 7200284 370-3800-7002 6” 1001 East Oakland Park Blvd 2 635595 370-40003007 6” 2054 East Oakland Park Blvd 3 70685360 370-4500-2004 6” 1601 NE 45 Street 4 700961700 370-5000-2006 8” 4500 NW 31 Avenue 5 70632140 370-5250-3001 8” 3500 NW 31 Avenue 6 4210594000 370-6200-7001 6” 1690 West Prospect Road 7 10722622 370-6300-5004 6” 1600 NW 41 Street 8 6906501 370-6500-0003 6” 499 West Prospect Road 9 802680100 370-7000-0006 6” 2 NE 38 Street 10 72230820 370-7800-3002 8” 2604 NW 21 Avenue 11 72359770 370-8000-9005 6” 2610 NW 26 Avenue 12 49504078 370-3700-9009 8” 1300 NE 38 Street The City does not normally have involvement in the planning, construction and operation of the water supply and water treatment facilities maintained, operated and owned by the City of Fort Lauderdale. The City of Oakland Park could be financially involved in the installation of additional water lines or water meters if required to convey water from the City of Fort Lauderdale. Currently, and as projected, there does not appear to be a need for any such additional wholesale service connections from Fort Lauderdale to the Oakland Park System. The City of Oakland Park has sole responsibility over the transmission and distribution system within the City’s service area. Section 2 – Water Service Area MWH Page 2-4 Broward County Water & Wastewater Services (BCWWS) provides retail potable water service to some of the areas within the City of Oakland Park. Currently, the City does not have an agreement with BCWWS as the City does not buy wholesale (bulk) water for its system from BCWWS. While not normally being involved in the water resource and treatment planning, the City has been actively coordinating and cooperating with both the County and City of Fort Lauderdale in the major annexation, service area, and neighborhood improvement projects that have taken place over the past few years. The annexations added about 40 percent to the City’s population. A revision (First Amendment) to the Service Area Boundaries was made in the Agreement with Fort Lauderdale in January 2007 after annexations had taken place. With the need to do this WSFWP came additional meetings to cooperate with both the County and City of Fort Lauderdale in the preparation of said Plan. Since both parties have retail services within the Oakland Park City Limits and Fort Lauderdale provides wholesale (bulk) water service to the City; the Water Supply Facilities Work Plans for each of these public water “Suppliers” has been included herein in the appendices. Neither the City of Fort Lauderdale nor Broward County reserve specific plant capacity for Oakland Park, but both plan to meet the water demands of their retail service areas, as well as the wholesale water needs by Fort Lauderdale for Oakland Park. Section 2 - Water Service Area MWHPage 2-5 Figure 2-2 Transmission and Distribution System Including Fort Lauderdale Interconnection Locations Section 2 - Water Service Area MWH Page 2-6 2.3 PRIVATE SUPPLIERS There are no known sources of potable water being served within the City Limits other than the primary providers mentioned above. There are two non-potable water service providers within the City: Oak Tree Country Club Golf Course and the City’s Wimberly Field Park. The golf course is currently not in service but has potential to reactivate and has had a withdrawal permit from SFWMD. The City Park water use is considerably less than 100,000 gpd and therefore is not required to obtain a withdrawal permit. The golf Course is located at 2400 Prospect Rd. and the City’s athletic complex at Wimberly Park is located at the corner of NE 3rd Ave and NE 38 St and up to NE 41 St. Figure 2-1 shows the location of the non-potable water service providers as points within the water service area. There are no other potable water purveyors than the City, Broward County, and City of Fort Lauderdale. Because of the annexations and neighborhood improvement program, additional discussions are taking place between Broward County and Oakland Park for possible emergency interconnections. It should be noted that Oakland Park has no wastewater treatment facilities or access currently to any wastewater effluent treated for reuse. A portion of the wastewater collected within Oakland Park is pumped to Fort Lauderdale for treatment and disposal and a portion is transmitted to Broward County for treatment and disposal. Section 3 Section 3 Existing Facilities MWH Page 3-1 3.0 EXISTING FACILITIES The City of Oakland Park does not own or operate any water supply, treatment or storage facilities. The following section discusses the existing water supply facilities owned, operated and maintained by the City of Fort Lauderdale and by Broward County. These facilities include wellfields, treatment plants, storage tanks and transmission and distribution systems. Additional information on Broward County and the City of Fort Lauderdale can be found in their WSFWP’s in the Appendices. This Section also addresses the City of Oakland Park Transmission and Distribution System. 3.1 WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES The City of Fort Lauderdale maintains two active wellfields: the Peele-Dixie Wellfield and the Prospect Wellfield which withdraw water supply from the Biscayne Aquifer system. The Peele-Dixie WTP is located in the vicinity of the intersection of Davie Blvd and N SR7 and has an installed capacity of 20 MGD. The Peele-Dixie wellfield is located west of the Plant, north of SW 24th street and south of Broward Blvd. The Prospect wellfield is located near the intersection of Florida Turnpike and NW 62nd St surrounding Prospect Lake and has an installed capacity of 87 MGD. Both wellfields are permitted by the SFWMD under Consumptive Use Permit No. 06-00123-W allowing an average daily withdrawal of 50.6 MGD for both wellfields. The permit allows a combined maximum daily allocation of 67.3 MGD from both wellfields. A CUP renewal application is currently being processed with SFWMD. The City of Fort Lauderdale is currently evaluating the future use and constructability of Floridan Aquifer wells to increase its supply capacity. Appendix B contains a map with the location of the City of Fort Lauderdale facilities as well as details of their WSFWP. Broward County Water & Wastewater Services (BCWWS) owns and operates two regional wellfields that supply raw water from the Biscayne aquifer to a variety of raw water large users. The Broward County retail service area within Oakland Park’s City Limits receives water supply from Browards’ District 1 wellfield which has a total design capacity of 23.5 MGD. The current SFWMD CUP No 06-00146-W for the District 1 wellfield is currently being renewed. The anticipated maximum monthly and average annual daily withdrawals from the Biscayne aquifer by District 1 wellfield are 317.9 MGM and 9.5 MGD, Section 3 – Existing Facilities MWH Page 3-2 respectively based on historical base conditions. BCWWS has requested a temporary permit for an allocation of 357 MGM maximum month and 10.9 MGD average annual day for the next five years. Figure 2 included in Appendix C contain a map with the location of the wellfields in the BCWWS area as well as details of their WSFWP. Appendix C contains the Broward County Water Supply Facilities Plan. 3.2 WATER TREATMENT FACILITIES The City of Fort Lauderdale owns two water treatment plants: the Fiveash Water Treatment Plant and the Peele-Dixie Water Treatment Plant. The Fiveash WTP is located at Powerline Road and NW 38th Street. The service area for this plant includes the jurisdictions of Fort Lauderdale, Wilton Manors, Lauderdale-by-the- Sea, Port Everglades and portions of Tamarac, Davie and Broward County. The plant was originally constructed in 1950 has undergone several expansions allowing a permitted capacity of 70 MGD. The plant provides conventional lime softening treatment, followed by filtration and disinfection. The Peele-Dixie Water Treatment Plant is located at S.R. 7/U.S. 441 and SW 16th Street. The plant used to be a lime softening facility, now retired and was replaced by a nanofiltration treatment plant in 2007. The plant has a maximum installed finished water treatment capacity of 12 MGD. The City of Fort Lauderdale is currently evaluating the construction of a 6 MGD Floridian Aquifer (alternative source) Reverse Osmosis treatment plant that would increase the total installed potable water production capacity at the Peele-Dixie WTP site to 18 MGD. The portion of Oakland Park provided retail service by Broward County receives water supply from Broward’s District 1 Water Treatment Plant located in Lauderdale Lakes. The service area for this plant includes portions of the cities of Fort Lauderdale, Lauderdale Lakes, Lauderhill, North Lauderdale, Oakland Park, Plantation, Pompano Beach, and Tamarac, as well as certain unincorporated areas in central Broward County. The plant was originally constructed in 1960 and has undergone several expansions to achieve a current design capacity of 16.0 MGD. The plant is a lime softening treatment facility with multimedia filtration systems. Figure 3 in Appendix C shows the location of the District 1 WTP, storage tanks and transmission mains 12 inches in diameter and larger. 3.3 FINISHED WATER STORAGE The City of Oakland Park does not have any storage tanks or high service /booster pump stations within the City’s transmission and distribution system. Section 3 – Existing Facilities MWH Page 3-3 The City of Fort Lauderdale has two on-site storage and high service pumping facilities and two offsite storage and high service pumping facilities. The two on- site storage and high service pumping facilities are located at the Fiveash and Peele-Dixie Water Treatment Plants. The Poinciana Park Water Tank is a 2.0 MG pre-stressed concrete ground storage tank. The Poinciana Park facility was upgraded in 2006 with a new 2.0 MG pre-stressed concrete tank with a new pumping facility with standby power on-site. The Northwest Second Avenue Water Tank is an elevated 1 MG steel tank located between NW 6th Street and NW 7th Street. The City of Fort Lauderdale is currently considering plans for the existing facility at NW Second Avenue to be refurbished or replaced with a new tank and pumping station. The area served by Broward County District 1 has two on-site water storage facilities at the water treatment plant site and four remote tanks within the distribution system. The total storage capacity is 5.6 MG. 3.4 WATER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM The City of Oakland Park maintains over 83 miles of water mains in sizes ranging from 4 inches to 12 inches in diameter. There are many miles of smaller water mains, typically 2 inch. The transmission and distribution system has been modeled in 1992 and again in 2005. With the number and location of the bulk meters from the City of Fort Lauderdale there has not been shown to be any system-wide problems under normal operating conditions. See Figure 3-1 for a map of Oakland Park Transmission and Distribution System. There has been an issue relative to the need for additional fire hydrants to provide more uniform and better fire hydrant coverage with looped water lines, but pressure in the system is excellent under peak hour flow conditions. Oakland Park has many interconnections with the City of Fort Lauderdale, but no official interconnections with Broward County. It was previously recommended that several possible interconnection locations be considered with Broward County. These four locations are shown below: x N.E. Dixie Hwy north of Commercial Blvd. x N.W. 44th Street between N.W. 29 Avenue and N.W. 31st Avenue x South of Oakland Park Blvd. between N.W. 29th Avenue and N.W. 31st Avenue x Near the C-13 Canal and N.W. 31st Avenue Since additional annexation and neighborhood improvement projects have been implemented, there may be an opportunity for other such interconnections between the City and the County. Section 3 - Existing Facilities MWHPage 3-4 Figure 3-1 Oakland Park Transmission and Distribution System Map Section 3 - Existing Facilities MWH Page 3-5 To verify the ability of the transmission and distribution system to adequately address fire flow events a number of hydrant flow tests were run. Table 3-1 below indicates the results of said flow tests at the locations indicated: Table 3-1 Fire Hydrant Flow Test Results Test Location Hydrant Static (psi) Residual (psi) Pitot (psi) Hydrant Flow (gpm) 1302 NE 32 Street 81 60 73 1430 316 NW 40th Court 84 60 62 1320 3901 N. Federal Highway 85 60 58 1280 850 E. Commercial Boulevard 80 45 40 1060 1522NE 34th Court 83 65 60 1300 111 Lake Emerald Drive 80 74 57 1025 3970 NW 21st Avenue 75 55 52 1200 1701 W. Oakland Park Boulevard 85 59 50 1190 2301 W. Oakland Park Boulevard 75 67 55 1250 NW 29th Street & NW 19th Avenue 80 54 49 1180 3501 NW 10th Terrace 81 60 72 1425 Static pressure and residual pressures were all excellent as were the flows. The computer model was run in 2005 using peak hour flows and a Fort Lauderdale pressure at the interconnections of 70 psi. The actual fire flow test revealed that pressures in the system were normally 5 to 15 psi higher than the assumed 70 psi. Figure 3-2 indicates that during peak hour flow conditions pressure loss in the Oakland Park transmission and distribution system was only 5 to 6 psi. Section 3 - Existing Facilities MWHPage 3-6 Figure 3-2 Peak Hour Flow Conditions; Pressure Contours Section 3 - Existing Facilities MWH Page 3-7 The City recently completed an analysis of the ability of this distribution system to continue to provide adequate service to City residents. The analysis found that the existing distribution system is adequate to handle average daily, maximum daily, and peak hourly demands. The City of Fort Lauderdale conveys water to the City of Oakland Park through 12 interconnects (9 currently in service) located within its water distribution system consisting of over 750 miles of 2 to 54-inch diameter water mains; See Appendix B for more data on the Fort Lauderdale System. The transmission and distribution system for BCWWS District 1 contains approximately 212 miles of pipe. BCWWS is implementing a major water system rebuilding effort in District 1 to correct system deficiencies that is anticipated to be completed by 2011; See Appendix C for more data on the Broward County System. Section 4 Section 4 Population Projections MWH Page 4-1 4.0 HISTORIC POPULATION DATA In the last decade, the City grew from approximately 28,000 to nearly 32,000 people, a growth rate of nearly 14% percent for the past 10 years, or an average growth rate of about 1.3 percent per year according to statistics published by the (University of Florida, Bureau of Education and Business Research (BEBR)). Currently, the City uses population projections provided by Broward County, which are based on Traffic Analysis Zones, or TAZs. However the County’s projections for the City population does not take into account annexed areas or recent Future Land Use Map Amendments. In 2005, the City had annexation in North Andrews Gardens, Twin Lakes South, Mira Lago and Montage by the Lake/Sartori Plat Area adding approximately 11,000 people for a total population of approximately 43,000 people. Due to the annexations and transfer of service areas between 2005 and 2007, it has been difficult to ascertain population base and water demand differentiation between retail and wholesale areas for the past few years. Population projections were developed using the Traffic Analysis Zone (TAZ) population data and working closely with City of Fort Lauderdale and Broward County. Using data obtained from the County and City of Fort Lauderdale, and population projections data from Bureau of Economic and Business Research (BEBR) and the Broward County Model Projections based on TAZ, it is apparent the City’s overall service area continued to experience a growth pattern in the first part of this decade. Table 4-1 presents the estimated historical population within the “current” City Limits. Table 4-1 Estimated Historical Population: Within Current City Limits* Year Service Provider Area 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 City of Oakland Park 29,075 29,232 29,390 29,547 29,705 29,863 32,408 City of Fort Lauderdale 1894 1950 2009 2069 2128 2187 2247 Broward County 8589 8631 8674 8716 8759 8801 9074 TOTAL 39,558 39,813 40,073 40,332 40,592 40,851 43,729 *Estimated as though annexed area was incorporate prior to 2000. Section 4 – Population Projections MWH Page 4-2 4.1 POPULATION PROJECTIONS The City’s Service Area population projections were carried out using the TAZ population projections from Broward County Planning TAZ projections. Linear Interpolation was conducted to project intermediate year populations that were not included in the TAZ projections. Where in this report the retail service is shown as “City of Oakland Park” it is the combination of “City of Oakland Park” and “Oakland Forest” as shown in the City of Fort Lauderdale WSFWP. For example; Table 2.2 of Fort Lauderdale’s WSFWP shows in 2010 Oakland Park population at 26,618 and Oakland Forest population at 3,716, for the sum of 30,334 which matches the 30,334 population number projected for the City of Oakland Park Service Provider area in Table 4-2 below. Table 4-2 shows the future population projections for the entire City of Oakland Park. Table 4-2 Future Population Projections Year Service Provider Area 2008 2010 2013 2015 2018 2020 2025 2030 City of Oakland Park* 30,146 30,334 32,329 33,509 35,436 36,720 39,712 41,784 City of Fort Lauderdale 2,588 3,307 3,449 3,542 3,581 3,607 3,722 3,926 Broward County 12,153 12,232 12,513 12,701 12,998 13,196 13,846 14,411 TOTAL 44,887 45,873 48,201 49,752 52,015 53,523 57,280 60,121 *ȱInȱtheȱCityȱofȱFortȱLauderdaleȱWSFWPȱthisȱisȱtheȱsummaryȱtotalȱofȱtheirȱpopulationȱprojectionsȱȱȱ forȱ“CityȱofȱOaklandȱPark”ȱandȱtheirȱpopulationȱprojectionsȱforȱ“OaklandȱForest”ȱ(aȱdevelopmentȱ withinȱtheȱCityȱofȱOaklandȱParkȱandȱprovidedȱretailȱserviceȱbyȱOaklandȱPark).ȱȱ The total population from Table 4-2 will be served in three ways. Those provided retail service with Oakland Park as the Service Provider will be receiving potable water that the City of Oakland Park purchases through the metered interconnections with Fort Lauderdale. Those receiving retail potable water service from Fort Lauderdale as the Service Provider will be receiving water directly from the Fort Lauderdale transmission and distribution system. Those receiving retail potable water service from Broward County as the Service Provider will be receiving their potable water directly from the Broward County transmission and distribution system. The water demand projections based on these population projections are found in Section 5 herein. Section 5 Section 5 Demand Projections MWH Page 5-1 5.0 DEMAND PROJECTIONS The future treated water needs for the City of Oakland Park are compiled in this Section. The population projections presented in the previous section were utilized to ascertain potable water needs for the future. Actual historical population estimates and real treated water supply numbers are used herein to establish per capita needs. 5.1 HISTORICAL WATER USE The City’s future water service areas are anticipated to remain as they are currently configured in Figure 2-1. No major unincorporated areas remain in the surrounding areas that could materially increase the City Limits. Only a few small unincorporated parcels remain near the City of Oakland Park. A compilation of the total annual water purchased from Fort Lauderdale for recent 7 years for resale in the Oakland Park Service Provider Area has been conducted and is presented in Table 5-1. Table 5-1 Summary Oakland Park Wholesale Water Purchased From Fort Lauderdale Year From FTL (gal) 2000 1777039000 2001 1596103000 2002 1769553020 2003 1604562000 2004 1656736000 2005 1645074000 2006 1635036000* *Billing Error Corrected in 2007. Historically Broward County has sent its retail customers, now in the City Limits of Oakland Park, about 1.30 to 1.34 mgd on an average day basis; 1.30 mgd in 2000 and 1.34 mgd in 2005. 5.2 PER CAPITA USAGE The historic per capita usage will be a major factor in projecting future treated water needs. Table 5-2 below indicates the historic per capita demands for the Section 5 –Demand Projections MWH Page 5-2 Oakland Park Retail Service Area based on treated water purchased from the City of Fort Lauderdale: Table 5-2 Per Capita Usage in Oakland Park Retail Service Area (RSA) Year 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 Oakland Park RSA Population 29,232 29,390 29,547 29,705 29,863 32,408 Fort Lauderdale Water Purchase in Thousand 1,596,103 1,769,553 1,604,562 1,656,736 1,645,074 1,682,151* Per Capita Usage** 150 165 149 153 151 142 *Estimated Volume Correction ** gpcd (gallons per capita daily) The average per capita over the recent 6 years is 152 gallons per capita daily (gpcd) within the Oakland Park Retail Service Provider Area. Broward County data indicates a 1.30 mgd demand in their retail service provider area in 2000 with a population serviced of 8,589 for a per capita usage of 151 gpcd. Their data also shows a 1.34 mgd demand in 2005 with a population served of 8,801 for a per capita usage of 152 gpcd. The Fort Lauderdale data for their small retail service area provider section is not broken out in their database, but the services provided within Oakland Park City Limits are similar to that of Oakland Park and Broward County. With the historic usage hovering slightly above 150 gpcd, there is a desire to lower said per capita usage for normal years. Instead of being below 150 gpcd during drought restrictions, but falling above 150 when restrictions are lifted it would be preferable to stay below 150 gpcd in normal rainfall years. It was noted that system losses within the Oakland Park transmission and distribution system has recently ranged between 9.5% to 13.4%. This is above the City’s long term goal of staying below a 10% loss factor; thus, steps will be taken to reduce this loss factor. See Table 5-3 below: Section 5 –Demand Projections MWH Page 5-3 Table 5-3 Potable Water Loss Oakland Park Service Provider Area (000 Gallons) Water Purchased Water Sold Water Loss Monthly 12 Mon Avg* Monthly 12 Mon Avg* % Oct 05 137,290 118,600 Nov 05 108,033 113,157 Dec 05 127,135 108,368 Jan 06 148,232 122,079 Feb 06 125,847 117,952 Mar 06 158,806 114,270 Apr 06 144,962 124,273 May 06 141,025 124,816 Jun 06 146,786 121,329 Jul 06 124,903 115,452 Aug 06 138,103 115,342 Sep 06 103,842 133,747 115,515 11,7596 12% Oct 06 132,094 133,314 103,940 116,374 12.7% Nov 06 140,587 136,027 121,283 117,052 13.9% Dec 06 129,849 136,253 125,198 118,454 13.1% Jan 07 136,797 135,300 114,905 117,856 12.9% Feb 07 127,952 135,476 112,271 117,383 13.4% Mar 07 123,728 132,552 109,818 117,012 11.7% Apr 07 102,955 129,052 104,447 115,360 10.6% May 07 122,791 127,532 100,866 113,364 11.1% Jun 07 98,373 123,498 102,314 111,779 9.5% Jul 07 120,861 123,161 92,580 109,873 10.8% Aug 07 124,759 122,049 87,523 107,555 11.9% Sep 07 101,772 121,877 94,871 105,835 13.2% Oct 07 102,543 119,414 90,115 104,683 12.3% Nov 07 100,059 116,037 93,525 102,369 11.8% Dec 07 110,813 114,450 101,640 100,406 12.3% Jan 08 113,968 112,548 100,662 99,219 11.8% Feb 08 95,854 109,873 91,598 97,497 11.3% Mar 08 114,223 109,081 90,153 95,858 12.1% *Because water purchased billings and water sold billings are not on the same time frame, a 12 month running average was used to give more meaningful results. Such corrective action should keep the per capita needs within the City Limits of Oakland Park below the 150 gpcd level in normal rainfall years. Section 5 –Demand Projections MWH Page 5-4 5.3 WATER DEMAND PROJECTIONS In a cooperative effort with Broward County and The City of Fort Lauderdale the per capita needs for the City of Oakland Park City Limits has been projected downward and kept below the threshold of 150 gpcd. See Table 5-4 below for the future demand projections. Table 5-4 City of Oakland Park Treated Water Demand Projections City Wide Demand Projections AADF (MGD) 2008 2010 2013 2015 2018 2020 2025 2030 City of Oakland Park* 4.46 4.49 4.77 4.96 5.24 5.43 5.88 6.18 City of Fort Lauderdale* 0.38 0.49 0.51 0.52 0.53 0.53 0.55 0.58 Broward County** 1.77 1.78 1.83 1.86 1.9 1.92 2.01 2.08 Total (City of Oakland Park) 6.61 6.76 7.11 7.34 7.67 7.88 8.44 8.84 * 148 gpcd ** 144 to 146 gpcd Note: Demand projections were calculated by multiplying the population projections by the gpcd. The per capita and water use projections from Broward County factor in a slight decrease in per capita usage over the next 20 years from 146 gpcd down to 144 gpcd. The per capita usage in the Oakland Park and Fort Lauderdale retail service area has been reduced to 148 gpcd. 5.4 CUSTOMER TYPES Within the City of Oakland Park Service Area there are only 5 categories of service in the billing system: Commercial, Government, Hotel, Multi-family Residential, and Residential. The split of the demand per billing type is shown in Table 5-5 below: Table 5-5 Billing Service Types Customer Type Percentage of Total Flow Commercial 31.7 Government 4.1 Hotel 2.6 Multi-family 30.8 Residential 30.8 Total 100.00 Section 5 –Demand Projections MWH Page 5-5 5.5 SEASONAL DEMAND The City water system has a very low seasonal demand peak. The City of Oakland Park while adjacent to the City of Fort Lauderdale, is not a tourist destination. The very minor (three percent above annual average) seasonal demand comes primarily from lack of rainfall during the winter and spring months when some small demand for irrigation water and commercial activities increases. Table 5-6 provides the average monthly percentages of water sold to Oakland Park customers within the Oakland Park Service Area Table 5-6 City of Oakland Park Water Consumption Month Water Billed in Thousands of Gallons Monthly Average % of Annual Average 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 Jan 143,671 141,504 172,782 159,815 151,690 142,706 148,232 151,486 9.08% Feb 150,094 140,690 135,444 140,789 130,402 138,328 125,847 137,371 8.23% Mar 161,229 128,619 128,546 122,566 140,445 143,252 158,806 140,495 8.42% Apr 134,099 125,192 160,270 135,282 149,739 147,430 144,962 142,425 8.53% May 153,076 138,873 181,245 129,531 141,177 144,196 141,025 147,018 8.81% Jun 158,002 124,519 132,650 122,407 160,338 140,158 146,786 140,694 8.43% Jul 136,361 108,048 132,419 140,850 132,677 126,067 124,093 128,645 7.71% Aug 164,008 139,407 155,942 121,705 129,292 154,361 138,103 143,260 8.58% Sep 133,037 130,964 132,180 129,199 128,379 136,118 103,842 127,674 7.65% Oct 137,702 129,692 149,109 146,212 130,069 137,290 132,094 137,453 8.24% Nov 172,049 156,396 125,067 124,802 114,916 108,033 140,587 134,550 8.06% Dec 133,711 132,199 163,899 131,404 147,612 127,135 129,849 137,973 8.27% Total 1,777,039 1,596,103 1769,553 1,604,562 1,656,736 1,645,074 1,634,226 1,669,042 100.00% In Broward County, the rainfall season is between late May and Late October. The peak seasonal water demand in Southeast Florida is normally in March, April, and May. However, as shown in Table 5-6, the City does not have a significant peak seasonal water demand. The normal dry season’s peak three months (March, April and May) show an increase of only about three percent above the annual average. A small increase is noted for the first six months of the year. The month of January’s billing averages about nine percent above the annual monthly average of 8.33 percent, which is skewed by inconsistent meter reading dates between the Thanksgiving and New Year holidays. The three hotel motel establishments within the Oakland Park Service Area do have a separate billing category and constitute a minor percentage of the City’s total sales in recent years, as shown in Table 5-7 below. Section 5 –Demand Projections MWH Page 5-6 Table 5-7 City of Oakland Park Hotel/Motel Water Consumption Year Percent of Total Water Consumed 2005 2.28% 2006 2.62% 2007 2.56% Additionally, the City’s agreement with the City of Fort Lauderdale does not include a seasonal or peak factor limitation on the water provided. This is a further indication of the lack of a seasonal demand within the City. The City is able to meet its maximum water demands through the current raw water supplies, plants and the alternative water supply plans of its water supply providers. Section 6 Section 6 Work Plan MWH Page 6-1 6.0 WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORK PLAN The treated and water needs for the City of Oakland Park and the population projections presented in the previous sections, were utilized to ascertain potable water needs for the future. The agreement between the City and Fort Lauderdale does not allocate plant capacity, but Fort Lauderdale agrees to meet water demands from the City of Oakland Park. The Agreement between Oakland Park and Fort Lauderdale is indicated herein in Appendix D. However, Fort Lauderdale has determined through their Water Supply Facilities Work Plan (WSFWP) that new facilities will be required to meet future demands of both their retail and wholesale customers. Their draft WSFWP is included as Appendix B. Since there is no wholesale service from Broward County, no agreement exists with Broward County. However, since they provide retail service to a portion of the City, the Broward County WSFWP is included as Appendix C. 6.1 INFRASTRUCTURE ELEMENT The essential infrastructure elements required for developmental approval and for subsequent certificate of occupancy are required per the City’s Land Development Code. Sign off on adequacy of water supply and treatment are coordinated with Suppliers, Broward County and Fort Lauderdale. On-site retention of storm water and impervious limitations are coordinated with Broward County Environmental Protection Division and, for large projects with SFWMD. Some key Goals, Objectives, and Policies (G.O.P’s) and proposed amendments to these are included at the end of this section (Section 6.8); whereas, the complete G.O.P.’s are included in Volume I of the Oakland Park 2007 Comprehensive Plan. Proposed amendments to the comprehensive plan affect the following elements: Future Land Use, Infrastructure, Conservation, Coastal Management, Capital Improvements and Intergovernmental Coordination. Discussion is included, herein, regarding both the Traditional Water Supply Facilities as well as Alternative Water Supply Projects being proposed by the Suppliers; Broward County and Fort Lauderdale. The City’s ongoing conservation program will continue and be enhanced further as included later in this Report Section. While “Reuse” is included, herein, there are no substantive plans for implementation of reuse projects within the 10 Year WSFWP schedule. Section 6 – Work Plan MWH Page 6-2 6.2 TRADITIONAL WATER SUPPLY PROJECTS The City of Oakland Park does not have any raw water supply facilities on its own and relies on its wholesale supplier of treated water, Fort Lauderdale. The City of Fort Lauderdale has to improve the reliability and expanded the capacity of the Fiveash WTP lime softening process to a firm maximum day treatment capacity of 70 MGD. According to Broward County WSFWP the North Regional wellfield is not anticipated to require any future changes, since the last water use application from the SFWMD limits the amount of water that can be withdrawn from the Biscayne aquifer for water supply needs. The capacity of the existing wellfield is expected to suffice for the water allocation withdrawal according to base conditions. The system #1 Biscayne Aquifer wellfield supplies raw water to WTP #1 from which the treated water is distributed to their retail service area in the City of Oakland Park. This system #1 Biscayne Aquifer wellfield has excess capacity to meet the current and future needs of their system #1 Service Area, which includes their retail Service Area in the City of Oakland Park. However, their withdrawal permit is limited; thus, requiring consideration of future raw water supply from the alternative Floridan Aquifer source for reverse osmosis treatment. 6.3 ALTERNATIVE WATER SUPPLY PROJECTS The City of Fort Lauderdale plans to utilize the Floridan Aquifer as an Alternative Water Supply to meet at least a portion of future demands. The City has already designed and permitted two Floridan Aquifer test production wells to assess water quality conditions. Based on the results obtained, the City of Fort Lauderdale is currently conducting conceptual plans to develop the Floridan Aquifer wellfield. The City of Fort Lauderdale has decided to initiate planning for 6 MGD of additional finished water production at the Peele-Dixie WTP utilizing reverse osmosis treatment of Floridan Aquifer water. The City has started an evaluation of future water treatment facilities, permitting requirements, order of magnitude project cost estimates and a preliminary project delivery schedule. The City of Fort Lauderdale has also evaluated various other options including wastewater reclamation and reuse in addition to inter- basin transfer of surface waters. For details of the Fort Lauderdale WSFWP see Appendix B. Broward County (BCWWS) also plans to use raw water supply from the Floridan aquifer as its alternative water supply. BCWWS plans to construct the Floridan wells and a reverse osmosis (R.O.) treatment plant that treats brackish raw water from the Floridan aquifer. The treatment plant is planned to be located at the existing District 1 Section 6 – Work Plan MWH Page 6-3 treatment plant site. The design and construction of the plant will be phased such that the first stage produces a minimum of 4.5 MGD of finished water and is expandable to a minimum of 5.5 MGD, with its first phase lasting at least 10 years. The basis of design for the plant will use a 1.36 maximum day to average day peak factor and 25% in plant process use of raw water. 6.4 CONSERVATION PROGRAMS The City of Oakland Park’s 1998 Comprehensive Plan included the objective to reduce its per capita water consumption rates by at least 5 percent through 2001. The City will continue to have water conservation practices through the long-range planning horizon and will coordinate with the City of Fort Lauderdale and Broward County on the incorporation of other water conservation techniques. As previously mentioned, the City will take steps to keep its per capita use below the 150 gpcd level and has projected its treated water supply needs on 148 gpcd. Several conservation measures will be utilized to keep the per capita demands below 150 gpcd. These measures include: An inverted tiered rate structure, Purchase and Distribution of Pre-Rinse Valves and Water Conservation Kits, Water Meter Replacement and Leak Detection Program, continued monitoring of losses and benefits of conservation practices implemented, and compliance with regulatory requirements for watering limits. The inverted conservation rate structure is being prepared for adoption by the City Council this year. The purchase and distribution of Pre-Rinse Valves and Water Conservation Kits is being applied for via a SFWMD Water Savings Incentive Program (SIP) grant program. The Pre-Rinse Spray Valves for Commercial Users could save from 100,000 to 300,000 gpyear per installation; See Table 6-1. If 100 commercial installations are successfully facilitated it would amount to saving between 10 and 30 mgpyear. The City will request 150 such pre-rinse valves. If all 150 were properly installed and used the annual water savings would be between 15 and 45 mgpyear. Section 6 – Work Plan MWH Page 6-4 Table 6-1 Pre-Rinse Spray Valves Water Savings (Per Unit) Hrs/day Old Valve 4GPM New Valve 1.28 GPM Water Savings (Gallons) WW Savings (Gallons) Annual Water Savings (Gallons) Annual WW Savings (Gallons) 2 480 154 326 326 101,837 101,837 4 960 307 653 653 203,674 203,674 6 1440 461 979 979 305,510 305,510 Potential Customer Cost Savings Business Size Spray Valve Usage (Hours per day) Wastewater and Savings (Gallons per day) Annual Dollar Savings* Small 2 326 $566 Medium 4 653 $1,137 Large 6 979 $1,708 *Based on City of Oakland Park water and wastewater rates as of March 2008, with 312 days of usage The purchase and distribution of water conservation kits will save between 8,760 and 26,280 gpyear (gallons per year) per kit. See Table 6-2 for water savings per installed water conservation kit. For each 1,000 kits successfully installed 9 to 26 mgpyear treated water will be saved. The City has about 1,000 such kits on hand. The City is applying for over 3,000 additional kits from the SFWMD under the SFWMD Water Savings Incentive Program. If 3,000 additional kits are implemented, an additional 26 to 79 mgpyear can be conserved. The City has typically provided for a Water Meter Replacement and Leak Detection Program in their annual budgets. In this current fiscal year $120,000 has been budgeted for this meter replacement/leak detection program. While such is done routinely, the City cannot make future year budget commitments as each budget must be done annually. There are no bonds, loans, or other long term Capital Improvement Funds outstanding or committed for this program. Through an inter local Agreement between Broward County and Oakland Park, the City has taken advantage of the Mobile Irrigation Lab Program here in Broward County. The mobile irrigation lab is part of the County’s NatureScape Irrigation Service (NIS) and reports at least annually on results obtained during their irrigation evaluations. Based on data from December 6, 2006 until December 5, 2007 an actual water savings of over 840,000 gallons was realized. This was an average reduction of 11% per site evaluated. The savings were due to a Section 6 – Work Plan MWH Page 6-5 combination of repairs and adjustments in the frequency and duration of actual watering of landscaping. Table 6-2 Water Conservation Kits Savings per Kit Gallons Used Regular Shower Head (4 gpm) Low Flow Shower Head (2 gpm) Savings Annual Water Saved (Gallons) Annual Dollar Savings* 5 Minute Shower 20 10 10 3,650 $20 3 Showers / Day 60 30 30 10,950 $61 Reg Aerators Low Flow Aerator Kitchen 2.2 1.5 Bathroom 2.2 1.5 4.4 3.0 1.4 10 Min/Day* 365 Days 16,060 10,950 5,110 $28 30 Min/Day*365 Days 48,180 32,850 15,330 $84 Low Water Savings Estimate (Gallons) 8,760 $49 High Water Savings Estimate (Gallons) 26,280 $147 *Based on City of Oakland Park water and wastewater rates as of March 2008, with 365 days of usage All water conservation programs and incentives, current and future, implemented by the City will support the goals and objectives of the Lower East Coast Water Supply Plan implemented by the South Florida Water Management District. The City’s water conservation program will also conform to anticipated amendments to Florida Statute 62-40.412 – Water Resource Implementation Rule: Water Conservation. The City of Oakland Park will continue to monitor the benefits of the above programs and leak detection and repairs from the system operations and maintenance budget. Also, lawn watering restrictions and conservation mandates from regulatory agencies will be adhered to by the City. The City of Fort Lauderdale has actively pursued a Conservation strategy that enforces water restriction during drought and implemented a conservation rate structure amongst other measures. For more information see the Fort Lauderdale WSFWP in Appendix B. Section 6 – Work Plan MWH Page 6-6 In the past BCWWS has implemented a conservation program that includes limiting irrigating hours, xeriscape principles, use of low flow and water conservation fixtures, installation of rain sensor devices on irrigation systems, tiered rate structure, and a leak detection program amongst other programs and efforts. BCWWS will continue to enforce these water conservation components in addition to including the following efforts: •Water Use Profile study to gather additional data to identify and reduce water loss throughout their transmission and distribution system. •Rebate Program feasibility study •Education Programs •Demand Management through the use of Mobile Irrigation lab inspections and industrial and commercial user water audits. For more information see the Broward County WSFWP in Appendix C. 6.5 REUSE PROGRAM As previously indicated, the City of Oakland Park has no wastewater treatment facilities within its city limits nor access to wastewater effluent treated for reuse. Should either Broward County or Fort Lauderdale make treated effluent available for reuse, Oakland Park would consider taking benefit of such service. However, previous evaluations have indicated that the alternative water supplies anticipated by both Fort Lauderdale and Broward County is the usage of the brackish Floridan Aquifer treated by reverse osmosis. As mentioned above, the City of Fort Lauderdale has previously conducted studies that have demonstrated the practical, logistical and economic infeasibility of instituting most options to reuse reclaimed water. Based on these results, Fort Lauderdale has decided to undertake an additional analysis designed to determine the feasibility of implementing selected reclaimed water projects. The City of Fort Lauderdale will continue to review alternatives for waste water reuse for the future. Water conservation measures such as the development and construction of Aquifer Storage and Retrieval (ASR) wells will also be considered. Construction of an irrigation-quality reclaimed water production facility at or near their WWTP for further treatment of effluent to public reuse standards is not feasible. Other skimming or scalping WWTP’s are being considered as alternatives; see Appendix B. Broward County currently does not have any reclaimed water facilities within their District #1 Service Area which includes their retail service area within the City of Section 6 – Work Plan MWH Page 6-7 Oakland Park. Their WSFWP (See Appendix C) does not include any reuse of wastewater effluent as an alternative water supply source. It is important to note that reuse in the form of groundwater recharge or surface water discharge is economically infeasible in Broward County because of local discharge regulations. Such regulations essentially mandate additional wastewater treatment via the Membrane Bioreactor Process followed by Reverse Osmosis or Nanofiltration. Such processes would only be used as an offset to enable additional raw water withdrawal from the Biscayne Aquifer, thus cost prohibitive with such stringent regulations. 6.6 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS ELEMENT The City of Oakland Park does not have any Capital Improvement Plans (C.I.P.) related to water supply and treatment. Table 6-3 indicates the treated water supply needs for the entire City of Oakland Park. These treated water needs will be provided by Fort Lauderdale (retail and wholesale) and Broward County (retail). See Table 6-4 and Appendix B for details on the Fort Lauderdale WSFWP and Appendix C for Broward County’s WSFWP. As required by state law, the City is including the alternative water supply plans of both its suppliers in its Capital Improvements Element. These proposed amendments are identified in Table 6-4, 6-5, and in Table 12 in Section 6.8. Even though Oakland Park does not have any immediate need, some expenditures will be made to benefit the transmission and distribution system. As indicated in Section 6.4, Tables 6-1 and 6-2; the City continues to place emphasis on replacement of old meters and leak detection, plus conservation measures to reduce system demand. See Table 6-6 for a current list of such projects. 6.7 INTERGOVERNMENTAL COORDINATION ELEMENT The City, in preparation of this document, coordinated with a number of governmental agencies so that the findings and conclusions were the result of information exchange and an understanding of the implications associated with this plan. Specifically the City’s Planning and Utilities staff met with The City of Fort Lauderdale and Broward County. Through these meetings, the City conveyed its water service areas, population projections, its water demand projections and the need for continued communication as future growth occurs. As part of its EAR-based amendments, the City included policies to continue future coordination with its water suppliers in the Intergovernmental Coordination Element (Policy 8.3.5). Several additional policies are proposed in Section 6.8 to reflect other items in the WSFWP. The City shall coordinate with its water suppliers through existing agreements, the Broward County Water Resources Task Force, and at an annual meeting (prior to adoption of each fiscal year budget), to collaborate on water supply planning issues such as: population projections; the development of efficient, cost-effective, and Section 6 – Work Plan MWH Page 6-8 technically feasible water supply sources that will supplement future demands; without causing adverse impacts to water quality; wetlands and aquatic systems. Consideration and coordination efforts for each major water project shall be noted in the Work Plan. Table 6-3 Current and Projected Treated Water Supply Needs Item 2005 2008 2010 2013 2015 2018 2020 2025 2030 Population 40,851 44,887 45,873 48,201 49,752 52,015 53,523 57,280 60,121 Per Capita Needs* gpcpd 151 147.3 147.4 147.5 147.5 147.5 147.2 147.3 147.0 Potable Water Demands (mgd) (daily average annual) 6.17 6.61 6.76 7.11 7.34 7.67 7.88 8.44 8.84 Volume from Biscayne** — — — — — — — — — Volume from Floridan** — — — — — — — — — Combination of Biscayne & Floridan Volume** mgd 6.17 6.61 6.76 7.11 7.34 7.67 7.88 8.44 8.84 Volume from Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Volume from Reclaimed 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Additional Potable Water Needed 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 *Future Per Capita need will vary slightly , but stay slightly below the 148 gpcpd upper limit. **The Division of the Treated Water Source has not been determined, but will depend upon Suppliers operations; thus the treated water volume shown. The City of Oakland Park does not have a dedicated page or Section in the Lower East Coast Plan as adopted in February, 2006. Both Fort Lauderdale and Broward County, District 1, which provide service within the Oakland Park City Limits, do have Utility Summaries within said L.E.C. Plan. The plans of Broward County, District 1 and Fort Lauderdale call for future supplies from the alternative source, Floridan Aquifer, using reverse osmosis for treatment. Oakland Park has been coordinating and cooperating with both Suppliers for many years as exemplified by the following actions: •January, 1994 Agreement with Fort Lauderdale as well as recent amendment dated January, 2007 to revise service area boundaries based on annexation and service area changes with Broward County. •New interconnection location #12 with Fort Lauderdale to have improved flow into the central east area of the Oakland Park Service Area where new water main improvements were implemented. •Coordination and cooperation with Broward County with regards to annexation, neighborhood improvement program (includes water main improvements), and service area boundary shifts within the City Limits. Section 6 - Work Plan MWH Page 6-9 Table 6-4 Water Supply Facilities Work Plan Projects and Programs All Public, Private and Regional Projects and Programs Serving Oakland Park Utility Serving Oakland Park Future Project Providing Water to Oakland Park Finished Water (MGD) Water Source for Project or Program Date Project Online Capital Cost Population Served Within Jurisdiction1 City of Fort Lauderdale Peele-Dixie Floridan Water Supply, R.O. Treatment Facility 6.0 Floridan Aquifer 2013 $31.52 million 35,778 Broward County Water and Wastewater Services District 1 Floridan Aquifer R. O. Water Treatment Plant 4.5 Floridan Aquifer 2013 $46.3 million 12,513 1 The population shown is the total projected population within the City of Oakland Park in 2013 served potable water from these alternative water supply projects. The population numbers shown for Fort Lauderdale include both the retail area and the wholesale area served by Fort Lauderdale and includes the retail area invoiced by Oakland Park. Sources: City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Facilities Work Plan and Broward County 10-Year Water Supply Facilities Workplan. 2 Not including engineering, land acquisition, legal, and administrative costs. Section 6 – Work Plan MWH Page 6-10 Š‹•ŽȱŜȬśȱȱ’¢ȱ˜ȱŠ”•Š—ȱŠ›”ȱŠ™’Š•ȱ –™›˜ŸŽ–Ž—œȱŽšž’›Žȱ˜ȱŽŽȱ›˜“ŽŒŽȱŠŽ›ȱŽ›Ÿ’ŒŽȱ›ŽŠȱ ›˜ ‘ȱ‘›˜ž‘ȱŘŖŗŞȘȱ˜ǯȱ ›˜“ŽŒȱȱ ’œŒŠ•ȱŽŠ›ȱ žž›Žȱ ˜›”ȱ•Š—ȱȱ ŽœŒ›’™’˜—ȱ ŘŖŖŞȱ ŘŖŖşȱ ŘŖŗŖȱ ŘŖŗŗȱ ŘŖŗŘȱ ŘŖŗřȱ ŘŖŗŚȱ ŘŖŗśȱ ŘŖŗŜȱ ŘŖŗŝȱŘŖŗŞȱ ȱ ˜Š•ȱŗȱ ȱȱ –’—’œ›Š’˜—ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱȱ˜—œ›žŒ’˜—ȱ ȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱȱ˜—’—Ž—Œ¢ȱ ȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱȱž‹˜Š•ȱŽŽȱŠ‹•ŽȱŜȬŚȱŠ—ȱŽŽȱ’¢ȱ˜ȱ˜›ȱŠžŽ›Š•Žȱȱȱ’—ȱ™™Ž—’¡ȱȃȄȱȱŘȱ ȱȱ –’—’œ›Š’˜—ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱȱ˜—œ›žŒ’˜—ȱ ȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱȱ˜—’—Ž—Œ¢ȱ ȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱȱž‹˜Š•ȱŽŽȱŠ‹•ŽȱŜȬŚȱŠ—ȱŽŽȱ›˜ Š›ȱ˜ž—¢ȱȱ’—ȱ™™Ž—’¡ȱȃȄȱȱřȱ ȱȱ –’—’œ›Š’˜—ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱȱ˜—œ›žŒ’˜—ȱ ȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱȱ˜—’—Ž—Œ¢ȱ ȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱȱ ž‹˜Š•ȱ ȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱŚȱ ȱȱ –’—’œ›Š’˜—ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱȱ˜—œ›žŒ’˜—ȱ ȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱȱ˜—’—Ž—Œ¢ȱ ȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱȱ ž‹˜Š•ȱ ȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱȱȱ ȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱȘ‘Žȱ’¢ȱ˜ȱŠ”•Š—ȱŠ›”ȱ˜Žœȱ—˜ȱ›Žšž’›ŽȱŠ—¢ȱŠ™’Š•ȱ –™›˜ŸŽ–Ž—œȱ˜ȱ‘Ž’›ȱ›Š—œ–’œœ’˜—ȱŠ—ȱ’œ›’‹ž’˜—ȱ¢œŽ–ȱ˜ȱŠŒŒŽ™ȱ›ŽŠŽȱ ŠŽ›ȱ›˜–ȱ˜›ȱŠžŽ›Š•ŽȱŠ—ȱ’œ›’‹žŽȱœŠ–Žȱ˜ȱ‘Ž’›ȱ›ŽŠ’•ȱŒžœ˜–Ž›œǯȱȱ˜‘ȱ˜›ȱŠžŽ›Š•ŽȱŠ—ȱ›˜ Š›ȱ˜ž—¢ȱ‘ŠŸŽȱœžŒ‘ȱŠ™’Š•ȱ –™›˜ŸŽ–Ž—ȱ—ŽŽœȱŠœȱ’—’ŒŠŽȱ’—ȱȱ™™Ž—’¡ȱȱŠ—ȱ™™Ž—’¡ȱȱ›Žœ™ŽŒ’ŸŽ•¢ǯȱ Section 6 – Work Plan MWH Page 6-11Table 6-6 City of Oakland Park System Improvements, Renewal and Replacements*** No. Project Fiscal Year Future Work Plan Description 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 Total 1 Water Meter Replacement and Leak Detection Program* Administration Construction Contingency Subtotal 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 TBC 1320 2 Pre-Rinse Valves per SFWMD Savings Incentive Program (SIP)** Administration 5 5 Construction 15 15 Contingency 5 5 Subtotal 25 TBD 25 3 Water Conservation Kits per SFWMD Savings Incentive Program (SIP)** Administration 5 5 Construction 15 15 Contingency 5 5 Subtotal 25 TBD 25 Notes: 1. Costs shown in thousands of dollars (2008). 2. Administration includes administration, engineering, inspection, legal and permit related activities. 3. TBC = to be continued 4. TBD = to be determined * Funded Annually from Water Operating Budget. ** Funded Partially from SFWMD grant and partially from annual Water Operating Budget. ***City is engaged in a Utilities Rate Study at the present with two main objectives: 1. Provide inverted tiered rate structure to encourage water conservation. 2. Provide direct funding or loan funding for future improvement projects. Section 6 – Work Plan MWH Page 6-12 •Utilization of the Broward County Mobile Irrigation Lab to reduce irrigation losses. •Procedures adopted by the City for notification to City Residents of both voluntary and mandatory water restrictions in conjunction with SFWMD. The City, even though not a Supplier, will continue to coordinate and cooperate with the Suppliers, regulatory agencies, and planning departments to help in demand management, reduction in system losses, conservation practices, and utilization of alternative raw water sources. Previous implementation of Land Development Regulations by the City assures that adequate water supply and treatment facilities will be in place to serve existing and proposed new developments prior to issuance of a building permit or certificate of occupancy. 6.8 GOALS, OBJECTIVES, AND POLICIES AND PROPOSED AMENDMENTS TO INCORPORATE THE WSFWP 6.8.1 Existing Goals Objectives and Policies The following are the existing goals, objectives and policies supporting the goal of the city related to potable water supply. Future Land Use Element Goal 1 Protect and enhance the single-family residential, multiple-family residential, nonresidential and natural resource areas of Oakland Park. Objective 1.1 The City shall continue to enforce the Land Development Code in order to assure that all new development connects to public sewer and water, addresses traffic problems, and respects its soil and terrain characteristics. Policy 1.1.1 As new development and redevelopment occurs, require a tie-in to public sanitary sewer and potable water systems, wherever feasible. Policy 1.1.5 The City shall continue to provide a Concurrency Management System (CMS) as incorporated within the land development code. The CMS provides procedures and criteria to assess future development approval requests relative to impacts to the adopted level of service standards. The procedures establish mechanisms such that development impacts can be phased concurrently with the level of service standards for roadways, recreation and open space and infrastructure facilities (i.e., sanitary sewer, drainage, solid waste, potable water and natural aquifer recharge). Development applications that are not consistent with the adopted level of Section 6 – Work Plan MWH Page 6-13 service standards or cannot be phased concurrently with available facilities will be denied. The Concurrency Management System includes the following guidelines. •The City shall not grant a development permit for a proposed development unless the City has determined that public facilities are adequate to serve the needs of the proposed development or unless the developer agrees in writing that no certificate of occupancy shall be issued for the proposed development until public facilities meet the LOS Standards as specified in the Land Development Code. Transportation facilities must be in place or under construction within three years of building permit, or functional equivalent, approval. •A preliminary concurrency determination shall be made at the earliest stage of development permit review process. Final concurrency should be determined at site plan or final plat stage. •The prescribed service needs must be met upon completion of construction and prior to issuance of a certificate of occupancy. •The burden of indicating compliance is upon the developer. Sufficient and verifiable information showing compliance is required for approval. •The City shall be responsible for monitoring development activity to ensure the development is consistent with the City Comprehensive Plan. Monitoring shall include monthly reports of all new or amended land development regulations including changes in zoning districts, building permits, demolition permits, certificates of occupancy and an annual summary of land use acreage. •Compliance will be finally calculated and capacity reserved at the time of final action of an approved site plan or an enforceable developer’s agreement. Applications for development permits shall be chronologically logged upon approval to determine rights to available capacity. •A building permit application must be submitted within 18 months of site plan approval to preserve the concurrency reservation. Section 6 – Work Plan MWH Page 6-14 Infrastructure Element Goal 4 To ensure that basic urban services of potable water, sanitary sewer and solid waste disposal, and land drainage capabilities are available and adequate to meet the needs of all City residents and businesses. Objective 4.1 The City shall continue to provide local infrastructure services in accord with the following Level of Service Standards: a) Average and peak flow per capita rates for sanitary sewer. b) Pickup frequency/per capita generation rate for solid waste. c) Storm drainage design criteria, and d) Minimum design flow and fire pressure and per capita consumption rate for potable water. Policy 4.1.1 Adopt the local level of service standards for infrastructure services as follows: •For sanitary sewer - 150 gallons per day per resident •For potable water - 150 gallons per day per resident •For fire flow - as required by the Fire Marshall •For solid waste - 8 pounds per capita per day with bi-weekly pickup •For drainage (Roadway Crown) - 10 year 3 day storm •For drainage (Finished Floor) - floor elevation above 100 years 3 day storm. Finished floor shall be no lower than the highest of: 1. One (1) foot above the FEMA Flood Insurance Rate Base Flood Elevation; or 2. The 100-year flood elevation as determined by the Broward County100-year Flood Criteria Map; or 3. Twelve (12) inches above the adjacent road crown for residential development and six (6) inches above the adjacent road crown for nonresidential development. Policy 4.1.4 Maintain the level of service standards through perpetuation of the existing or future inter-local retail service agreements with Fort Lauderdale, Broward County and, where appropriate, private service providers. Section 6 – Work Plan MWH Page 6-15 Policy 4.1.5 Review and, if appropriate, consider the adoption of revised level of service standards based on planning efforts of outside service providers to the City. Objective 4.2 The City shall continue to implement land development regulations to assure that new development or redevelopment occurs concurrently with the adopted level of service standards. Policy 4.2.1 Approval of all City development and redevelopment plans shall be conditioned on service availability at the adopted standards concurrently with development. Objective 4.8 Through the Year 2012, correct existing water distribution system deficiencies, extend water service to non-serviced areas as appropriate and support centralized regional wellfield and water conservation efforts. Policy 4.8.1 Include in the annual modification of the Capital Improvement Program funding for correcting existing water distribution system deficiencies. Policy 4.8.2 Through implementation of the Land Development Regulations the City shall continue to require extension of water services to new developments. Policy 4.8.3 Support centralized regional wellfield efforts through the adoption of resolutions. Policy 4.8.4 Retain a procedure, in conjunction with water suppliers and the South Florida Water Management District, to notify City residents of voluntary and mandatory water conservation practices during drought periods. Objective 4.10 Prior to Plat approval, ensure that the public facilities and services necessary to meet the level of service standards established within the City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan will be available concurrent with the impacts of the development, consistent with Chapter 163.3202(g) Florida Statutes and the concurrency management policies included within Goal 1 of the Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan. Objective 4.11 Coordinate with Broward County, the City of Fort Lauderdale, and the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD) to address the City’s water supply and wastewater treatment needs for 2030. Section 6 – Work Plan MWH Page 6-16 Policy 4.11.1 The City shall coordinate with Broward County and the City of Fort Lauderdale to ensure potable water and wastewater service is provided to the North Andrews Neighborhood annexation area by 2009 and to the Twin Lakes South annexation area by 2012. Policy 4.11.2 Within 18 months after adoption of the Lower East Coast Water Supply Plan by the SFWMD, the City shall amend the Comprehensive Plan to: •Include a water supply facilities work plan. •Identify and incorporate the alternate water supply project(s) selected by the City’s water suppliers, Broward County and the City of Fort Lauderdale; and •Identify traditional and alternate water supply projects and programs necessary to meet current and future water use demands. Policy 4.11.3 By 2012, the City shall establish water conservation programs, such as public education, graduated water rates, or required low-flow fixtures in new development. Coastal Management Goal 5 To develop and maintain the coastal area of the City in a manner which protects human life, limits public expenditures in areas subject to destruction by natural disasters and perpetuates existing upland uses while best preserving local shoreline and tidewater resources. Objective 5.6 Provide for urban services consistent with the level of service standards of each Comprehensive Plan Element. Policy 5.6.1 Maintain existing inter-local agreements for provision of potable water and wastewater collection with the City of Fort Lauderdale and Broward County. Conservation Goal 6 The development and maintenance of a high quality natural environment based on the preservation, improvement and wise use of local existing natural resources. Objective 6.4 Promote water conservation by advocating reduced consumption and encouraging development and redevelopment to include xeriscape and other water conservation techniques in its design. Section 6 – Work Plan MWH Page 6-17 Policy 6.4.1 The City shall continue to utilize standardized procedures to notify City residents of voluntary and mandatory (when requested by the South Florida Water Management District) water conservation practices during drought periods. Policy 6.4.2 The City shall distribute information on water conservation techniques through water service bills and at City-owned civic locations such as City Hall and the Public Works Department. Policy 6.4.3 The City shall continue to participate in the National “Xeriscape” Council and continue to plant drought tolerant species, where feasible. Policy 6.4.4 The City shall continue to encourage green building in the Federal Highway Mixed Use Business and Entertainment Overlay District, and shall consider including similar incentives for green building in other redeveloping areas of the City. Intergovernmental Coordination Goal 8 To maintain a cooperative and effective local environment of communication and participation with other governments and government agencies in the overall best interest of City residents and businesses. Objective 8.3 The City shall continue to review local level of service (LOS) standards for sanitary sewer, potable water and solid waste for consistency with those of outside providers of City infrastructure services such as Fort Lauderdale and Broward County and amend the City's adopted LOS standards as necessary to ensure consistency and facilitate execution and renewal of inter-local agreements and service contracts, as deemed appropriate by the City Commission. Policy 8.3.1 When negotiating or renewing inter-local service agreements with Fort Lauderdale and/or Broward County, the City shall provide for contractual recognition of adopted local level of service standards. Policy 8.3.2 The City shall review the level of service standards subsequently adopted by other government service providers (Fort Lauderdale and Broward County) to the City through continued monitoring of the actions of the Broward County Planning Council and Board of County Commissioners with respect to the amendment of adjacent jurisdictional Comprehensive Plans. To identify consistency with local level of service standards, the Section 6 – Work Plan MWH Page 6-18 City will annually contact all service providers to obtain current information, and evaluate if future modifications to either the service agreements or level of service standards should be included in subsequent Comprehensive Plan amendments. Policy 8.3.5 The City shall coordinate with the SFWMD and the City’s potable water providers, Broward County and the City of Fort Lauderdale, in implementing the regional water supply plan as it applies to the City of Oakland Park, including identified traditional and alternate water supply projects. Capital Improvements Goal 9 To ensure the orderly and efficient provision of all public services and facilities necessary to serve existing and future local population needs. Objective 9.2 The City shall continue to implement a Concurrency Management System that ensures development or redevelopment proposals are approved consistent with the programmed provision of additional services at the adopted level of service standards and meets existing and future facility needs. Policy 9.2.1 The City shall continue to review development proposals cognizant of the City’s adopted level of service standards, existing levels of service and where appropriate, the timeframe for implementation of additional facility improvements. Policy 9.2.2 The approval of proposed development or redevelopment projects shall be conditioned on the basis of project related service needs being concurrently available at the adopted level of service standards specified in Policy 9.2.4. Transportation facilities needed to serve development or redevelopment projects shall be in place or under construction within three (3) years after the building permit, or functional equivalent, is approved. Policy 9.2.3 Subject to Policy 9.2.2., the City shall allow for phasing of development related infrastructure improvements concurrently with project impacts on public facilities. Policy 9.2.4 The Level of Service (LOS) standards for capital facilities shall be: •For sanitary sewer - 150 gallons per day per resident •For potable water - 150 gallons per day per resident •For fire flow - as required by the Fire Marshall Section 6 – Work Plan MWH Page 6-19 •For solid waste - 8.0 pounds per capita per day with bi-weekly pickup •For drainage (Roadway Crown) - 10 year, 3 day storm •For drainage (Finished Floor) - Floor elevation above 100 year, 3 day storm; finished floor shall be no lower than the highest of: 1. One (1) foot above the FEMA Flood Insurance Rate Base Flood Elevation; or 2. The 100-year flood elevation as determined by the Broward County 100-year Flood Criteria Map; or 3. Twelve (12) inches above the adjacent road crown for residential development and six (6) inches above the adjacent road crown for nonresidential development. For parks and recreation facilities – three (3) acres per 1,000 residents, with two (2) acres per 1,000 population provided by neighborhood parks or mini-parks and one (1) acre per 1,000 population provided by community parks; and •For transportation facilities: •I-95 (a SIS corridor) - LOS E. •Cypress Creek Road from I-95 to Andrews Avenue and Andrews Avenue from Cypress Creek Road to the Tri-Rail station entrance (a SIS connector) - LOS D. •As part of the Broward County Central District using transit oriented concurrency – coordinate with the county to achieve headways of 30 minutes or less on 80% of routes (non-contract BCT routes), establish at least one neighborhood transit center, and establish at least two additional community bus routes, increase bus shelters by 30%, and maintain the peak hour two- way maximum service volumes on arterial roads as listed below: •Two-lane arterials 2,555 •Four-lane arterials 5,442 •Six-lane arterials 8,190 •Eight-lane arterials 10,605; and •For Local Roadways - LOS C ADT, PSDT and PKHR Section 6 – Work Plan MWH Page 6-20 Policy 9.2.5 By 2008, the City shall review and modify as necessary the land development regulations to be consistent with the level of service standards and the requirements of Florida Statutes regarding the timing of development and the provision of facilities and infrastructure. Objective 9.4 Provide a capital program that can be adequately accommodated by projected revenues or other available financial resources. Policy 9.4.4 Within 18 months of adoption of the Lower East Coast Water Supply Plan, the City shall amend the comprehensive plan to include supply projects and work plan schedules and funding as identified by Broward County and the City of Fort Lauderdale. 6.8.2 Proposed Amendments to Incorporate the WSFWP The following are the proposed amendments to Volume I of the City’s comprehensive plan that are necessary to incorporate the WSFWP. For brevity, only those sections proposed for amendment are included. Amendments to the Supporting Data and Analysis and Map Volume are also proposed to incorporate the WSFWP but are not included in this section since they are not formally adopted by the City. The supporting data and revised map will be included as part of the comprehensive plan amendment package transmitted to the reviewing agencies. Introduction General The Local Government Comprehensive Planning Act of 1975 (LGCPA) requires each governmental jurisdiction to prepare and adopt a comprehensive plan. Significant revisions to the LGCPA in 1985 and 1986 (known as the Growth Management Act) have added additional requirements for a more detailed and systematic approach to local planning. In 2005, revisions to the Growth Management Act established a “pay-as-you- grow” plan through Senate Bills 360, 444 and 362 to ensure the roads, schools and water are available to meet the needs of communities. In addition to the State Acts, the State of Florida Department of Community Affairs issued minimum criteria for plan compliance in Rule 9J-5 of the Florida Administrative Code. The Comprehensive Plan for the City of Oakland Park has been prepared relative to the State Growth Management Act and Rule 9J-5. It is designed to provide a guide for the future physical, economic, and social development of the City of Oakland Park. In 2008, the City adopted a Water Supply Facilities Work Plan (Exhibit 1) and in accordance with state law, portions of this Work Plan have been incorporated into the Section 6 – Work Plan MWH Page 6-21 Comprehensive Plan. Affected sections include the Future Land Use, Infrastructure, Conservation, Coastal Management, Capital Improvements and Intergovernmental Coordination Elements. To be consistent with the Water Supply Facilities Work Plan, information for the years 2013 and 2018 was included as appropriate. Future Land Use Policy 1.1.9 Adequate water supplies and potable water facilities shall be in place and available to serve new development or redevelopment that increases density or intensity no later than the issuance by the City of a certificate of occupancy or its functional equivalent. Prior to approval of a building permit or its functional equivalent that allows an increase in density or intensity, the City shall consult with the applicable water supplier to determine whether adequate water supplies to serve the new development will be available no later than the anticipated date of issuance of a certificate of occupancy or its functional equivalent. The Land Development Regulations shall be updated to reflect this change by 2009. Policy 1.7.5 Proposed amendments to the Future Land Use Map shall provide data and analysis demonstrating that adequate water supply and associated public facilities will be available to meet projected growth demands. Infrastructure Policy 4.1.1 Adopt the local level of service standards for infrastructure services as follows: •For sanitary sewer - 150 gallons per day per resident •For potable water - 148 gallons per day per resident •For fire flow - as required by the Fire Marshall •For solid waste - 8 pounds per capita per day with bi-weekly pickup •For drainage (Roadway Crown) - 10 year 3 day storm •For drainage (Finished Floor) - floor elevation above 100 yr 3 day storm. Finished floor shall be no lower than the highest of: 1. One (1) foot above the FEMA Flood Insurance Rate Base Flood Elevation; or 2. The 100-year flood elevation as determined by the Broward County 100-year Flood Criteria Map; or 3. Twelve (12) inches above the adjacent road crown for residential Section 6 – Work Plan MWH Page 6-22 development and six (6) inches above the adjacent road crown for nonresidential development. Policy 4.1.4 Maintain the level of service standards through perpetuation of the existing or future inter-local retail service agreements with Fort Lauderdale and Broward County Policy 4.1.7 By 2012, establish an implementation program to increase the number of fire hydrants and improve fire flow as identified in the water distribution system analysis undertaken in 2005. Policy 4.1.8 By 2012 the City will evaluate the feasibility of creating a potable water level of service standard for non-residential users. Objective 4.8 Through the Year 2018, correct existing water distribution system deficiencies and extend water service to non-serviced areas as appropriate. Policy 4.8.3 Retain a procedure, in conjunction with water suppliers and the South Florida Water Management District, to notify City residents of voluntary and mandatory water conservation practices during drought periods. Objective 4.11 Coordinate with Broward County and the City of Fort Lauderdale to address the City’s water supply and wastewater treatment needs for 2030. Policy 4.11.2 By 2012, the City shall undertake a study to assess inflow and infiltration (I/I) of wastewater facilities in order to reduce wastewater treatment demand and achieve the level of service standard target for 2030. Policy 4.11.3 The City shall establish emergency water main interconnections with Broward County within their franchise service area by 2013. Objective 4.12 The City shall coordinate land use planning with the management of water source and supply plans through the Comprehensive Plan, coordination with the City’s water providers, and the South Florida Water Management District’s Lower East Coast Water Supply Plan. Policy 4.12.1 The City shall maintain a Water Supply Facilities Work Plan (Work Plan) for at least a ten (10) year planning period addressing water supply facilities necessary to serve existing and future development within the City and support other local and regional water supply plans. The Work Plan shall be incorporated wholly into the Infrastructure Element of the Comprehensive Plan. Other elements of the Section 6 – Work Plan MWH Page 6-23 Comprehensive Plan shall be amended as necessary to support and be consistent with the Work Plan. Policy 4.12.2 Capital projects scheduled in the first five years of the ten year Work Plan shall be included in the Capital Improvements Element which is to be financially feasible. This schedule shall be updated annually as necessary to maintain consistency with the capital projects listed in the Work Plan and within 18 months following updates to the Lower East Coast Water Supply Plan, the City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Plan, or the Broward County Water Supply Plan. Policy 4.12.3 The City shall coordinate the Water Supply Facilities Work Plan with the adopted Future Land Use Map and the socio-economic data projections of the Comprehensive Plan. This coordination will occur in two ways: •Long range water supply planning to meet future service demand shall be based upon Broward County’s socio-economic data projections for the City. The City shall update its socio-economic data every seven years with the Evaluation and Appraisal Report or more frequently as needed. Coordination with the City of Fort Lauderdale and Broward County regarding their service areas will be completed as part of these updates. •Prior to issuing a building permit that increases density or intensity, the City shall continue to require a concurrency review finding that the calculated water service demand can be met by available and uncommitted facility capacity and water supply. Policy 4.12.4 The City shall coordinate with and be consistent with the South Florida Water Management District’s most current Lower East Coast (LEC) Water Supply Plan when proposing or amending the ten-year Water Supply Facilities Work Plan (Work Plan). At a minimum, this coordination shall take place within 18 months following an update to the LEC, generally done every five (5) years, and be documented in the text of the Work Plan. Policy 4.12.5 The City shall coordinate with its water suppliers through existing agreements, the Broward County Water Resources Task Force, and at an annual meeting (prior to adoption of each fiscal year budget), to collaborate on water supply planning issues; such as population projections, water conservation practices, the development of efficient, cost-effective, and technically feasible water supply sources that will supplement future demands, without causing adverse impacts to water Section 6 – Work Plan MWH Page 6-24 quality, wetlands and aquatic systems. Consideration and coordination efforts for each major water project shall be noted in the Work Plan. Policy 4.12.6 The City shall seek to maximize the use of existing potable water facilities, when financially and technically feasible, through the implementation of conservation techniques as described in the Work Plan, including but not limited to reducing per capita water consumption rates through education, incentive programs (promoting utilization of water conservation kits, pre-rinse valves, and leak detection kits), the replacement of outdated water meters, and water conservation techniques (xeriscaping). Policy 4.12.7 By 2012 the City shall implement a water conservation type rate structure for the City’s retail service area. Policy 4.12.8 By 2012 the City shall reduce losses in the water system to ten percent or less. Strategies to achieve this reduction include the replacement of outdated water meters and implementation of a more detailed “unbilled use” tracking program. If these strategies have not resulted in a reduction of system loss, the City will engage an outside leak detection firm to identify pipe leaks and make the necessary repairs. . Policy 4.12.9 The City will apply for a Water Savings Incentive Program (SIP) grant from the South Florida Water Management District to assist with the purchase and distribution of pre-rinse valves and water conservation kits. Coastal Management Policy 5.6.2 Adequately fund continued local maintenance and operation needs with respect to storm drainage, roadway surfacing and parks and recreation. Policy 5.6.3 Support and, where applicable, participate in water supply projects identified by the City of Fort Lauderdale, Broward County and the South Florida Water Management District to ensure adequate potable water for future development. Conservation Policy 6.4.6 The City shall implement the water conservation techniques identified in the Water Supply Facilities Work Plan including but not limited to reducing per capita water consumption rates through education, incentive programs (promoting utilization of water conservation kits, pre-rinse valves, leak detection kits, and the replacement of outdated water meters), and water conservation techniques (xeriscaping). Section 6 – Work Plan MWH Page 6-25 Policy 6.4.7 The City will apply for a Water Savings Incentive Program (SIP) grant from the South Florida Water Management District to assist with the purchase and distribution of pre-rinse valves and water conservation kits. Intergovernmental Coordination Policy 8.3.6 The City will work with Broward County on establishing emergency water main interconnections within their franchise area. Policy 8.3.7 As a means to achieve the adopted level of service for potable water, the City will coordinate with Broward County, the City of Fort Lauderdale, and the South Florida Water Management District on improving water conservation practices. Specific coordination mechanisms include the City’s participation in the National Xeriscape Council, involvement on the Broward County Water Resources Task Force, participation in the Water Management District’s Water Savings Incentive Program, and through its website, printed materials available at City Hall, and information included with the City’s water Bills. Water conservation best practices will also be discussed during the annual meeting with the City’s water suppliers. Policy 8.3.8 To assist commercial and residential landowners with water conservation, the City will apply for a Water Savings Incentive Program (SIP) grant from the South Florida Water Management District to assist in the purchase and distribution of pre-rinse valves and water conservation kits. Capital Improvements Policy 9.2.4 Adopt the local level of service standards for infrastructure services as follows: •For sanitary sewer - 150 gallons per day per resident •For potable water - 148 gallons per day per resident •For fire flow - as required by the Fire Marshall •For solid waste - 8 pounds per capita per day with bi-weekly pickup • For drainage (Roadway Crown) - 10 year 3 day storm •For drainage (Finished Floor) - floor elevation above 100 yr 3 day storm. Finished floor shall be no lower than the highest of: 1. One (1) foot above the FEMA Flood Insurance Rate Base Flood Elevation; or 2. The 100-year flood elevation as determined by the Broward County 100-year Flood Criteria Map; or Section 6 – Work Plan MWH Page 6-26 3. Twelve (12) inches above the adjacent road crown for residential development and six (6) inches above the adjacent road crown for nonresidential development. Policy 9.2.6 By 2009, the City shall modify the Concurrency Management System to require written approval from water suppliers regarding available capacity to support new development as described in Policy 1.1.9 of the Future Land Use Element. Policy 9.4.4 Capital projects scheduled in the first five years of the ten year Work Plan shall be included in the Capital Improvements Element which is to be financially feasible. This schedule shall be updated annually as necessary to maintain consistency with the capital projects listed in the Work Plan and within 18 months following updates to the Lower East Coast Water Supply Plan, the City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Plan, or the Broward County Water Supply Plan Policy 9.4.5 The following list identifies improvements the City would like to undertake. They are not specified in the City’s Five-Year Capital Improvement Program. (Costs, where identified, reflect FY 08 amounts and are subject to change.) Project Costs ($) CITY FACILITIES Historical Society House Renovations 132,250 City Garage Roof Replacement 45,000 Painting 17,010 Replace Bay Doors 92,160 Renovations 50,600 Municipal Services Complex Renovations 270,215 Library Painting (Interior & Exterior) 80,280 A/C Replacement 54,000 Roof Replacement 56,700 Renovations 148,300 Parks and Cultural GENERAL PARKS AND RECREATION NEEDS Recapitalization 458,900 Parks Improvements 1,376,700 Acquisition / Development 4,589,000 Section 6 – Work Plan MWH Page 6-27 Project Costs ($) Development (FRDAP) 1,835,600 Downtown Parks Phase II 2,430,000 Wimberly Field Complex Wimberly Field Complex Improvement 1,015,600 Rebuild Ball Fields / Concession Stand 1,800,000 Expansion Of Athletic Fields 1,620,000 Woodson Park Development 400,000 Veterans Park Veterans Park Extension 615,600 Royal Palm Park Renovations - Building and North Restrooms 144,300 Dillon Tennis Center Roof Replacement 27,500 Restrooms 44,275 Painting 12,000 NEHS Complex Renovations 390,000 Collins Center Renovations 406,300 BSO Building Renovate For Recreation Center 2,250,000 Stevens Field Painting 30,325 Roof Replacement 26,400 Renovations 36,450 Wimberly Field Painting 19,800 Renovations 38,223 Roof Replacement 17,550 STORMWATER NE 32 St NE 11th Ave to NE 10th Ave north Prospect Gardens East NW 42nd St & 43rd St & 43rd Ct NW 17th Terrace W Oakland Park Blvd to NW 29th St Lloyd Estates NW 35th Ct NW 36th St & NW 37th St Section 6 – Work Plan MWH Page 6-28 Project Costs ($) NW 36th Ct East of NW 18th Ave & north of canal NW 39th St Alley west of Andrews STREETS Streets NE 12th Avenue 1,700,000 Sidewalk / Curbing Citywide - Consolidated Annual Budget 237,465 Streetscape NE 34th Court (Dixie Hwy to NE 6th Ave) 495,000 NE 38th (Dixie Hwy to 10th Ave) 495,000 City Hall Landscaping 115,000 WATER Water Improvement Projects Southwest Zone 3,054,817 South Central Zone 2,675,114 Northwest Zone 2,363,640 Northeast Zone 2,218,638 North Central Zone 2,344,000 Southeast Zone 3,255,326 Stormwater Project Impact On Water System Projects 2,486,295 WASTEWATER Wastewater Equipment Trailer Mounted Generators 392,350 Miscellaneous Lift Station Pumps 173,000 Wastewater Improvements System Wide Study 98,100 I&I Rehabilitation Program I&I Rehabilitation Program 1,644,304 Pump Station Rehabilitation Pump Station 4 Rehab 319,000 Pump Station 3 Rehab 319,000 Pump Station 7 Rehab 332,100 Rock Island Rock Island Sewer 5,000,000 Garden Acres Garden Acres Sewer 7,110,000 Section 6 – Work Plan MWH Page 6-29 The table below contains the City’s Capital Improvements Program. The City of Oakland Park is almost fully developed. No specific infrastructure improvements to achieve level of service standards are identified in the City's comprehensive plan. There are two improvements identified in Table 12 related to water supply. Both of these are projects being undertaken by the City’s water suppliers, the City of Fort Lauderdale and Broward County, and are included as a separate table to comply with state law. Projects included in the capital improvements program are designed to ensure operational capacity and efficiency to maintain level of service standards. Section 6 – Work Plan MWH Page 6-30 Table 12 Water Supply Facilities Work Plan Projects and Programs All Public, Private and Regional Projects and Programs Serving Oakland Park Utility Serving Oakland Park Future Projects Providing Water to Oakland Park Finished Water (MGD) Water Source for Project or Program Date Project Online Capital Cost Population Served Within Jurisdiction1 City of Fort Lauderdale Peele-Dixie Floridan Aquifer, Reverse Osmosis Treatment Facility 6.0 Floridan Aquifer 2012 $31.52 million 35,778 Broward County Water and Wastewater Services District 1 Floridan Aquifer Supply, Reverse Osmosis Water Treatment Facility 4.5 Floridan Aquifer 2013 $46.3 million 12,513 1 The population shown is the total projected population within the City of Oakland Park in 2013 served potable water from these Alternative Water Supply Projects. The population numbers shown for Fort Lauderdale include both the retail area and the wholesale area served by Fort Lauderdale and includes the retail area invoiced by Oakland Park. Sources: City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Facilities Work Plan and Broward County 10-Year Water Supply Facilities Workplan. 2 Not including engineering, land acquisition, legal, or administrative costs. Appendices Appendix A Appendix B City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Facilities Work Plan Prepared for the Florida Department of Community Affairs Prepared by the City of Fort Lauderdale Public Works Department, City of Fort Lauderdale Planning & Zoning Department and Hazen and Sawyer Consultants January 2009 Ordinance No. C-09-01 TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction…………………………………………………………………………...1 Section 1: Existing Facilities Information…………………………………….1 Section 1.1 Water Service Area……………………………………………………...1 Section 1.2 Consumptive Use Permit………………………………………………. 2 Section 1.3 Existing Water Facilities……………………………………………..….2 Section 1.4 Fiveash Water Treatment Plant…………………………………….…. 5 Section 1.5 Peele-Dixie Water Treatment Plant……………………………………5 Section 1.6 Current Raw Water Supply……………………………………………..5 Section 1.7 Prospect Wellfield………………………………………………………. 6 Section 1.8 Dixie Wellfield…………………………………………………………… 6 Section 1.9 Saline Intrusion Monitoring (SALT) Program………………………… 7 Section 1.10 Distribution System Water Storage Facilities…………………………7 Section 1.11 Raw Water Aquifer Storage and Recovery…………………………...7 Section 1.12 Finished Water Distribution System…………………………………...7 Section 1.13 Sanitary Sewer………………………………………………………….. 7 Section 1.14 George T. Lohmeyer Wastewater Treatment Plant………………….8 Section 1.15 Discharge Permits……………………………………………………….10 Section 1.16 Deep Well Injection Capacity…………………………………………..11 Section 2.0 Population Forecast…………………………………………………11 Section 2.1 Permanent Residents in City of Fort Lauderdale’s Retail Water Service Area……………………………………………………………..11 Section 2.2 Permanent Residents in Cities That Purchase Wholesale Water from the City of Fort Lauderdale……………………………………….13 Section 2.3 Seasonal Residents / Tourists…………………………………………14 Section 3.0 Baseline Finished Water Demand Forecast……………………14 Section 3.1 Baseline Finished Water Demand Summary…………………………15 Section 3.2 Water Consumption (Use) Forecasts………………………………….17 Section 3.3 Residential Water Use Forecasts……………………………………...18 Section 3.4 Commercial Water Use Forecasts……………………………………..18 Section 3.5 Residential and Commercial Sprinkler Account Water Use Forecasts…………………………………………………………………19 Section 3.6 Wholesale Customer Water Use Forecasts………………………….19 Section 3.7 Annual Average Finished Water Demand Forecast…………………22 Section 3.8 Water Demand Comparison to Previous Planning Efforts………….23 Section 3.9 Water Demand Characteristics………………………………………...24 Section 3.10 Maximum Day Demand Factor………………………………………...24 Section 3.11 Peak Hour Demand Factor……………………………………………..26 Section 3.12 Port Everglades Water Demand Factor…………………………….…27 Section 3.13 Potable Water Adopted Level of Service………………..……………28 Section 4.0 Finished Water Demand Forecast Adjusted for Conservation……………………………………………………….…28 Section 5.0 Raw Water Demand Forecast……………………………………...29 Section 6.0 Expected Water Use Permit Allocation………………………….30 Section 7.0 Water Supply Forecast……………………………………………..30 Section 8.0 Other Water Supply Initiatives……………………………………30 Section 8.1 Conservation……………………………………………………………..30 Section 8.2 City of Fort Lauderdale Code of Ordinances…………………………33 Section 8.3 Floridan Wells……………………………………………………………36 Section 8.4 Wastewater Reuse………………………………………………………37 Section 8.4.1 ‘E’ Repump Station/Prospect Well Field Recharge, 5 million gallons per day (MGD) demand capacity………………………………………38 Section 8.4.2 ‘E’ Repump Station/Dew Lake, 1 to 5 million gallons per day (MGD) demand capacity………………………………………………………...38 Section 8.4.3 Repump Station/Palm Aire Country Club Irrigation/City of Pompano Beach Well Field Recharge/Fern Forrest Nature Center Replenishment, 5 MGD demand capacity……………………………38 Section 8.4.4 ‘B’ Repump Station/Coral Ridge Country Club Irrigation/Saltwater Intrusion Barrier, 6 MGD demand capacity…………………………..39 Section 8.4.5 Peele-Dixie Fort Lauderdale Country Club Well Field/Concentrate Blending, 5 MGD capacity……………………………………………...39 Section 8.4.6 Peele-Dixie Fort Lauderdale Country Club Well Field Recharge/Irrigation, 5 MGD demand capacity……………………….39 Section 8.5 Regional Water Supply Planning Efforts……………………………...40 Section 9 Costs – Peele-Dixie Floridan Water Supply Treatment Facility…………………………………………………………………40 Section 9.1 Construction Costs………………………………………………………40 Section 9.2 Operating Costs………………………………………………………….41 Section 9.3 Funding Sources………………………………………………………...41 Section 10 Summary………………………………………………………………41 LIST OF MAPS Map 1.1: Water Service Area……………………………………………………….3 Map 1.3: Water Treatment Facilities……………………………………………….4 Map 1.14 Wastewater Service Area………………………………………………..9 Map 1.14.1 George T. Lohmeyer Wastewater Treatment Plant…………………..10 LIST OF TABLES Table 2.1: Population Projections Retail Water Service Area …………………..12 Table 2.2: Population Projections Wholesale Customers ……………………….13 Table 3.1: Water Account Inventory………………………………………………..15 Table 3.1a: Baseline Finished Water Demands, 1998 and 2005………………...17 Table 3.3: Residential Water Use Category Water Use Forecasts……………..18 Table 3.4 Commercial Water Use Category Water Use Forecasts……………19 Table 3.6 Water Use by Wholesale Water Customers………………………….20 Table 3.6a Wholesale Water Use Category Water Use Forecasts……………...22 Table 3.7 Finished Water Demand Forecast, 2005 to 2025……………………23 Table 3.10 Historical Treated Water Production…………………………………..26 Table 4 Finished Water Demand Forecast Adjusted for Conservation (AADF MGD)……………………………………………………………..29 Table 5 Raw Water Demand Forecast on Annual Average Basis (MGD)…..29 Table 7 Biscayne Water Supply Forecast (AADF in MGD)…………………..30 Table 8.1 Water Commodity Charge……………………………………………...32 LIST OF EXHIBITS Exhibit 1 Capital Improvements Program – Peele-Dixie Floridan Well LIST OF ACRONYMS AADF Annual Average Daily Flow ASR Aquifer Storage and Recovery AWS Alternative Water Supply AWWA American Water Works Association CERP Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan CIE Capital Improvement Element CIP Capital Improvement Plan City City of Fort Lauderdale COE United States Army Corps of Engineers CUP Consumptive Use Permit DCA Florida Department of Community Affairs DEP Florida Department of Environmental Protection FPL Florida Power and Light FPS Feet Per Second FS Florida Statutes GIS Geographic Information Systems GPM Gallons Per Minute GTLWWTP George T. Lohmeyer Wastewater Treatment Plant ICW Intracoastal Waterway I/I Inflow and Infiltration IWRP Integrated Water Resource Plan LDR Land Development Regulations LEC Lower East Coast Regional Water Supply LOS Level of Service M3MADF Maximum Three-Month Average Daily Flow MADF Monthly Average Daily Flow MBR Membrane Bioreactor MGD Million Gallons Per Day MHF Maximum Hourly Flow NPDES National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System RO Reverse Osmosis SALT Saline intrusion Monitoring Program SFWMD South Florida Water Management District TAZ Traffic Analysis Zone ULDR Uniform Land Development Regulations UV Ultraviolet WTP Water Treatment Plant WWTP Wastewater Treatment Plant City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Plan Page 1 Ordinance No. C-09-01 City of Fort Lauderdale 10-Year Water Supply Facilities Work Plan Introduction In anticipation of increasing water demands facing the state, and the potential threats to both the economy and natural resources, the Legislature amended the Florida Water Resources Act (Chapter 373, F.S.) in 1997. The amendments required the five water management districts to initiate regional water supply planning in all areas of the state where reasonable anticipated sources of water were deemed inadequate to meet year 2020 projected demands. The 2002 and 2005 Legislature expanded the local government comprehensive plan requirements to strengthen coordination of water supply planning and local land use planning. The work plan must: 1. Project the local governments water need for at least a 10-year period; 2. Identify and prioritize the water supply facilities and source(s) of water that will be required to meet those needs; and 3. Include in the local government’s Five-Year Schedule of Capital Improvements the capital improvements identified as needed for the first five years, including financially feasible revenue sources. A current five- year schedule must always be maintained. The 10-Year Water Supply Facilities Work Plan must be incorporated into the City’s Comprehensive Plan and be accepted by the Florida Department of Community Affairs (DCA). Section 1 Existing Facilities Information The City of Fort Lauderdale provides solid waste, stormwater management, sanitary sewer and potable water services in accordance with federal, state, regional, and county regulations. Fort Lauderdale provides water and sanitary sewer services for areas outside of the City and receives a minimal amount of water and sanitary sewer service from Broward County. The sections below describe the City’s water supply, water treatment, water storage, sanitary sewer and wastewater treatment facilities. Section 1.1 Water Service Area The City of Fort Lauderdale provides retail water service to about 187,200 residents and 6,300 commercial and wholesale customers in the City and surrounding areas, totaling approximately 255,000 customers across several governmental jurisdictions in central Broward County. Map 1.1 depicts the water service area for retail customers. City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Plan Page 2 Ordinance No. C-09-01 The City provides wholesale water service to other municipalities and large users that, in total, currently utilize 7.6 MGD, or about 17 percent of the 2005 billed water use. Wholesale customers are as follows: xCity of Oakland Park xCity of Wilton Manors xPort Everglades xOakland Forest subdivision within the City of Oakland Park xCity of Tamarac xTown of Davie – Hacienda Village xBroward County Office of Environmental Services xState of Florida Department of Transportation – Toll Booth Section 1.2 Consumptive Use Permit The City of Fort Lauderdale holds a CUP permit number 06-00123-W from the South Florida Water Management District to withdraw water from the Prospect and Dixie Wellfields. This permit allows the City to pump a combined average daily allocation of 52.55 MGD and a maximum monthly allocation of 59.9 million gallons per day (52.55 times the 1.14 maximum month peaking ratio). Section 1.3 Existing Water Facilities This section provides a brief summary of the City’s existing water facilities, on going improvements and future planning initiatives that are currently underway. Principal water facilities serving the City’s customers include the following: xFiveash Water Treatment Plant; xPeele-Dixie Water Treatment Plant; xProspect Wellfield; xDixie Wellfield; xSaline Intrusion Monitoring (SALT) Program; xDistribution System Water Storage Facilities; xRaw Water Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR); and xFinished Water Distribution System. Key facility locations are depicted in Map 1.3. City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Plan Page 3 Ordinance No. C-09-01 W SUNRISEBLVD W BROWARDBLVD DAVIEBLVD S R 8 4NSR7OAKLANDPARKBLVD COMMERCIAL BLVD NW 62ND ST SFEDERALHWYNFEDERALHWYE LAS OLAS BLVD NATLANTICBLVDNW31STAVEINTERSTATE95NW 19 ST ATLANTICOCEANFLORIDATURNPIKEANDREWSAVENDIXIEHWYNE 13 ST I-595 SE 17 STNW27AVESISTRUNKBLVD MCNAB RD Fort Lauderdale / Hollywood International Airport Port Everglades ¯ DATA SOURCE: CITY OF FORT LAUDERDALE PUBLIC SERVICES DIVISION MAP SOURCE: CITY OF FORT LAUDERDALE PLANNING & ZONING DEPARTMENT- JULY, 2006 WATER SERVICE AREA 0120.5 Miles Legend WATER WATER SERVICE AREA AGENCY CITY COUNTY TAMARAC MAP 3Map 1.1 City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Plan Page 4 Ordinance No. C-09-01 #* #* W SUNRISE BLVD W BROWARDBLVD DAVIEBLVD S R 8 4NSR7OAKLANDPARKBLVD COMMERCIAL BLVD NW 62ND ST SFEDERALHWYNFEDERALHWYE LA S OLAS BLVD NATLANTICBLVDNW31STAVEINTERSTATE95NW 19 ST ATLANTICOCEANFLORIDATURNPIKEANDREWSAVENDIXIEHWYNE 13 ST I-595 SE 17 STNW27AVESISTRUNKBLVD MCNAB RD Fort Lauderdale / Hollywood International Airport Port Everglades Prospect Wellfield Peele-Dixie Wellfield FIVEASH WATER TREATMENT PLANT PEELE-DIXIE WATER TREATMENT PLANT ¯ DATA SOURCE: CITY OF FORT LAUDERDALE PUBLIC SERVICES DIVISION MAP SOURCE: CITY OF FORT LAUDERDALE PLANNING & ZONING DEPARTMENT- JULY, 2006 WATER TREATMENT FACILITIES 0120.5 Miles MAP 4 Legend WATER #*FACILITIES Well Field Protection Zones Zones Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 1 CITY LIMIT Map 1.3 City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Plan Page 5 Ordinance No. C-09-01 Section 1.4 Fiveash Water Treatment Plant The City's largest water treatment plant is the Fiveash WTP. The plant was originally constructed in 1950 and has undergone various expansions in subsequent years. The facility’s treatment capacity is technically permitted at 70 MGD. The plant uses conventional lime softening at a target pH of 9.0 – 9.5, followed by filtration. At this pH, recarbonation is not needed. Polymers are added for turbidity removal and a ferric sulfate/polymer blend is added to assist in color removal. Disinfection is achieved by chloramination. The plant has a staff of 26 employees, and a produced annual average of about 43 MGD in 2006. This annual average is lower than the typical average because water use restrictions were in effect for portions of this year. The plant produces safe, reliable potable water, which complies with current regulations. Section 1.5 Peele-Dixie Water Treatment Plant The existing Peele-Dixie Water Treatment Plant is a nanofiltration treatment plant on the same site as the retired lime softening facilities. The nanofiltration treatment plant has a maximum installed finished water treatment capacity of 12 million gallons per day with all units in service. A study entitled “Floridian Aquifer Reverse Osmosis (RO) Conceptual Plan and Assessment for the Peele Dixie WTP” is currently underway to address technical and constructability issues for the addition of six MGD of RO production capacity from the Floridian Aquifer brackish water supply system. This would supplement the current 12 MGD nanofiltration facility. Space in the facility was pre-planned for such a purpose. When constructed, the Floridian Aquifer Reverse Osmosis treatment units would increase the total installed potable water production capacity at the Peele Dixie WTP site to 18 MGD to partially meet the forecasted potable water production shortfall in the City’s service area. This study is further discussed later in Section 4 of this report. Section 1.6 Current Raw Water Supply The City obtains all of its raw water supply from the surficial Biscayne Aquifer system via two active wellfields. These wellfields, which are commonly known as the Dixie Wellfield and the Prospect Wellfield, operate independently of each other, the former serving the Peele-Dixie Water Treatment Plant (WTP) and the latter serving the Fiveash WTP. Both wellfields are permitted by the SFWMD under Consumptive Use Permit No. 06-00123-W. City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Plan Page 6 Ordinance No. C-09-01 Section 1.7 Prospect Wellfield Raw water to the Fiveash WTP used to be supplied from groundwater wells that surround Prospect Lake plus wells that surround the Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport. The wells at the executive airport were abandoned in 1999 due to contamination. As a result, all of the raw water supplied to the Fiveash WTP is pumped from wells around Prospect Lake. This site is known as the Prospect Wellfield. The Prospect Wellfield has 29 active production wells (Well Numbers 25 through 28, 30 through 49 and 50 through 54) that were constructed from 1969 through 2006. Production well No. 35 is only utilized on a standby basis. The wells have pumping capacities of approximately 2,100 gallons per minute (gpm) each, which equates to a total wellfield capacity of approximately 87 MGD. The old abandoned wells at the Executive Airport site are located directly east of the Prospect Wellfield. These wells were taken out of service due to the presence of volatile organic compounds. An extensive monitoring program has successfully been employed to protect the Prospect Wellfield from contamination. Section 1.8 Dixie Wellfield Raw water to the Peele-Dixie Water Treatment Plant is supplied from groundwater from the Dixie Wellfield. The Dixie Wellfield is composed of two wellfield configurations, the “Old Dixie Wellfield” and the “New Dixie Wellfield.” The Old Dixie Wellfield will be removed from service, the wells plugged, and the above ground features (i.e., piping, electrical, etc.) demolished under a future project by the end of 2008. The New Dixie Wellfield conveys water to the Peele-Dixie Nanofiltration Plant. The installed capacity of the New Dixie Wellfield is approximately 20 MGD (from eight 2.5 MGD wells). The wellfield withdrawal permit limits the maximum withdrawal to 15 MGD on a daily basis. It is noted that volatile organic compounds have been detected in the southern half of the wellfield and the City has been proactive in successfully addressing these concerns by retiring wells, managing withdrawals away from critical areas and implementing an extensive monitoring program to protect the northern wells. In 2007, the City completed the construction of two Floridan Aquifer test wells at the Dixie Wellfield site. The purpose of these wells is to collect data for the design of Floridan Aquifer wells to supply sufficient brackish water for the addition of six MGD of reverse osmosis (RO) production capacity at the Peele-Dixie Water Treatment Plant. City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Plan Page 7 Ordinance No. C-09-01 Section 1.9 Saline Intrusion Monitoring (SALT) Program The City of Fort Lauderdale operates a SALT program. The goal of the SALT program is to locate and monitor the saltwater interface in and around the City’s wellfields. The purpose of the program is to provide an early warning monitoring system to assist wellfield managers in tracking the location and to manage withdrawals to limit the inland movement of the salt front. The City currently has 11 saltwater monitoring wells. Section 1.10 Distribution System Water Storage Facilities The City has two distribution system storage sites. These sites are known as the Poinciana Park Water Tank and Pump Station and the Northwest Second Avenue Water Tank and Pump Station. In 2006, the existing tank and pump station at the Poinciana Park Water Tank and Pump Station site were replaced with a 2.0 million gallon pre-stressed concrete ground storage tank and pumping station with backup power diesel engine generator. The existing elevated steel water tank at the Northwest Second Avenue site is 1.0 million gallons. The facility is currently in service. The City is currently considering rehabilitation plans for the existing facilities. Section 1.11 Raw Water Aquifer Storage and Recovery The City’s existing Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) well is located at the Fiveash WTP, just east of the ground storage tanks. The ASR well is currently permitted under a no flow permit. Section 1.12 Finished Water Distribution System The City of Fort Lauderdale's water distribution system consists of over 750 miles of 2 to 54-inch diameter water mains that convey the finished water from the treatment facilities to the individual customers. In general, the larger diameter transmission mains radiate from the treatment facilities and decrease in size as they extend throughout the service area. The major transmission mains travel east from the water treatment plants to the populated portions of the service area and the two systems are interconnected along major north-south avenues. Section 1.13 Sanitary Sewer The City of Fort Lauderdale provides wastewater treatment and disposal services to approximately 190,000 people in central Broward County. Approximately 70 percent of the service population resides within the City, with the remainder located in adjacent governmental jurisdictions. Nearly 34,000 people within the service area have septic tank systems, mostly located within the Fort Lauderdale City limits, which are being replaced with sewer service. Map 1.14 generally depicts the City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Plan Page 8 Ordinance No. C-09-01 wastewater service area. All of the wastewater from sewered portions of the service area is treated at the George T. Lohmeyer Wastewater Treatment Plant (GTL WWTP), which is owned and operated by the City of Fort Lauderdale. The City also owns and operates the regional wastewater transmission system, as well as the wastewater collection system within its boundaries and a small portion of unincorporated Broward County. This system consists of approximately 368 miles of gravity sewers and 135 miles of force main. The other contributing wastewater collection systems located outside the city boundaries are owned and operated by the respective governmental entities. Section 1.14 George T. Lohmeyer Wastewater Treatment Plant The GTL WWTP is located on a 9.58-acre site near S.E. 17th Street and Eisenhower Boulevard. The plant provides secondary treatment followed by deep-well injection via five injection wells located approximately one-quarter mile south of the site. The plant is owned and operated by the City of Fort Lauderdale (City) and is used to treat wastewater generated in a region encompassing the City, Wilton Manors, Oakland Park, Davie and Port Everglades, as well as part of Tamarac and unincorporated Broward County (See Map 1.14). The location of the plant is shown in Map 1.14.1. City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Plan Page 9 Ordinance No. C-09-01 W SUNRISE BLVD W BROWARD BLVD DAVIEBLVD S R 8 4NSR7OAKLANDPARKBLVD COMMERCIAL BLVD NW 62ND ST SFEDERALHWYNFEDERALHWYE LAS OLAS BLVD NATLANTICBLVDNW31STAVEINTERSTATE95NW 19 ST ATLANTICOCEANFLORIDATURNPIKEANDREWSAVENDIXIEHWYNE 13 ST I-595 SE 17 STNW27AVESISTRUNKBLVD MCNAB RD Fort Lauderdale / Hollywood International Airport Port Everglades ¯ DATA SOURCE: CITY OF FORT LAUDERDALE PUBLIC SERVICES DIVISION MAP SOURCE: CITY OF FORT LAUDERDALE PLANNING & ZONING DEPARTMENT- JULY, 2006 WASTEWATER SERVICE AREA 0120.5 Miles MAP 1 Legend CITY LIMIT WATER WASTEWATER SERVICE AREA AGENCY CITY COUNTY TAMARAC SEPTIC TANK 2Map 1.14 City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Plan Page 10 Ordinance No. C-09-01 SE 20TH ST George T. Lowmeyer Wastewater Treatment Plant Convention Center Harbour Shoppes Commmercial Northport Garage PORT EVERGLADES SE 17TH ST SE 15T H ST SE 20TH STCORDOVARDSE16THST SE 18TH ST SE 21ST ST EISENHOWERBLVDSE 22ND ST GRANDE DR SE18THAVESE10THAVESE10THSTSE10THTERSE 14TH PL PORTSIDE DR SE 18TH ST SE20TH ST SE18TH ST ¯ DATA SOURCE: CITY OF FORT LAUDERDALE PLANNING & ZONING DEPARTMENT- JULY, 2006 MAP SOURCE: CITY OF FORT LAUDERDALE PLANNING & ZONING DEPARTMENT- JULY, 2006 GEORGE T. LOHMEYER WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT MAP 2 05001,000250 Feet The facility has been expanded several times over the years. It was converted from a small trickling filter plant to a 22-MGD facility in 1978, with effluent disposal via an outfall to the Intracoastal Waterway. In 1984, four deep injection wells were constructed for effluent disposal and the plant was converted and expanded to a permitted capacity of 38 MGD. New clarifiers and biosolids dewatering facilities were added to the existing treatment train. In 1994, DEP issued a permit with a capacity of 43 MGD, on a maximum three-month average daily flow (M3MADF) basis. In 2001, DEP issued a permit modification that increased the design capacity of the plant to 54.0 MGD, pending approval of the increase in disposal capacity of the underground injection well system. The City then re-rated the plant to 55.7 MGD, M3MADF. Section 1.15 Discharge Permits DEP issued a new Domestic Wastewater Facility Permit for the GTLWWTP on March 30, 2005 with an expiration date of March 2010. The permit specifies a plant capacity of 55.7 MGD (M3MADF) and contains standard effluent limitations, moni- toring requirements, and provisions for biosolids disposal, industrial pretreatment, and operation and maintenance. Map 1.14.1 City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Plan Page 11 Ordinance No. C-09-01 The plant no longer holds an NPDES Permit that would allow for the discharge of treated effluent into the Intracoastal Waterway. Discharging the effluent into the Intracoastal Waterway is limited to emergency situations only. Treated effluent from the plant is discharged to the deep injection wells located approximately one-quarter mile south of the GTLWWTP. Section 1.16 Deep Well Injection Capacity The effluent pump station discharges to five deep injection wells via 3,500 feet of 54-inch-diameter force main. The wells are permitted to operate at up to 10 feet per second (fps) flow velocity on a sustained basis and 12 fps during emergencies. These velocities yield total injection well capacities of 93.25 and 112 MGD, respectively. The design forecast Maximum Hourly Flow (MHF) is 113 MGD, which would require operation of the wells at greater than 10 fps. Therefore, a sixth injection well will be required unless peak flows to the plant can be reduced through inflow and infiltration (I/I) reduction, conservation measures, transmission system flow control, off-site flow equalization or reuse systems in the collection system to divert flow away from the plant. The City is considering a backup force main for the future. Section 2.0 Population Forecast Current and forecasted populations through 2025 by Traffic Analysis Zone (TAZ) were used to forecast residential water use of the City’s retail water customers and total water use of the City’s wholesale water customers. These projections were developed in consultation with Broward County and other wholesale customers are shown in Table 2.1. The percent change in future population relative to 2005 was calculated using these population projections and applied to the actual 2005 water use by TAZ. Section 2.1 Permanent Residents in City of Fort Lauderdale’s Retail Water Service Area Permanent residents, seasonal residents, and tourists are three distinct population categories that could have been utilized in residential water use forecasting. It was decided that using the percent change in the future permanent resident population would be the most appropriate method for forecasting residential water demands. The water use forecasting methodology includes seasonal residents and tourist populations in either the commercial or resident water use forecasts and does not require that these two population categories be addressed independently. The permanent resident population forecasts within the City’s retail water service area are presented in Table 2.1. The permanent resident population forecasts were organized by TAZ. City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Plan Page 12 Ordinance No. C-09-01 The Broward County, Lauderhill and Lauderdale-by-the-Sea water supply plans contain text from the City of Fort Lauderdale’s Water Supply Plan. These plans identify their residents as being part of the City of Fort Lauderdale’s retail customers. The residents of unincorporated Broward County, Lauderhill, Lauderdale-by-the-Sea and Lazy Lake are shown as retail customers in the City of Fort Lauderdale’s Water Supply Plan. Retail population projections are shown in Table 2.1. The population projections contained in the City of Fort Lauderdale are consistent with the three plans referenced above. Unincorporated Broward County customers include residents of Boulevard Gardens, Franklin Park, Roosevelt Gardens and Washington Park. The unincorporated population of this area in 2005 was 6,127. According to the Broward County Forecasting Model, population in this area is expected to increase by 2,406 to 8,533 in 2025. The City of Lauderhill’s southeast corner served by the City of Fort Lauderdale is approximately 35 acres out of the 24,400 acre City of Fort Lauderdale water service area. Thus, the City of Lauderhill’s southeast corner is less than 0.1 percent of the entire City of Fort Lauderdale water service area. Based on the Broward County Forecasting Model, this portion of the City of Lauderhill will increase in population from 315 in 2006 to 474 in 2030. The annual average water demand of the population of this area is not expected to exceed .05 mgd. In 2005, the City of Fort Lauderdale served 3,767 residents in the southern portion of Lauderdale-by-the-Sea. According to the Broward County Forecasting Model, population in this area is expected to increase by 1,663 to 5,430 in 2025. According to the Broward County Forecasting Model, the population of Lazy Lake Village in 2005 was 43 residents. It is expected to increase by four to 47 in 2025. Table 2.1 Population Projections City of Fort Lauderdale Retail Water Service Area* Population 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 Permanent 175,873 187,003 196,981 209,671 223,100 237,645 % change 6.3 5.3 6.4 6.4 6.5 Source: Fort Lauderdale Water and Wastewater Master Plan and Broward County *Includes population within the City limits, unincorporated Broward County, Lauderdale-by-the-Sea and Lazy Lake. Some portions of the City are serviced by Broward County. City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Plan Page 13 Ordinance No. C-09-01 Section 2.2 Permanent Residents in Cities That Purchase Wholesale Water from the City of Fort Lauderdale Four cities purchase water from the City of Fort Lauderdale: Oakland Park, Tamarac, Wilton Manors and Davie. The projected populations used for these entities, and Oakland Forest, a subdivision that obtains water from Fort Lauderdale through a master meter, are provided in Table 2.2. The percent changes in projected populations were used to forecast wholesale water demands from these customers. The baseline figures and projections were developed in consultation with the City’s wholesale customers and are consistent with figures in their water supply plans. The City of Fort Lauderdale’s Public Works Department monitors water use of wholesale customers through user agreements, monthly meetings and monthly monitoring reports. The user agreements include several measures to ensure that water use remains consistent with projections in the water supply plans. For example, any new utility customer requesting more than 100,000 gallons of water per day must receive written approval from the City of Fort Lauderdale. The user agreements also require the purchasing cities to comply with City of Fort Lauderdale conservation regulations. Table 2.2 Permanent Populations, Current and Projected Cities of Oakland Park, Tamarac, Davie and Wilton Manors(a) Wholesale Customer 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 Oakland Park 25,856 26,492 26,618 29,467 32,432 35,216 Oakland Forest(b) 3,219 3,371 3,716 4,042 4,288 4,496 Tamarac(c) 6,359 7,069 7,490 8,060 8,513 8,712 Wilton Manors 12,117 12,390 13,152 14,134 15,030 15,832 Town of Davie – Hacienda Village 2,400 2,400 2,400 2,400 2,400 2,400 (a) Populations in 2000 and 2005 are actual values. Forecasts are provided for all other years. (b) Oakland Forest is a subdivision of the City of Oakland Park and comprises all of TAZ 414. Potable water from the City of Fort Lauderdale is supplied to this subdivision through a master meter. Water demand by the residents in this subdivision was forecast separately from the water demand of the City of Oakland Park. (c) The area of Tamarac served by the City of Fort Lauderdale via a master meter includes small portions of TAZ’s 398, 393, 394, and 400. These TAZ’s also include areas served by Fort Lauderdale retail service and Oakland Park retail service. The population presented for Tamarac includes the total population in these TAZ’s from which the percent growth in population was used to forecast future water demand by the City of Tamarac. (d) Hacienda Village is built out. City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Plan Page 14 Ordinance No. C-09-01 Section 2.3 Seasonal Residents / Tourists Seasonal (nonpermanent) residents are those who reside in the service area for only a portion of the year, generally in the winter months. Most seasonal residents own second homes or condominiums in the area so their water use would be included in the 2005 residential water use data. Residential water use was forecast using this 2005 data and the percent change in the forecasted permanent resident population. Tourists generally visit for several days to several weeks and are a separate category from seasonal residents. Tourist water use is included in the commercial category for those who reside in hotels or other commercial accommodations and in the residential category for those who stay with family members or friends. The population forecasts used to estimate residential water use projections did not include the seasonal or tourist populations for the following reasons: xFor those tourists who stay with family members and friends, their water use is included in the residential forecasts. For those tourists who stay at hotels or other public accommodations, their water use is included in the commercial forecasts. xFor seasonal residents, the number of seasonal residents and the average lengths of stay by TAZ are not known. This information would be necessary to adjust the number of seasonal residents to equal year-round resident equivalents. xWater use by seasonal residents is a small proportion of total water use and is included in the residential water use forecasts. In these forecasts, the percent change in the permanent resident population is used to forecast future water use. Therefore, using the percent changes in permanent resident populations alone is a better indicator of future changes in residential water use than attempting to include the percent changes in seasonal and tourist populations in the residential water use forecast. Section 3.0 Baseline Finished Water Demand Forecast This section describes the methodologies utilized to determine the finished water demand for the City of Fort Lauderdale service area. Finished water demand forecasts were developed and presented through the study period for use in subsequent planning sections. City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Plan Page 15 Ordinance No. C-09-01 Section 3.1 Baseline Finished Water Demand Summary Water use is influenced by several factors including service area population; the types, numbers and sizes of commercial businesses and/or industries; rainfall conditions; the relative price of water1; and the distribution of water using technologies. The City maintains water billing account information for various customer categories as summarized in Table 3.1 1 The relative water price is the value of the water rate per 1,000 gallons relative to customer income and the prices of other goods and services. Table 3.1 Water Account Inventory – Calendar Year 2005 Customer Type Description Number of Accounts Residential Regular Service Ɣ All accounts serving single-family and multi-family dwelling units. Does not include sprinkler accounts. 49,574 Commercial Regular Service Ɣ All accounts serving commercial, industrial, and governmental users. Does not include sprinkler accounts. 6,258 Sprinkler Service Ɣ All accounts that meter sprinkler consumption only. These accounts are provided at the request of the residential or commercial customer. 6,975 Wholesale Service Ɣ All accounts that meter large water deliveries to nearby cities and other jurisdictions. 27 Fire Service Ɣ All accounts that meter water use for fire suppression. 1,057 Mobile Service Ɣ All mobile meters. 83 Total 63,974 Source: City of Fort Lauderdale Water Account Database, 2005. City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Plan Page 16 Ordinance No. C-09-01 Water use of customer accounts in calendar year 2005 was chosen as the baseline water use from which forecasts were derived. Calendar year 2005 was chosen as the baseline year for the following two reasons: Ɣ It was the most recent calendar year where water account information, representing current conditions, was available. Ɣ Calendar year 2005 was an average rainfall year2. In this report, the 2005 water uses of four customer categories were reviewed for forecasting purposes as follows: Ɣ Residential Category – Residential Regular Service Ɣ Commercial Category – Commercial Regular Service Ɣ Sprinkler Category – Commercial and Residential Irrigation Service Ɣ Wholesale Customers – Bulk Water Customers (local water utilities, Port Everglades, etc.) Through the use of GIS techniques, the City’s regular, sprinkler, and wholesale water billing accounts were matched to planning area Traffic Analysis Zones (TAZs) to arrive at a spatial allocation of 2005 water use by TAZ for subsequent development of water demand projections. Fire service connections are for emergency use and therefore not considered in subsequent water demand forecasts. The amount of water used by mobile meters is not significant. Water use for fire suppression and mobile service were not specifically forecasted but captured in the overall forecast. The 2005 water billing data was analyzed to forecast and spatially allocate water use during average rainfall conditions. The water accounts were mapped to the TAZ planning areas using GIS modeling. The City provided the service addresses of all retail and wholesale water accounts in 2005. These addresses were used to determine the location of each water account and identify the TAZ number where the account is located. Total finished water demand is the amount of water that leaves the City’s two water treatment plants and is the sum of water use by all four customer categories plus the amount of distribution system loss. Distribution system loss as a percent of total finished water varies from year to year. Over the past six years, 2000 to 2005, the average distribution system loss was 8.1 percent of total finished water. This value was used to convert forecasted customer water use to total finished water. 2 The 30-year average annual rainfall in Fort Lauderdale is 57.7 inches. The annual rainfall in Fort Lauderdale in 2005 was 58.4 inches or 1.2 percent over the 30-year average annual rainfall. This information is from the South Florida Water Management District. City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Plan Page 17 Ordinance No. C-09-01 A summary of 2005 finished water demand is provided in Table 3.1a. The table also includes a summary of the 1998 finished water demand which was the baseline water demand used for the 2000 Fort Lauderdale Water and Wastewater Master Plan3. Section 3.2 Water Consumption (Use) Forecasts Water use by residential, commercial, sprinkler and wholesale customers was forecasted for the years 2010, 2015, 2020 and 2025. Water use does not include the distribution system loss, which is added when computing finished water demand. The methods and results are described below. The water use projections were based upon the following data and information: Ɣ 2005 billed water use of each customer category by traffic analysis zone (TAZ); Ɣ population forecasts by TAZ; Ɣ the current commercial and residential development efforts within the City’s service area; and, Ɣ commercial build-out of the remaining vacant land areas that are not likely to be residential and are not classified as wetlands. 3 CH2M Hill and Hazen and Sawyer, “City of Fort Lauderdale Water and Wastewater Master Plan”, prepared for the City of Fort Lauderdale, Florida, December 2000. Table 3.1a Baseline Finished Water Demands, 1998 and 2005 City of Fort Lauderdale Water Utility Annual Average million gallons per day (MGD) Water Use Category 1998 2005 Residential water use 19.44 19.47 Commercial water use 7.61 8.90 Wholesale water use 9.00 7.61 Sprinkler water use 7.76 9.16 Subtotal 43.81 45.14 Distribution System Loss(a) 3.90 3.98 Total Finished Water Demand 47.71 49.12 (a) Distribution system loss in 1998 is the actual loss of8.2% of total finished water demand. In 2005, the distribution system loss is the forecasted quantity of8.1%. City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Plan Page 18 Ordinance No. C-09-01 The methodology to forecast water use for each customer category is discussed in turn. Section 3.3 Residential Water Use Forecasts The 2005 water billing records were spatially allocated to determine the total annual average daily residential water consumption in each TAZ. Forecasts were completed by multiplying the 2005 residential billed water use in each TAZ by one plus the forecasted percent change in population within that TAZ. Residential water uses under average rainfall conditions were projected for the years 2010, 2015, 2020 and 2025 and are summarized in Table 3.3. Table 3.3 Residential Water Use Category Water Use Forecast, Annual Average MGD, Average Rainfall Conditions Year Water Use (MGD)(a) 2005 (base) 19.5 2010 20.5 2015 21.7 2020 22.9 2025 24.8 (a) Does not include water distribution system loss. Section 3.4 Commercial Water Use Forecasts Commercial water use can increase under two conditions. First, it is reasonable to presume that the City of Fort Lauderdale will be built out by 2025. Much of the existing vacant land will become either residential or commercial property. Second, general population growth in Broward County will increase the demand for local commercial goods and services resulting in increased water use by existing and new commercial establishments within the City of Fort Lauderdale. The 2025 forecast of average daily commercial water use within each TAZ was estimated as the average daily commercial water use in 2005 increased by 28 percent. The 28 percent is the forecasted percent increase in the Broward County population from 2005 to 2025. The resulting land use implied by the forecasted 2025 water use for each TAZ was compared to the size of the TAZ and the expected land use of that TAZ in 2025. The resulting 2025 water use forecast of each TAZ was reasonable for the size of the TAZ and the anticipated land uses. City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Plan Page 19 Ordinance No. C-09-01 Commercial water use forecasts between 2005 and 2025 were interpolated between the 2005 actual retail commercial water use and the 2025 forecast. Resultant commercial water use forecasts between 2005 and 2025 are summarized in Table 3.4. Table 3.4 Commercial Water Use Category Water Use Forecasts Annual Average MGD, Average Rainfall Conditions Year Water Use (MGD)(a) 2005 (base) 8.9 2010 9.5 2015 10.1 2020 10.7 2025 11.4 (a) Does not include water distribution system loss. Section 3.5 Residential and Commercial Sprinkler Account Water Use Forecasts Residential and commercial customers have the option of opening an account that meters and bills for landscape irrigation (sprinkler) water use only. Customers who choose this option have a regular account that meters and bills for indoor water use and a sprinkler account that meters and bills for outdoor use. Charges for water metered under the sprinkler account do not include wastewater user rates. Water use of sprinkler accounts is not expected to increase in the future as residential and commercial buildings are expected to occupy more and more of the land within each TAZ. Also, most of the sprinkler accounts are located in high valued residential and commercial areas that are built out and are unlikely to be redeveloped prior to 2025. For the purposes of these water use forecasts, the amount of water used by sprinkler accounts in each TAZ was held constant from 2005 through 2025. Section 3.6 Wholesale Customer Water Use Forecasts The City of Fort Lauderdale also provides wholesale water service to large users adjacent to the service area. These types of accounts are called master meters. One customer account is one master meter that records the amount of water that passes through the Fort Lauderdale water system and into the water system of the wholesale customer. There can be more than one account (or master meter) per wholesale customer. City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Plan Page 20 Ordinance No. C-09-01 The monthly 2005 water use and customer account information of each meter associated with each wholesale customer was provided by the City of Fort Lauderdale. The sum of the annual 2005 master meter water use for each wholesale customer is provided in Table 3.6. Also presented in this table are the amounts of water used in 1998 by these customers and other wholesale customers that existed in 1998. The year 1998 was the base year used in the 2000 Fort Lauderdale Water and Wastewater Master Plan. Table 3.6 Water Use by Wholesale Water Customers(a) Annual Average MGD, Average Rainfall Conditions Wholesale User 1998 2005 Percent Change from 1998 City of Oakland Park 3.99 3.91 0.5% City of Wilton Manors 1.56 1.60 2.5% Port Everglades 1.79 1.31 -26.6% Oakland Forest 0.17 0.50 192.2% City of Tamarac 0.16 0.19 16.7% Town of Davie – Hacienda Village 0.04 0.10 150% Broward County Office of Environmental Services 0.42 0.0007 -99.8% FDOT – Toll Booth (<0.01 MGD) 0.0004 0.0005 16.4% Broadview Park Water Company 0.75 Account closed City of Dania 0.1 Account closed Total 8.98 7.61 -15.3% (a) Does not include water distribution system loss. The method used to forecast water use of each wholesale customer varied depending on the type of customer and the purpose of the water use. For the City of Oakland Park, City of Tamarac, City of Wilton Manor and Oakland Forest subdivision, the 2005 water use was increased by the projected percent increase in population associated with the geographic areas served by the water supply. Due to the builtout nature of the area, the Town of Davie’s Hacienda Village, population and water use was kept at their 2005 levels. City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Plan Page 21 Ordinance No. C-09-01 For Port Everglades, 2005 water use was increased by five percent each year through 2025. This percent increase was approved by the Port and its consultant4. It was based on the Port’s forecasts of anticipated growth in the number of cruise ship passengers through 2020 of five to six percent and the anticipated growth in the amount of cargo through 2020 of 2.4 percent5. Because most of the Port’s water use is comprised of the potable water loaded onto cruise ships and water used by cruise ship passengers at the Port, a five percent per year overall water use growth rate was used. The Broward County Office of Environmental Services uses their master meter account to irrigate landscaping at the Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport. The quantity of water used in 2005 was relatively small, 0.0007 MGD. The decline in water use from 1998 is due to major construction activities that expanded airport capacity and displaced irrigation water needs. No significant increase in the amount of water used in the near future is expected. However, it is possible that more water may be used for landscaping in the future. To account for any unanticipated future increases, the 2005 water use was increased by 10 percent per year. The Florida Department of Transportation uses their master meter account to supply potable water to a toll booth. Water use is not expected to increase because no changes to the toll booth are anticipated. Therefore, future water use for this customer is held constant as the 2005 level. The water use projections of the City of Fort Lauderdale’s wholesale customers are provided in Table 3.6a. 4 Telephone conversations on June 7, 2006 with John Foglesong of Port Everglades and Kevin Hart of Craven Thompson. 5 TranSystems Corporation, “Port Everglades Master Plan”, Final Report, August 23, 2001, Fort Lauderdale, Florida. City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Plan Page 22 Ordinance No. C-09-01 Section 3.7 Annual Average Finished Water Demand Forecast The annual average water use forecasts for the residential, commercial, sprinkler and wholesale water accounts are summarized for the years 2005 through the year 2025 in Table 3.7. This table combines the water use forecast with water distribution system loss, resulting in a forecast of finished water demand. The forecasts were based on water use in 2005 and are representative of typical consumptive conditions because 2005 was an average rainfall year and is the most recent year for which water use data was available. Temporary reductions in finished water demands during drought years and SFWMD Phase I/II/III restriction schedules are not reflected in the overall forecast due to their transient nature. These water use forecasts were based upon end user consumption and need to be augmented with the loss realized within a water distribution system. Distribution system loss is equivalent to the difference between total finished water production and total water billed. This loss is comprised of water leakage from the system, unmetered uses and under registration of installed meters. During the years 2000 to 2005, the average distribution system loss was 8.1 percent of total finished water. This value was used to convert customer water use to total finished water. Table 3.6a Wholesale Water Use Category Water Use Forecasts(a) Average Rainfall Conditions, Annual Average MGD Wholesale User 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 City of Oakland Park 3.91 4.19 4.63 5.09 5.52 City of Wilton Manors 1.60 1.70 1.82 1.94 2.04 Port Everglades 1.31 1.68 2.14 2.73 3.49 Oakland Forest 0.50 0.55 0.60 0.63 0.66 City of Tamarac 0.19 0.20 0.21 0.22 0.23 Town of Davie – Hacienda Village 0.10 0.10 0.10 0.10 0.10 Broward County WW Services 0.0007 0.0012 0.0019 0.0031 0.0049 FDOT – Toll Booth (<0.01 MGD)0.0005 0.0005 0.0005 0.0005 0.0005 Total 7.61 8.41 9.50 10.72 12.04 (a) Doesnot include distribution system losses. City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Plan Page 23 Ordinance No. C-09-01 Section 3.8 Water Demand Comparison to Previous Planning Efforts Current finished water demand projections were compared to the 2000 Water and Wastewater Master Plan6 finished water demand projections. The 2000 Master Plan projected an annual average finished water demand of 50 MGD in 2005. Actual finished water demand was 49 MGD. The current and the 2000 Master Plan forecast of 2010 water demand are the same: 52 MGD. In 2015, the current forecast is 55 MGD and the 2000 Master Plan forecast was 53 MGD. In 2020, the current forecast is 58 MGD and the 2000 Master Plan forecast was 55 MGD. By 2025, the current forecast of water demand is 62 MGD. A 2025 forecast was not provided in the 2000 Master Plan. These water demand forecasts were based on the best available information including future forecasted percent changes in populations and expected commercial development. Water use forecasts are also based on existing water 6 CH2M Hill and Hazen and Sawyer, “City of Fort Lauderdale Water and Wastewater Master Plan”, prepared for the City of Fort Lauderdale, Florida, December 2000. Table 3.7 Finished Water Demand Forecast, 2005 to 2025 Average Rainfall Conditions, Annual Average MGD Water Use Category 2005 (Actual)2010 2015 2020 2025 Retail Customer: Residential(a)19.47 20.48 21.70 22.90 24.76 Commercial(b)8.90 9.51 10.13 10.74 11.36 Sprinkler(c)9.16 9.16 9.16 9.16 9.16 Wholesale Customers(d) 7.61 8.41 9.50 10.72 12.04 Subtotal 45.14 47.57 50.49 53.52 57.32 Distribution System Loss of 8.1%(e)3.98 4.19 4.45 4.72 5.05 Total Finished Water Demand 49.12 51.76 54.94 58.24 62.37 (a) Residential includes all single-family, multifamily and condominium watercustomers. (b) Commercial includes all retail water users other than residential watercustomers and sprinkler accounts. (c) Sprinkler accounts represent separate meters used to bill sprinkler water useseparately. Includes sprinkler accounts of residential and commercialcustomers. (d) Wholesale customers include Broward County, Port Everglades andsurrounding cities that purchase water for resale to their water customers. (e) Distribution system loss is estimated at 8.1 percent of total finished waterproduction. Loss estimate provided by City staff. City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Plan Page 24 Ordinance No. C-09-01 using technologies, the current relative price of water, and the existing types of commercial and industrial businesses. Any significant changes in these factors from those used to create the projections reported in this Master Plan could cause actual water use to be higher or lower than these projections. Therefore, changes in these factors should be monitored over time. When these changes are believed to be significant, for example through major redevelopment efforts, future water demand should again be reassessed. Section 3.9 Water Demand Characteristics Historical water consumption and production records were reviewed to establish specific system performance characteristics, such as treatment plant losses, unaccounted for water losses and unit flow factors within a distribution system. This information is typically registered via the use of flow meters at key locations within the raw water transmission system, water treatment plant facility and customer billing meters. The City of Fort Lauderdale maintains meters at the Fiveash Water Treatment Plant and at customer connections. Water production is estimated at the Peele-Dixie Plant based upon pump and well operating records. The Fiveash Water Treatment Plant maintains four raw water meters at the entrance to the treatment plant and three venturi meters along the discharge piping of the plant’s high service pump stations. Staff has indicated that flow rate measurements of the finished water via the discharge venturi meters are believed to be inaccurate due to flow turbulence at the entrance and exit of the venturi meters and due to their old age. The Peele-Dixie Water Treatment Plant does not currently have operational raw or finished water flow meters. Finished water is pumped to the distribution system via three constant speed pumps. Finished water flow rates are estimated by monitoring high service pump run times and pump characteristic curves. Use of the pump run time provides an estimate of the pump delivery rate. Plant staff also monitor and maintain records for the fluctuation of the on-site finished water storage tank elevation to refine these estimates. Raw water influent is recorded as the sum of the treatment plant losses and the net change in stored water volume. Short term capital improvements for both treatment facilities include the installation of flow meters at key locations within the raw water and finished water systems which should improve long term reporting of water flow rates. Section 3.10 Maximum Day Demand Factor The City’s Monthly Water Treatment Plant Operations Reports for the Fiveash and Peele-Dixie Water Treatment Facilities were reviewed to determine the average daily flow rate and maximum day demand factor for the period of January 1995 through December 1998 and January 2005 to December 2005. Results for the former time period were calculated and reviewed during the 2000 Master Water City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Plan Page 25 Ordinance No. C-09-01 planning efforts. A summary of the average and maximum daily water production rates and maximum day demand factors for each year is provided in Table 3.10. The results indicate the ten-year average maximum day demand factors for the Fiveash and Peele-Dixie facilities are 1.27 and 1.25, respectively. The 1995 to 1998 four-year average was 1.30 and 1.38 respectively. For both plants, the maximum day demand factor averaged 1.26 and the highest factor experienced was 1.39 in 1998. Typical maximum day demand factors experienced in similar South Florida municipalities range between 1.3 and 1.5 times the annual average flow. The 2000 Water and Wastewater Master Plan utilized a maximum day demand factor of 1.5 for water forecasts. A factor of this magnitude has not been experienced at the Fiveash WTP in the past 10 years, however, an estimated maximum day factor of 1.56 was documented at the Peele-Dixie WTP in November 1995. Considering this historical data and to account for uncertainties associated with the City’s current flow metering systems, a systemwide maximum day demand factor of 1.4; representative of the mid-range of maximum day demand factors experienced in South Florida, has been used for transmission system planning in this Master Plan. A maximum day demand factor of 1.3 is suggested for water treatment plant capacity planning where on-site storage and other contingencies are typically incorporated into the process design criteria. City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Plan Page 26 Ordinance No. C-09-01 Table 3.10 Historical Treated Water Production City of Fort Lauderdale Fiveash Peele-Dixie Total Water Production Water Production Water Production Year(a) Avg. Daily (MGD) Max. Day (MGD) Ratio of Max. Day to Avg. Daily Avg. Daily (MGD) Max. Day (MGD) Ratio of Max. Day to Avg. Daily Avg. Daily (MGD) Max. Day (MGD) Ratio of Max. Day to Avg. Daily 1995 41.79 54.86 1.31 6.64 10.39 1.56 48.43 65.25 1.35 1996 42.21 51.72 1.23 6.93 8.95 1.29 49.14 60.67 1.23 1997 40.35 50.98 1.26 6.84 8.60 1.26 47.19 59.58 1.26 1998 41.00 57.17 1.39 6.64 9.16 1.38 47.64 66.33 1.39 2000 43.79 51.63 1.18 6.86 10.29 1.50 50.65 61.93 1.22 2001 37.28 47.49 1.27 5.99 7.25 1.21 43.27 54.74 1.27 2002 42.46 55.97 1.32 6.59 7.91 1.20 49.05 63.87 1.30 2003 41.95 51.40 1.23 7.49 7.32 0.98 49.44 58.72 1.19 2004 42.91 54.53 1.27 7.51 7.88 1.05 50.42 62.40 1.24 2005 40.14 48.17 1.20 7.72 8.16 1.06 47.86 56.34 1.18 Avg.:1.27 1.25 1.26 Max.:1.39 1.56 1.39 Min.:1.18 0.98 1.18 (a) Results for the years 1995 to 1998 were calculated during preparation of the 2000Master Wastewater and Water Plan. Results for the years 2000 to 2005 werecalculated during preparation of this Master Water Plan. The year 1999 was notevaluated. Section 3.11 Peak Hour Demand Factor Distribution system piping and pumping facilities must be capable of meeting maximum system demands. The limiting demand criteria for the design and analysis of the water transmission system piping and pumping components is the peak hour demand. The peak hour demand factor is the greatest amount of water produced by both plants (Fiveash and Peele Dixie) in a single hour during the year as measured in MGD divided by the average daily water produced during the year in MGD. It was determined by reviewing the historical hourly plant operating records, as well as the influence (if any) from distribution system storage. Analysis of hourly water production data from the Fiveash and Peele Dixie plants during the 2000 Master Plan found that the estimated peak hour flow factors for maximum production days ranged between 1.9 and 2.0 times the annual average daily flow from 1995 through 1998. In 2005, the peak hour flow factor was 2.01. Since the Poinciana Tank is currently off-line and the Northeast 2nd Avenue Tank is hydraulically limited, future peak flows are anticipated to increase when these City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Plan Page 27 Ordinance No. C-09-01 systems are refurbished or replaced. A peak hour factor of 2.2 and 2.1 times the annual average daily flow was utilized in the 2000 and 1990 Master Plans respectively. Historically, for the City of Fort Lauderdale, the peak hour demand has been associated with lawn irrigation in the early morning hours each day. Typical peak hour demand factors range from 1.2 to 2.5 per American Water Works Association (AWWA) Manual of Water Supply Practices M32 – Distribution Network Analysis for Water Utilities. For the purposes of this Master Plan, a peak hour demand factor of 2.2 was utilized to account for uncertainties associated with the City’s current flow metering systems, and increased water use as system pressures are improved. In early 2007, drought conditions and falling Lake Okeechobee water levels required the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD) to impose Phase III (the most stringent) water restrictions throughout South Florida. Under Phase III restrictions, casual water use was severely limited and lawn watering was reduced to one day per week (between 4 am and 8 am) in an “odd” and “even” address basis. The result of the Phase III restriction significantly curtailed overall water demand and essentially eliminated the peak hour demand. In the long term, it is expected that peak hour demands will return to some level as water restrictions are eased but probably not to historical levels should the City decide to adopt permanent water use restrictions. The long term effectiveness of water use restrictions may defer some improvements and may require additional improvements to other infrastructure to address necessary changes in operation due to the changes historical demand patterns. Section 3.12 Port Everglades Water Demand Factor One of the City of Fort Lauderdale’s wholesale customers is the Port Everglades Authority whose water demand characteristics differ from typical residential/commercial patterns. The Port purchases potable water from the City of Fort Lauderdale through five metered connections at the following locations: Ɣ 10-inch meter at Southeast 17th Street Ɣ 12-inch meter at Southeast 20th Street Ɣ 8-inch meter at Southeast 24th Street Ɣ 16-inch meter at Southeast Eller Drive / Old South Federal Highway Ɣ 10-inch meter at 900 Southeast 26th Street City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Plan Page 28 Ordinance No. C-09-01 Port Everglades distributes this potable water to various commercial and industrial users within its boundaries, such as passenger cruise ships, the Florida Power and Light (FPL) power generation facility, cargo container ships, and commercial space. It is believed that water consumption patterns within Port Everglades are not coincidental to the City of Fort Lauderdale due to the varying land uses found within its boundaries. Based upon the efforts under the 2000 Water and Wastewater Master Plan, it is recommended that the maximum day demand factor for the Port Everglades water demand forecasts be maintained at 1.5. It is recommended that water distribution modeling efforts utilize a peak hour demand factor of 2.8 for the Port Everglades to more closely represent cruise ship operations. This factor will be used simultaneously with the remaining distribution system realizing peak hour demand factors as part of the hourly diurnal flow patterns to be applied throughout the system for varying types of consumptive use. Section 3.13 Adopted Level of Service As described in Policy 2.3.1 of the Infrastructure Element of the City of Fort Lauderdale Comprehensive Plan, the adopted level of service for potable water is 197 gallons per capita per day. Section 4.0 Finished Water Demand Forecast Adjusted for Conservation The “Baseline” finished water demand forecast was prepared based on year 2005 water meter data. The City has experienced approximately a 20 percent reduction in water demand during the District’s Phase 2 and Phase 3 water restrictions implemented in year 2007. The City believes that implementation of a water demand reduction ordinance can reasonably be expected to reduce current and projected water demand by 10 percent. Additionally, the City believes that the SFWMD will recognize conservation as a legitimate method to offset the need for development of alternative water supplies. The City is moving forward with passing the water demand reduction ordinance. It is anticipated that this ordinance will go into effect by about August 2008. Based on an anticipated 10 percent reduction, a new finished water demand forecast, adjusted for conservation, is derived in Table 4. City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Plan Page 29 Ordinance No. C-09-01 Table 4 Finished Water Demand Forecast Adjusted for Conservation (AADF MGD) 2005 2010 2015 2018 2020 2025 Baseline 49.12 51.76 54.94 56.92 58.24 62.37 Conservation (10%) 5.18 5.49 5.69 5.82 6.24 Demand Adjusted for Conservation 46.6 49.4 51.23 52.4 56.1 Section 5.0 Raw Water Demand Forecast Raw water demand forecast can be derived from the finished water demand forecast along with the expected efficiencies for the treatment processes. The following assumptions are used to derive the raw water demand forecast: 1. The Dixie nanofiltration WTP will go online in 2008. 2. Nanofiltration recovery will be 80 percent of the raw water (i.e., 20 percent loss). 3. The Dixie nanofiltration plant will produce 12 MGD of finished water on an annual average basis. 4. The Fiveash WTP will remain as a lime softening treatment process. 5. The lime softening treatment process recovery is 96 percent of the raw water (i.e., 4 percent treatment loss). Based on the above assumptions, the raw water demand forecast is presented in Table 5 below. Table 5 Raw Water Demand Forecast on Annual Average Basis (MGD) 2005 2010 2015 2018 2020 2025 Demand Adjusted for Conservation 49.1 46.6 49.4 51.2 52.4 56.1 Distribution System Loss of 8.1%* 2.1 4.4 4.6 4.66 4.7 4.9 Raw Water Demand 51.2 50.1 54.0 55.86 57.1 61.0 *Distribution system loss is estimated at 8.1 percent of total finished water production. Loss estimate provided by City staff. City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Plan Page 30 Ordinance No. C-09-01 Section 6.0 Water Use Permit Allocation On September 11, 2008, the City’s consumptive use permit (CUP) was issued by the SFWMD. The CUP limits total Biscayne Aquifer withdrawals to 52.55 MGD on an annual average daily basis. Section 7.0 Water Supply Forecast Based on the above calculations, the City will experience a water supply deficit in 2012. Consequently, alternative water supply projects are needed to offset this deficit. The water supply deficits are tabulated below. Table 7 Biscayne Water Supply Forecast (AADF in MGD) 2005 2010 2015 2018 2020 2025 Raw Water Demand 51.2 51.0 54.0 55.9 57.1 61.0 Water Use Permit 50.6 52.55 52.55 52.55 52.55 52.55 Water Supply Deficit 0.6 0 1.45 3.35 4.55 8.45 Section 8.0 Other Water Supply Initiatives This section describes other water supply related initiatives. Alternative water sources including wastewater reclamation and reuse (either as an irrigation offset or aquifer recharge) as well as Floridian Aquifer brackish water reverse osmosis are being studied. Additionally, the City is participating in a multijurisdictional study, commonly referred to as the L-8 Reservoir Study. These alternative water supply projects are currently under consideration to supplement the City’s Biscayne Aquifer supply. Section 8.1 Conservation The City of Fort Lauderdale has actively pursued a Conservation strategy that includes goals, objectives, and policies to conserve water. Within those objectives, Objective 9 of Fort Lauderdale’s Comprehensive Plan forms the basis for its programs: City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Plan Page 31 Ordinance No. C-09-01 Continue to conserve water as a resource of the City and region as a whole and work to reduce per capita water demand. This objective is supported by the following Comprehensive Plan policies: xWork on a local and regional basis to conserve and protect water resources by implementation and enforcement of the conservation rate ordinance adopted in 1996. xDuring drought periods, limit the use of water for irrigation and car washing and cooperate with the SFWMD water withdrawal limitations through enforcement of the emergency restrictions ordinance adopted in 1994. xDistribute literature pertaining to water conservation and appropriately cite residents not complying with mandatory drought prohibitions. xReplace water mains with a history of leakage through an annual infiltration repair program. xReview and determine the most cost-effective application of a water reuse system for the City as well as water-saving devices for future City facilities. xIf necessary, implement an emergency conservation of water resources in accordance with the plans of the regional water management district. xBecause studies conducted for the City have demonstrated the practical, logistical and economic infeasibility of instituting a program of reuse of reclaimed water at this time, the City of Fort Lauderdale has developed and will continue to implement alternatives to water reuse for the near future as water conservation measures. These measures include: 1. The development and construction of a wellfield recharge basin utilizing Prospect Lake as storage, developed in cooperation with Broward County Environmental Protection Department and using grant funds from both the County and the South Florida Water Management District. 2. The enactment and enforcement of the Water Conservation Rate Ordinance in 1996, which allows the City to charge lower water rates for users that conserve water. xContinue to enforce City of Fort Lauderdale Ordinance 28-1, which states that the City shall comply with South Florida Water Management District rules and enforce and restrictions relating to water shortages and surface watercourses. City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Plan Page 32 Ordinance No. C-09-01 The City continues to maintain an active public information campaign on water conservation and restrictions and enforces water restrictions on irrigation using Environmental Inspectors, Code Enforcement Officers, and Police Officers. In addition, the City is a partner of the County in the operation of the NatureScape Irrigation Service. Over 13 million gallons of water was saved as a result of implementing recommendations based on irrigation system evaluations completed in 2006. The City also maintains a conservation rate structure for water and wastewater use (Table 8.1). These rates are in effect year-round to encourage users to conserve water. Table 8.1 Water Commodity Charge Usage Consumption (gallons) Rates ($ per thousand gallons) 0 - 3,000 1.23 4,000 – 7,000 2.12 Single Family > 7,000 3.12 0 – 6,000 1.23 7,000 – 14,000 2.12 Duplex > 14,000 3.12 0 – 9,000 1.23 10,000 – 21,000 2.13 Triplex > 21,000 3.12 0 – 3,000 x # of units 2.124 or More Units Multifamily Condo > 3,000 x # of units 2.89 Commercial > 1,000 2.38 Sewer Commodity Charge Usage Consumptions (gallons) Rates ($ per thousand gallons) 0 – 3,000 2.87Single Family 4,000 – 20,000 3.96 0 - 6,000 2.87Duplex 7,000 – 40,000 3.96 0 – 9,000 2.87Triplex 10,000 – 60,000 3.96 Commercial 3.67 In 2006, the City also updated a drought rate ordinance to further encourage residents to conserve water during water shortages, and to recapture the loss of revenue from water restrictions. City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Plan Page 33 Ordinance No. C-09-01 Section 8.2 City of Fort Lauderdale Code of Ordinances Section 28-1 of the City of Fort Lauderdale’s Code of Ordinances defines water rate structures under District water restriction levels. This section of the code of ordinances is included below to illustrate the City’s proactive approach. Sec. 28-1. Water shortage--Declaration of emergency; emergency restrictions. (a) Declaration. The city manager is hereby authorized, after consultation with the director of the utilities department of the city, to have appropriate enforcement personnel enforce the provisions or restrictions of any declaration of the South Florida Water Management District pertaining to a water shortage. (b) Restrictions. Whenever activated by the South Florida Water Management District in times of a water shortage, those provisions of chapter 40E-21 of the Florida Administrative Code as they relate to water usage restrictions, as same may be amended from time to time, are incorporated herein by this reference and made a part of the Code. It shall be unlawful for any person to fail to comply with said restrictions. (c) Surcharges. In the event the South Florida Water Management District declares a drought and mandates water restrictions in one (1) of the four (4) established drought phases, the City of Fort Lauderdale will implement a surcharge on the water, wastewater, and sprinkling meter commodity charges established in sections 28-76, 28-143 and 28-144 of the Code of Ordinances and on the user agreements and industrial user charges established in sections 28-77 and 28-78 of the Code of Ordinances. The amount of surcharge shall be based on the level of declaration of a Phase I, Phase II, Phase III or Phase IV level of water restrictions as provided in this subsection and the number of gallons generated by the user with priority consideration given to the purpose of the usage. If a declaration of any Phase level of water restriction is issued prior to or on the 15th of the month, the prescribed surcharge for that level of water restriction shall appear on the first utility billing processed on or after the 1st day of the following month. If such declaration is issued after the 15th of the month, the prescribed surcharge shall appear on the first utility billing issued on or after the 1st day of the month following a thirty-day period after the declaration date. When a declaration of water restrictions is rescinded by the South Florida Water Management District, surcharges shall be rescinded with the adjustment appearing on the first utility billing issued on or after the 1st day of the month following the date the declaration is rescinded. All surcharge adjustments, including the initial imposition, any increases and decreases, and the rescinding of the surcharge shall be implemented as described above. Surcharges shall be charged as follows in the chart below: City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Plan Page 34 Ordinance No. C-09-01 City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Plan Page 35 Ordinance No. C-09-01 City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Plan Page 36 Ordinance No. C-09-01 Section 8.3 Floridan Wells After the 6 MGD RO facility goes online, the City will not need an additional alternative water supply project until 2022. As such, the City has proposed utilization of the Floridan Aquifer as an Alternative Water Supply (AWS) to meet at least a portion of future demands. That proposal was made via a response to a District request for AWS project listings (submitted by the City in November 2005) to be included in the LEC Plan update. The project name as it appears in the 2005- 2006 LEC Water Supply Plan is the “Dixie Floridan Water Supply/Treatment Facility.” The City, however, is not certain that utilization of the Floridan Aquifer should be used to make up the entirety of the water "demand-not met" through the Year 2025. The City is evaluating various other options including reuse of treated wastewater effluent and interbasin transfer of surface waters (the latter through a project currently known as the L-8 Reservoir). Nevertheless, the City believes that projected finished water shortfalls will require at least some amount of Floridan Aquifer water to reliably provide for future demands. Additionally, provision of additional treatment capacity is highly desirable to allow for extended duration maintenance of the Fiveash WTP lime softening treatment units. Hence, the City has decided to initiate planning for 6 MGD of additional finished water production at the Peele-Dixie WTP utilizing reverse osmosis treatment of Floridan Aquifer waters. The City is currently studying the treatment facility upgrades that will be needed at the WTP. It is expected this study will be complete in March 2008. The City has developed a preliminary plan for implementation of 6 MGD (finished water capacity) of RO facilities at the existing Peele-Dixie WTP. This project includes the construction of 10 MGD of Floridan Aquifer water supply wells at the Dixie Wellfield to supply raw water to the proposed RO facilities. City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Plan Page 37 Ordinance No. C-09-01 Section 8.4 Wastewater Reuse The City is considering implementing reuse of wastewater effluent, particularly systems that can be used to develop alternative water supplies. The SFWMD is developing policies that require the development of alternative water supplies to meet the potable water needs of future growth when the Biscayne Aquifer and regional surface water supply systems are considered to be at capacity. Indirect potable reuse systems have dual benefits of providing more wastewater treatment and disposal capacity and augmenting local water supplies, which will be important when the City next applies for a Water Use Permit from the SFWMD. The GTL WWTP is located far from any significant users of reclaimed water, such as golf courses. Therefore, the construction of an irrigation-quality reclaimed water production facility at or near the plant to provide further treatment of effluent to public reuse standards is not feasible. There is little available space on the plant site or plant vicinity to construct the required treatment facilities. In addition, due to high levels of I/I near coastal areas and waterways, the chloride concentration in the treated effluent (approximately 600 mg/L) exceeds the maximum recommended amount (250 mg/L). Therefore, the only practical alternatives for implementing reuse systems are off site, near potential beneficial uses of reclaimed water. In order to update the reuse options to the City, the Public Works Department applied for an Integrated Water Resource Plan (IWRP) grant with Broward County. The City has undertaken an analysis designed to determine the feasibility of implementing selected reclaimed water projects that could offset potable water deliveries from the regional water management system. The intent of the feasibility study is to identify potential sites and determine the feasibility of their use for aquifer recharge and irrigation. The technologies being considered are satellite wastewater treatment facilities using Membrane Bioreactor (MBR) technology and the blending of concentrate from the water treatment plant process with raw water. As part of the project scope, the City has internally identified several sites that could provide alternative water supply to meet the City’s projected demands. These sites are undergoing evaluation for criteria such as permitability, influent characteristics and availability, reclaimed water demand, environmental benefits, consumptive use permit credits for aquifer recharge, and public acceptance. In reviewing potential reclaimed water projects, the City has taken a holistic approach where consideration has been given to achieving multiple benefits for an application of technology rather than using the conservative approach to meet specific treatment capacity needs. This philosophy considered not only the inherent benefits to the environment of this technology, but also other positive factors such as postponing the need for a major expansion of the City’s Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant and obtaining consumptive use credits to use the Biscayne aquifer. City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Plan Page 38 Ordinance No. C-09-01 Six conceptual projects have developed out of the feasibility study. Descriptions of the potential projects are provided below including location, treatment type and capacity being considered, and environmental benefits. Section 8.4.1 ‘E’ Repump Station/Prospect Well Field Recharge, 5 million gallons per day (MGD) demand capacity This project envisions the construction of a MBR treatment facility just south of Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport at the regional ‘E’ wastewater repump station. The MBR facility would capture up to 6 MGD of influent from the wastewater collection system and process it to highly treated levels meeting Broward County and Florida reclaimed water standards. There is a treatment process loss of approximately 1 MGD at a 6 MGD level of influent flow leaving a net reclaimed water flow of 5 MGD. In addition to the treatment afforded by the MBR (filtration and nutrient removal), it is likely that tertiary treatment in the form of reverse osmosis (RO) filtration and ultraviolet (UV) disinfection would be required to meet these standards. Approximately 5 MGD of highly treated reclaimed water would be distributed in the area of the City’s Prospect Well Field to assist in recharging the Biscayne aquifer and relieving the need for replenishment from the regional water delivery system. A consumptive use credit is a possible benefit to the City in this scenario. Section 8.4.2 ‘E’ Repump Station/Dew Lake, 1 to 5 million gallons per day (MGD) demand capacity This project is similar to the above project. A MBR facility would be constructed near the ‘E’ Repump Station to provide reclaimed water that would be distributed to Dew Lake east of Executive Airport. A wetland would be constructed in the lake and the water discharging from the lake’s control structure would be used to recharge the aquifer and possibly form a salt water intrusion barrier. The reclaimed water would be treated to above secondary standards through the MBR facility and a disinfection process. Capacity remains to be determined at this stage of the project. Section 8.4.3 Repump Station/Palm Aire Country Club Irrigation/City of Pompano Beach Well Field Recharge/Fern Forrest Nature Center Replenishment, 5 MGD demand capacity This project would be a done as a supplement to the Prospect Well Field Recharge project described above. The concept for this project is to construct a larger capacity MBR facility, on the order of 12 MGD, and provide up to 5 MGD of reclaimed water for irrigation to the five golf courses at the Palm Aire Country Club. The City of Pompano Beach operates its west well field on the golf course property and potential aquifer recharge benefits could accrue to this municipality by using highly treated reclaimed water to recharge the area near the well field. Economically, the City would benefit from sharing the capital and operations and maintenance costs of the project with Pompano Beach. City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Plan Page 39 Ordinance No. C-09-01 Broward County operates the Fern Forrest Nature Center to the west of the golf course property. During the dry season, the creek that runs through the center is dry. Consideration is being given to provide 1 MGD of reclaimed water to recharge the creek during these periods. These flows and uses would be in addition to the 5 MGD of the highly treated reclaimed water that would be utilized to recharge the area near the Prospect Well Field. Section 8.4.4 ‘B’ Repump Station/Coral Ridge Country Club Irrigation/Saltwater Intrusion Barrier, 6 MGD demand capacity The concept for this project is to construct an MBR facility at the regional ‘B’ Repump Station near the driving range of the Coral Ridge Country Club. The MBR facility would treat up to 7 MGD of wastewater from the collection system. The bulk of the resulting reclaimed water supply (5 MGD) would be piped to the west of the facility for the purposes of creating a saltwater intrusion barrier for the Prospect Well Field. A series of injection wells would be manifolded in a northeast-southwest line and reclaimed water would be injected to form a groundwater mound to displace salt water intrusion. The remainder of the reclaimed water (~ 1 MGD) would be distributed to the golf course and to a new residential development for irrigation purposes. The treatment process is anticipated to consist of filtration and nutrient removal through the MBR unit with disinfection. Section 8.4.5. Peele-Dixie Fort Lauderdale Country Club Well Field/Concentrate Blending, 5 MGD capacity This project envisions utilizing concentrate from the Peele-Dixie water treatment plant process and blending it with raw water for the purposes of recharging the plant’s well field and providing irrigation water for the golf course on which the wells reside. The capacity would be approximately 5 MGD. Section 8.4.6 Peele-Dixie Fort Lauderdale Country Club Well Field Recharge/Irrigation, 5 MGD demand capacity Under this project’s concept, an MBR facility would be constructed near the Peele- Dixie water treatment plant to provide reclaimed water. The reclaimed water would be used to provide irrigation water to the Fort Lauderdale Country Club and to recharge the area near the Peele-Dixie Well Field, which is located on the Club’s property. Reclaimed water used for irrigation would undergo filtration and nutrient removal through MBR treatment with disinfection, while the water used for recharge purposes would undergo the same treatment but with an additional RO filtration step. Five MGD of reclaimed water is proposed for these projects. City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Plan Page 40 Ordinance No. C-09-01 Section 8.5 Regional Water Supply Planning Efforts The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE), in concert with the SFWMD, are currently in the midst of implementing the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP). The overarching objective of that project is the restoration and protection of the South Florida ecosystem (i.e., the Everglades). The restoration planning efforts have determined that additional water is necessary to re-hydrate the Everglades to achieve their natural functions and values. To provide this needed water, the COE has proposed a comprehensive construction project to create both above ground water storage in a series of reservoirs (i.e., the Lake Belt Reservoir system) and ground water storage in a massive regional aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) system. In part, this new infrastructure will provide regional water to the coastal areas to maintain canal levels. The water currently used for this purpose, along with additional water stored in the proposed CERP projects, will be redirected to the Everglades. A second planning effort of importance to the City is the Lower East Coast Regional Water Supply Plan (LEC). The LEC plan incorporates the water supply strategies developed in the CERP, and the expected performance of the CERP infrastructure projects for determining water supply availability in the southeast coast of Florida. The purpose of the LEC Plan is to provide a cost effective strategy for assuring that adequate water supplies are available to meet the demands of natural systems, agriculture, and urban areas within the planning area through the year 2025. Current schedules for project implementation suggest that water for future drinking water needs in the southeast coast of Florida will not be available in the time frame originally anticipated. Consequently, alternative water supplies will likely be needed to meet regional demand. Additionally, if the proposed CERP projects are less efficient than anticipated, alternative water supplies will likely be needed to meet regional demand. All of these water supply planning efforts have the potential to affect the City’s long-term water supply. Even upon completion of the various planning efforts, the efficacy of a modified regionally water supply system will not be known until the proposed water supply infrastructure is constructed, and, perhaps, operated for several years. Section 9 Costs – Peele-Dixie Floridan Water Supply Treatment Facility Section 9.1 Construction Costs The City and their consultant recently completed a study to implement 6 MGD of RO treatment at the Peele-Dixie WTP along with related Floridan Aquifer wellfield facilities. This proposed Alternative Water Supply project is named “Dixie Floridan City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Plan Page 41 Ordinance No. C-09-01 Water Supply/Treatment Facility” in the 2005-2006 LEC Water Supply Plan. This study offered an opinion of the probably construction cost for this project of approximately $31.5 million. This value includes a 30 percent contingency. It does not include engineering, legal, administrative services, or land acquisition costs. This opinion of cost is an “order of magnitude” estimate (as defined by the Association of the Advancement of Cost Engineering International). The expected accuracy range would be +50 percent to –30 percent. Section 9.2 Operating Costs The cost of operating the Peele-Dixie Floridan Water Supply/Treatment Facility are estimated in 2008 dollars as follows: xYears 2013 to 2018 O & M cost of $1.8 million/year xYears 2018 onward O & M cost of $3.6 million/year Section 9.3 Funding Sources The funds appropriated for Peele-Dixie are described in Exhibit 1 as part of the City’s Water Master Plan projects. On September 16, 2008, the Peele-Dixie RO project was approved as part of the City’s FY 2009-2013 Capital Improvement Program. Funding will consist of bonds and state revolving loan funds. State Revolving Loan Funds as a source of external funding for Water Works 2011 projects was undertaken at the direction of the City Commission to maximize this source of low interest funding. To date the City has received State Revolving Loan Funds of $90 million; another $16 million has been approved and is pending distribution to the City. The $1,991,582 of State Revolving Loan funds shown below on the Capital Improvements Program sheet for Water Works 2011 projects is a subset of the $116 million received. This project has been added to the Capital Improvements Plan of the Capital Improvements Element of the Comprehensive Plan. Section 10 Summary This water supply plan forecasts finished water and raw water demands through the year 2025. Based on the assumptions that a 10 percent reduction in historical demands are viable through implementation of conservation ordinances; along with a water use permit increase to 52.55 MGD result in the City prediction water supply deficits beginning in the year 2012. Hence, the City proposes to initiate design of a project titled “Dixie Floridan Water Supply/Treatment Facility.” This project includes the construction of 6 MGD of finished water capacity reverse osmosis treatment at the Peele-Dixie WTP along with 10 MGD of Floridan Aquifer Wells. This alternative water supply project is predicted to provide the City with sufficient drinking water through the year 2023. Exhibit 1 Capital Improvements Program Peele-Dixie Floridan Well EXHIBIT 1 Appendix C APPENDIX C 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN July 2008 BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Environmental Protection and Growth Management Department Natural Resources Planning and Management Division Public Works and Transportation Department Water & Wastewater Services Broward County Page i Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C TABLE OF CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY .............................................................................................. 1 I. INTRODUCTION........................................................................................................ 4 A. Broward County......................................................................................................... 4 B. Water Supply.............................................................................................................. 4 C. The Broward County-wide Integrated Water Resource Plan..................................... 6 1. Making the Most of Local Water Resources .........................................................7 2. Coordinating a Diverse Water Management Community ..................................... 8 3. Matching up Local Water Sources and Users......................................................... 8 4. Diversifying Water Supplies................................................................................... 8 D. Challenges.................................................................................................................9 E. The 10-Year Water Supply Facilities Workplan...................................................... 11 F. Goals, Objectives, and Policies Supporting Water Supply Planning...................... 11 II. OBJECTIVES AND APPROACH ...........................................................................20 A. General..................................................................................................................... 20 B. Acknowledgements.................................................................................................. 21 III. ANALYSIS OF UNINCORPORATED AREAS OF BROWARD COUNTY SUPPLIED WATER BY CITY OF FORT LAUDERDALE .....................................22 A. City of Fort Lauderdale........................................................................................... 22 1. Service Area.......................................................................................................... 22 2. Production and Treatment Facilities..................................................................... 22 3. Finished Water Distribution System.................................................................... 25 4. Baseline Condition................................................................................................ 27 5. The Needs Assessment ......................................................................................... 27 6. Specific Needs ...................................................................................................... 33 7. The Water Supply Plan......................................................................................... 36 8. Reuse.................................................................................................................... 37 9. Conservation........................................................................................................ 38 10. Additional Considerations ................................................................................. 40 11. Summary of Planned Improvements.................................................................. 41 12. Cost Analysis and Funding................................................................................ 42 B. REGIONAL CONSIDERATIONS....................................................................... 43 1. Water Supply Needs ............................................................................................. 43 2. Local Water Resource Management..................................................................... 44 3. Water Conservation .............................................................................................. 44 4. Stormwater Reuse................................................................................................. 46 5. Wastewater Reuse................................................................................................. 46 6. Aquifer Storage and Recovery, the Floridan Aquifer, and Desalination.............. 48 7. Perspectives on Alternate Water Resource Development .................................... 49 C. Summary ................................................................................................................. 49 IV. ANALYSIS OF BCWWS SERVICE AREAS...................................................... 51 A. REGULATION OF BCWWS WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES...................... 51 B. BCWWS WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES & SERVICE AREAS................... 53 1.Existing Facilities................................................................................................... 53 Broward County Page ii Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C C. BCWWS Existing and Future Demands.............................................................. 68 1. Broward County Population Forecasting Model.................................................. 68 2. Methodology Used to Determine Future Water Demands ................................... 69 3. Future BCWWS Demands.................................................................................... 70 4. Alternative Water Supply Facilities to Meet Future Needs.................................. 86 5. BCWWS Comprehensive Conservation Plan....................................................... 88 6. Summary and Conclusions – BCWWS Service Areas......................................... 90 LIST OF FIGURES........................................................................................................ 94 LIST OF TABLES.......................................................................................................... 95 LIST OF ACRONYMS ..................................................................................................97 REFERENCES ................................................................................................................98 APPENDICES................................................................................................................. APPENDIX A Water Provider Support Document From The City of Plantation For The Unincorporated Area - Broadview Park of The District 1 Service Area…………………………………………………………………………. APPENDIX B Water Provider Support Document From The City of Hollywood For The Unincorporated Area - Broadview Park of The District 3A And District 3BC Service Areas……………………………………………………… 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 1 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C I. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Broward County is one of the fastest growing counties in the United States, with a population that is projected to increase thirty-one (31) percent between 2005 and 2030. For the most part, the potable water demands of this rapidly growing community are supported solely by the Biscayne Aquifer. Hydrologic modeling indicates that more than twice as much water flows through the Biscayne aquifer than is currently allocated in municipal consumptive use permits. Analyses to date indicate that roughly two-thirds of the water in the aquifer underlying urban Broward County is the result of rainfall infiltration, the remaining one-third is from lateral seepage from the Everglades. During droughts, restrictions on water use may be imposed to protect the aquifer from long-term harm due to saltwater intrusion. The frequency and severity of water use restrictions has the potential to increase during the next few decades as the urban population continues to expand, rainfall patterns change, and as we attempt to balance the needs of the Everglades along with the needs of urban and agricultural interests. Due to the uncertainty regarding population growth, water availability, and the ability to meet future water demands, local governments need to take a proactive role in water supply planning. From 2003 to 2005, the Florida State Legislature passed legislation to expand upon the requirements of the local government comprehensive plan and Florida water law to include closer coordination between land use planning and water supply planning. Included in those legislative changes, was the requirement for the development of a 10- Year Water Supply Facilities Workplan (Chapter 163, F.S.), with the purpose of increasing the coordination of future land use and water supply planning. In 2004, the Broward County Environmental Protection Department (EPD) and the Broward County Water and Wastewater Services (BCWWS) partnered in the development of an initial 10-Year Water Supply Facilities Workplan for the County. In both that workplan and this document, the role of the EPD, now the Environmental Protection and Growth Management Department, was to identify the future water supply needs of unincorporated areas of Broward County, to assess the provider utility’s ability to meet those needs, and to partner with provider utilities in plan development. In 2004, a number of municipalities - the City of Fort Lauderdale, the City of Plantation, the City of Cooper City, and the City of Sunrise – were all identified as providers of potable water to unincorporated areas of Broward County, as well as the County itself. Since that time, several of Broward County’s unincorporated areas have been incorporated or annexed. Of the remaining unincorporated areas, the City of Fort Lauderdale is the primary municipal provider of potable water to unincorporated areas and its participation and assistance was instrumental in development of this 2008 Workplan. In terms of total water delivery, the municipal utility operated by the City of Fort Lauderdale is the largest purveyor of potable water in Broward County, providing service to approximately 238,725 Broward County residents in 2005. In 2005, the per capita demand of all of the utility’s customers averaged 206 gallons per day (GPD), although the City has adopted a level of service of 230 GPD per capita. Population projections for the City of Fort Lauderdale were calculated using the Broward County Population 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 2 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C Forecasting Model (BCPFM) and were provided by the Broward County Office of Urban Planning and Redevelopment – Planning Services Division (BCPSD). This model has been approved by the Florida Department of Community Affairs. Based on a projected population increase of twenty-seven (27) percent between 2005 and 2025, the utility’s finished water demands are projected to grow from 49.12 to 62.37 million gallons per day (MGD). Although the utility has traditionally been able to meet demands through its existing wellfields and treatment facilities, application of the Regional Water Availability Rule is expected to restrict wellfield withdrawals from the Biscayne Aquifer to 2005 levels, thereby requiring the development of alternative water resources. The utility’s development of the Floridan aquifer as an alternative additional water resource and the construction of associated Floridan treatment facilities will help to provide for the utility’s water demands of 546.9 MGD in 2018 and beyond. During the next decade however, the utility’s water supply needs may increase above current projections as it works to transition to membrane technology. Since membrane treatment has a finished water recovery equal to 80% of raw water treated, compared to 96% with lime softening, the utility will need to increase its total pumpage to provide the same amount of finished water. The BCWWS operates four principal service areas in Broward County, maintains a wholesale agreement with Coconut Creek and provides raw water to several large users and utilities. The BCWWS provided an analysis of the water supply needs of their retail and wholesale customers, and generated a facility work plan tailored to the BCWWS service areas. Projections of future water demands for the BCWWS service areas were estimated based on February, 2007 model results from the BCPFM. The model results were further refined by BCWWS to examine the demand in utility analysis zones (UAZ). Based on anticipated levels of consumptive use permitting and infrastructure capacity, utility service areas requiring additional supplies or new facilities were identified. Plans are provided for improved water resource management through continued development and implementation of regional programs, projects and policies, and the development of alternative water resources. Based on system wide projections, total demand for all BCWWS service areas is expected to increase by approximately 35% from 34.4 MGD in 2005 to 46.3 MGD in 2030. In addition to the continued use of traditional sources, conservation efforts, and the utility’s reclaimed water facility, the construction of new Floridan wells and treatment facilities will be needed to meet the 2030 water demands of 4.5 MGD and 6.7 MGD in Districts 1 and 2, respectively. Both these facilities are expected to be on-line by 2013. The water utilities analyzed in this study had adequate infrastructure capacity to meet 10- year water demands through 2018 should traditional water resources be available. However, it is water availability that poses the greatest limitation to meeting future water demands. With the recent implementation of the Regional System Water Availability Rule, Biscayne Aquifer allocations are limited to historic usage. The current policy of the South Florida Water Management District (as of February 15, 2007) requires that municipalities and utilities meet new demands through the development of alternative water supplies. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 3 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C From a sub-regional perspective, Broward County, though its Water Resources Policy and Planning Program within the Environmental Protection and Growth Management Department, has developed a County-wide Integrated Water Resource Plan (IWRP) designed to provide comprehensive and efficient water management of local water resources through water resource assessments, water resources management strategies, policy integration, and conservation outreach and education. Projects pursued as part of the IWRP have included secondary canal and utility needs assessments; needs assessments for the County’s urban natural systems; and secondary canal improvements to enhance freshwater storage, and recharge of urban natural systems and the Biscayne Aquifer. Conservation programs, including NatureScape Broward and the NatureScape Irrigation Service, are found to provide an important role due to their relatively low cost compared to AWS development and their immediate application. The IWRP also provides cost share support in AWS project feasibility and design, regional water resource and AWS analyses, and investigation of technologies as well as construction of surface water management and natural system rehydration projects with regional benefits. Continued implementation of the IWRP will assist utilities in meeting water supply needs through hydrologic modeling of local water resources, including recently-initiated studies to identify key projects; the identification and implementation of improved water management strategies for water conservation and aquifer recharge; the coordination of water management efforts throughout the county; and policy recommendations that reflect evolving water supply and planning needs. While the improved management of localized water resources could allow greater flexibility and capacity in optimizing potable water withdrawals from the Biscayne Aquifer and may reduce overall demands, it will not fully provide for future demands. Therefore, the development of AWS will be a necessary part of local and regional water resource planning efforts. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 4 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C II. INTRODUCTION A. Broward County Broward County is located along the lower east coast of Florida, between Miami-Dade and Palm Beach Counties (Figure 1). It has experienced significant population growth since 2000, which is expected to continue. The County’s population is projected to increase thirty-one (31) percent between 2005 and 2030, from 1.75 to 2.29 million. The County contains more than 1,225 square miles, however, only the eastern third of the county (approximately 422 square miles) is urbanized. The remaining two-thirds is wetlands and constitutes a large part of the Everglades Water Conservation Areas. The increasing water demands of the rapidly growing community make water supply planning a challenge, especially in a region participating in the largest natural system restoration effort in the world, that of the Everglades. The ability to meet future water demands without impacting the natural system or compromising the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) requires extensive water supply and water resource planning, and coordination among the numerous water management entities in Broward County, which includes thirty-one (31) municipalities, twenty-eight (28) utilities and twenty-two (22) drainage districts. B. Water Supply The Biscayne Aquifer is one of the most productive aquifers in the world and is currently the primary source of freshwater to residents of Broward County, Miami-Dade County, and southeastern Palm Beach County. In 1979, it was designated a sole source aquifer by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), under the Safe Drinking Water Act (1974). The South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD) is the state agency responsible for water supply planning in the Lower East Coast Planning Area, which includes all of Broward County. Withdrawals from the Biscayne Aquifer are managed by the SFWMD through the issuance of Consumptive Use Permits (CUPs). In order to secure and maintain a CUP, applicants, which primarily consist of water utilities and agricultural operations, must meet the criteria of “three-prong test”. This test requires: 1) Reasonable and beneficial use of the resource; 2) Consistency with public interest, including compliance with minimum flows and levels (MFLs) established for surface water and groundwater sources; and 3) Demonstration of no adverse impact to existing legal users (Chapter 373, F.S.). The MFLs outlined in the Florida State Statutes are defined as the “limit at which further withdrawals would be significantly harmful to the water resources or ecology of the area” (section 373.042(1), F.S.). They serve to protect the Biscayne Aquifer from saltwater intrusion, ensure adequate groundwater levels for maintenance of natural systems, and prevent excessive groundwater seepage or surface water flows from the regional (Everglades) system. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 5 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C Figure 1 Broward County Location Map. The relationship between withdrawals from the Biscayne Aquifer and MFLs was analyzed in the Lower East Coast Regional Water Supply Plan (LECRWSP) (2000). At that time, withdrawals projected for 2005 were consistent with the MFLs for surface water and groundwater resources. However, it remained unclear whether additional pumpage, beyond the 2005 projection, could be supported without increasing withdrawals from regional water resources, and whether the SFWMD would continue to issue CUPs that exceeded the 2005 projection. Questions also arose with regards to the demands projected in the LECRWSP and whether these demands accurately reflected utility operations and the number of customers served. Due to the uncertainty regarding future water demands, water availability, and population growth, it was evident that water supply plans needed to be reviewed and updated, and that local governments needed to take a proactive role in water supply planning. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 6 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C The Broward County government was an active participant in development of the LECRWSP planning process and embraced the concept of a subregional water supply plan for improved water resource management. The County recognized that in the absence of an inexhaustible local water supply, the increasing water demands of a rapidly growing population were likely to result in more frequent and longer periods of water restrictions. Plan development was driven by the need to establish immediate improvements in water resource management to meet short-term water supply needs. The County’s objective was to optimize the efficient management of existing local water resources in an effort to delay and reduce the need for costly development of alternative water resources. The County and SFWMD partnered to fund several projects under the Integrated Water Resource Plan (IWRP). However, policy changes at the state level were directing water managers away from continued dependence on the Biscayne Aquifer and towards the development of alternative water resources. In 2005, passage of Senate Bill 444 created an alternative water supply assistance program to encourage the development of alternative water supplies by providing financial assistance. Alternative water supplies are defined in Section 373.019, Florida Statutes (2006) (F.S.) and include salt water; brackish surface and groundwater; surface water captured predominately during wet-weather flows; sources made available through the addition of new storage capacity for surface or groundwater; water that has been reclaimed after one or more pubic water supply, municipal, industrial, commercial, or agricultural uses; the downstream augmentation of water bodies with reclaimed water; stormwater; and any other water supply source that is designated as nontraditional for a water supply region in the applicable water supply plan. Subsection 373.1961(3)(f)(6), F.S., provides additional encouragement for projects in which the construction and delivery to end users of reuse water is a major component by requiring governing boards to give such projects significant weight when selecting AWS projects. Subsection 373.1961(3)(f)(7), F.S., requires that particular consideration be given to the quantity of water supplied by the project compared to its cost. In February 2007, the Governing Board of the SFWMD adopted the “Regional System Water Availability Rule” requiring that new water demands be met through alternative water sources. At the same time, an updated version of the LECRWSP, the 2005-2006 Lower East Coast Water Supply Plan Update (2005-2006 LEC Plan Update), was approved by the SFWMD Governing Board. The AWS focus of the 2005-2006 LEC Plan Update was driven by the rule that was concurrently under development. C. The Broward County-wide Integrated Water Resource Plan In 1997, Broward County initiated the County-wide Integrated Water Resource Plan (IWRP), in partnership with the SFWMD, in an effort to improve the coordination and efficiency of local water management. The principle of the IWRP was that water should be viewed as a regional resource, independent of municipal and utility service area boundaries. Successful implementation of the plan would require consensus building among a diverse group of sometimes opposing interests. To increase the potential for success, water managers, utility directors and drainage engineers were brought to the 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 7 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C table and invited to participate in all aspects of plan development. In 2008, and in the eleventh year of IWRP implementation, the County has made substantial progress with respect to projects and policies designed to protect the quality and preserve the quantity of local water resources. The keystone of the IWRP is efficient and effective water management through system integration. The IWRP is structured to promote a more regional approach to water resource management through water resource management strategies, water resource assessments, policy integration, and conservation outreach and education. Broward’s IWRP has four main goals: x To make the most of local water resources, so that Broward’s long-term water supply needs are met; x To coordinate a diverse water management community, ensuring the efficient and effective management of Broward’s water resources; x To match up local water sources and users to ensure that water supplies are available when and where they’re needed; x To diversify water supplies so that the needs of urban and natural systems are met under wet and dry conditions. 1. Making the Most of Local Water Resources Before developing the IWRP, Broward’s water management community conducted a comprehensive review of Broward’s local (urban) water resources and water users. This initial effort was somewhat cursory; a more comprehensive assessment would continue as the IWRP was put into motion. It was soon apparent that the IWRP would have to address water management from several different perspectives, including urban and non- urban interests, natural systems, and potable water needs. The approach to water management was reaffirmed with the passage of the Federal Water Resources Development Act (2000) and the adoption of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP). Successful restoration of the Everglades would require a careful balance of urban and natural system water needs. With an urban population expected to reach almost 2.3 million by 2030, water demands are expected to increase significantly. At the same time, there are more and more constraints on our ability to use current water resources to meet future water demands. These constraints are also closely linked to the health of the Everglades. So, one of the IWRP’s goals is to produce the additional water needed to support the County’s population in 2030, without increasing its reliance on the Everglades system. One way the water management community is doing this is through the IWRP, by making better, more efficient use of local water resources, and by protecting the quality of those resources. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 8 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C 2. Coordinating a Diverse Water Management Community The water management community in Broward County consists of dozens of water utilities, water managers, municipalities, and drainage/water control districts. In addition to making the most of existing water resources, another IWRP goal is to coordinate the actions of this diverse water management community. By coordinating efforts, more efficient and effective operations can be realized. This water management approach requires that water resources be viewed from a regional perspective, independent of municipal and service area boundaries and that water projects are evaluated based on their benefits to the entire region. This eliminates redundancy in planning efforts and reduces construction and maintenance costs. The idea is to maximize the benefits when compared to the costs. Because Broward County and the SFWMD have agreed to share the costs on some projects, there are more incentives to develop projects that offer regional solutions to local water management problems. In addition, cost sharing promotes finding solutions that are both effective and efficient. 3. Matching up Local Water Sources and Users To help guide water management decisions, Broward County has invested a lot of time, energy, and resources to develop advanced hydrologic models. These models help the County and its water management community plan for the future while guiding current water management decisions. With the financial support of the SFWMD, Broward County is using some of the most sophisticated water modeling technologies available to evaluate water management options. This technical approach to water planning is of particular value when determining how surface waters can be routed through the County’s extensive canal system to areas in need of recharge, and when measuring the potential benefits of transporting water. Some recharge projects help sustain wetlands, others recharge wellfields, and still others can help hold back saltwater intrusion. To this end, the County is currently undertaking the development of an Integrated Water Resource Master Management Plan which will help the water management community in fully assessing the implications of water management decisions, including impacts to surface water and groundwater levels, drainage implications and flood control. 4. Diversifying Water Supplies Broward’s IWRP works because of its unique combination of a technical framework, outreach efforts and focus on regional coordination. Although it is expected that great efficiencies will be achieved by coordinating water management practices and by conserving water, these strategies will not meet all of Broward’s future water demands. So, another goal of the IWRP is to expand and diversify local water sources by developing new alternative water supplies. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 9 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C These alternative water supplies are independent of the Biscayne Aquifer and are not dependent on water deliveries from the Everglades system. They include such strategies as desalination, treatment and reuse of wastewater, and capture and reuse of stormwater, Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR), and use of the Floridan Aquifer. Although more costly than traditional water supplies, alternative water supplies are not dependent on rainfall and they help protect against water restrictions and shortages during times of drought. Policy integration has been, and always will be a critical element of the IWRP, since a regional approach to water management requires political will and partnerships. Broward County has worked with municipal governments to review and streamline water ordinances and policies in order to ensure consistency throughout the County. Policy integration has included review and update of the County’s Comprehensive Plan with respect to water elements of the Plan, which provide the basis for municipal Comprehensive Plan amendments. Principle projects in support of policy integration include the development of a county-wide water conservation and education outreach program called “Water Matters”. The “Water Matters” campaign encourages environmental stewardship through activities that help to protect water quality and conserve water resources, such as landscape techniques and water use in the home. NatureScape Broward is an outreach program designed to improve water conservation, protect water quality and preserve native habitats through responsible landscape design and maintenance. The NatureScape Irrigation Service is a program designed to improve irrigation system efficiency through partnerships with 22 of the County’s water management entities. Another program, called “Know the Flow”, targets professional property managers, landscape professionals, and municipal staff and offers a structured water management course that addresses issues of water conservation, water quality, and best landscaping practices. Over the past ten years, the implementation of the Broward County-wide Integrated Water Resource Plan has been conducted in phases: Phase I included the identification, cataloging, and mapping of surface water features, natural systems, and utility service areas and wellfields; Phase II consisted of natural systems, secondary canal and utility needs assessments for northern, central and southern Broward County; Phase III entails the feasibility analysis and preliminary design of priority improvement projects identified in the needs assessments and as will be further identified through the Integrated Water Resources Master Management Plan (IWRMMP); and Phase IV provides for the construction of these projects. D. Challenges Population growth and increasing water demands will constitute a significant challenge for water supply planners during the next two decades. Based on data originally collected during the 2000 Census, and population modeling performed by the BCPSD, Broward County’s population is projected to increase thirty-one (31) percent between 2005 and 2030, with the highest rates of growth occurring in areas of intense redevelopment. For a County that was supposed to have reached build-out several years 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 10 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C prior, growth rates of this magnitude were not anticipated. Even under more certain circumstances, local water utilities might have difficulties meeting future water needs, but when coupled with limits on the amount of water available from the regional water system as well as significant restrictions imposed during regional droughts in 2000-2001 and 2007-2008, water supply planning has become a major endeavor. The 2005-2006 LEC Plan Update and the CERP both encourage the development of alternative water resources as a means of ensuring adequate water supplies. Water supplies derived from alternative water resources offer the provider and the consumer the benefit of a reliable water supply, protected from both climatologic and seasonal variability. However, as will be discussed, some of these alternatives are not without their risks or uncertainties. Variable chloride levels in the Floridan Aquifer, concerns regarding water quality and wastewater reuse, the feasibility of desalination, disposal of membrane treatment byproducts, and economic implications are factors that warrant additional consideration. These concerns are likely to be addressed as treatment technologies become more advanced, flexible, and cost-effective, and with the completion of AWS feasibility analysis. Certainly, the intended use will influence the AWS project pursued and the level of water quality treatment required. In light of these considerations, Broward County’s planning efforts in the early years of IWRP implementation focused largely on stormwater reuse as an alternative water resource. The objective has been to integrate the County’s secondary canal systems in order to increase retention of stormwater runoff and local rainfall to provide greater water conservation, water quality treatment, and aquifer recharge. Through the construction of secondary canal interconnects and culverts, surface water can be redistributed throughout the secondary canal system and to areas in need of additional water supply. Secondary canal interconnects provide flexibility in surface water management and thereby reduce the amount of water that is discharged to tide following rain events, and increase water conservation. With the support of the SFWMD, Broward County conducted secondary canal needs assessments in northern, central and southern parts of the County. These analyses identified a number of secondary canal improvement projects that could increase water conservation and aquifer recharge through stormwater reuse. Benefits of the proposed projects included the creation of hydrologic barriers to saltwater intrusion, recharge of urban natural systems, and augmentation of recharge to local wellfields. Several of the identified improvement projects have been pursued by Broward County or by interlocal partners in cost share with Broward County and the SFWMD. As a result of having pursued this water management strategy, the County is now well positioned to receive and redistribute surface waters for canal and aquifer recharge, regardless of the source. These alternative sources might include regional surface water reservoirs, ASR systems, and reclaimed wastewater. In Broward County, water supply planning has also focused on the modeling of local hydrology to identify and guide management decisions. The project began with the development of three regional models that were later merged into a single fully-integrated surface and ground water model which is now being applied in local and regional water resource planning efforts. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 11 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C E. The 10-Year Water Supply Facilities Workplan In 2002, the Florida State Legislature expanded upon the requirements of the local government comprehensive plan to include the development of a 10-Year Water Supply Facilities Workplan (chapter 163, F.S.), with the purpose of increasing the coordination of future land use and water supply planning. Additional requirements to strengthen the link between land use and water supply planning were made by the 2005 legislature, including the requirement for identification of any traditional and alternative water supply projects, as well as conservation and reuse programs necessary to meet projected water demands. The 2005 legislation also requires that the future land use element and future land use map be based upon the availability of water supplies and that local governments must consult with applicable water suppliers to determine that adequate water supplies will be available to serve new development no later than the anticipated date that a certificate of occupancy is issued. Plan development is required of all local governments with responsibility for providing all or a portion of water supply within their jurisdictional boundaries and located in area where a Regional Water Supply Plan has been developed by the water management district. Broward County is located entirely within the Lower East Coast Planning Area of the SFWMD and is responsible for ensuring adequate water resource development and water delivery to unincorporated areas of the County and areas served by the County’s water utility, the BCWWS. As such, the Environmental Protection and Growth Management Department and the BCWWS have jointly developed this 10-Year Water Supply Facilities Workplan to address future water supply needs in Broward County. F. Goals, Objectives, and Policies Supporting Water Supply Planning There are numerous Goals, Objectives, and Policies (GOPs) found within Broward County’s Comprehensive Plan which support the County’s 10-Year Water Supply Facilities Workplan and the requirements of Chapters 163 and 373, F.S. These can be found within the following sub-elements of the County’s Comprehensive Plan: x Potable Water x Conservation x Wastewater/Sanitary Sewer x Drainage and Aquifer Recharge x Capital Improvements x Intergovernmental Coordination The following GOPs are some of those that reflect the County’s commitment to water supply planning: Potable Water Goal 4.0. Provide residents of the Unincorporated Area, customers, and large users of Broward County utility districts a cost-effective and equitable potable water supply system which provides an adequate supply of water meeting all applicable federal, state 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 12 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C and local water quality standards and does not compromise the sustainability of the county’s water resources or ability to supply water in the future. Objective 4.1.Broward County Water and Wastewater Services (WWS) shall identify and, where feasible, correct existing potable water facilities' deficiencies by 2018. Objective 4.2. Potable water facilities shall be provided to meet the County’s short-term and long-term future needs. Policy 4.2.4. Prior to approval of a building permit, Broward County shall consult with the appropriate water supplier(s) to determine whether adequate water supplies to serve the new development will be available no later than the anticipated date of issuance of a certificate of occupancy. Policy 4.2.5. Planning for additional capacity and/or a reduction in per capita demand shall be included in the 10-Year Water Supply Facilities Work Plan as required in Chapter 163 of Florida Statutes to increase the coordination of local land use and future water supply planning. Policy 4.2.8. In order to protect and conserve the Biscayne Aquifer, and limit demands on the regional water management system, the Broward County Environmental Protection and Growth Management Department shall continue to investigate utilization of alternate water sources to supplement and broaden the county’s future water supply sources as described in the 10-Year Water Supply Facilities Workplan. These potential sources could include the increased use of reclaimed wastewater, improved methods of conservation, development of the Floridan Aquifer, Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR), improved operations to increase stormwater reuse and aquifer recharge by improvements to the secondary canal infrastructure, and other technologies and management strategies which may be reflected in the Lower East Coast Water Supply Plan 2005- 2006 Update of the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD). Policy 4.2.9. Broward County WWS will construct alternative water supplies by the year 2013 sufficient to meet its needs to the year 2023. Policy 4.2.10. Broward County shall encourage maximizing the use of existing potable water facilities and reducing redundant facilities, consistent with current water policy, including the Regional Water Availability Rule adopted February 15, 2007 by the SFWMD. Objective 4.3. Utilize existing potable water facilities to the extent permitted and encourage compact urban growth patterns. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 13 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C Policy 4.3.1. Broward County WWS shall continue to utilize the development review process of the Land Development Code to require applicants for development permits within the County’s utility districts to enter into an agreement to “tie-in” to existing facilities or construct improvements to the County’s potable water system necessitated by the proposed development when adequate facilities, based on the adopted level of service standard, are not available and no fiscally feasible plan to construct or expand said facilities is proposed. Policy 4.3.2. Broward County shall continue to coordinate the provision of potable water through agreements with the municipalities and other service providers in Broward County. Policy 4.3.3. The PRD shall recommend the denial of future land use map amendments where densities or intensities are increased if: 1. Plans do not demonstrate that adequate water supplies and associated public facilities will be available to meet the projected growth demands. 2. There is not a reasonable expectation that a consumptive use permit for the proposed water resource will be issued by the South Florida Water Management District. 3. Plans to extend and/or develop potable water resources and facilities do not include a financially feasible capital improvement program. Policy 4.3.4. As an alternative to new potable water facility construction, Broward County shall identify opportunities to increase the efficiency and optimization of existing facilities, while promoting water conservation initiatives. Objective 4.4. Conserve and protect potable water resources with primary focus on the Biscayne Aquifer by optimizing the utilization of water resources through effective water management practices. Policy 4.4.4. The Broward Permitting, Licensing, and Consumer Protection Division (PLCPD) shall continue to enforce Chapter 39, "Zoning," Article VIII, "Functional landscaping and Xeriscaping," Broward County Code of Ordinances, which reflects the NatureScape Broward program principles. Policy 4.4.6.The WWS shall continue to implement its conservation-oriented rate structure within its WWS utility systems. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 14 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C Policy 4.4.8.Broward County shall continue to develop and implement County-wide water conservation programs and initiatives including the Water Matters education and outreach program, NatureScape Broward, and the NatureScape Irrigation Service (NIS). Objective 4.5. Potable water facilities shall be designed, constructed, maintained and operated in such a manner as to protect the functions of natural groundwater recharge areas and natural drainage features and not exacerbate saltwater intrusion. Policy 4.5.1. The design for the construction, operation and maintenance, of new or expanded potable water facilities shall consider the short-term and long-term impacts to natural groundwater recharge areas, wetlands, surface and groundwater levels, and exacerbation of saltwater intrusion. The design shall also consider whether or not the construction, operation and maintenance will significantly harm the aquifer system or result in any additional demand upon the regional system. Adverse impacts of construction, operation, and maintenance shall be avoided or at least minimized. Objective 4.6.Provide the customers and large users of Broward County WWS, a cost effective, equitable and adequate potable water system meeting all applicable federal, state, and local standards; and provide the residents of unincorporated Broward County a cost-effective, equitable and adequate potable water system meeting all applicable federal, state, and local standards. Policy 4.6.2. Broward County shall continue to coordinate the provision of potable water through agreements with the municipalities and other service providers in Broward County. Policy 4.6.3. In order to protect and conserve the Biscayne Aquifer, and ensure the availability of future water supplies, the Broward County Environmental Protection and Growth Management Department shall investigate demand management and utilization of alternate potable water sources to supplement and broaden its future water supply sources. These potential sources could include the Floridan Aquifer, reclaimed wastewater, ASR, desalination, capture and storage of excess storm water currently lost to tide and other technologies and water management strategies consistent to the goals of the SFWMD's Lower East Coast Water Supply Plan 2005-2006 Update. Sanitary Sewer Goal 5.0. Provide residents of the Unincorporated Area, large users, and customers of Broward County utility districts, cost effective, equitable and adequate sanitary sewer 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 15 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C facilities meeting applicable federal, state, and local design standards and effluent water quality standards. Objective 5.4. Sanitary sewer facilities shall be designed, constructed, maintained, and operated in a manner that conserves and protects potable water resources by optimizing the use of reclaimed wastewater, where feasible, thus offsetting demands on the Biscayne Aquifer. Policy 5.4.1. Broward County shall encourage the use of reclaimed water as an integral part of its wastewater management program, where economically, environmentally, and technically feasible. Policy 5.4.2. Broward County shall encourage increased wastewater reuse from the North Regional Waste Water Treatment Plant (NRWWTP), where feasible. Policy 5.4.3. Broward County shall continue public education efforts on the reuse of reclaimed water, encouraging the reuse of water of an appropriate quality level for the purpose intended. Drainage and Aquifer Recharge Goal 7.0. To optimize the utilization of water resources through provision of stormwater management for Broward County which reduces damage and inconvenience from flooding, promotes recharge to the Biscayne Aquifer, improves and protects water quality in surface and ground waters, and protects the functions of wetlands in urban areas. Objective 7.4. Stormwater management facilities shall be designed, constructed and operated in a manner that conserves and enhances potable water resources. Policy 7.4.1. Broward County shall work with the South Florida Water Management District and the independent drainage districts to implement applicable portions of the Lower East Coast Water Supply Plan 2005-2006 Update intended to reduce losses of excess stormwater to tide, recharge the surficial aquifer and provide additional storage of surface waters. Policy 7.4.3. Broward County shall develop a County-wide Water Management Master Plan that optimizes flood protection, water quality treatment and protection, stormwater storage, wetlands sustainability, and ground water recharge functions. The Master Plan shall be developed as part of the County’s efforts to meet water supply needs and water resource goals through 2025 with the application of the County’s integrated surface water and groundwater model that incorporates the existing surface water management system, well field characteristics, water demands, ground water levels, and flows and canal stages. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 16 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C Policy 7.4.5. Broward County shall provide information to users in the service areas of alternative water sources of appropriate quality available for non-potable water needs. Objective 7.5.Maintain and enhance ground water recharge to the surficial aquifer system so as to maintain all of the functions of the Biscayne Aquifer, including potable water supply, the abatement of saltwater intrusion, and reduced seepage from the Water Conservation Areas, while ensuring the necessary water quality protections. Policy 7.5.8. Broward County shall work cooperatively with the SFWMD, municipalities, and drainage/water control districts to develop and implement plans for additional surface water storage so as to improve the volume of regional water available for the purpose of maintaining canal levels and to the Biscayne Aquifer. Policy 7.5.9. In order to protect and conserve the Biscayne Aquifer, Broward County shall investigate utilization of alternate potable water resources to supplement and broaden the county’s future water supply sources. These potential sources include the Floridan Aquifer, Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR), desalination, capture and storage of excess storm water, surface water storage, reclaimed water, and other technologies addressed in the Lower East Coast Water Supply Plan 2005- 2006 Update of the SFWMD. Policy 7.5.1. Broward County shall protect aquifers from depletion through water conservation and preservation of the functions of high recharge areas including but not limited to the water conservation areas and water preserve areas. Conservation Goal 13.0. Conserve, and protect the beneficial use of the natural resources of Broward County so as to provide and maintain a level of environmental quality that ensures the public health, safety, and sustainable environmental communities. Objective 13.3. Broward County shall maintain or reduce the average daily per capita water demand as reflected in the South Florida Water Management District’s consumptive use permits. The consumptive use permits provide for the following per capita water demand: 141 gallons per capita per day for District 1; 152 gallons per day for District 2; 255 gallons per capita per day for District 3A; and 117 gallons per day for District 3BC. Policy 13.3.1. Broward County shall encourage the reuse of reclaimed water as an integral part of its wastewater management program, where economically, environmentally, and technically feasible. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 17 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C Policy 13.3.2. Broward County shall encourage increased waste water reuse from North Regional Waste Water Treatment Plant where feasible. Policy 13.3.3. Broward County shall continue to plan and develop new wellfields and water supplies in accordance with state rules and water policy. Policy 13.3.4. Broward County shall continue to implement the Water Conservation Plan as required in their consumptive use permit from the South Florida Water Management District as well as other utility specific water conservation efforts which include water use audits, education, and support for the Naturescape Irrigation Service operations within the WWS service area. Policy 13.3.5. Broward County shall continue to develop and implement County-wide water conservation programs and initiatives including the Water Matters education and outreach program, the NatureScape Broward, and the NatureScape Irrigation Service (NIS). Policy 13.3.6. Broward County shall maintain specific landscape irrigation measures urging the public to conserve water resources prior to declaration of an emergency water shortage by the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD) and shall implement all water use restrictions applicable to Broward County in accordance with Chapter 40E-21, Florida Administrative Code (FAC). Policy 13.3.7. Broward County shall continue to enforce Chapter 39, "Zoning," Article VIII, "Functional landscaping and Xeriscaping," of the Broward County Code of Ordinances, which reflects the NatureScape Broward program principles. Policy 13.3.9. Broward County shall pursue the use of reclaimed water as an integral part of regional water development strategies for potential application in landscape irrigation, aquifer recharge, and environmental enhancement where technically, environmentally, and economically feasible. Policy 13.3.11. Broward County shall work with the SFWMD, municipalities, independent drainage districts, and neighboring counties to plan and develop additional surface water storage including the water preserve areas in western Broward County. Policy 13.3.12. In order to protect and conserve the Biscayne Aquifer, and support Everglades restoration, Broward County shall pursue projects that enhance aquifer recharge and investigate utilization of alternative water resources to supplement and broaden the county’s future water 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 18 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C supply sources. These potential sources include the Floridan Aquifer, Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR), desalination, capture and storage of excess stormwater and other technologies addressed in the Lower East Coast Water Supply Plan 2005-2006 Update of the SFWMD. Policy 13.3.13. Broward County shall explore additional opportunities to conserve water by targeting industries and areas characterized by high rates of water consumption and develop industry specific water conservation strategies. Policy 13.3.14. Broward County will work expeditiously to apply the County-wide hydrologic model in support of water resource planning and management. Policy 13.3.15. Broward County will work with local governments, including municipalities and drainage/water control districts to apply the County-wide integrated Water Resources Plan principles. Policy 13.3.16. Broward County shall pursue a feasibility analysis of the potential for Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) to serve as a regional alternative water supply within the County. Policy 13.3.17. Broward County shall work with water managers to review water supply planning efforts and consider opportunities for coordination in alternative water resource development, such as desalination, the development of Floridan wells, ASR, and reuse. Capital Improvements Goal 14.0.The County will strive to provide sufficient and efficient infrastructure within its service areas to meet the standards set forth within the comprehensive plan elements, by preserving, modifying and replacing existing infrastructure and providing new infrastructure when required due to growth and development. Policy 14.1.2. Continue implementation of approved master plans as outlined within the Transportation, Potable Water, Sanitary Sewer, Solid Waste, Deepwater Port and other Comprehensive Plan Elements. Policy 14.1.5. Capital Improvement needs which are the financial responsibility of Broward County as described in other elements, shall be included within the capital program. These needs will be served concurrently with the impact of new development or the needs to satisfy an existing deficiency or previously approved development. Objective 14.4. Construction of all improvements and facilities included within other plan elements shall be monitored through the land development review 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 19 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C process, which shall ensure that the County is not required to construct improvements beyond its financial capacity. Policy 14.4.1. Land development regulations shall be revised and adopted pursuant to Florida Statutes, Chapter 163 to ensure that all the objectives within the Comprehensive Plan are accomplished. Objective 14.5. Land use decisions shall be made based on the planned availability of resources to provide sufficient improvements to maintain adopted levels of service. Policy 14.5.1. Recommendations on proposed land use changes shall be based on an analysis of infrastructure planned to support the area. Objective 14.6. Development orders will be issued based on the availability of infrastructure required to maintain the adopted levels of service discussed in other elements of this Comprehensive Plan. Policy 14.6.5. Development shall be deferred in those areas without sufficient public facilities to meet the adopted level of service if the above funding alternatives are not approved by the electorate and if other general revenues are not available. Policy 14.6.6. The County shall provide the infrastructure necessary to maintain the adopted levels of service standards as identified in the respective elements of the Broward County Comprehensive Plan. Objective 14.7. Development orders will be issued upon the availability of infrastructure required to maintain adopted levels of service. Intergovernmental Coordination Objective 15.3.Ensure the coordinated establishment of level of service standards for public facilities with agencies and/or municipalities having operational and maintenance responsibilities for such facilities. Policy 15.3.2. Broward County will coordinate with municipalities supplying water to unincorporated areas and those municipalities which receive water from WWS. This coordination will include sharing and updating information regarding 10 Year Water Supply Facility Work Plans, including the Lower East Coast Water Supply Plan to meet ongoing water supply needs and the implementation of alternate water supplies. Policy 15.3.3.Broward County shall consult/coordinate with the appropriate water supplier prior to the building permit stage for the unincorporated areas to determine whether adequate water supplies will be 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 20 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C available to serve developments by the issuance of a certificate of occupancy or its functional equivalent. II. OBJECTIVES AND APPROACH A. General The purpose of the Broward County Water Supply Facilities Workplan is to identify the future water supply needs for the unincorporated areas of Broward County and those areas serviced by the BCWWS, and to present the strategy for meeting projected water demands. The role of the Environmental Protection and Growth Management Department was to identify the future water supply needs of unincorporated areas of Broward County not serviced by BCWWS and to assess the provider utility’s ability to meet those needs. The role of BCWWS was to identify the future water supply needs of their service areas, which include both unincorporated areas and incorporated areas, and to determine the most appropriate methodologies for meeting their water needs. Several of the unincorporated areas of Broward County are provided water service by BCWWS; hence these areas were included in the BCWWS analysis. For the remaining unincorporated neighborhoods, the City of Fort Lauderdale was identified as the provider water utility. The Environmental Protection and Growth Management Department partnered with the municipality and its Potable Water Utility in plan development. In coordination with the Fort Lauderdale Planning and Zoning Department and the water utility, the Environmental Protection and Growth Management Department identified current and future water supply needs within the water utility’s service area. Fort Lauderdale provided data required for the needs assessment, confirmed the accuracy of the analysis, and generated a 10-year water supply plan for meeting water demands in the utility’s service area. The Environmental Protection and Growth Management Department has provided a review of regional considerations and will continue to assist local municipal utilities in water resource planning and management through continued investigation and development of water resource projects and programs with regional benefits. Unincorporated areas dependent upon private wells for potable water supply were not included in the analysis. Needs assessments were developed based on current utility operations and the existing customer base, compared to population projections through 2030. Population modeling was performed by the BCPSD, which developed a Population Forecasting Model that was approved by the State of Florida’s Department of Community Affairs and adopted as part of the Broward County Comprehensive Plan in 1989. The model provides details about Broward County’s expected population with respect to age, gender, and race and provides forecasting at 1-year intervals. The model also accounts for changes in land use patterns that are expected through development and redevelopment. Both the City of Fort Lauderdale and BCWWS further refined these population estimates to address the populations within specific Traffic Analysis Zones (TAZ) that are provided service by the respective utility. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 21 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C The Workplan presented here includes an analysis of existing water facilities, current and projected water demands versus water availability (based on current and projected consumptive use permitting), and the presentation of water supply plans for the Fort Lauderdale utility and BCWWS. Future water demands prepared for this analysis are compared to projected demands presented in the 2005-2006 LEC Plan Update, with discussion of deviations. Areas likely to require new supply and/or facilities based on anticipated regional water availability (current CUP) compared to projected demands are identified, and recommendations are provided for improved water resource management through continued development and implementation of regional programs, projects and policies, and the development of alternative water supplies, such as ASR, conservation, reuse, water-sharing agreements, treatment of the Floridan Aquifer using reverse osmosis, and desalination of ocean water. The Water Supply Facilities Workplan begins with an analysis of the water supply needs of that portion of unincorporated Broward County not serviced by BCWWS. This consists of a number of neighborhoods adjacent to or within the Fort Lauderdale service area – Roosevelt Gardens, Boulevard Gardens, Franklin Park, and Washington Park. This portion of the document contains an analysis of Fort Lauderdale’s ability to provide water to its customers, including those residing in these unincorporated areas of Broward County. This section includes a description of the service area, and current production, distribution, and treatment facilities; establishes a baseline condition (2005); presents a needs assessment; identifies specific needs; and concludes with a utility-specific workplan, including proposed alternative water supply projects, conservation and reuse initiatives, and cost analysis and funding. Sub-regional analyses are followed by a discussion of regional considerations, including County-wide water management strategies as part of the IWRP, and a summary of the water supply needs and planning requirements for Broward County. The second half of the document contains the Water Supply Facilities Workplan prepared by the BCWWS. This section of the report includes a description of the existing BCWWS facilities, followed by an analysis of existing and future water demands, a discussion of new sources and facilities needed to meet expected demands, and water conservation efforts being undertaken and considered by BCWWS. The BCWWS analysis concludes with a summary of water supply facilities needed in its service areas in order to meet long-term water supply needs and maintain consistency with both the CERP and the 2005-2006 LEC Plan Update. B. Acknowledgements The principle utility servicing the unincorporated areas of Broward County involved in this study is the City of Fort Lauderdale. This study was conducted with tremendous support and in collaboration with the City’s staff. Their support and participation is greatly appreciated. Special thanks to: x Mr. Maurice Tobon, City of Fort Lauderdale Water Utility x Mr. Kris McFadden, City of Fort Lauderdale Water Utility x Mr. Eric Silva, Principal Planner, City of Fort Lauderdale 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 22 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C III. ANALYSIS OF UNINCORPORATED AREAS OF BROWARD COUNTY SUPPLIED WATER BY CITY OF FORT LAUDERDALE A. City of Fort Lauderdale 1. Service Area The municipal utility owned and operated by the City of Fort Lauderdale is the single largest purveyor of potable water in Broward County, in terms of total water delivery, providing service to approximately 238,725 Broward County residents in 2005 or approximately 13.3% of the County’s population. The utility’s service area encompasses a total area of 43 square miles, approximately one-tenth the total area of urban Broward County. Retail customers include residential, commercial, and industrial properties within the City of Fort Lauderdale, a portion of Lauderdale-by-the-Sea, the Village of Lazy Lake, and several unincorporated Broward County neighborhoods, including all or portions of Roosevelt Gardens, Franklin Park, Washington Park, and Boulevard Gardens (Figure 2). The utility also maintains wholesale agreements for potable water supply with the City of Oakland Park, the City of Wilton Manors, the City of Tamarac (east of 34th Avenue), Town of Davie, and Port Everglades. Emergency potable water interconnections are maintained with the City of Dania Beach, the City of Pompano Beach, and the City of Plantation. The next sections provide a brief summary of the City’s existing water facilities, ongoing improvements, and future planning initiatives that are currently underway. Principal water facilities serving the City’s customers include the following: x Fiveash Water Treatment Plant; x Peele-Dixie Water Treatment Plant; x Prospect Wellfield; x Dixie Wellfield; x Distribution System Water Storage Facilities; x Raw Water Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR); and x Finished Water Distribution System. 2. Production and Treatment Facilities The Fort Lauderdale water utility operates two water treatment facilities, the Peele-Dixie and the Fiveash Water Treatment Plants (WTPs). The Peele-Dixie and Prospect wellfields provide the source water for each of the treatment facilities, respectively and are permitted by the SFWMD under Consumptive Use Permit (CUP) No. 06-00123-W. The Prospect Wellfield has 29 active production wells with pumping capacities of 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 23 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C approximately 700 to 2,100 gpm each, with a total wellfield capacity of approximately 87 MGD. Raw water to the Peele-Dixie WTP is supplied from the Dixie Wellfield, composed of two wellfield configurations, the “Old Dixie Wellfield” and the “New Dixie Wellfield.” The Old Dixie Wellfield will be removed from service by the end of 2008. The City will abandon 19 wells and replace them with 8 new 2.5 MGD wells which have already been completed. The installed capacity of the New Dixie Wellfield is approximately 20 MGD. The wellfield withdrawal permit limits the maximum withdrawal to 15 MGD on a daily basis. Wholesale customers receive finished water from the Fiveash WTP. The Peele-Dixie WTP is operated to supplement the Fiveash Water Treatment Plant. The plant has recently been converted from a lime-softening facility to a state-of-the-art membrane facility, scheduled to begin operation by mid-2008. The nanofiltration treatment plant has a maximum installed finished water treatment capacity of 12 MGD with all units in service. A single 2.3 MG clearwell provides the only current storage at this facility, however two additional 4 MG ground storage tanks will be available when the new facility begins operation, increasing the storage capacity at this facility to 10.3 MG. In 2007, the City completed construction of two Floridan Aquifer test wells at the Dixie Wellfield site. A study is currently underway to assess the feasibility of the addition of 6 MGD of reverse osmosis (RO) production capacity from the Floridan Aquifer at the new nanofiltration treatment plant. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 24 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C Figure 2 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 25 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C The Fiveash WTP is the primary water treatment facility for the City’s Water System service area. It has a designed treatment capacity of 70 MGD and is supplied by the Prospect wellfield. Hydraulic restrictions limit its actual capacity to 55-60 MGD on a maximum day basis. Actual treated flow averaged about 42 MGD in 2005, with a maximum day flow of 57 MGD. Onsite storage of 21.76 Million Gallons (MG) is provided by two 5-MG tanks, one 4-MG tank, one 7-MG tank, and seven clearwells totaling 0.76 MG (Table 1). Table 1 Summary of Statistics for the City of Fort Lauderdale Water Treatment Plants *Treatment capacity is in millions of gallons per day (MGD). Operational constraints reduce capacity of Fiveash treatment plant to 60 MGD. Peele-Dixie nonofiltration plant to be in service by mid-2008. **Storage capacity is in millions of gallons (MG). Includes 8 MG for Peele-Dixie scheduled to come on-line mid 2008 The City also has two distribution system storage sites – one at Ponciana Park which includes a new 2.0 MG concrete storage tank and one 1.0 MG tank at Northwest Second Avenue. The Northwest Second Avenue site also includes one 2.4 MGD high service pump. Fort Lauderdale also has one existing Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) well, located at the Fiveash WTP, designed to inject and recover raw water at rates of approximately 2 MGD. However, at this time the ASR well is inactive due to recovery inefficiencies and is currently permitted under a no flow permit. Fort Lauderdale has one wastewater treatment facility. The George T. Lohmeyer Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) is designed as a central regional facility and is used to treat all wastewater generated in a region encompassing the City of Fort Lauderdale, Wilton Manors, Oakland Park, and Port Everglades, as well as part of Tamarac and unincorporated Broward County. The plant has a capacity to treat 55.7 million gallons of water per day. There is no use of reclaimed water from this facility. 3. Finished Water Distribution System The City of Fort Lauderdale’s water distribution system consists of over 750 miles of 2 to 54-inch diameter water mains that convey the finished water from the treatment facilities to the individual customers. Major distribution lines are shown on Figure 3. In general, the larger diameter transmission mains radiate from the treatment facilities and decrease Water Treatment Plant Treatment Type Treatment Capacity* (MGD) Storage Capacity** (MG) Source Water Peele-Dixie Lime Softening 12.0 10.3 Peele-Dixie Wellfield Fiveash Lime Softening 70.0 21.76 Prospect Wellfield Total 82.0 32.06 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 26 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C Figure 3 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 27 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C in size as they extend throughout the service area. The major transmission mains travel east from the water treatment plants to the populated portions of the service area and the two systems are interconnected along major north-south avenues. Under the current Waterworks 2011 program, on-going infrastructure improvements are anticipated to significantly improve water delivery flows and system pressures in many areas served by the City. However, based upon future projections, areas of lower pressure are anticipated to re-occur and additional long-term improvements may be required in certain service areas, including: x Downtown Business District (Northwest 2nd Avenue Tank) x Las Olas Isles (North) x Las Olas Boulevard (East) x Southeast 17th Street (West of Intracoastal) x Harbor Beach Area (East of Intracoastal) Based upon need and priority, a number of transmission system infrastructure improvements will require completion between 2011 and 2025 to meet these demands. 4. Baseline Condition The City’s current CUP (No. 06-00123-W) from the SFWMD expired on May 8, 2007. This permit allows the City to pump a combined average daily allocation for the two wellfields of 50.6 MGD, and a maximum daily allocation of 67.3 MGD. Withdrawals from the Dixie Wellfield are limited to 10 MGD. The City is awaiting a new CUP from the SFWMD. It has requested an increase to 59 MGD, but anticipates that it will receive a CUP allocation from the Biscayne Aquifer of 53.6 MGD based on the guidance provided in the Regional Water Availability Rule. In 2005, the combined pumpage from the Peele-Dixie and Prospect Wellfields averaged 46.76 MGD. More recently, in 2006, the City’s total wellfield pumpage averaged 48.9 MGD, 1.7 MGD less than total permitted withdrawals. During the first six calendar months of 2007, total pumpage for Fort Lauderdale was 7,737 MG (42.7 MGD), a 15% reduction over the amount used during the same period in 2006. The large decrease in raw water pumpage recently is associated with water use restrictions that have been imposed by the SFWMD as a result of the current (2006-20078) drought. 5. The Needs Assessment The 2007 Water Master Plan Update prepared for the City of Fort Lauderdale calculated water use by residential, commercial, sprinkler/irrigation, and wholesale customers and was forecasted 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 28 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C for the years 2010, 2015, 2020, 2025, and 2030. Water use does not include the distribution system loss which is added when computing finished water demand. The methods and results are described below. The water use projections were based upon the following data and information: x 2005 billed water use of each customer category by traffic analysis zone (TAZ); x Population projections supplied by Broward County’s Planning Services Division (BCPSD) to the City of Fort Lauderdale; x Current commercial and residential development efforts within Fort Lauderdale’s service area; and, x Commercial build-out of the remaining vacant land areas that are not likely to be residential and are not classified as wetlands. Future finished water demands on the Fort Lauderdale water utility by user category are presented in Table 2. The 2005 water billing records were spatially allocated to determine the total annual average daily residential water consumption in each TAZ. Forecasts were completed by multiplying the 2005 residential billed water use in each TAZ by one, plus the forecasted percent change in population within that TAZ. Commercial water use is expected to increase as Fort Lauderdale approaches build out by 2025 and demand for local commercial goods and services results in increased water use by existing and new commercial establishments within the City. The 2025 forecast of average daily commercial water use within each TAZ was estimated as the average daily commercial water use in 2005 increased by 27 percent, the forecasted percent increase in the Broward County population from 2005 to 2025. Commercial water use forecasts between 2005 and 2025 were interpolated between the 2005 actual retail commercial water use and the 2025 forecast. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 29 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C (a) Residential includes all single-family, multifamily, and condominium water customers. (b) Commercial includes all retail water users other than residential and irrigation accounts. (c) Irrigation accounts represent separate meters used to bill irrigation use separately-residential and commercial. (d) Wholesale customers include Port Everglades and surrounding cities that purchase water for resale. (e) Distribution loss is calculated as 8.1 percent of total finished water production. (f) Per capita estimate provided for comparison purposes only. The City’s stated level of service is to provide 230 gallons per capita per day. Residential and commercial customers also have the option of opening accounts that meter and bill for landscape irrigation water use only. Charges for these accounts do not include wastewater user rates. Water use of these accounts is not expected to increase in the future as residential and commercial buildings are expected to occupy more and more of the pervious land cover within each TAZ and conservation measures are implemented that reduce landscape irrigation demand. For the purposes of these water use forecasts, the amount of water used by sprinkler/irrigation accounts in each TAZ was held constant from 2005 to 2025. The City of Fort Lauderdale also provides wholesale water service to large users adjacent to the service area, through master meters. There may be more than one master meter per wholesale customer. Depending on the type of customer and the purpose of the water use, different methods were used to determine future demand. For the major municipalities supplied water by Fort Lauderdale, the 2005 water use was increased by the projected percent increase in population associated with the geographic areas served by the water supply and as presented in the population forecasts. For Port Everglades, 2005 water use was increased by five percent each year through 2025 as determined by planning consultants for the Port. Two other master meter customers – one for irrigation at the Fort Lauderdale – Hollywood International Airport (with WWS) and one for potable water at the Florida Department of Transportation at a toll booth are not included here, as they represent only very minor future demands. Table 2. Fort Lauderdale Service Area Finished Water Demand Forecast, 2005-2025 (MGD) 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 Residential (a) 19.47 20.48 21.70 22.90 24.76 Commercial (b) 8.90 9.51 10.13 10.74 11.346 Irrigation (c) 9.16 9.16 9.16 9.16 9.16 Wholesale (d) 7.61 8.41 9.50 10.72 12.04 Subtotal 45.14 47.57 50.49 53.52 57.32 Distribution System Loss of 7.6% (e) 3.98 4.19 4.45 4.72 5.05 TOTAL FINISHED WATER DEMAND 49.12 51.76 54.94 58.24 62.37 Per Capita Estimate (f) 205.76 205.32 203.82 202.51 203.69 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 30 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C The per capita rate of water consumption calculated for the utility’s retail and wholesale customers was based on population estimates for 2005 and the annual average daily flow (ADF) that was delivered to each of the utility’s service areas. Distribution losses were taken into account and included in the Retail Service Area flow information. The per capita water demand averaged 206 GPD throughout the utility’s supply area (Figure 2, Table 3). Table 3 City of Fort Lauderdale Total Water Consumption – Baseline Conditions Population 2005 Average Daily Flow (MGD) Per Capita Demand (MGD) Per Capita Demand (GPD) Retail Service Area 187,713 41.51 0.0002211 221 Wilton Manors 12,390 1.6 0.0001291 129 Oakland Park 29,863 4.41 0.0001477 148 Tamarac 6,359 0.19 0.0000298 30 Davie-Hacienda Village 2,400 0.10 0.0000416 42 Port Everglades 1.31 Total/Average 238,725 49.12 206 *Average daily flow measured in 2005 in millions of gallons per day (MGD), and the per capita water demand for each of the service areas in gallons per day (GPD). The Retail Service Area includes Fort Lauderdale, Lauderdale by the Sea, Sea Ranch Lakes, Lazy Lake, and Unincorporated Broward neighborhoods. The per capita water demand measured in 2005 is provided for informational purposes only. The population of Fort Lauderdale and the other municipalities in the Water Service Area was forecasted by using the Broward County Population Forecasting Model (BCPFM). The Model employs a cohort-survival methodology to project population. The Florida Department of Community Affairs has found that the BCPFM complies with the population projection methodology requirements of Chapter 9J-5, FAC. For purpose of the City’s analysis the Broward County Model was used as the basis of the forecast (Table 4). As a cross reference, finished water demands for the future were also calculated using the average per capita demand in 2005 throughout the service area (208 GPD) multiplied by these same population estimates (Table 2). Since it may be assumed that local water demands will increase at a rate proportional to that of population growth, future demands using this method were calculated as: Future Demand (MGD) = Per Capita Demand (GPD) * Projected Population where the future water demand is in millions of gallons per day (MGD), the per capita demand is in gallons per day (GPD) averaged throughout the service area and is based on population and total water consumption measured in 2005, and the projected population is obtained from the City’s estimates based on BCPSD’s population projections. This method provides slightly 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 31 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C higher projections of future demands. However, for purposes of this report, the finished water demand estimates used are those prepared by the City’s consultant in the Water Master Plan – 2006 Update as adjusted to reflect the average distribution system loss over the past five years. The future water demands of the utility’s retail and wholesale customers were calculated at 5-yr intervals through 2025, with 2005 providing the baseline condition (Figure 4, Table 4). The utility’s wholesale customers are projected to account for approximately 19% of the total demand on the Fort Lauderdale water utility in 2025. The future water requirements at Port Everglades were estimated from total consumption measured in 2005 and an annual 5% increase in demand. For the remainder of the service area, future demands were estimated as a function of the per capita rate of water consumption measured in 2005 and population projections provided by the BCPSD. Water demands are presented in MGD. Table 4 Population Projections for the City of Fort Lauderdale Retail and Wholesale Service Areas 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 Fort Lauderdale 180,876 190,408 202,257 214,992 229,112 Oakland Park 29,863 32,077 35,289 38,549 41,604 Wilton Manors 12,390 13,152 14,134 15,030 15,832 Tamarac (a) 7,069 7,490 8,060 8,513 8,712 Davie- Hacienda Village 2,400 2,400 2,400 2,400 2,400 Unincorporated populations (b) 6,127 6,573 7,414 8,108 8,533 Subtotal 238,725 252,100 269,554 287,592 306,193 (a) The area of Tamarac served by the City of Fort Lauderdale via a master meter includes small portions of TAZ's 398, 393, 394, and 400. These TAZ's also include areas served by Fort Lauderdale retail service and Oakland Park retail service. The Tamarac population presented here includes the total population in these TAZ's from which the percent growth in population was used to forecast future water demand by Tamarac. (b) Unincorporated area customers include residents of Boulevard Gardens, Franklin Park, Roosevelt Gardens, and Washington Park * Data were derived from the Broward County Population Forecasting Model developed by the Broward County Environmental Protection and Growth Management Department – Planning and Redevelopment Division. The peak demand on the utility’s water supply system was calculated by comparing the maximum daily flow (MDF) for a 30-day period to the annual ADF. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 32 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C Figure 4 Projected Water Demands by Service Area for the City of Fort Lauderdale Water Utility 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 YearDemand (MGD)Retail Service Area Wilton Manors Oakland Park Tamarac Port Everglades Davie-Hacienda V illage System Loss This ratio of MDF:ADF is referred to as the peaking factor. According to Fort Lauderdale, the peaking factor for the combined Peele-Dixie and Fiveash facilities is estimated at 1.4 (Maurice Tobon, personal communication, 2007). This peaking factor was used to estimate future peak demands. Between 2005 and 2025, demands on the Fort Lauderdale water utility are projected to increase 27% to 62 MGD, with a peak demand of 87.32 MGD (Table 5). The future water supply needs estimated in this study were compared to projections prepared by the SFWMD, as presented in the 2005-2006 LEC Plan Update. Comparison of the Fort Lauderdale and LEC Plan Update data suggests that demands presented in the 2005-2006 LEC Plan Update might significantly overestimate long-term water needs by as much as 20.23 MGD, or 342% by 2025 (Table 5). This discrepancy appears to be explained by differences in population projections and a higher per capita demand than reported by the City of Fort Lauderdale’s utility. Nonetheless, this information is presented for comparison purposes in Figure 5. Additionally, should Fort Lauderdale adopt a water demand reduction ordinance, as proposed as part of its Conservation effort, finished water demands are expected to be reduced by 10 percent (see discussion). Projections under the 10 percent reduction Conservation scenario are presented in Table 5 and Figure 5 for comparison purposes as well. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 33 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C Figure 5 Projected Finished Water Demands For the City of Fort Lauderdale Water Utility 49.12 51.76 54.94 58.24 62.37 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 YearDemand (MGD)* Projected water demands of the Fort Lauderdale water utility, estimated by Fort Lauderdale and shown relative to demand projection as estimated in the 2005-2006 LEC Plan Update. Also shown is the expected demand assuming Fort Lauderdale adopt a Conservation Ordinance resulting in 10% reduction. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 34 Comprehensive Plan Volumen 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C Table 5. Projected Water Demands for the City of Fort Lauderdale Water Utility* 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 ADFMDF ADFMDF ADFMDF ADFMDF ADFMDF Retail Service Area(a) 37.534 39.15 40.994 42.81 45.289 Wilton Manors 1.60 1.70 1.82 1.94 2.04 Oakland Park 4.41 4.74 5.72 5.782 6.18 Tamarac 0.19 0.20 0.21 0.22 0.23 Port Everglades 1.310 1.68 2.14 2.73 3.49 Davie – Hacienda Village 0.10 0.10 0.10 0.10 0.10 System Loss 3.98 4.19 4.45 4.72 5.05 TOTAL 49.12 68.77 51.76 72.46 54.94 76.92 58.24 81.54 62.37 87.32 Conservation Ordinance Demand (b) 46.60 49.40 52.40 56.10 2005-2006 LEC Plan 47.80 65.30 82.60 Update Projected Demand (a) Retail Service Area includes residential, commercial, and irrigation demands for Fort Lauderdale, Lazy Lakes, Lauderdale by the Sea, Sea Ranch Lakes, and Unincorporated Areas served by Fort Lauderdale Utility. (b) Fort Lauderdale proposes passing a conservation based water demand reduction ordinance in 2008 that is anticipated to result in a 10 percent reduction in demand * Demands are estimated from the projected water needs of retail, commercial and wholesale customers and are in millions of gallons per day (MGD). Calculation of the average daily flow (ADF) was based on per capita water demands measured in 2005 and population projections for each of the service areas. The maximum daily flow (MDF) was calculated as the ADF multiplied by a peaking factor of 1.4. Demands presented for 2005 were the actual rates of consumption measured in that year. Also shown are the projected water demands presented by the South Florida Water Management District in the Lower East Coast Water Supply Plan Update 2005-2006. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 35 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C 6. Specific Needs The City of Fort Lauderdale water utility has sufficient Biscayne wellfield capacity (102 MGD) and treatment capacity (82.0 MGD) to meet the projected water supply demand of 62.37 MGD in 2025, based on current water sources and treatment technology. However, the utility’s current consumptive use permit limits withdrawals from the Biscayne Aquifer, the sole source of water for both the Peele-Dixie and the Fiveash WTPs, to an average of 50.6 MGD and recent water policy decisions will limit the City’s use of this traditional water resource as it relates to meeting new water supply needs. In February 2007, the SFWMD Governing Board authorized the adoption of the Regional Water Availability Rule. This rule limits water allocations provided through permit renewal to conditions or pumpage that existed prior to April 1, 2006, known as the “base condition water use.” The rule only allows allocations over the “base condition water use” if additional impacts to the Everglades are avoided through alternative source development, or with the transfer of allocations from terminated or reduced demands. The “base condition water use” consists of the pumpage during any consecutive twelve month period during the five years preceding April 1, 2006. Examples of alternative water resource development include the implementation of ASR, withdrawals from the Floridan Aquifer, desalination, reverse osmosis, and advanced wastewater treatment for reuse. As stated, the City is in the process of renewing its consumptive use permit and it is anticipating that it will receive a 53.6 MGD raw water allocation from the Biscayne Aquifer. However, given different treatment efficiencies for water sources other than the Biscayne aquifer, additional raw water will need to be utilized to meet expected demands. The SFWMD’s current policy requires utilities to compensate for the difference between permitted (Biscayne) allocations and actual demand through the development of alternative water supplies. While the City is pursuing numerous alternatives, at this point in time, it intends to produce additional water by tapping into the Floridan Aquifer. By 2015, the utility’s finished water supply needs are projected to reach 54.94 MGD, requiring an additional 1.67 MGD of AWS raw water, and by 2025, the finished demands are expected to reach 62.37 MGD, requiring a total of 13.64 MGD of AWS raw water (Table 6). Although these scenarios assume the AWS source will solely be from the Floridan aquifer, the raw water supply needs could actually be much different and come from various sources such as a regional reservoir (L8), ASR, and/or wastewater reuse. Successful implementation of conservation programs can reduce potential demand as well. The exact timing and implementation of specific water projects is dependent on water demands and water use permit requirements. Depending on the source of AWS to be developed, raw water requirements will differ. Assuming a 96% recovery rate of Biscayne-sourced water through lime- 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 36 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C softening treatment and a Biscayne CUP for 53.6 MGD, Fort Lauderdale should be able to provide 51.46 MGD of finished water through 2025. However, with the City’s plan to transition to membrane treatment, recovery rates will decrease to 80%, requiring additional raw water withdrawals to produce the same amount of finished water. These additional withdrawals are estimated to reach 4.35 MGD in 2015 and 13.64 MGD in 2025. With a 12 MGD finished water nano-filtration facility expected to be competed by 2015, sufficient treatment capacity should exist to meet the 2015 finished water demand of 54.94 MGD and the 2025 demand of 62.4 MGD of finished water. Although the City of Fort Lauderdale operates a pilot ASR project, recovery from the Floridan Aquifer has not been satisfactory, averaging less than 10%. It is doubtful whether long-term operation of the ASR will provide a sustainable and cost-effective source of additional water. Therefore, the City is primarily working to develop Floridan wells to meet future demand, while pursuing other multi-jurisdictional initiatives in conjunction with other utilities (see L-8 reservoir discussion below). The City of Fort Lauderdale’s future water supply needs were analyzed with respect to the projected demands presented in the LEC Plan Update and Fort Lauderdale’s analysis (Figure 5). By 2010 the utility’s water supply needs are expected to exceed the current CUP allocation by 1.16 MGD (assuming the current CUP of 50.6 MGD is maintained). Should Fort Lauderdale receive its anticipated allocation of 53.6 MGD, an additional 4.35 MGD of raw water will be needed by 2015 to meet the projected finished water demand of 54.94 MGD. As stated above, this number increases to nearly 13.64 MGD of alternative water by 2025. 7. The Water Supply Plan The City of Fort Lauderdale plans to meet wellfield and treatment requirements with construction of various water supply projects. Major capital improvement projects include the construction of new Floridan wells at the Peele-Dixie wellfield and transition Table 6. Fort Lauderdale Raw Water Demand Forecast, 2005-2025 (MGD) 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 TOTAL FINISHED WATER DEMAND 49.12 51.76 54.94 58.24 62.37 Biscayne CUP (a) 50.60 53.60 53.60 53.60 53.60 Available from Biscayne after lime treatment (b) 48.58 51.46 51.46 51.46 51.46 Additional Finished Water Required 0.00 0.30 3.48 6.78 10.91 Raw Water needed from AWS (c) 0.00 0.38 4.35 8.48 13.64 TOTAL RAW WATER DEMAND 50.60 53.98 57.95 62.08 67.24 (a) Biscayne CUP only - assumes increase to 53.60 MGD by 2010 (b) Assumes 96% recovery rate of Biscayne-sourced water (c) Assumes 80% recovery rate from MBR treatment of AWS 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 37 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C from lime softening to nanofiltration at this facility. While nanofiltration will enhance the quality of finished water by removing discoloration associated with high levels of dissolved organics, the replacement of lime softening processes with membrane treatment will also increase the total raw water demand. Since membrane treatment has a finished water recovery equal to 80% of raw water treated, compared to 96% with lime softening, the utility will need to increase pumpage and treatment to provide the same amount of finished water. Since the utility’s current CUP limits total pumpage to just 50.6 MGD, the utility has sought an increase in its CUP Biscayne Aquifer allocation to 53.6 MGD which is allowed under the Water Availability Rule. In addition to the Biscayne allocation, it will need to request an increase in its CUP for an allocation from the Floridan Aquifer. The City is also investigating other strategies to meet projected water demands through the 20 year period addressed in this report and beyond. One water management strategy that is being investigated is to offset withdrawals associated with the Biscayne Aquifer through one or more water reuse projects. A water reuse project would allow the City to withdraw additional Biscayne Aquifer water if an equal amount of wastewater is treated and used to recharge the aquifer. The City has recently approved a study to investigate the water reuse option. The City is partnering with several water utilities to explore the possibility of collaborative, sub-regional, and multi-jurisdictional solutions to provide more cost- effective and environmentally-sound methods of developing needed water supplies. One water management strategy that is being investigated by the City is the capture and reuse of stormwater in a regional reservoir in Palm Beach County (referred to as the L-8 reservoir). Capture of this stormwater runoff would serve to reduce environmentally harmful discharges to the Loxahatchee River and downstream estuarine resources while providing source water for redistribution within the regional water management system. Expansion of the existing L-8 reservoir could serve to capture additional stormwater runoff from within Palm Beach County to satisfy both environmental and water supply objectives. This water would be potentially available to recharge various canal systems and wellfields, benefiting multiple utilities in Palm Beach and Broward Counties, including the City of Fort Lauderdale. Preliminary studies have indicated that the project could be economically advantageous, compared to other AWS options, but requires further analysis. 8. Reuse The City is also considering implementing reuse of wastewater effluent, as part of projects that could be used to meet alternative water supplies. Indirect potable reuse systems have dual benefits of providing more wastewater treatment and augmenting local water supplies, which will be important whenever the City applies for a Water Use Permit from the SFWMD. The implementation of reuse systems, and particularly those that develop an alternative water supply to decrease the City’s dependence on the regional water supply system, are encouraged by the State. Projects that reuse wastewater effluent while meeting other water resource needs are encouraged, providing they address environmental and economic concerns. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 38 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C The Fort Lauderdale GT Lohmeyer WWTP is located far from any traditional users of reclaimed water, such as golf courses. Therefore, the construction of an irrigation-quality reclaimed water production facility at or near the plant to provide further treatment of effluent to irrigation standards is not generally considered a worthwhile investment. Furthermore, there is little available space on the plant site or plant vicinity to construct the required treatment facilities. In addition, due to high levels of infiltration/inflow near coastal areas and waterways, the chloride concentration in the treated effluent (approximately 600 mg/L) exceeds the maximum recommended amount (2450 mg/L). Therefore, the only practical alternatives for implementing reuse systems are off site, near potential beneficial uses of reclaimed water. The City submitted an Updated Wastewater Reuse Feasibility Study to FDEP in July 2004. This document summarized an evaluation of alternatives for the reuse of wastewater effluent and provided a summary of the estimated costs and benefits of the alternative systems. At that time, it was determined that the projects being considered were not cost effective. More recently, the City has undertaken an analysis designed to determine the feasibility of implementing selected reclaimed water projects that could offset potable water deliveries from the regional water management system, focusing on aquifer recharge and irrigation. The technologies being considered are satellite wastewater treatment facilities using Membrane Bioreactor (MBR) technology and the blending of concentrate from the water treatment plant process with raw water. Six conceptual projects are being considered: x ‘E’ Repump Station/Prospect Wellfield Recharge, 5 MGD demand capacity x ‘E’ Repump Station/Dew Lake, 1-5 MGD capacity x Repump Station/Palm Aire Country Club Irrigation/City of Pompano Beach Wellfield Recharge/Fern Forest Nature Center Replenishment, 5 MGD demand capacity x ‘B’ Repump Station/Coral Ridge Country Club Irrigation/Saltwater Intrusion Barrier, 6 MGD demand capacity x Peele-Dixie Fort Lauderdale Country Club Wellfield/Concentrate Blending, 5 MGD demand capacity x Peele-Dixie Fort Lauderdale Country Club Wellfield Recharge/Irrigation, 5 MGD demand capacity 9. Conservation The City of Fort Lauderdale has actively pursued a Conservation strategy that includes goals, objectives, and policies to conserve water. Within those objectives, Objective 9 of Fort Lauderdale’s Comprehensive Plan forms the basis for its programs: Continue to conserve water as a resource of the City and region as a whole and work to reduce per capita water demand. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 39 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C This objective is supported by the following Comprehensive Plan policies: x Work on a local and regional basis to conserve and protect water resources by implementation and enforcement of the conservation rate ordinance adopted in 1996. x During drought periods, limit the use of water for irrigation and car washing and cooperate with the SFWMD water withdrawal limitations through enforcement of the emergency restrictions ordinance adopted in 1994. x Distribute literature pertaining to water conservation and appropriately cite residents not complying with mandatory drought prohibitions. x Replace water mains with a history of leakage through an annual infiltration repair program. x Review and determine the most cost-effective application of a water reuse system for the City as well as water-saving devices for future City facilities. x If necessary, implement an emergency conservation of water resources in accordance with the plans of the regional water management district. x Because studies conducted for the City have demonstrated the practical, logistical and economic infeasibility of instituting a program of reuse of reclaimed water at this time, the City of Fort Lauderdale has developed and will continue to implement alternatives to water reuse for the near future as water conservation measures. These measures include: 1. The development and construction of a wellfield recharge basin utilizing Prospect Lake as storage, developed in cooperation with Broward County Environmental Protection Department and using grant funds from both the County and the South Florida Water Management District. 2. The enactment and enforcement of the Water Conservation Rate Ordinance in 1996, which allows the City to charge lower water rates for users that conserve water. x Continue to enforce City of Fort Lauderdale Ordinance 28-1, which states that the City shall comply with South Florida Water Management District rules and enforce and restrictions relating to water shortages and surface watercourses. The City continues to maintain an active public information campaign on water conservation and restrictions and enforces water restrictions on irrigation using Environmental Inspectors, Code Enforcement Officers, and Police Officers. In addition, the City is a partner of the County in the operation of the NatureScape Irrigation Service. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 40 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C Over 13 MG of water was saved as a result of implementing recommendations based on irrigation system evaluations completed in 2006. The City also maintains a conservation rate structure for water and wastewater use. These rates are in effect year-round. 10. Additional Considerations The SFWMD has suggested that water management strategies that offset withdrawals from the Biscayne Aquifer might provide justification for an increase in a utility’s CUP. The City of Fort Lauderdale has actively pursued and implemented improved water management strategies for enhanced surface water storage and recharge of the Biscayne Aquifer. For example, the City has worked to develop and construct improvements in the secondary canal system to increase the conveyance of stormwater runoff to Prospect and Gator Lakes for greater freshwater storage and recharge of the Biscayne Aquifer and the Prospect Wellfield. The City of Fort Lauderdale is currently working with Broward County, the Old Plantation Water Control District (OPWCD), the City of Plantation, the Florida Turnpike Enterprise, and the SFWMD to coordinate a wellfield recharge project with expansion of the Florida Turnpike. The OPWCD has proposed to provide the City of Fort Lauderdale’s Peele-Dixie Wellfield with an additional 2 to 3 MGD of recharge from OPWCD’s secondary canal system. Another project that is projected to enhance recharge of the Peele-Dixie Wellfield is expansion of the culvert connecting the C-12 Canal to the Turnpike ditch on the East side of the Turnpike at Sunrise Boulevard. This improvement, accompanied by the construction of a culvert underneath Broward Boulevard, also East of the Florida Turnpike, is expected to provide an additional 2 to 3 MGD recharge to the Fort Lauderdale wellfield. The completion of these recharge projects could provide enough recharge to the Peele-Dixie wellfield to offset the additional pumpage required to meet the utility’s short-term water supply needs. The projected cost of these improvements is $230,000. In November 2005, in response to the SFWMD’s request for AWS project listings for the LEC Plan update, the City submitted the “Dixie Floridan Water Supply/Treatment Facility” project. However, the City is evaluating various other options to meet its “unmet demand” as well, including reuse of treated wastewater effluent and interbasin transfer of surface waters. It recognizes that projected finished water shortfalls will require at least some amount of Floridan Aquifer water to reliably provide for future demands. Hence, it has initiated planning for 6 MGD of additional finished water utilizing reverse osmosis treatment of Floridan Aquifer sourced water and has developed a preliminary plan for implementation of 6 MGD of RO facilities at the existing Peele- Dixie Water Treatment Plant. The preliminary project timeline proposes that these facilities will go online in the year 2013. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 41 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C 11. Summary of Planned Improvements 2008 – The Fort Lauderdale utility is finalizing the construction of the Peele-Dixie WTP. This construction includes conversion of the water plant from lime softening to nonofiltration and will eventually provide 12 MGD of finished water. The total cost of improvements at the Peele-Dixie wellfield and WTP are estimated at $30 Million. This is being funded through the Waterworks 2011 program. The City has completed and tested two Floridan wells to be used as a source of raw water to be treated at the Peele-Dixie membrane treatment plant. Reverse osmosis will be utilized to treat the Floridan raw water. Separate RO membrane treatment units will be installed in the membrane building. Well test data from the Floridan test wells will be used to determine the number, spacing, and location of the future Floridan wells. The SFWMD provided $325,000 in AWS grant funds in FY 2007 for this project and the City has committed $26,000,000 to the development of Floridan wells and facility. 2013 – The City will complete its 36 MGD Floridan reverse osmosis facility at the Peele – Dixie WTP. The treatment capacity of the RO facility will be based on the anticipated water demands. There is some indication that demands may not be as great as originally projected. Recent restrictions associated with the 2006-2008 drought have reduced pumpage levels by 15% during the first six months of 2007 as compared to that same period in 2006. Permanent year-round water conservation measures are currently being considered by the SFWMD. Depending on the water demand impacts of these proposed permanent year-round landscape water restrictions, the City may only need a portion of the finished water capacity of the RO system. Therefore portions of the RO system may come online in 2013, with the remainder to be operational by 2015. 2018 – By 2018, the City will most likely be utilizing a combination of Biscayne and Floridan raw water for treatment. Table 7 provides a facility capacity analysis. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 42 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C Table 7. Fort Lauderdale Facility Capacity Analysis 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 Population Served (All users) 238,725 252,100 269,554 287,592 306,193 Avg. Daily Demand (MGD) 49.12 51.76 54.94 58.24 62.37 Demand per Capita (GPD) 205.76 205.32 203.82 202.51 203.69 Available Facility Capacity (GPD)1 66.00 72.00 78.00 78.00 78.00 Facility Capacity Surplus/(Deficit) 16.88 20.24 23.06 19.76 15.63 Permitted Amount (GPD Annual Avg.)2 50.60 53.60 53.60 53.60 53.60 Permitted Surplus/(Deficit) 1.48 1.84 (1.34) (4.64) (8.77) Supply Surplus/(Deficit) with 10% reduction3 7.00 4.20 1.20 (2.50) 1 Rated capacity per City of Fort Lauderdale is 85 MGD, but operational/other constraints limit full utilization to approximately 60 MGD for the Five Ash facility and 6 MGD for Peele Dixie. Conversion of Peele-Dixie facility in 2008 will provide 12 MGD finished water. An additional 6 MGD of RO treatment is projected to come on line by 2013. 2 Includes new Biscayne CUP by 2010. A new CUP for Floridan or anoter AWS will be requested prior to 2015 if necessary. 3 Assuming Fort Lauderdale implements its Conservation Ordinance resulting in a 10% reduction in demand, a supply deficit would not occur until after 2020. 12. Cost Analysis and Funding As outlined, it is likely that the City’s Biscayne Aquifer Consumptive Use Permit will be limited to 53.6 MGD or less. To address the resultant water supply shortfall as forecasted demands are realized, the City is working closely with the SFWMD and has begun to explore and evaluate the benefits and costs of various initiatives, including water reclamation, alternative water supplies and other “water-making” projects to supplement the Peele Dixie and the Fiveash Water Treatment Plant supply and production capacities. Ultimately, the costs will depend on the success of conservation efforts, the types of alternative water resource projects selected, and the demands created by growth. In the interim, water production from the City’s Fiveash and Peele - Dixie Water Treatment Plants will need to be closely managed in cooperation with the SFWMD to ensure operation remains within agreed withdrawal limits until alternative resources are explored and implemented to supplement the current supply. A recent study completed for the City indicated that the AWS project known as the “Dixie Floridan Water Supply/Treatment Facility”, identified in the 2005-2006 LEC Water Supply Plan Update, would cost approximately $35.1 Million. Operating and maintenance costs are estimated in 2008 dollars as follows: x Years 2013-2018 $1.8 Million/year x Years 2018 – on $3.6 Million/year 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 43 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C Estimated expenditures per year through 2013 for the Peele-Dixie Floridan Water Supply Treatment Facility are as follows: x 2007-2008 $1.3 Million x 2008-2009 $5.2 Million x 2009-2010 $5.2 Million x 2010-2011 $5.2 Million x 2011-2012 $5.2 Million x 2012-2013 $5.2 Million B. REGIONAL CONSIDERATIONS 1. Water Supply Needs The Lower East Coast Plan Update has indicated that Broward County faces an estimated deficit of 106 MGD of water in meeting its demands by 2025. While new water demands have traditionally been met through further development of the Biscayne Aquifer resource, recent policy changes restrict withdrawals from this resource to levels measured prior to April 2006. With the adoption of the Regional Water Availability Rule in February, 2007, it is now required that new demands be met through the development of alternative water supplies. In the absence of being able to obtain an increase in their CUP to utilize the Biscayne Aquifer, water utilities are required to develop alternative water resources in order to meet any additional demands that can not be met with withdrawals from the Biscayne Aquifer. The development of alternative water supplies will allow water providers to meet the consumptive use needs associated with future growth and will also better position utilities to manage any further changes in regional water availability, such as those associated with drought. Successful development of alternative water resources relies upon critical consideration and contemplation of all possible alternatives, and changes in technology, as part of the planning process. While the course of local governments has been to pursue the most cost-effective and certain alternatives as part of their water supply and comprehensive planning processes, the adoption of the Regional Water Availability Rule has necessitated an acceleration of alternative water resource development by many utilities. The County’s IWRP was developed to help guide water resources planning and management decisions. Previous investments in the IWRP have supported water resource assessments, development of advanced technical tools, and county-wide implementation of innovative conservation programs which have equipped the County and water management community at large with the means of evaluating and pursuing the various water resource alternatives required under this new policy environment. Today, the IWRP is seen as a regional solution requiring a combination of conservation and alternative water supply. The IWRP is able to provide assistance with both strategies. The following section describes previous efforts and their application in today’s environment. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 44 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C 2. Local Water Resource Management To aid utilities and water managers in their planning efforts, technical staff from Broward County, the SFWMD, and local environmental firms worked to address the question of local water availability through the development of three subregional hydrologic models. These models were originally developed to: 1) identify wellfield operations that could be sustained while still meeting permit criteria without compromising the Everglades restoration project; 2) determine the rate of pumpage that can be supported by the Biscayne Aquifer; and 3) to relate this number to the projected water demands for Broward County. As these models were developed, various alternatives were tested to examine the benefits of various infrastructural improvements, operational changes, aquifer recharge projects, and drainage enhancements as part of overall water management. In 2005, the County combined and improved the three MIKE SHE/MIKE 11 models (northern, central, and southern) to provide a seamless integrated surface water and groundwater model for all of the urban area of Broward County. This model is now being applied in the development of a County-wide Integrated Water Resource Master Management Plan (IWRMMP) to help guide water resource planning and management decisions. The water supply and water resource goals of this Plan include (1) meeting the projected water supply demands for each water utility service area to the year 2025, (2) reducing saltwater intrusion, (3) decreasing flood hazard, (4) improving the hydrologic regime of wetlands in the urban area, and (5) providing benefits to CERP. Another goal is to improve surface water quality in the urban area. Given the current direction that many utilities are pursuing with development of Floridan Aquifer resources, the project also includes Floridan modeling. Many of the alternatives addressed in the IWRMMP will not specifically address the source of water, but will rather examine points in the system where water deliveries will best satisfy needs – whether it be for aquifer recharge, wetland rehydration, saltwater abatement, etc. This will assist utilities in establishing timeframes upon which they can base their own individual master plans, as well as the development of their alternative water resources for supplementing withdrawals from the Biscayne Aquifer. In the meantime, water management strategies pursued under the IWRP will help utilities meet short- and long- term water supply needs. 3. Water Conservation Although it is inevitable that alternative water supplies must be developed, there are significant opportunities to reduce the total volume that must be produced by these more costly alternatives through the implementation of more aggressive water conservation measures. Water conservation constitutes the most cost-effective and immediate means of reducing urban demands on the Biscayne Aquifer. Broward County has implemented an extensive water conservation program to reduce water consumption both indoors and outdoors. The County’s goal of increasing water conservation is documented in the 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 45 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C Comprehensive Plan, in which numerous water-related objectives and policies have been outlined as a framework for ensuring the conservation and protection of urban water resources and the Everglades. These policies are supported by the Broward County Code of Ordinances, which, for example, requires the installation of automatic shut-off devices on outdoor sprinkler systems (Chapter 39, Article VIII); mandates the use of water- conserving appliances in the construction of new homes (Chapter 5 Article IV); and restricts the hours of lawn irrigation. (Chapter 36, Article II). In support of Policy 13.3.5 of the Comprehensive Plan, which requires the development and implementation of a program to promote conservation of water resources, Broward County has developed a water conservation education and outreach program called “Water Matters”. The “Water Matters” program is unique from other water conservation programs in that it not only addresses water conservation strategies to be employed inside the home, but also emphasizes opportunities for water conservation in the homeowner’s backyard, where 30% to 50% of household water consumption can occur. The focus of this program is to educate Broward County homeowners about landscape Best Management Practices (BMPs) that help to conserve the quantity, and protect the quality of local and regional water resources. Examples of effective BMPs include limiting landscape irrigation to just twice a week, reducing the amount of pesticides and herbicides applied to landscapes, maintaining surface water management systems, and the use of native plants in landscaping. Similar landscape BMPs are also promoted as part of the County’s NatureScape Broward program, which seeks to protect water quality and quantity through appropriate landscaping practices and prudent use of water resources and to encourage the planting and propagation of native and non-invasive plants in Broward County. These objectives are achieved, in part, through landscape design with native plants. The incorporation of native plants in landscaping helps to conserve water since these plants tend to be more drought resistant than non-native varieties, and can therefore support substantial water savings during the dry season and periods of drought. Native plants are also uniquely adapted to extreme conditions in South Florida and therefore require less application of pesticides and herbicides in order to maintain an attractive landscape. Limiting the application of these chemicals reduces contamination of stormwater runoff and therefore helps to protect the quality of Broward County’s canals and ponds, and adjacent WCAs. A third water conservation program is the NatureScape Irrigation Service (NIS). The NIS, which operates similar to the Mobile Irrigation Labs (MIL) elsewhere in Florida and other states, is locally operated in cooperation with twenty-two municipal and water utility partners, along with BCWWS. The NIS is designed to achieve water savings through more efficient design, maintenance, and operation of irrigation systems. Landscape evaluations are generally conducted on large, professionally managed properties where the opportunity for water savings is greatest, although residential properties served by Broward County Water and Wastewater Services are also eligible for free site assessments. In less than two years, water savings achieved by the NIS exceed 340 million gallons. The NIS technicians make specific recommendations on irrigation system design and maintenance, and landscape BMPs based on NatureScape 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 46 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C principles to improve water conservation and protection. Broward County staff will also work on a voluntary basis with property managers to monitor the water savings achieved with implementation of the NIS recommendations. Another water conservation program developed by Broward County, in partnership with the SFWMD, is called “Know the Flow”. While the “Water Matters” program focuses on water savings that can be achieved by the homeowner, the “Know the Flow” course targets the more than 10,000 registered professional property managers in Broward County and is designed to provide a half-day of instruction on water management in Broward County. Participants in the “Know the Flow” course can receive continuing education credits and are eligible to have an irrigation evaluation of their property. These partnerships, as well as others being developed, will aid the County in determining the volume of water that could realistically be saved through more stringent irrigation ordinances, and will guide the development of water policy in support of future water- supply planning. 4. Stormwater Reuse Stormwater reuse constitutes another form of water conservation and is a water management strategy that has been actively pursued under the Broward County IWRP. This approach to alternative water resource development involves the capture, storage and redistribution of stormwater runoff and local rainfall within the County’s secondary canal system for the purpose of providing recharge to urban natural systems and the Biscayne Aquifer. Broward County has developed an extensive stormwater reuse system through integration of the secondary canal system. The construction of secondary canal interconnects and culverts has increased the storage capacity of the canal system and provided a means for redirecting surface flows to areas in need of additional recharge for saltwater abatement, wellfield recharge and rehydration of urban natural systems. Integration of the secondary canal system through such improvements serves the dual purpose of optimizing stormwater reuse and providing greater flexibility in flood control. The dual purpose of the secondary canal system is exemplified in the north regional recharge system where, following a fourteen inch rain event, flood control was provided without the need to discharge stormwater to tide. Water management improvements achieved in the north regional recharge system have resulted in similar secondary canal improvements being pursued throughout the County. Feasibility and design work for these type of projects are eligible for cost-share funding from Broward County through the IWRP grant process. As a result of these improvements and investments the County has developed an extensive distribution network that is well-equipped to receive and utilize recharge water, both from traditional and alternative sources. The Broward County Secondary Canal Improvement Project, a project proposed as part of CERP, is another water management project that will optimize the integration and operation of the County’s secondary canal system. While construction of this project is not imminent, this CERP project for Broward County consists of secondary canal 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 47 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C improvements similar to those pursued through the IWRP, but on a broader scale. Thus, this CERP project is also expected to produce water quality and water supply benefits. 5. Wastewater Reuse Treatment of wastewater for reuse provides another means by which demands on the Biscayne Aquifer can be reduced, and is a water management strategy that has been extensively developed in northern portions of the state. However, concerns about impacts to surface water and groundwater quality and cost have limited the development of wastewater reuse as a water resource alternative in Broward County. Treated wastewater has an average phosphorus concentration of approximately 1,000 parts per billion, 100-times greater than the phosphorus concentration permitted in discharges to the Everglades natural system under the Everglades Forever Act (1994) and 50-times the Broward County surface water standard. Broward County is working to reduce phosphorus loads to the Everglades, and to the County’s 1700 linear miles of freshwater canals, through the promotion and development of landscape BMPs. The broad application of wastewater reuse could be counterproductive to these efforts if phosphorus-rich runoff were to enter the County’s canal system, and/or the Everglades WCAs during periods of back-pumping for flood control. The nitrogen standard is another issue of concern when discussing surface water discharges. To prevent water quality and ecological impacts, wastewater would have to undergo additional advanced treatment in order to reduce the nitrogen concentrations to an acceptable level, 1.5 mg/l for surface water discharge and 10 mg/l for groundwater discharge. Membrane bioreactor (MBR), reverse osmosis (RO), and Ultraviolet radiation (UV) are all treatment methods which may be used alone or in combination to achieve these water quality standards. Another factor that limits opportunities for traditional wastewater reuse in Broward County is land development. For example, the development of extensive wastewater reuse systems for landscape irrigation is most practical in regions that are still undergoing development, where the infrastructure required for distribution can be installed as part of development and where mandatory reuse zones can be established. Broward County is essentially built-out, which means that apart from urban natural systems there is little land that remains undeveloped. Based on environmental considerations and the economics of establishing broad distribution systems, traditional wastewater reuse may be limited to large users of irrigation, such as parks and golf courses. On the other hand, advancements in technology may alleviate some of the current concerns and there may be a potential for wastewater application to be used as recharge for surface and groundwater if treated to appropriate standards. Wellfield recharge is another potential use for wastewater reuse. Broward County will explore the options and quantify benefits in the modeling work being undertaken as part of the IWRMMP. Pilot projects, now underway in Broward County, will assist utilities in determining the costs and benefits of pursuing wastewater treatment projects within their service areas. One such pilot project is to be pursued in the City of Pompano Beach with cost share funding to be provided by Broward County as part of the IWRP. This project will explore the use of MBR as a 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 48 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C treatment technology for reclaimed water to be delivered via infiltration trenches to provide aquifer recharge in an area subject to saltwater intrusion. One of the more promising advances in wastewater treatment for reuse is the application of membrane technology, which provides onsite treatment and supply of treated wastewater for irrigation. These systems utilize a series of membrane bioreactors to remove particles as small as 0.1 μm in size, and produces finished water with a phosphorus concentration of just 50-60 ppb. 6. Aquifer Storage and Recovery, the Floridan Aquifer, and Desalination Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) has been an effective water management tool employed by water utilities in many parts of the state. However, in Broward County, it has been met with limited success due to low recovery rates. Although still in the early stages of development in southern Florida, ASR has the potential to provide a cost- effective water supply alternative for meeting urban, agricultural and natural systems needs. The County plans to partner with the United States Geological Survey to conduct a geotechnical analysis of subsurface geology County-wide to identify stratigraphic layers that might be more conducive to ASR operations. This will ideally serve to guide future ASR placement so as to achieve improved operations and recovery and therefore the viability of ASR as an alternative technology in Broward County. This is not being pursued necessarily for potable supply, but as a potential source for canal recharge. As an alternative to the development of ASR wells, which rely on water from the Biscayne Aquifer, numerous utilities in Broward County are seeking to develop wells that use the more saline Floridan Aquifer as a water source, and provide treatment through reverse osmosis. Development of Floridan wells is an alternative being considered by many local utilities as they respond to the limitations on Biscayne withdrawals as imposed by the Regional Water Availability Rule; however, there are some uncertainties that require further investigation. Unlike the Biscayne Aquifer, which is transmissive enough that utilities have little effect on one another’s operations, hydrologic modeling of the Floridan Aquifer suggests that withdrawals from the Floridan Aquifer might produce interactions between competing wellfields. For example, Floridan wells of one utility might cause sufficient drawdown so as to affect the water supplied to a nearby Floridan well, or intercept neighboring ASR wells. Furthermore, there also exists the potential for higher and more variable chloride levels with increasing withdrawals, which could limit treatment capabilities. Desalination of ocean water constitutes another water resource alternative that might be considered by utilities in eastern parts of the County; this water resource option might be impractical for western utilities since it would require extensive transmission systems for the delivery of raw water for treatment. Also to be considered with the RO treatment of source waters derived from the Floridan Aquifer or the ocean, is the disposal of the treated-water by-product, a concentrated brine. Disposal offshore is likely to require substantial dilution prior to discharge and expanded inland disposal would require the use of deep injection wells. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 49 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C 7. Perspectives on Alternate Water Resource Development While the development of alternative water resources has now become a necessity as a result of recent SFWMD policy, utilities in Broward County are working diligently to pursue those alternatives that best meet their needs. Future advancements in treatment technologies are expected to render variable chloride levels in source waters less of a concern for utilities intending to develop Floridan wells. Wastewater reuse is likely to become more common and accepted as treatment technologies are locally tested and proven. Water managers may be able to optimize withdrawals from the Biscayne Aquifer with AWS projects that can offset withdrawals through aquifer recharge. However, it will be prudent for local governments and utilities to continue to pursue efficient surface water management, stormwater reuse and water conservation as a first line approach to improve and make better use of current water resources and to better manage overall water demands. As Broward County’s unincorporated areas are annexed to various municipalities, the water supply demands of these areas will be included in future 10-Year Water Supply Plans of the respective municipality. The Workplan presented here constitutes the County’s most recent effort in policy integration, and represents the participation and contributions of planners and utility staff from the County and City of Fort Lauderdale. In addition, the County’s recent Working Water Solutions outreach initiatives in fall 2007, brought together elected officials, business leaders, senior governmental staff, and environmental professionals to discuss local and regional water resource challenges, and opportunities for collaboration in long term solutions. Such efforts will remain fundamental to successful water supply planning in Broward County. C. Summary The water utility operated by the City of Fort Lauderdale was identified as a primary provider of potable water service to unincorporated neighborhoods of Broward County. While this utility represents just one of the twenty-eight water utilities in Broward County, in 2006, its operation satisfied 18% of the water demand measured county-wide. Hence, the ability or inability of this utility to meet future water demands has the potential to impact much of the Broward County population. Furthermore, the challenges faced by Fort Lauderdale are not unique and are considered representative of utilities throughout Broward County. Water utilities will need to reassess their ability to meet the needs of their customers, not so much as a function of infrastructure capacity, but in terms of water availability. There are no simple solutions, and Broward County and its municipal partners must work together to balance urban water supply needs, the need for continued environmental protection, and the appropriate development of water resources and use of technologies. Through the IWRP, Broward County government should continue to take the lead in developing and facilitating water resource projects that have regional benefits to assist local municipalities and utilities in meeting the water supply needs of a growing population. The following represent some recommended actions. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 50 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C Recommendations: x Water conservation programs offer a relatively inexpensive and immediate means of demand management and should be more actively pursued at all levels. The County should continue to implement the “Water Matters”, NatureScape Broward, NatureScape Irrigation Service, and “Know the Flow” outreach programs in support of this effort. x Broward County should look for additional opportunities to conserve water by targeting industries and areas characterized by high rates of water consumption and should work to develop industry-specific water conservation strategies. x The County should work expeditiously to apply the County-wide hydrologic model to various scenarios in support of water resource planning. x The County should actively pursue implementation of the Broward County Secondary Canal Improvement Project as part of the CERP. Hydrologic models developed by the County should be applied during project design to identify secondary canal improvements with the greatest regional benefits. x Broward County should work with cities, especially those struggling with flood control and water quality issues, to integrate the principles of the IWRP into their water supply and comprehensive plans. x Broward County should actively pursue a feasibility analysis of the potential for ASR to serve as a regional alternative water supply within Broward County. x Broward County should provide leadership in convening the varied stakeholders within the Broward community to jointly address shared water concerns. x Water managers should review water supply plans and consider opportunities for alternative water resource development, such as desalination, the development of Floridan wells, ASR, and reuse. As utilities move towards development of alternative water resources, and as was demonstrated in this study, the question of water allocation and availability is expected to pose the greatest challenge for utilities in future planning efforts. Water resources managers and planners, utility directors and engineers should remain vigilant of water policy development as it relates to the CERP, and should be prepared to revisit and update their water plans to incorporate changing policies and perspectives. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 51 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C IV. ANALYSIS OF BCWWS SERVICE AREAS Broward County Water & Wastewater Services (BCWWS) is one of 28 utilities that provide water services within the urbanized area of the County. The utility supplies treated potable water to four distinct service areas (Figure 6). BCWWS also supplies treated potable water on a large user basis to the City of Coconut Creek and it owns and operates two regional wellfields that supply raw water from the Biscayne aquifer to a variety of raw water large users. A. REGULATION OF BCWWS WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES BCWWS has traditionally obtained all of its water supplies from the Biscayne aquifer which is recharged by infiltration from rainfall, groundwater seepage and surface water deliveries from the Everglades regional system. A regulatory change known as the Regional Water Availability Rule was adopted February 15, 2007 and incorporated into the September 13, 2007 revision of the Basis of Review for Water Use Applications within the SFWMD. This rule limits the amount of water that can be withdrawn from the Biscayne aquifer for water supply needs where it results in impacts to the Lower East Coast Everglades Waterbodies or the North Palm Beach County/Loxahatchee River Watershed Waterbodies (hereinafter referred to as the “Waterbodies)”. The amount of water allowed to be withdrawn from these Waterbodies shall be determined by the “base condition water use”. For the public water supply class, “base condition water use” is determined to be the maximum quantity of water withdrawn by the applicant from the permitted source during any consecutive 12 month period during the 5 years proceeding April 1, 2006. Any additional water supply needs for future demands must be provided by alternative sources and management methods such as increased conservation, increased use of reclaimed wastewater, development of the Floridan Aquifer and other AWS projects, demand management, and increased reuse of stormwater through improved operations of the secondary canal system. The volume and rate of water withdrawal is regulated by the SFWMD through the use of Consumptive Use Permits (CUPs) issued pursuant to Part II of Chapter 373, Florida Statutes. BCWWS currently holds CUPs which govern the operations of the District 1, District 2, North Regional and South Regional wellfields. Each permit stipulates the maximum allowable annual and maximum monthly withdrawals. In addition to regulation of water withdrawals and supplies by the SFWMD, the Florida Department of Health (FDOH) regulates the water treatment plant facility through the use of construction and operating permits. The Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) also requires registration of all storage tanks, including water storage facilities at the Water Treatment Plants. The FDOH and FDEP permits are renewed on a yearly basis. The BCWWS currently holds FDOH operating permits for each of its water treatment plants, and maintains current registration on all storage tanks with the FDEP. The Water 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 52 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C Figure 6 BCWWS Retail Water Service Areas 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 53 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C Treatment Plants are operated in accordance with Chapter 403, Florida Statutes and Florida Administrative Code Rules 62-550, 62-555 and 62-560. B. BCWWS WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES & SERVICE AREAS 1. Existing Facilities The following section discusses the existing water supply facilities and service areas operated and maintained by the BCWWS. These include regional and local wellfields, treatment plants, storage tanks, reclaimed water facilities, and transmission and distribution lines. This section also discusses existing large user agreements between BCWWS and other water providers. a. Regional Wellfields In 1986, the County adopted the Regional Raw Water Supply Program, which called for inland wellfields safe from salt water intrusion to ensure a continual supply of potable water for Broward County. Under the program, new wellfields were constructed in the west to shift demand from the east to the west. The new wellfields and raw water delivery systems were financed, constructed and operated as a regional system, using general County revenues. Large User Agreements were established with each entity receiving water from the wellfields and, at present, one such agreement is in place for the North Regional Wellfield (NRW) and four agreements are in effect for the South Regional Wellfield (SRW). These agreements provide for a method to charge each user a pro rata share of system operations and maintenance costs. i. North Regional Wellfield The NRW is located in Quiet Waters Park and along Hillsboro Boulevard, just west of Powerline Road (Figure 7). The NRW is comprised of ten (10) wells, each with a capacity of 2 million gallons per day (MGD), providing a total design capacity for the wellfield of 20 MGD and a firm capacity of 18 MGD with the largest well unit out of service. The consumptive use permit for the NRW has been combined with the 2A wellfield permit and has been issued as one single permit from the SFWMD. This is 06-00142-W issued in March 2008 for a twenty (20) year permit duration. Based on the historically derived “base condition use” for the NRW, individually, the maximum monthly and average annual daily withdrawals are 259.4 MGM and 7.1 MGD, respectively. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 54 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C Figure 7 BCWWS Wellfields General Location 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 55 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C A temporary allocation of 703.9 MGM maximum month and 20.7 MGD average annual day has been requested for the combined permit sources for the next five years (until 2013), while an alternative source of water and associated water treatment plant facilities can be constructed and brought on line. The NRW is operated in concert with the 2A wellfield to supply the 2A Water Treatment Plant (WTP) with sufficient volume to meet the potable water demands of the District 2 retail service area and the City of Coconut Creek service area with the temporary allocation. The NRW also supplies raw untreated water to the City of Deerfield Beach under a large user raw water agreement. Per this agreement, BCWWS agrees to supply the City with untreated water from the Biscayne aquifer pumped directly from the NRW and the City will not provide potable water outside its service area without prior approval of the County. The County is obligated to provide the City with a minimum of 0.50 MGD and a maximum of 0.59 MGD annual average daily flow, a peak daily flow of 0.83 MGD, and a peak hourly flow of 2.0 MGD. Approximately 12 % of current raw water withdrawn from the NRW is pumped to the City of Deerfield Beach. The term of the agreement is endless and will continue in perpetuity unless there is mutual agreement for termination. ii. South Regional Wellfield The South Regional wellfield (SRW) is located in the southern central portion of the County. The majority of the wells are located in Brian Piccolo Park to the east of Palm Avenue and north of Sheridan Street. In addition, wells previously associated with the now decommissioned 3A and 3B Water Treatment Plants have been incorporated into the SRW. Wells 5-3A and 6-3A, which served the 3A Water Treatment Plant, are located east of State Road 441, just north of Sterling Road (Figure 7). The SRW includes ten (10) wells. Eight (8) 4.0-MGD wells and two (2) 2.0 MGD wells are currently in operation, providing a total design capacity for the wellfield of approximately 36 MGD and a firm capacity of 32 MGD with the largest well unit out of service. The SFWMD consumptive use permit for the SRW is currently being renewed. Based on the historically derived “base condition use” the anticipated maximum monthly withdrawal from the Biscayne Aquifer allowed from the SRW is 386.1 MGM and the average annual daily withdrawal is 15.2 MGD (Table 8). The SRW provides raw water to the City of Dania Beach, the City of Hallandale, the City of Hollywood and the Florida Power and Light Corporation (FPL) under large raw water user agreements. The contractual agreements with each of the large users of the SRW run for an indefinite period of time with the exception of the City of Hollywood where their agreement has a four (4) year term with an automatic renewal for four (4) years. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 56 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C Table 8 South Regional Wellfield Base Condition Water Use and Large User’s Allocations SRW (MGD) Hallandale Beach (MGD) Hollywood (MGD) Dania Beach (MGD) FPL (MGD) Base Condition Water Use (Wellfield Withdrawal) 11.84 2.87 5.99 1.13 1.85 Adjustment to Base Condition Use* 3.4 3.4 NA NA NA Adjusted **Total Wellfield Withdrawal 15.24 6.27 5.99 1.13 1.85 * The water availability rule provides for an increase to the base condition water use to account for the additional volume used in Hallandale Beach’s conversion of it’s water treatment process. (SFWMD BOR, Section 3.2.1.E.(3)(a), page WU-BOR-64, September 2007.) ** Includes line flushing & water losses between withdrawal point and User’s meter. NA - Not Applicable b. District 1 The BCWWS District 1 retail service area is located in the central portion of Broward County and covers approximately 12.1 square miles. In the year 2000 the population of the service area was approximately 62,523. As shown in Figure 3 the service area includes all of the City of Lauderdale Lakes and portions of the cities of Fort Lauderdale, Lauderhill, North Lauderdale, Oakland Park, Plantation, Pompano Beach and Tamarac in the central region of Broward County. BCWWS has the responsibility to provide all the water supply to the District 1 service area except for an area called Broadview Park. Broadview Park is in the BCWWS District 1 service area but is being provided water purchased from the City of Plantation. i. District 1 Wellfield Potable water for District 1 is currently supplied by the BCWWS District 1 wellfield (Figure 7) which withdraws raw water from the Biscayne aquifer and is treated at the District 1 Water Treatment Plant prior to distribution to retail customers. The existing wellfield is comprised of nine wells, all of which are currently in service. The total design capacity of the wellfield is approximately 23.5 MGD with a firm capacity of 19.6 MGD with the largest well unit out of service. The SFWMD CUP number 06-00146-W for the District 1 wellfield was issued in April 2008 for a twenty (20) year permit duration. Based on the historically derived “base condition use” the maximum monthly and average annual daily withdrawals from the Biscayne aquifer are 317.9 MGM and 9.8 MGD, respectively. A temporary permit for an allocation of 357 MGM maximum month and 10.9 MGD average annual day has been allowed for this source for the next five years, (until 2013) while an alternative source of water and associated water treatment plant facilities can be constructed and brought on line. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 57 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C ii. District 1 Water Treatment Plant The existing District 1 Water Treatment Plant, located in Lauderdale Lakes, (Figure 8) was originally constructed in 1960 with a treatment capacity of 3.0 MGD, expanded to 10.5 MGD in 1979, and brought to its current design capacity of 16.0 MGD in 1994. The plant uses upflow clarifiers and multimedia filtration to provide lime softening of the raw water inflows from the District 1 wellfield. iii. Finished Water Storage Facilities District 1 has two (2) water storage facilities at the water treatment plant site and four (4) at remote locations (Figure 8). The total storage capacity is 5.6 MG, plus an additional clearwell volume of 0.65 million gallons, which can be pumped directly into the distribution system if needed. iv. Transmission and Distribution System The transmission and distribution system for District 1 contains approximately 212 miles of pipe. Figure 8 shows piping 12 inches in diameter and larger, storage tanks and the location of the District 1 WTP. The capacity of the system to handle existing and projected demands was determined by BCWWS using water distribution system hydraulic modeling. To correct identified deficiencies, BCWWS is implementing a major water system rebuilding effort in District 1, which includes rebuilding substantial portions of the water and wastewater systems and providing wastewater service to those on septic tanks. The projects are anticipated to be completed by the year 2011 at an estimated cost of $320 million. BCWWS maintains water system interconnections with the systems of the City of Fort Lauderdale, the City of Tamarac, and the City of Lauderhill. These interconnects are used for emergency purposes to maintain adequate supply. v. Reclaimed Water Facilities There are no current reclaimed water facilities in the District 1 service area. vi. Large User Agreements BCWWS entered into a sales agreement with the City of Plantation under which the City provides potable water for resale to County customers in the Broadview Park portion of District 1 on a continuing basis. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 58 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C Figure 8 BWWS District 1 Retail Water Service Area and Facilities 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 59 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C c. District 2 The BCWWS District 2 retail service area (not including the City of Coconut Creek) is located in the northern portion of Broward County and covers approximately 14.9 square miles. As shown in Figure 9, the service area includes portions of the cities of Deerfield Beach, Lighthouse Point and Pompano Beach. The year 2000 population of the retail service area (excluding the City of Coconut Creek) was approximately 54,946. BCWWS is responsible for the water supplies for all of the District 2 retail area and the Coconut Creek service area.. Potable water for District 2 is supplied by both the 2A wellfield and the NRW. The two wellfields withdraw from the Biscayne Aquifer and are operated in concert to provide the 2A Water Treatment Plant (WTP) water supplies to meet both the potable demands of the District 2 retail service area and the City of Coconut Creek service area. In addition, as a measure to lessen impacts to the Everglades Regional system and increase water supply during the drought period of 2007, BCWWS received permission to operate an existing ASR well in the 2A wellfield as a Floridan blending well. Approximately 0.125 MGD is withdrawn resulting in 0.12 MGD finished water. This well will continue to be used as a Floridan blending well for 2 to 3 years until the alternative water supply Floridan well projects commence. i. 2A Wellfield The majority of the wells that comprise the 2A wellfield are located at the 2A WTP site with the exception of four, which are offsite (Figure 7). The 2A wellfield contains 11 wells with a total design capacity of approximately 34.7 MGD with a firm capacity of 28.9 MGD with the largest well out of service. Wells 1, 2 and 5 are currently on stand-by. In addition, a former ASR well with a design capacity of 2 MGD is currently being used as a Floridan blending well. The consumptive use permit for the 2A, number 06-00142-W, has been combined with the NRW permit and issued as one single permit from the SFWMD. This permit was issued in March 2008 for a twenty (20) year permit duration. Based on the historically derived “base condition use” for the 2A wellfield individually the maximum monthly and average annual daily withdrawals are 363.84 MGM and 11 MGD, respectively. A temporary allocation of 20.8 annual average day and 703.9 MGM maximum month has been allowed for the combined permit sources for the next five years, (until 2013) while an alternative source of water and associated water treatment plant facilities can be constructed and brought on line. This temporary allocation may be reduced by 0.125 MGD in the interim period the Floridan blending well is still in use. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 60 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C Figure 9 BCWWS District 2 Retail Water Service Area 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 61 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C ii. 2A Water Treatment Plant The 2A WTP located in Pompano Beach (Figure 9) was originally constructed in 1972 with a treatment capacity of 20 MGD and was expanded to its present design capacity of 40 MGD in 1994. The permitted operating capacity for the plant is currently 30 MGD. The treatment process includes the use of upflow clarifiers and multimedia filtration to provide lime softening of the raw water from the Biscayne aquifer. iii. Finished Water Storage Facilities District 2 has three (3) above ground concrete storage facilities and one (1) underground clearwell onsite, which provide a total storage capacity of 7.5 MGD (Figure 9). iv. Transmission and Distribution System The District 2 transmission and distribution system contains approximately 240 miles of pipe. Figure 4 shows piping within the system of 12 inches in diameter and larger, storage tanks and the location of the 2A WTP. As previously stated, the capacity of the distribution system is determined using water distribution system hydraulic modeling. A hydraulic model was developed which included all pipes in the distribution system except for service connections. Based on the system demands and operational goals, the capacity of the current system to handle existing and projected demands was determined. Deficiencies in the distribution system were identified using the model and BCWWS is implementing a major water system rebuilding effort which includes rebuilding substantial portions of the water and wastewater systems and providing wastewater service to those on septic tanks. The improvements are expected to be completed by the year 2012 at an estimated cost of approximately $167 million. BCWWS maintains water system interconnects with the systems of the Cities of Pompano Beach, Deerfield Beach, the Town of Hillsboro Beach, and Palm Beach County. These interconnects are used for emergency purposes to maintain adequate supply. v. Reclaimed Water Facilities BCWWS currently operates a reclaimed water system of approximately 10 MGD that is associated with the 84 MGD Broward County North Regional Waste Water Treatment Plant (NRWWTP). The reclaimed water is used for process water and for irrigation at the NRWWTP and the adjoining WWS Administrative Complex. Off-site users consist of the Waste Management Resource Recovery Facility (cooling towers), the Septage Receiving Facility and the Pompano Beach Commercial Park. The current sustained demand is 3.1 MGD for the NRWWTP & Administrative Complex and 1.2 MGD for the off-site users. The remainder of the treatment capacity has been committed for a future cooling tower, expanded service to the Pompano Commercial Park and process water to support the WWTP expansion leaving no excess facility capacity. Figure 10 shows the reuse facility location and the transmission and distribution systems. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 62 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C vi. Large User Agreements Broward County and the City of Coconut Creek maintain a large user potable water agreement under which the County agrees to supply the City with potable water from the 2A WTP until the year 2031. The agreement provides that, except by written consent of the County, the City is prohibited from buying or otherwise providing water within its service area from any source other than the County during the term of the Agreement, and cannot provide more than 100,000 gallons per day of water to any customer unless approved by the County. Per the terms of the agreement, the City currently supplies water to portions of the City of Parkland. The County has agreed not to sell water to anyone within the defined service area and Coconut Creek is not permitted to increase its water service area without the written consent of the County. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 63 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C Figure 10 BCWWS Reclaimed Water Areas 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 64 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C c. District 3A BCWWS Retail District 3A is located in the south central portion of Broward County and covers approximately 7.8 square miles. In 2000, the population of District 3A was 12,492. The service area contains portions of the cities of Dania Beach, Davie, Fort Lauderdale and Hollywood, the Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport (Figure 11). BCWWS purchases finished water from the City of Hollywood for resale to retail District 3A customers per an agreement between the City and County. i. Finished Water Storage Facilities District 3A has one 2.0 MG finished water storage tank (Figure 11). ii. Transmission and Distribution System As shown on Figure 11, the transmission and distribution system for District 3A contains approximately 90 miles of pipe. Water system interconnects with the City of Fort Lauderdale and the City of Dania Beach systems are used for emergency purposes to maintain adequate water supply. iii. Reclaimed Water Facilities There are no reclaimed water facilities in the District 3A area. iv. Large User Agreements In 1991, Broward County entered into an interlocal resale water agreement with the City of Hollywood under which the City provides potable water for resale to County customers in Districts 3B and 3C. In 1996, that agreement was amended to include District 3A. The term of the agreement is endless and will continue in perpetuity unless there is mutual agreement for termination. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 65 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C Figure 11 BCWWS District 3A Retail Water Service Area 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 66 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C d. District 3BC BCWWS Retail District 3BC is located in the southern portion of Broward County and covers approximately 6.7 square miles. The year 2000 population for the District was estimated to be 30,823. The service area includes portions of the cities of Hollywood, Miramar, Pembroke Park, Pembroke Pines and West Park, (Figure 12). BCWWS purchases finished water from the City of Hollywood for resale to retail District 3BC customers per an agreement between the City and County. i. Finished Water Storage Facilities As shown in Figure 12, District 3BC has finished water storage at two locations, with a total storage volume is approximately 3.0 million gallons. ii. Transmission and Distribution System The transmission and distribution system for District 3BC contains approximately 118 miles of pipe. Figure 12 shows piping 12 inches in diameter and larger. Districts 3B and 3C are interconnected and, as indicated previously, their water supply distribution system is fed solely by the City of Hollywood. Water system interconnects with the system of the City of Hollywood and the City of Miramar systems are used for emergency purposes to maintain adequate water supply. WWS has implemented a major water system rebuilding effort in District 3BC, which included rebuilding the water and wastewater systems, and providing wastewater service to those on septic tanks. These projects were completed in 2006, at a cost of $95 million. iii. Reclaimed Water Facilities There are no reclaimed water facilities in the District 3BC area. iv. Large user Agreements BCWWS purchases finished water from the City of Hollywood for resale to retail District 3BC customers per an agreement between the City and County. The term of the agreement is endless and will continue in perpetuity unless there is mutual agreement for termination. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 67 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C Figure 12 BCWWS District 3BC Retail Water Service Area 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 68 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C C. BCWWS Existing and Future Demands The following sections discuss the methodology used by BCWWS to calculate population and future water demands. 1. Broward County Population Forecasting Model Population from the decennial Census of Population and Housing, collected by the United States Bureau of the Census, is considered to be the definitive base for population modeling in the United States. New data from the 2000 Census was published in 2001. Based on that data, Department of Urban Planning and Redevelopment (BCPSD) staff projected future population for 2001 to 2030 using the Broward County Population Forecasting Model (BCPFM). This model has been certified by the State of Florida’s Department of Community Affairs for use in the Broward County Comprehensive Plan. The BCPFM is a cohort survival model which consists of two major parts, natural increase and net migration. Natural increase is the difference between the number of births and the number of deaths for a given period. Net migration equals the number of people moving into the County minus the number of people moving out of the County. The BCPFM shows an increase in population from 1.6 million in 2000 to 2.3 million in 2030. After preparing Broward County’s forecast, BCPSD staff assigned that population to the County’s 892 traffic analysis zones (TAZ). TAZs are the smallest level of geography that allow for both a measure of accuracy and flexibility. First, the population forecasts are translated into households by household size. The implication in this is that population change over time is determined by the number of housing units in an area, the occupancy rate, and the distribution of households by size. Second, the base distribution of housing units for the year 2000 is determined. While Census 2000 is an adequate base for the countywide distribution, there are instances of misplacement of units that cause error in both the base population and the forecasts. To set the base, a variety of sources were utilized with checks and cross-checks designed to identify problem areas. The problem areas were then resolved individually. Third, measures of growth potential and of the pressure for change are calculated. These forces and their interaction will cause the number, the occupancy, and household-size distribution to change over the forecast period. Factors such as available vacant residential parcels, platted lands, and land use plan capacity all play a role in the growth of an area. Combining these elements into a cohesive computer application is then performed. The final product results in a series of worksheets showing the number of households, vacant units, total units, and total population for individual years 2000 through 2010 and for years 2015, 2020, 2025 , and 2030 for each of the 892 TAZs. Based upon the numbers provided and subsequent briefings by BCPSD staff, BCWWS service areas are expected to be impacted by two phenomena in the future: (1) A 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 69 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C redevelopment corridor loosely defined as bordering and to the east of State Road 7; and (2) An increase in the number of people living in each dwelling unit, both new and existing. 2. Methodology Used to Determine Future Water Demands BCWWS uses utility analysis zones (UAZ) to plan and coordinate utility activities within its service areas. The UAZ defines the boundaries of the utility’s service areas within each TAZ. BCWWS service areas encompass 150 of the 892 TAZ’s, which are then divided into 130 UAZ’s. Retail customers in each UAZ are categorized as “single family residential”, “multi-family residential”, “commercial” and “other”. Finished water usage for each of the four customer categories listed above was determined for each UAZ using year 2000 BCWWS billing records. System uses and losses were calculated on a District by District basis and allocated to each UAZ to determine a total potable water demand per UAZ. The percentage of a TAZ in each UAZ was also determined. Adjustments were made to account for UAZ’s where BCWWS does not provide potable water service (i.e. those UAZ’s or portions of UAZ’s where BCWWS provides services for sewer only, not water) and for UAZ’s that contained a portion of a TAZ that did not include single or multi-family residential land use. BCWWS projections utilize the year 2000 as a base year. The 2030 demands for “single family residential” and “multi-family residential” were estimated by multiplying the year 2000 demands by the change in population from 2000 to 2030 for each UAZ. The year 2030 demands for “commercial” and “other” required a slightly different approach. Because it was not reasonable to assume that a person works or even shops in the same UAZ in which they live, the overall change in population of the County was multiplied by year 2000 “commercial” and “other” demands for each UAZ. Residential demand was calculated by dividing the service area into sub areas, then doing a traditional per capita forecast for each sub area. Therefore, when population growth rates in relatively lower per capita usage sub areas exceed population growth rates in relatively higher per capita usage sub areas, lower overall residential per capita demands occur. Overall per capita demand consists of three parts: residential demand, commercial demand and system uses and losses demand. For District 1, the projected change in residential/ commercial flow ratio (residential will increase more than commercial) accounts for about a third of the reduction in overall per capita demand; and improvement in system uses and losses accounts for the remaining reduction in overall per capita demand. For District 2, improvement in system uses and losses accounts for essentially all the reduction in overall per capita demand. For District 3A the residential component is projected to remain the same. System uses and losses are projected to decrease slightly. However, the District 3A commercial component is expected to increase significantly. While the projected commercial part averages 31% of the overall per capital demand for Districts 1 and 2, it is 56% for District 3A, predominately due to the Fort Lauderdale - Hollywood International Airport. While general commercial demand was projected to increase 43% between the year 2000 and 2030, demand for the International Airport was 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 70 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C projected to increase 165%. The increase was based on official FAA enplanement forecasts. Interim year demands were determined by doing the same detailed population projection as was done for the year 2030, then calculating change in demand as a percentage of change in population. Demands for the City of Coconut Creek service area (a large user of potable water) was obtained from the City. BCWWS obtained the BCPFM from BCPSD staff in February, 2007. BCPSD staff had continued to improve the model since the model was last obtained in 2003. This, along with improved analysis techniques, resulted in changes in population projections since BCWWS produced its 10-Year Water Supply Facilities Workplan in 2004. The new population projection for District 1 increased, while all the others decreased. The net change was an insignificant increase of 0.2%. 3. Future BCWWS Demands In this section, the future water demands based on projected population are shown for each service area. a. District 1 Table 9 shows the District 1 projected population and finished water demand potential to the year 2030. Table 9 District 1 Projected Population and Finished Water Demand Potential 2000-2030 Year Projected Population * Finished Water Demand Potential (Average Day in MGD) Finished Water Demand Potential (Max. Day in MGD) ** Overall Per Capita Demand (GPD) Residential Per Capita Demand (GPD) *** 2000 62,523 8.8 12.0 141 81 2005 70,952 10.0 13.6 141 81 2010 81,118 11.1 15.1 136 81 2015 89,643 12.0 16.3 134 80 2020 97,642 12.8 17.4 131 80 2025 104,013 13.6 18.5 131 80 2028 106,889 13.9 18.9 130 80 2030 108,807 14.1 19.2 130 80 * Based on 2000 Census estimates for WWS Utility Analysis Zones ** Based on a maximum day to average day ratio of 1.36 *** Estimated finished potable water billed to residential customers divided by population. Service area changed in 2004 to include Broadview Park. Service area changed in 2007 to include North Andrews Gardens south of Commercial Boulevard. BCWWS currently purchases finished water from the City of Plantation for the Broadview Park portion of the service area. Broadview Park’s population and demands are included in the above table. Appendix A contains information from the City of 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 71 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C Plantation on its ability to provide service to Broadview Park. Table 10 shows the Broadview Park projected population and finished water demand potential to the year 2030. Table 10 Broadview Park Projected Population and Finished Water Demand Potential 2000- 2030 Year Projected Population * Finished Water Demand Potential (Average Day in MGD) Finished Water Demand Potential (Max. Day in MGD) ** 2000 0 0.0 0.0 2005 6,743 0.9 1.2 2010 7,166 1.0 1.4 2015 7,389 1.0 1.4 2020 7,682 1.0 1.4 2025 8,145 1.1 1.5 2028 8,347 1.1 1.5 2030 8,481 1.1 1.5 * Based on 2000 Census estimates for WWS Utility Analysis Zones ** Based on a maximum day to average day ratio of 1.36 Table 10 shows WWS projected year average day demand for Broadview Park as 1.1 MGD. WWS obtains its water for Broadview Park from the City of Plantation. Appendix A includes water supply information from the City of Plantation. Although Plantation used different 2030 population and per capita demand numbers for Broadview, the formula used for the year 2030 is comparable to the WWS projection. The Plantation formula is: 7,581 persons x 148 gallons per capita per day + 1.2 MGD average day demand Table 11 District 1 Projected Population and Finished Water Demand Potential 2000-2030 Excluding Broadview Park Year Projected Population * Finished Water Demand Potential (Average Day in MGD) Finished Water Demand Potential (Max. Day in MGD) ** 2000 62,523 8.8 12.0 2005 64,209 9.1 12.4 2010 73,952 10.1 13.7 2015 82,254 11.0 14.9 2020 89,960 11.8 16.0 2025 95,868 12.5 17.0 2028 98,542 12.8 17.4 2030 100,326 13.0 17.7 * Based on 2000 Census estimates for WWS Utility Analysis Zones ** Based on a maximum day to average day ratio of 1.36 *** Estimated finished potable water billed to residential customers divided by population. Service area changed in 2007 to include North Andrews Gardens south of Commercial Boulevard. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 72 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C i. Source of Supply The level of service standard for source of supply is maximum day, meaning the system must have enough firm source of supply capacity to meet its maximum day needs. Firm capacity is the design capacity with the largest unit out of service. The South Florida Water Management District, through its permitting process, has limited the long term use of the current source of supply, the Biscayne aquifer, to the “base condition use” of 9.5 MGD average day flow (9.31 average day finished water plus 2% in-plant treatment process use). To meet the projected future demands as indicated in Table 11 for District 1, the withdrawal and treatment of water from the Floridan aquifer has been proposed. A five year temporary allocation of 10.9 MGD (10.7 MGD per flow projections plus 0.2 MGD for land use amendments not included in the flow projections) of average day raw water flow above the permitted “base condition use” from the Biscayne aquifer will provide the additional water needed while the Floridan aquifer source is planned, designed, permitted, constructed, and brought on line. The District 1 treatment plant currently uses approximately 2% of the Biscayne Aquifer raw water supply in its treatment process. This means it takes 102 gallons of Biscayne Aquifer raw water to produce 100 gallons of finished water. The amount of water used by the treatment process varies from plant to plant and by type of treatment process. The raw water flows in Table 12 have been increased by 2% over the finished water flows in Table 11. As stated earlier the firm capacity of the District 1 wellfield is 19.6 MGD and the level of service for source of supply is maximum day. District 1’s maximum day to average day ratio is 1.36. Therefore the Available Facility Capacity in Table 12 is firm capacity of 19.6 divided by 1.36 to obtain available capacity in annual average day terms. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 73 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C Table 12 District 1 Comparison of Biscayne Aquifer Source of Supply Facility Capacity and Permitted Capacity Year 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 Population Served 62,523 64,209 73,952 82,254 89,960 95,868 100,326 Avg. Daily Demand MGD* 9.0 9.3 10.3 11.2 12.0 12.8 13.3 Demand per Capita* (overall) 144 144 139 137 134 134 133 Available Facility Capacity (MGD) 14.4 14.4 14.4 14.4 14.4 14.4 14.4 **Facility Capacity Surplus(Deficit) 5.4 5.1 4.1 3.2 2.4 1.6 1.1 ***Permitted Surplus(Deficit) 0.8 0.5 0.6 (1.7) (2.5) (3.3) (3.8) * Raw water **Calculated by subtracting Avg. Daily Demand from Available Facility Capacity *** Calculated by subtracting Avg. Daily Demand from Permitted amount. **** Assumes a CUP issued by 2010 with this temporary allocation. After the five year temporary allocation of water above the “base condition use” amount, an alternative water supply will provide any additional water needed for the future. BCWWS has elected to use the Floridan aquifer as its alternative source of supply to provide the additional water supply required to meet demands to the end of the planning period. Use of this brackish water from the Floridian aquifer will require a significantly different treatment process than the type currently used for Biscayne aquifer raw water. Treatment plants using the Floridan aquifer as the source of supply use approximately 25% of the raw water in the treatment process. This means it takes 125 gallons of Floridian aquifer raw water to produce 100 gallons of finished water. Tables 13 and 14 show the combination of Biscayne and Floridan aquifer sources of supply proposed to be used to meet future needs. A subsequent section describes the proposed Floridan aquifer source of supply project. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 74 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C Table 13 District 1 Biscayne Aquifer Source of Supply Future Needs Year Raw Water Withdrawal From Biscayne Aquifer Annual Average Flow (MGD) Finished Water Produced Annual Average Flow (MGD) Firm Maximum Day Physical Capacity Required (MGD) 2010 10.3 10.1 14.0 2012 10.7 10.5 14.6 2013 9.5 9.3 12.9 2015 9.5 9.3 12.9 2020 9.5 9.3 12.9 2025 9.5 9.3 12.9 2028 9.5 9.3 12.9 2030 9.5 9.3 12.9 Note: Finished water produced is 2% less than raw water withdrawn Table 14 District 1 Floridan Aquifer Source of Supply Future Needs Year Raw Water Withdrawal From Floridan Aquifer Annual Average Flow (MGD) Finished Water Produced Annual Average Flow (MGD) Firm Maximum Day Physical Capacity Required (MGD) 2010 0.0 0.0 0.0 2012 0.0 0.0 0.0 2013 1.6 1.3 2.2 2015 2.1 1.7 2.9 2020 3.1 2.5 4.2 2025 4.0 3.2 5.4 2028 4.4 3.5 6.0 2030 4.6 3.7 6.3 Note: Finished water produced is 25% less than raw water withdrawn. Does not include water required for testing. ii. Treatment Plant The level of service standard for treatment is maximum day, meaning the system must have enough firm treatment capacity to meet its maximum day needs. The type of treatment is dependent on the source of supply. Since WWS intends to have two different sources of supply, two different treatment processes will be required. Tables 15 and 16 show the combination of Biscayne and Floridan aquifer treatment processes proposed to be used to meet future needs. A subsequent section describes the proposed Floridan aquifer water treatment project. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 75 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C Table 15 District 1 Biscayne Aquifer Treatment Plant Future Needs Year Finished Water Produced Annual Average Flow (MGD) Firm Maximum Day Physical Capacity Required (MGD) 2010 10.1 13.7 2012 10.5 14.3 2013 9.3 12.6 2015 9.3 12.6 2020 9.3 12.6 2025 9.3 12.6 2028 9.3 12.6 2030 9.3 12.6 Note: Treatment production capacity is the capacity to make finished water available to the system on a maximum day basis, which equals 1.36 times average day demand. Treatment capacity required to generate water used by the treatment process is not included. Table 16 District 1 Floridan Aquifer Treatment Plant Future Needs Year Finished Water Produced Annual Average Flow (MGD) Firm Maximum Day Physical Capacity Required (MGD) 2010 0.0 0.0 2012 0.0 0.0 2013 1.3 1.8 2015 1.7 2.3 2020 2.5 3.4 2025 3.2 4.4 2028 3.5 4.8 2030 3.7 5.0 Note: Treatment production capacity is the capacity to make finished water available to the system on a maximum day basis, which equals 1.36 times average day demand. Treatment capacity required to generate water used by the treatment process is not included. iii. Finished Water Storage Facilities The level of service standard for finished water storage is 40% of maximum day demand for meeting peak demands during the day and routine operational purposes, plus 0.63 million gallons (MG) for fire protection purposes. Table 17 shows future storage needs. Since existing storage capacity is 6.25 MG. BCWWS needs to increase its storage capacity by 2010. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 76 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C Table 17 District 1 Future Finished Water Storage Needs Year Required Minimum Finished Water Storage (MG) 2010 6.7 2015 7.2 2020 7.6 2025 8.0 2028 8.2 2030 8.3 BCWWS has two projects in its five year capital improvement program to provide the required finished water storage (additional storage is to be constructed at two different locations). One project received its initial funding in FY2008 and is scheduled for completion in FY2010. The other will receive its initial funding in FY2009 and is scheduled for completion in FY2012. b. District 2 Table 18 shows the District 2 projected population and finished water demand potential to the year 2030. Table 19 shows the Coconut Creek projected population and finished water demand potential to the year 2030. Table 20 shows the combined District 2 and Coconut Creek projected population and finished water demand potential to the year 2030. Table 18 District 2 Projected Population and Finished Water Demand Potential 2000-2030 Year Projected Population * Finished Water Demand Potential (Average Day in MGD) Finished Water Demand Potential (Max. Day in MGD) ** Overall Per Capita Demand (GPD) Residential Per Capita Demand (GPD) *** 2000 54,946 9.8 13.4 178 106 2005 57,364 10.1 13.8 177 106 2010 60,553 10.3 14.1 170 106 2015 63,659 10.8 14.8 170 105 2020 66,944 11.3 15.5 170 104 2025 70,980 11.9 16.3 168 104 2028 73,099 12.2 16.7 167 103 2030 74,512 12.4 17.0 166 103 * Based on 2000 Census estimates for WWS Utility Analysis Zones ** Based on a maximum day to average day ratio of 1.37 *** Estimated finished potable water billed to residential customers divided by population. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 77 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C Table 19 Coconut Creek Projected Population and Finished Water Demand Potential 2000-2030 Year Projected Population Finished Water Demand Potential * (Average Day in MGD) Finished Water Demand Potential (Max. Day in MGD) ** Overall Per Capita Demand (GPD) 2000 45,165 5.7 7.8 126 2005 54,252 6.8 9.3 126 2010 71,438 9.0 12.3 125 2015 71,438 9.0 12.3 125 2020 71,438 9.0 12.3 125 2025 71,438 9.0 12.3 125 2028 71,438 9.0 12.3 125 2030 71,438 9.0 12.3 125 Note: For that portion of Coconut Creek and Parkland that use WWS potable water. * Included 0.16 MGD of WWS system uses and losses incurred in providing water to Coconut Creek. ** Based on a maximum day to average day ratio of 1.37 Table 20 District 2 and Coconut Creek Projected Population and Finished Water Demand Potential 2000-2030 Year Projected Population Finished Water Demand Potential (Average Day in MGD) Finished Water Demand Potential (Max. Day in MGD) * Overall Per Capita Demand (GPD) 2000 100,111 15.5 21.2 155 2005 111,616 16.9 23.1 152 2010 131,991 19.3 26.4 146 2015 135,097 19.8 27.1 146 2020 138,382 20.3 27.8 146 2025 142,418 20.9 28.6 146 2028 144,537 21.2 29.0 146 2030 145,950 21.3 29.3 146 Note: For that portion of Coconut Creek and Parkland that use WWS potable water. * Based on a maximum day to average day ratio of 1.37 i. Source of Supply The level of service standard for source of supply is maximum day, meaning the system must have enough firm source of supply capacity to meet its maximum day needs. Firm capacity is the design capacity with the largest unit out of service. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 78 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C The South Florida Water Management District, through its permitting process, has limited the long term use of the current source of supply, the Biscayne aquifer, to the “base condition use” of 17.5 MGD average day flow. (16.84 average day finished water plus 3.8% in-plant treatment process use). To meet the projected future demands as indicated in Table 20 for District 2 and Coconut Creek’s service area, the withdrawal and treatment of water from the Floridan aquifer has been proposed. A five year temporary allocation of 20.7 MGD (20.3 MGD per flow projections plus 0.4 MGD for land use amendments not included in the flow projections) of average day raw water flow above the permitted “base condition use” from the Biscayne aquifer will provide the additional water needed while the Floridan aquifer source is planned, designed, permitted, constructed, and brought on line. The District 2 treatment plant currently uses approximately 3.8% of the Biscayne Aquifer raw water supply in its treatment process. This means it takes 103.8 gallons of Biscayne Aquifer raw water to produce 100 gallons of finished water. The amount of water used by the treatment process varies from plant to plant and by type of treatment process. The raw water flows in Table 21 have been increased by 3.8% over the finished water flows in Table 20. As stated earlier the firm capacity of the combined North Regional/2A wellfield is 39.0 MGD, with 0.6 MGD reserved for Deerfield Beach, and the level of service for source of supply is maximum day. District 2’s maximum day to average day ratio is 1.37. Therefore the Available Facility Capacity in Table 21 is firm capacity less Deerfield Beach of 0.6 divided by 1.37 to obtain available capacity in annual average day terms. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 79 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C Table 21 North Regional/2A Wellfield Comparison of Biscayne Aquifer Source of Supply Facility Capacity and Permitted Capacity (not Including Deerfield Beach) Year 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 Population Served 100,111 111,616 131,991 135,097 138,382 142,418 145,950 Avg. Daily Demand MGD* 16.1 17.6 20.0 20.6 21.1 21.7 22.2 Demand per Capita* (overall) 161 158 152 152 152 152 152 Available Facility Capacity (MGD) 28.0 28.0 28.0 28.0 28.0 28.0 28.0 **Facility Capacity Surplus(Deficit) 11.9 10.4 8.0 7.4 6.9 6.3 5.8 Permitted Amount (MGD Annual Avg.) 18.1 18.1 20.7**** 16.9 16.9 16.9 16.9 ***Permitted Surplus(Deficit) 2.0 0.5 0.7 (3.7) (4.2) (4.8) (5.3) * Raw water **Calculated by subtracting Avg. Daily Demand from Available Facility Capacity *** Calculated by subtracting Avg. Daily Demand from Permitted amount. **** Assumes a CUP issued by 2010 with this temporary allocation. After the five year temporary allocation of water above the “base condition use” amount, an alternative water supply will provide any additional water needed for the future. BCWWS has elected to use the Floridan aquifer as its alternative source of supply to provide the additional water supply required to meet demands to the end of the planning period. Use of this brackish water from the Floridian aquifer will require a significantly different treatment process than the type currently used for Biscayne aquifer raw water. Treatment plants using the Floridan aquifer as the source of supply use approximately 25% of the raw water in the treatment process. This means it takes 125 gallons of Floridian aquifer raw water to produce 100 gallons of finished water. Tables 22 and 23 show the combination of Biscayne and Floridan aquifer sources of supply proposed to be used to meet future needs. A subsequent section describes the proposed Floridan aquifer source of supply project. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 80 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C Table 22 District 2 Biscayne Aquifer Source of Supply Future Needs Year Raw Water Withdrawal From Biscayne Aquifer Annual Average Flow (MGD) Finished Water Produced Annual Average Flow (MGD) Firm Maximum Day Physical Capacity Required (MGD) 2010 20.0* 19.3 27.4 2012 20.3 19.5 27.8 2013 16.9 16.3 23.2 2015 16.9 16.3 23.2 2020 16.9 16.3 23.2 2025 16.9 16.3 23.2 2028 16.9 16.3 23.2 2030 16.9 16.3 23.2 Note: Finished water produced is 3.8% less than raw water withdrawn. Table does not include Deerfield Beach withdrawal from North Regional Wellfield. *2010 raw water withdrawal could be reduced by 0.125 MGD if Floridan blending well is still in use BCWWS is also implementing a reclaimed water irrigation project. It is anticipated that by 2015, this project will result in 0.1 MGD less demand. Demand reduction will increase to 0.3 MGD by 2020 as more customers utilize the reclaimed water for irrigation.Table 23 has these anticipated demand reductions incorporated into it. Table 23 District 2 Floridan Aquifer Source of Supply Future Needs Year Raw Water Withdrawal From Floridan Aquifer Annual Average Flow (MGD) Finished Water Produced Annual Average Flow (MGD) Firm Maximum Day Physical Capacity Required (MGD) 2010 0.0 0.0 0.0 2012 0.0 0.0 0.0 2013 4.1 3.3 5.6 2015 4.3 3.4 5.9 2020 4.6 3.7 6.3 2025 5.4 4.3 7.4 2028 5.8 4.6 7.9 2030 5.9 4.7 8.1 Note: Finished water produced is 25% less than raw water withdrawn. Does not include water required for testing. Includes 0.1 MGD of demand reduction by 2015 and 0.3 MGD of demand reduction by 2020 due to reclaimed water irrigation. ii. Treatment Plant The level of service standard for treatment is maximum day, meaning the system must have enough firm treatment capacity to meet its maximum day needs. The type of treatment is dependent on the source of supply. Since BCWWS intends to have two different sources of supply, two different treatment processes will be required. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 81 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C Tables 24 and 25 show the combination of Biscayne and Floridan aquifer treatment processes proposed to be used to meet future needs. A subsequent section describes the proposed Floridan aquifer water treatment project. Table 24 District 2 Biscayne Aquifer Treatment Plant Future Needs Year Finished Water Produced Annual Average Flow (MGD) Firm Maximum Day Physical Capacity Required (MGD) 2010 19.3 26.4 2012 19.5 26.7 2013 16.3 22.3 2015 16.3 22.3 2020 16.3 22.3 2025 16.3 22.3 2028 16.3 22.3 2030 16.3 22.3 Note: Treatment production capacity is the capacity to make finished water available to the system on a maximum day basis, which equals 1.37 times average day demand. Treatment capacity required to generate water used by the treatment process is not included. Table 25 District 2 Floridan Aquifer Treatment Plant Future Needs Year Finished Water Produced Annual Average Flow (MGD) Firm Maximum Day Physical Capacity Required (MGD) 2010 0.0 0.0 2012 0.0 0.0 2013 3.3 4.5 2015 3.5 4.7 2020 4.0 5.1 2025 4.6 5.9 2028 4.8 6.3 2030 5.0 6.4 Note: Treatment production capacity is the capacity to make finished water available to the system on a maximum day basis, which equals 1.37 times average day demand. Treatment capacity required to generate water used by the treatment process is not included. iii. Finished Water Storage Facilities The level of service standard for finished water storage is 40% of maximum day demand for meeting peak demands during the day and routine operational purposes, plus 0.63 million gallons (MG) for fire protection purposes. Since Coconut Creek is required to have its own finished water storage, the maximum day demand is the BCWWS portion of 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 82 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C the overall maximum day demand. Table 26 shows future storage needs. Since existing storage capacity is 7.5 MG, BCWWS does not need to increase its storage capacity within the foreseeable future. Table 26 District 2 Future Finished Water Storage Needs Year Required Minimum Finished Water Storage (MG) 2010 6.3 2015 6.6 2020 6.8 2025 7.2 2028 7.3 2030 7.4 c. District 3A Table 27 shows the District 3A projected population and finished water demand potential to the year 2030. Table 27 District 3A Projected Population and Finished Water Demand Potential 2000-2030 Year Projected Population * Finished Water Demand Potential (Average Day in MGD) Finished Water Demand Potential (Max. Day in MGD) ** Overall Per Capita Demand (GPD) Residential Per Capita Demand (GPD) *** 2000 12,492 3.1 4.1 247 95 2005 14,547 3.7 4.9 255 95 2010 15,712 3.9 5.1 251 95 2015 16,992 4.4 5.8 257 95 2020 18,173 4.7 6.2 259 95 2025 18,959 5.0 6.6 265 95 2028 19,403 5.2 6.9 268 95 2030 19,699 5.4 7.1 274 95 * Based on 2000 Census estimates for WWS Utility Analysis Zones ** Based on a maximum day to average day ratio of 1.32 *** Estimated finished potable water billed to residential customers divided by population. Not including water sold back to Hollywood. i. Source of Supply and Treatment Plant BCWWS purchases finished water from the City of Hollywood for resale to retail customers in District 3A. Therefore the City of Hollywood’s Water Supply Facilities 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 83 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C Workplan will address source of supply and treatment plant. See Appendix B for information obtained from the City of Hollywood. ii. Finished Water Storage Facilities The level of service standard for finished water storage is 40% of maximum day demand for meeting peak demands during the day and routine operational purposes, plus 0.63 million gallons (MG) for fire protection purposes. Table 28 shows future storage needs. Since existing storage capacity is 2.0 MG, BCWWS needs to increase its storage capacity by 2010. Table 28 District 3A Future Finished Water Storage Needs Year Required Minimum Finished Water Storage (MG) 2010 2.7 2015 3.0 2020 3.1 2025 3.3 2028 3.4 2030 3.5 BCWWS has a project in its five year capital improvement program to provide the required finished water storage. This project received its initial funding in FY2006 and is scheduled for completion in FY2009. d. District 3BC Table 29 shows the District 3BC projected population and finished water demand potential to the year 2030. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 84 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C Table 29 District 3BC Projected Population and Finished Water Demand Potential 2000-2030 Year Projected Population * Finished Water Demand Potential (Average Day in MGD) Finished Water Demand Potential (Max. Day in MGD) ** Overall Per Capita Demand (GPD) Residential Per Capita Demand (GPD) *** 2000 30,823 3.8 5.5 122 79 2005 32,240 3.8 5.5 117 79 2010 33,912 3.9 5.6 116 79 2015 36,163 4.3 6.2 118 78 2020 38,886 4.5 6.5 116 78 2025 42,688 4.8 6.9 113 77 2028 44,477 5.0 7.2 112 77 2030 45,670 5.1 7.3 112 77 * Based on 2000 Census estimates for WWS Utility Analysis Zones ** Based on a maximum day to average day ratio of 1.44 *** Estimated finished potable water billed to residential customers divided by population. i. Source of Supply and Treatment Plant BCWWS purchases finished water from the City of Hollywood for resale to retail customers in District 3A. Therefore the City of Hollywood’s Water Supply Facilities Workplan will address source of supply and treatment plant. See Appendix B for information obtained from the City of Hollywood. ii. Finished Water Storage Facilities The level of service standard for finished water storage is 40% of maximum day demand for meeting peak demands during the day and routine operational purposes, plus 0.63 million gallons (MG) for fire protection purposes. Table 30 shows future storage needs. Since existing storage capacity is 3.0 MG, BCWWS needs to increase its storage capacity by 2015. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 85 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C Table 30 District 3BC Future Finished Water Storage Needs Year Required Minimum Finished Water Storage (MG) 2010 2.9 2015 3.1 2020 3.2 2025 3.4 2028 3.5 2030 3.6 BCWWS has a project in its five year capital improvement program to provide the required finished water storage. This project received its initial funding in FY2006 and is scheduled for completion in FY2010. e. North Regional Wellfield Facilities at the North Regional wellfield (NRW) are not anticipated to require any future changes. The “base condition water use” calculated for the NRW as per the Regional Water Availability Rule (adopted February 15, 2007 and incorporated into the September 13, 2007 revision of the Basis of Review for Water Use Applications within the SFWMD) limits the amount of water that can be withdrawn from the Biscayne aquifer for water supply needs. The capacity of the existing wellfield is more than sufficient to supply the amount of water allowed to be withdrawn per the allocated “base condition water use”. f. South Regional Wellfield The South Regional Wellfield (SRW) supplies raw water to the Cities of Dania Beach, Hallandale Beach, Hollywood, and the Florida Power & Light Company (FPL) according to the terms of their Large User Raw Water Agreements with the County. As stated in the existing facilities section of this plan all the large users except Hallandale Beach have indicated that they would not need any more water than their portion of the “base condition use” for the SRW. The permit is currently being renewed and the requested allocation is for the base condition use allocation. Though the City of Hallandale has requested additional water beyond their share of the base condition use allocation, the SRW does not have additional water to supply at this time. The total demand for the SRW is therefore determined not to increase above the base condition use allocation of 15.24 MGD. Table 31 shows the South Regional Wellfield Raw Water Demands to the year 2030. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 86 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C Table 31 South Regional Wellfield Raw Water Demands* 2010-2030 City of Dania Beach City of Hallandale Beach City of Hollywood Florida Power and Light Corporation Year Ave. Annual Flow* Ave. Annual Flow* Ave. Annual Flow* Ave. Annual Flow* Ave. Annual Flow* 2010 1.13 6.27 5.99 1.85 15.24 2015 1.13 6.27 5.99 1.85 15.24 2020 1.13 6.27 5.99 1.85 15.24 2025 1.13 6.27 5.99 1.85 15.24 2028 1.13 6.27 5.99 1.85 15.24 2030 1.13 6.27 5.99 1.85 15.24 *Million Gallons per Day (MGD). Based on projections from large users. 4. Alternative Water Supply Facilities to Meet Future Needs The following section discusses the alternative water supply facilities that BCWWS will need to develop to meet future demands. a. District 1 BCWWS plans to meet its future source of supply and water treatment needs by obtaining raw water from the Floridian aquifer. BCWWS will continue to permit and operate its Biscayne aquifer facilities at base condition use of 9.5 MGD average annual flow for source of supply and 12.6 MGD maximum day demand for treatment plant. BCWWS plans to construct a treatment plant that uses the Floridan aquifer as its alternative water supply. The treatment plant is planned to be located at the existing District 1 treatment site. BCWWS want the treatment plant and its source of supply to last at least 10 years before a subsequent expansion is required. BCWWS also wants to construct the treatment plant and its source of supply large enough to be able to accommodate 0.5 MGD maximum day flow (0.4 MGD average day flow) of land use amendments, which are by definition, not included in the previous flow projections. Therefore the first phase of the treatment plant will be designed to produce a minimum 4.5 MGD of finished water (maximum day basis), and will be designed so that it is expandable to a minimum of 5.5 MGD. According to demand projections, the initial Floridan treatment plant combined with the Biscayne treatment plant should meet demands to the year 2023. The expansion would meet demands until after 2030. If the actual increase in flow is slower than projected, the expansion can be delayed. If the actual increase in flow is faster that projected the expansion would be required sooner. The alternative water supply project will include enough Floridan well capacity to power the treatment plant. Using a 1.36 maximum day to average day factor and 25% in plant process use of raw water, Floridan wells with an average annual day withdrawal of 4.1 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 87 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C MGD will be required for the first phase of the treatment plant. The plant expansion would require an additional 0.9 MGD of average annual day withdrawal. The initial phase of the Floridan wellfield will be designed for its eventual expansion. The well field should have enough physical capacity to insure delivery of raw water with the largest well out of service. BCWWS has a $46.3 million project in its five year capital improvement program to provide the required first phase of the Floridan aquifer production capacity. This project received its initial funding in FY08. The anticipated schedule is: Planning and Design January, 2008 – September, 2010 Permitting and Procurement October, 2010 – June, 2011 Construction and Startup July, 2011 – January, 2013 Planning and design includes any necessary Floridan test wells and final production well consumptive use permitting. BCWWS will continue to pursue demand reduction practices. This will not impact the sizing of the initial Floridan aquifer project, but may delay the need for the subsequent expansion. b. District 2 BCWWS plans to meet its future source of supply and water treatment needs by obtaining raw water from the Floridian aquifer. BCWWS will continue to permit and operate its Biscayne aquifer facilities at base condition use of 17.5 MGD average annual flow for source of supply (including 0.6 MGD for Deerfield Beach) and 22.3 MGD maximum day demand for treatment plant. BCWWS is also implementing a reclaimed water irrigation project. It is anticipated that by 2015, this project will result in 0.1 MGD less demand. Demand reduction will increase to 0.3 MGD by 2020 as more customers utilize the reclaimed water for irrigation. The reclaimed water project is a distribution and transmission system piping project, with the reclaimed water being obtained from the City of Pompano Beach. Current plans are for the reclaimed water to be constructed in three parts. Part one will be constructed in North County Neighborhood Improvement Program bid packages 9 and 12. Bid packages 9 and 12 are scheduled to be constructed simultaneously with construction starting in early 2009 and completed in 2011. Part two will be constructed in North County Neighborhood Improvement Program bid package 10, which will follow bid packages 9 and 12 by approximately a year. Part three will be constructed in North County Neighborhood Improvement Program bid package 11, which will follow bid package 10 by approximately a year. BCWWS plans to construct a treatment plant that uses the Floridan aquifer as its alternative water supply. The treatment plant is planned to be located at the existing District 2 treatment site. BCWWS want the treatment plant and its source of supply to 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 88 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C last at least 10 years before a subsequent expansion is required. BCWWS also wants to construct the treatment plant and its source of supply large enough to be able to accommodate 1.1 MGD maximum day flow (0.8 MGD average day flow) of land use amendments, which are by definition, not included in the previous flow projections. Therefore the first phase of the treatment plant will be designed to produce a minimum 6.7 MGD of finished water (maximum day basis), and will be designed so that it is expandable to a minimum of 7.5 MGD. According to demand projections, the initial Floridan treatment plant combined with the Biscayne treatment plant should meet demands to the year 2023. The expansion would meet demands until after 2030. If the actual increase in flow is slower than projected, the expansion can be delayed. If the actual increase in flow is faster that projected the expansion would be required sooner. The alternative water supply project will include enough Floridan well capacity to power the treatment plant. Using a 1.37 maximum day to average day factor and 25% in plant process use of raw water, Floridan wells with an average annual day withdrawal of 6.1 MGD will be required for the first phase of the treatment plant. The plant expansion would require an additional 0.8 MGD of average annual day withdrawal. The initial phase of the Floridan wellfield will be designed for its eventual expansion. The well field should have enough physical capacity to insure delivery of raw water with the largest well out of service. BCWWS has a $46.3 million project in its five year capital improvement program to provide the required first phase of the Floridan aquifer production capacity. This project received its initial funding in FY08. The anticipated schedule is: Planning and Design January, 2008 – September, 2010 Permitting and Procurement October, 2010 – June, 2011 Construction and Startup July, 2011 – January, 2013 Planning and design includes any necessary Floridan test wells and final production well consumptive use permitting. BCWWS will continue to pursue demand reduction practices. This will not impact the sizing of the initial Floridan aquifer project, but may delay the need for the subsequent expansion. 5. BCWWS Comprehensive Conservation Plan Water conservation is an essential component of responsible water use and a pivotal element toward achieving long-term sustainability of water supplies. To this end, BCWWS implemented a conservation program in 1991 which includes the following components: x A County-wide ordinance limiting hours of irrigation from 5:00 PM to 9:00 AM (Chapter 36, Broward County Code of Ordinances, Article II) 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 89 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C x A County-wide ordinance adopting the principles of Xeriscape (Chapter 39, Broward County Code of Ordinances, Article VIII) x A County-wide ordinance adopting the South Florida Building Code which requires water conservation fixtures and low flow volume irrigation (Chapters 5 and 39, Broward County Code of Ordinances, Article III). x A County-wide ordinance requiring the installation of rain sensor devices on all irrigation systems installed after May 1, 1991 (Chapter 39, Broward County Code of Ordinances, Article VII). x Broward County has adopted a progressive rate structure which includes a three tier structure for residential users and a two tier structure for commercial and irrigation users. Automatic tier adjustments are imposed for formally declared water restrictions. (Chapter 34, Broward County Code of Ordinances, Article III). x BCWWS maintains a leak detection program utilizing surveillance techniques, certification and calibration of water meters to reduce water losses. x BCWWS provides water conservation flyers and brochures to the public and hosts conservation contests throughout the Broward County elementary school system. BCWWS has added or is continuing to pursue the following components in an effort to increase conservation: a. Customer Base Data BCWWS is currently conducting a comprehensive Water Use Profile study to gather additional data to identify and reduce water loss throughout the distribution system. The data will include information on customer class, land use, rate profiles, usage patterns, and seasonal variations. This information will be used to increase the effectiveness of conservation efforts by focusing methods on those elements with the greatest savings potential. b. Rebate Programs BCWWS will investigate the feasibility of implementing a rebate program as part of the water use profile study for the BCWWS service area. If implemented, the program could provide rebates to qualified customers who replace existing toilets with ultra low volume toilets, install certain irrigation equipment, and plant certain xeriscape-type trees and shrubs. The conservation realized from this type of program would be dependent on the proportion of customers who participate and the level of funding available. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 90 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C c. Education Programs The expansion of the existing public education/information program may include components such as a water conservation curriculum and presentation program for schools, community/neighborhood workshops that encourage and educate the public about water conservation (especially communities built in the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s that would benefit from the retrofit programs), semiannual informative presentations about reducing water use at work and at home to businesses within the BCWWS service areas, and presentations to homeowner associations. BCWWS will also coordinate with other Broward County agencies to investigate the feasibility of developing public service announcements via radio, television, billboards, and newspapers to inform water users about current restrictions, events, programs, and efforts of water conservation related to utility efforts. In addition, an informational video that addresses frequently asked questions and provides pertinent information about water conservation will be considered for development and distribution to the public, businesses, residences, and schools. Other components of the public education program may include the development and dissemination of a water conservation tips/checklist for commercial users. The list may include suggestions such as the installation of reverse osmosis systems for boiler feeder water, retrofitting low-flow packing and mechanical seals on pumps, reclaiming cooling water, and conducting a comprehensive water conservation education program for employees. d. Demand Management BCWWS offers irrigation system inspections to customers through the County’s NatureScape Irrigation Service (NIS) initiative. The NIS provides practical advice on how to achieve water savings based upon the results of landscape and irrigation system performance evaluations. BCWWS offers a water audit program for industrial and commercial users. These audits provide an evaluation of the customer’s water use and provide recommendations for improving water use efficiency. Follow up visits will be made to verify which recommendations were implemented and to measure water savings. 6. Summary and Conclusions – BCWWS Service Areas Population growth within the BCWWS service areas is expected to increase by 55% between 2000 and 2030. As a result, water needed to meet finished demands for Districts 1 and 2 (including the City of Coconut Creek) will increase by approximately 46%. Demands for finished water supplied by the City of Hollywood for resale to Districts 3A and 3BC will increase by 53%. Based on projections for each service area developed according to the methodology described above, the total average day finished water demand for all BCWWS systems is expected to increase by approximately 47% from 31.2 MGD in 2000 to 46.0 MGD in 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 91 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C 2030.Figure 13 shows the projected finished water demands for the BCWWS service areas through 2030. Figure 13 BCWWS Water Service Areas Projected Average Day Finished Water Demand Potential Note: CC means the City of Coconut Creek Service Area. Although BCWWS is a County government owned and operated utility, it provides potable water service to all or parts of several cities. Table 32 contains year 2000 to year 2030 population and average day finished water flow projection for these cities based on year 2007 city boundaries. The data in Table 32 is based upon the UAZ projections as described in section III.B Methodology Used to Determine Future Water Demands. UAZ projections were then allocated to cities on a percent of area basis. In conclusion, although BCWWS has traditionally obtained all of its water supplies from the Biscayne Aquifer which is recharged by infiltration from rainfall, and through groundwater seepage and surface water deliveries from the Everglades regional system, the new SFWMD CUP permitting regulations have limited the utility’s ability to access water from the regional system. As a result, the use of the alternative water sources as described in this document will be necessary to meet a portion of the utility’s 2030 potable water demands. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 92 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C However, in addition to the planned AWS projects listed in this work plan, BCWWS is a member of a regional water supply working group investigating other possible alternative water sources. Currently a feasibility study of a project that could have significant multi- jurisdictional benefits as a future alternative water source is being undertaken. The project, referred to as the “Sub-Regional Lower East Coast Water Supply Solution”, would utilize a reservoir created from a rock mining operation in northern Palm Beach County. This reservoir, the “Western L-8 Reservoir”, would capture excessive surface water discharges that would otherwise cause environmental harm to estuaries and sensitive water bodies and/or flow to tide with the intent that this water would be available to water utilities. This captured water would become a water supply source and distributed through various water control district conveyance systems for water supply withdrawals. The feasibility study is proceeding but may not be completed in time for BCWWS’s short term alternative water supply planning needs. If shown that this project is feasible and the best environmental and economical choice, Broward County may elect to revise some of its long term alternative water supply projects to include an L-8 reservoir component. Similarly, if other alternative water sources become available in the future that are better environmental and economical choices, those may also be considered. 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 93 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C Table 32 Population and Flow Projections for BCWWS Service Area in a City 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 94 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C LIST OF FIGURES Page Figure 1 Broward County Location Map……………………………………… 5 Figure 2 Fort Lauderdale Potable Water Supply Area… ……………………..23 Figure 3 Fort Lauderdale Potable Water Supply Area Water Supply Facilities………………………………………………….........26 Figure 4 Projected Water Demands by Service Area for the City of Fort Lauderdale Water Utility………………………………………..31 Figure 5 Projected Finished Water Demands for the City of Fort Lauderdale Water Utility……………………………………………..36 Figure 6 BCWWS Retail Water Service Areas……………………………..…53 Figure 7 BCWWS Wellfields General Location Map………….……………...55 Figure 8 BCWWS District 1 Retail Water Service Area …………………...…59 Figure 9 BCWWS District 2 Retail Water Service Area ……….......................61 Figure 10 BCWWS Reclaimed Water Service Area ……………………….......64 Figure 11 BCWWS District 3A Retail Water Service Area …………..………..66 Figure 12 BCWWS District 3BC Retail Water Service Area ……………...…...68 Figure 13 BCWWS Water Service Areas Projected Average Day Finished Water Demand Potential……………………………..……..91 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 95 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C LIST OF TABLES Page Table 1 Summary of Statistics for the City of Fort Lauderdale Water Treatment Plants…………………………………………………..25 Table 2 Fort Lauderdale Service Area Finished Water Demand Forecast, 2005-2025 (MGD)……………………………………………..29 Table 3 City of Fort Lauderdale Total Water Consumption- Baseline Conditions…………………………………………………...…30 Table 4 Population Projection for City of Fort Lauderdale Retail And Wholesale Service Areas……………………………………….…..31 Table 5 Projected Water Demands for the City of Fort Lauderdale Water Utility…………………………………………..…….33 Table 6 Fort Lauderdale Raw Water Demand Forecast, 2005-2025 (MGD)………………………………………………….……36 Table 7 Fort Lauderdale Facility Capacity Analysis…………………………..…42 Table 8 South Regional Wellfield Base Condition Water Use for Large User’s Allocations………………………………………………...56 Table 9 District 1 Projected Population and Finished Water Demand Potential 2000 – 2030…………………………………………..70 Table 10 Broadview Park Projected Population and Finished Water Demand Potential 2000 – 2030……………. ……………………………71 Table 11 District 1 Projected Population and Finished Water Demand Potential 2000 – 2030 Excluding Broadview Park……….........71 Table 12 District 1 Comparison of Biscayne Aquifer Source of Supply Facility Capacity and Permitted Capacity……………………….73 Table 13 District 1 Biscayne Aquifer Source of Supply Future Needs...…….........74 Table 14 District 1 Floridan Aquifer Source of Supply Future Needs…….. ……..74 Table 15 District 1 Biscayne Aquifer Treatment Plant Future Needs……..………75 Table 16 District 1 Floridan Aquifer Treatment Plant Future Needs…….………..75 Table 17 District 1 Future Finished Water Storage Needs…….…………………..76 Table 18 District 2 Projected Population and Finished Water Demand Potential 2000 – 2030..…………………………………………76 Table 19 Coconut Creek Projected Population and Finished Water Demand Potential 2000 – 2030 …………...……………………………..77 Table 20 District 2 and Coconut Creek Projected Population and Finished Water Demand Potential 2000 – 2030………………………....77 Table 21 2A Wellfield/North Regional Comparison of Biscayne Aquifer Source of Supply Facility Capacity and Permitted Capacity (not including Deerfield Beach)………….. …………………..79 Table 22 District 2 Biscayne Aquifer Source of Supply Future Needs……. …. …80 Table 23 District 2 Floridan Aquifer Source of Supply Future Needs ……………80 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 96 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C Table 24 District 2 Biscayne Aquifer Treatment Plant Future Needs …………….81 Table 25 District 2 Floridan Aquifer Treatment Plant Future Needs.......................81 Table 26 District 2 Future Finished Water Storage Needs ………………………..82 Table 27 District 3A Projected Population and Finished Water Demand Potential 2000-2030……………………………………………………...82 Table 28 District 3A Future Finished Water Storage Needs ……………………...83 Table 29 District 3BC Projected Population and Finished Water Demand Potential 2000-2030……………………………………………84 Table 30 District 3BC Future Finished Water Storage Needs …………………….85 Table 31 South Regional Wellfield Raw Water Demands 2010 – 2030 ………….86 Table 32 Population and Flow Projections for BCWWS Service Area in a City …………………………………………………………………….93 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 97 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C LIST OF ACRONYMS ADF – Average Daily Flow ASR _ Aquifer Storage & Recovery BCPFM – Broward County Population Forecasting Model BCWWS – Broward County Water and Wastewater Services BCPSD – Broward County Planning Services Division CERP _ Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan CUP – Consumptive Use Permit BCPSD – Department of Urban Planning and Redevelopment EPD – Environmental Protection Department FDEP – Florida Department of Environmental Protection FDOH – Florida Department of Health FPL – Florida Power and Light Corporation F.S. - Florida Statutes GOPs - Goals, Objectives, and Policies GPM – Gallons Per Minute GPD – Gallons Per Day IWRMMP _ Integrated Water Resources Master Management Plan IWRP _ Integrated Water Resources Plan LECRWSP – Lower East Coast Regional Water Supply Plan MDF – Maximum Daily Flow MG – Millions of Gallons MGD – Millions of Gallons Per Day MGM – Millions of Gallons Per Month MIL – Mobil Irrigation Lab NIS _ NatureScape Irrigation Service NRW – North Regional Wellfield NRWWTP – North Regional Waste Water Treatment Plant RWSP – Regional Water Supply Plan SFWMD – South Florida Water Management District SRW – South Regional Wellfield TAZ – Traffic Analysis Zone UAZ – Utility Analysis Zone WTP – Water Treatment Plant WWS _ Water and Wastewater Services (Broward County) WWTP – Waste Water Treatment Plant 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 98 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C REFERENCES Section 5.0 Finished Water Demand Forecast. City of Fort Lauderdale Water Master Plan -2006 Update. Hazen & Sawyer, P.C. April 2007 LECRWSP. 2005-2006. Lower East Coast Regional Water Supply Plan, West Palm Beach, Florida. Rules of the SFWMD Basis of Review for Water Use Applications within the SFWMD, Sept. 13, 2007, West Palm Beach, FL Tobin, Maurice. City of Fort Lauderdale, personal communication, 2007 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 99 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C APPENDIX A WATER PROVIDER SUPPORT DOCUMENT FROM THE CITY OF PLANTATION FOR THE UNINCORPATED AREA - BROADVIEW PARK- OF THE DISTRICT 1 SERVICE AREA 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 100 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C APPENDIX B WATER PROVIDER SUPPORT DOCUMENT FROM THE CITY OF HOLLYWOOD FOR DISTRICT 3A AND DISTRICT 3BC SERVICE AREAS 10-YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORKPLAN Broward County Page 101 Comprehensive Plan Volume 4, Support Document Potable Water Element-Appendix C THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Appendix D