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2007 Comprehensive Plan Volume 1 2007 Comprehensive Plan Adopted December 12, 2007 Revised February 2009 Revised April 2010 Revised March 2015 Volume I: Goals, Objectives & Policies Mayor Jed Shank Vice Mayor Tim Lonergan Commissioner Shari L. McCartney Commissioner John Adornato III Commissioner Sara Guevrekian Prepared by: The Engineering and Community Development Department Staff Acknowledgements City Manager David Hebert Assistant City Manager Ana Alvarez Assistant City Manager Horace McHugh Local Planning Agency Richard (Rick) Buckeye, AICP, Senior Planner Christopher Gratz, AICP, Senior Planner Kristen Nowicki, AICP, Senior Planner Harris Hamid, P.E., Director, Engineering & Community Development Harvey Rambarath, PMP, AICP, LEED, GA, Assistant Director, Engineering & Community Development Department Directors Renee Shrout, City Clerk Horace McHugh, Director – Financial Services Donald P. Widing, Fire-Rescue Chief Lynn McCaffrey – Human Resources Amy Flaherty – Parks and Leisure Services Kenneth Resor – Public Works Harris Hamid, P.E. - Engineering and Community Development Al Hubrig, Police Chief (BSO District 12) CITY OF OAKLAND PARK FLORIDA 2007 Comprehensive Plan Originally Adopted December 12, 2007 Revised February 2009 Revised April 2010 January 2015 Revised March 2015 Table of Contents Volume I – Goals, Objectives and Policies Section Title Introduction 1 Future Land Use 2 Transportation 3 Housing 4 Sanitary Sewer, Solid Waste, Drainage, Potable Water and Natural Groundwater Aquifer Recharge (Infrastructure) 5 Coastal Management 6 Conservation 7 Recreation and Open Space 8 Intergovernmental Coordination 9 Capital Improvements 10 Land Use Implementation 11 Capital Improvements Implementation 12 Monitoring and Evaluation 13 Public Schools Facilities Volume I – Table of Tables Number Title Page Table 1 Capital Improvement Needs Identified in the Comprehensive Plan 9-7&8 Table 2 Other Needed Capital Improvements 9-9 Table 3 Oakland Park Local Government Revenue Sources 9-10 Table 4 Fund Accounts 9-11 Table 5 Revenue Projections Affecting Capital Improvements 9-12 Table 6 Expenditure Projections for Scheduled Capital Improvements 9-13&15 Table 7 Loan and Bond Payments 9-16 Table 8 Needed Capital Improvements 9-17 Table 9 Cumulative Operating Cost Increase Due to New Capital Improvements 9-18 Table 10 Fiscal Assessment 9-19 Table 11 Five-Year Schedule of Capital Improvements 9-20 thru25 Table 12 Water Supply Facilities Work Plan Projects and Programs 9-26 City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan Volume I – Goals, Objectives & Policies Adopted December 12, 2007 Revised February 2009 Revised April 2010 Revised January 2015 Revised March 2015 Prepared By: City of Oakland Park Engineering and Community Development Department - Planning & Zoning Division Staff Introduction General The Local Government Comprehensive Planning Act of 1975 (LGCPA) requires each governmental jurisdiction to prepare and adopt a comprehensive plan. Significant revisions to the LGCPA in 1985 and 1986 (known as the Growth Management Act) have added additional requirements for a more detailed and systematic approach to local planning. In 2005, revisions to the Growth Management Act established a “pay-as-you-grow” plan through Senate Bills 360, 444 and 362 to ensure the roads; schools and water are available to meet the needs of communities. In addition to the State Acts, the State of Florida Department of Community Affairs issued minimum criteria for plan compliance in Rule 9J-5 of the Florida Administrative Code. The Comprehensive Plan for the City of Oakland Park has been prepared relative to the State Growth Management Act and Rule 9J-5. It is designed to provide a guide for the future physical, economic, and social development of the City of Oakland Park. In 2008, the City adopted a Water Supply Facilities Work Plan (Exhibit 1) and in accordance with state law, portions of this Work Plan have been incorporated into the Comprehensive Plan and as was updated in 2015. Affected sections include the Future Land Use, Infrastructure, Conservation, Coastal Management, Capital Improvements and Intergovernmental Coordination Elements. To be consistent with the Water Supply Facilities Work Plan, information for the years 2013 and 2018 was included as appropriate and again updated in 2015 for the years 2020 and 2025. Designation of Local Planning Agency The City of Oakland Park has designated the City Planning and Engineering Departments as the Local Planning Agency for the City. Relationship to the Broward County Land Use Plan The State Planning Act specifies that in Chartered Counties, the planning responsibilities between the County and its municipalities shall be as stipulated in the Charter. The Broward County Charter stipulates that the County Land Use Plan is the effective Land Use Plan until such time as a municipality has its Land Use Plan certified as being in “substantial conformity” with the County Plan. The Future Land Use Element of this Comprehensive Plan has been prepared for submission to the Broward County Planning Council for Certification/Recertification. Legal Status of the Comprehensive Plan Upon adoption of the Comprehensive Plan all development undertaken, and all actions taken in regard to development orders by the City, must be consistent with the Plan. Amendments and Evaluation The Comprehensive Plan is based on a current understanding of the existing development characteristics of the City and the long-range goals for how the City wishes to develop. As new development proposals, technology innovations or community values change, it will be necessary to amend portions of the Plan. Amendments can be made twice per year; however, the City should not amend the Plan without careful consideration of the impacts of the amendment. The LGCPA requires the City to perform an Evaluation and Appraisal of the success or failure of the adopted Plan to meet the City’s goals. This process assures the continual nature of the planning process. The City adopted its EAR April 19, 2006 and the 2007 comprehensive plan addresses the recommendations of the 2006 report. Plan Preparation The Evaluation and Appraisal Report based amendments and the water supply facilities work plan amendments to the Comprehensive Plan for the City of Oakland Park were prepared by the Engineering and Community Development Department, Planning and Zoning Division staff with the assistance of Carter & Burgess, Inc., located in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Plan Content and Format This amended Comprehensive Plan contains all the required Plan Elements specified by the Florida Department of Community Affairs. Within the adopted Plan, the following material is provided: x Goals, Objectives and Policies of Each Required Element x Future Land Use Map x Natural Resource Map Series x Land Use Plan Implementation x Capital Improvements Implementation x Requirements for Monitoring and Reporting In addition to this adopted Plan, a separate document of supporting information is available. This supporting documentation provides the framework for the Goals, Objectives and Policies. It further provides the data inventory and analysis requirements of the various Plan Elements. Goals, Objectives and Policies The Local Government Comprehensive Planning and Land Development Regulation Act require that the City establish general Goals for the local Comprehensive Plan. The Act further requires a listing of specific attainable objectives to assist and ensure that local governments will make positive efforts towards the adopted goals. Implementation policies provide the basis for acting on the Plan objectives and goals. The Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan groups all goal statements, objectives and policies of the various required elements into one section. The intent of this grouping was to assist in ensuring that the following statements are internally consistent, and clearly identify the long- term direction of the City. The following pages contain statements relative to the various Plan Elements. For example, under Future Land Use, the goal is subsequently followed by multiple objectives. Each objective is then provided with a series of implementation policies. This process is then repeated for each of the Plan Elements. The order of the grouping is consistent with the layout of the Plan sections. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 1-1 Future Land Use Goal 1 Protect and enhance the single-family residential, multiple-family residential, nonresidential, open space, parks/recreation, golf course and natural resource areas/habitats of Oakland Park. Objective 1.1 The City shall continue to enforce the Land Development Code in order to assure that all new development connects to public sewer and water, addresses traffic problems, and respects its soil and terrain characteristics. Policy 1.1.1 As new development and redevelopment occurs; require a tie-in to public sanitary sewer and potable water systems, wherever feasible. Policy 1.1.2 Develop traffic control strategies to minimize through-traffic on residential streets. Policy 1.1.3 By December 2008, the City shall review all development codes to determine needed refinements relative to on-site drainage, off-site stormwater disposal, open-space, access and parking lot standards. Policy 1.1.4 The City shall continue to enforce its flood retention code requiring all first floor elevations to be at or above the 7 foot elevation. Policy 1.1.5 The City shall continue to provide a Concurrency Management System (CMS) as incorporated within the land development code. The CMS provides procedures and criteria to assess future development approval requests relative to impacts to the adopted level of service standards. The procedures establish mechanisms such that development impacts can be phased concurrently with the level of service standards for roadways, recreation and open space and infrastructure facilities (i.e., sanitary sewer, drainage, solid waste, potable water and natural aquifer recharge). Development applications that are not consistent with the adopted level of service standards or cannot be phased concurrently with available facilities will be denied. The Concurrency Management System includes the following guidelines. i The City shall not grant a development permit for a proposed development unless the City has determined that public facilities are adequate to serve the needs of the proposed development or unless the developer agrees in writing that no certificate of occupancy shall be issued for the proposed development until public facilities meet the LOS Standards as specified in the Land Development Code. Transportation facilities must be in place or under construction within three years of building permit, or functional equivalent, approval. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 1-2 i A preliminary concurrency determination shall be made at the earliest stage of development permit review process. Final concurrency should be determined at site plan or final plat stage. i The prescribed service needs must be met upon completion of construction and prior to issuance of a certificate of occupancy. i The burden of indicating compliance is upon the developer. Sufficient and verifiable information showing compliance is required for approval. i The City shall be responsible for monitoring development activity to ensure the development is consistent with the City Comprehensive Plan. Monitoring shall include monthly reports of all new or amended land development regulations including changes in zoning districts, building permits, demolition permits, certificates of occupancy and an annual summary of land use acreage. i Compliance will be finally calculated and capacity reserved at the time of final action of an approved site plan or an enforceable developer’s agreement. Applications for development permits shall be chronologically logged upon approval to determine rights to available capacity. i A building permit application must be submitted within 18 months of site plan approval to preserve the concurrency reservation. Policy 1.1.6 The City permitting process shall assist the Broward County Environmental Protection Department in enforcing the County Wellfield Protection Ordinance. Policy 1.1.7 Continue to require building construction elevations consistent with minimum Federal Flood Insurance regulations. Policy 1.1.8 Continue to require building construction techniques in accord with the Florida Building Code. Policy 1.1.9 Adequate water supplies and potable water facilities shall be in place and available to serve new development or redevelopment that increases density or intensity no later than the issuance by the City of a certificate of occupancy or its functional equivalent. Prior to approval of a building permit or its functional equivalent that allows an increase in density or intensity, the City shall consult with the applicable water supplier to determine whether adequate water supplies to serve the new development will be available no later than the anticipated date of issuance of a certificate of occupancy or its functional equivalent. The Land Development Regulations shall be updated to reflect this change by 2009. Objective 1.2 By 2010, the City shall establish a neighborhood planning program to preserve and increase neighborhood vitality through such activities as City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 1-3 community involvement, community signage and aesthetics, traffic calming and landscaping, improved infrastructure, code enforcement or community policing (if desired), and the provision of services. Policy 1.2.1 By 2008, in coordination with the local neighborhoods and subdivisions, the City shall establish a neighborhood planning map delineating each area and by 2010, strategies (along with potential indicators) to be employed in each neighborhood shall be identified. As part of this program, the City shall consider undertaking a citywide visioning process, with emphasis on the western areas of the City, to direct future activities. Policy 1.2.2 The City shall evaluate the need for a revised redevelopment strategy and related land use plan for the Orange Grove Manors Redevelopment Area. Policy 1.2.3 By December 31, 2008, the City shall establish community appearance guidelines in the land development regulations to address physical compatibility of nonresidential uses where adjacent to residential use and the aesthetic or visual quality of development throughout the City. Objective 1.3 Community redevelopment areas, as designated by the City, shall receive special attention and assistance in renewal. Measure: Evaluate development applications for redevelopment areas and monitor for compliance and consistency with policies below and the CRA plan. Policy 1.3.1 The City shall assist in building a positive community and image through such activities as: i reducing land use incompatibilities, particularly in the East Harlem McBride area; i monitoring changes in land use and economic conditions to ensure an appropriate balance of uses is maintained; i improving aesthetics through code enforcement, gateway improvements, and façade improvements; i clean-up and maintenance programs for public corridors and streets as well as private buildings and developments; i creating opportunities for cultural activities and public art; and i enhancing and maintaining public parks and open spaces. Policy 1.3.2 The City shall assist in providing improved quality and safety of housing and neighborhoods, through such activities as: i encouraging a diversity of housing types located near parks and open spaces, where feasible; i encouraging in-fill development; i improving neighborhood compatibility and buffering from industrial and commercial uses; i improving the level of service for water, wastewater and drainage infrastructure; and City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 1-4 i encouraging innovative community policing programs. Policy 1.3.3 The City shall create opportunities to supply affordable/workforce housing through housing rehabilitation programs, in-fill development, investigating inclusionary requirements and density bonuses, and addressing potential displacement of residents through redevelopment. Policy 1.3.4 The City shall improve mobility options and ensure multi-modal transportation opportunities in redevelopment areas by: i creating open space connections throughout the area; i encouraging pedestrian friendly site designs, such building placement adjacent to sidewalk, front porches or outdoor seating, and rear parking areas. i initiating a sidewalk program to address gaps in the network and provide routes to schools, parks and other community facilities; i improving bicycle mobility; i enhancing bus stops; i planning for a Downtown transit station along the FEC corridor; i intersection improvements and traffic calming to improve safety and access; and i encouraging a park-once strategy in the Downtown. Policy 1.3.5 By 2009, the City shall amend the future land use map based on the recommendations of the CRA Plan. The City shall meet with property owners and residents, and as a result of this public participation, the actual amendments may differ from those proposed by the CRA Plan. Policy 1.3.6 The City shall build upon existing activities, including Oakland Park Main Street, and developments to create “Downtown Oakland Park” by creating a presence along Dixie Highway through signage, landscaping and hardscape improvements. Pedestrian access and connectivity to Downtown shall be provided along with parking opportunities. Policy 1.3.7 By 2009, the City shall amend the land development regulations based on the policies above and recommendations of the CRA Plan to encourage the desired types and mix of uses and site designs. Objective 1.4 By 2010, eliminate uses incompatible with this land use plan citywide. Policy 1.4.1 Bi-annually, review and revise the nonconforming uses section of the Land Development Code and the Occupational License section of the Code of Ordinances to facilitate the elimination of nonconforming uses. Policy 1.4.2 Bi-annually review sign and landscaping codes to determine refinements needed to upgrade community character and image. Specific consideration should be given to the following: City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 1-5 i Fewer signs; i Smaller signs; i Less total sign area; i Elimination of tall freestanding signs; i Coordination of sign size, shape, materials and placement with building architecture; i Greater use of hedges and trees to provide vegetation on cramped sites; i Use of attractive paving material to enhance appearance on cramped sites; i Payments to a beautification fund in lieu of landscaping on cramped sites; and i Greater use of hedges, trees and grass or other ground cover to provide vegetation on adequately sized sites. Policy 1.4.3 By 2010, the City shall modify the development code to provide for the removal of nonconforming uses. Nonconforming uses should be removed within a 5- year amortization period, provided that the 5-year period may be extended following a public hearing and pursuant to a finding that the extension granted is necessary to provide a reasonable period of amortization. Policy 1.4.4 The City shall diligently monitor nonconforming uses for ordinance compliance. Policy 1.4.5 The land use plans shall form the basis for zoning categories that distinguish between neighborhood, community and regional commercial developments within their respective service areas. Policy 1.4.6 The City shall continue to minimize the impacts of incompatible land uses through the Land Development and Zoning Codes. Objective 1.5 The Conservation Element of this Comprehensive Plan and the City’s adopted Land Development Code shall include procedures and mechanisms that protect and ensure that the existing natural conditions of open space sites, parks/recreation, golf courses, natural resource sites/areas/habitats and wetlands are maintained or improved and are not permitted to be lessened unless mitigation measures are approved. In addition, acquisition and preservation within budgetary limits of any and all areas identified and designated as parks/recreation, conservation and/or endangered ecosystems shall be considered. Policy 1.5.1 The City shall continue to implement Section 24-117 of the adopted Land Development Code, entitled, “Natural Resources Overlay Zone” and the City’s adopted Tree Preservation Ordinance and continue to coordinate with the South Florida Water Management District and Broward County Environmental Protection Department during review of development and/or redevelopment in order to limit the cumulative impacts of development and redevelopment on wetlands, water quality, living marine resources and wildlife habitats. Policy 1.5.2 The City shall retain landscaping and open space provisions in the City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 1-6 development code to require protection of the limited vegetative communities in the City. Policy 1.5.3 By 2009, the City shall consider amending the future land use map to identify the Sand Pine Preserve as “conservation”. Policy 1.5.4 Amendments to the Future Land Use Map which would result in the loss of public or private open space shall be strongly discouraged. Policy 1.5.5 Any Amendments to the Future Land Use Map related to open space sites, parks/recreation, golf courses, natural resource sites/areas/habitats and wetlands shall be required to address how open space and parks/recreation needs of the existing and projected residents of the community will be met and how the negative impacts of the loss of open space on surrounding neighborhoods will be minimized or mitigated. Policy 1.5.6 The proposed development of any sites designated as parks/recreation, golf courses and/or conservation that are zoned and used as open space and/or conservation shall be strongly discouraged. Policy 1.5.7 Amendments to the Future Land Use Map containing any open space, parks/recreation, golf courses, natural resource areas/habitats and/or conservation areas shall address the following: a. The impact of the loss of open space on the surrounding residential areas. The loss of open space must be mitigated through provision of parks and open space to serve the surrounding neighborhood. b. Management of storm water retention taking into account the extent to which the open space, parks/recreation, golf courses and/or natural resource areas/habitats provided storm water retention for the surrounding development and how this will be mitigated, along with any additional storm water impacts created by the new development. c. Minimization of the impact on natural resources including wetlands, lakes, aquifer recharge areas and the tree canopy, including any historic trees on the site. d. Mitigation of environmental contamination on any public parks and/or golf course sites. The level of environmental contamination must be determined and evaluated by conducting a Phase 1 and Phase 2 environmental assessment. e. Integration of the proposed development with the surrounding areas including how the development will tie into the existing neighborhoods through roads, sidewalks, parks/open space and greenways. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 1-7 f. With any proposed amendment, the existing natural site characteristics will need to be included and taken into consideration in the form of a study addressing the impacts of the loss of open space, site lighting, development noise, impacts on visual views, analysis of current and future property values, natural resource/environmental impacts, traffic, impacts on man-made lakes, and the preservation of native specimen trees (including species names, maximum caliper size and maximum tree heights of those trees that would be acceptable to be removed and as determined by the City’s Parks & Leisure Services Department). Policy 1.5.8 The proposed purchase of land for open space, parks/recreation, golf courses, natural resource areas/habitats and conservation shall be based upon comprehensive and coordinated short and long term plans. The following criteria shall apply in the implementation of this policy: Strategy #1: The City shall develop a short term and long term land acquisition plan for park, recreation, conservation and open space areas. Strategy #2: Priorities will be assigned to acquire parks/recreational land/facilities in areas identified as being deficient. Strategy #3: Potential recreational areas most vulnerable to immediate development shall be identified and given 'highest' priority for acquisition. Strategy #4: The City shall attempt to acquire or reserve future parks/ recreational sites and open space areas in advance of new development to optimize locational advantages and ensure preservation for public use at the least tax payers cost. Strategy #5: The City shall attempt to acquire or reserve open space areas which would conserve or preserve certain natural, geologic, or historic resource elements, maintain natural processes, restore or enhance degraded natural areas, or protect environmentally sensitive areas. Policy 1.5.9 The City shall establish selection criteria in order to set priorities for acquisition and preservation of open space, parks/recreation, golf courses and natural resource areas/habitats and conservation lands. These criteria shall contain, as a minimum, the following: 1. Maximum Utility - a measure of the number of recreational activities for which natural features of the site are suitable, the more possible uses of the site, the greater its suitability for park purposes. 2. Aesthetic Quality - a measure of amenity values due to the existence of steep slope, forests, water, historic association, or other identified feature. 3. Cost - a measure of land value; the less expensive the land, the greater its City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 1-8 suitability for acquisition as a park considering its functional utility. 4. Supply and Demand - measured as a ratio between the supply of available parks and the measure of demand for recreation taken from a survey and estimated for each of a number of sub areas of the City; areas of high demand relative to supply are given higher priority. 5. Other Facilities - a measure as proximity to major existing City, County, State or Federal recreation facilities; the higher the proximity to such existing facilities, the lower the priority for a City park at the location. 6. Accessibility - measured as proximity to people and transportation facilities; the better the accessibility, the higher the suitability of a site for a City park. 7. Threat of loss - measured by potential for urban development; the greater the development pressure, the higher the priorities to acquire the site for park land/open space. Objective 1.6 Protect the City’s limited historic resources. Policy 1.6.1 The City shall coordinate applications for new development and City capital improvement projects with the most current State of Florida Master Site File in order to identify potential impacts to structures which may be of potential historical or archaeological significance. a) Upon the identification of impacts to structures of potential historical or archaeological significance the City shall evaluate the potential historic or archaeological significance of the effected structures through historical research and coordination with the Florida Department of State, Division of Historical Resources and determine if preservation or protection is necessary, as deemed appropriate by the City Commission. b) Upon the identification of potential impacts of new development or redevelopment upon historically or archaeologically significant structures the City shall take such action, as deemed necessary by the City Commission to preserve and protect such structures and minimize the impacts of development or redevelopment. Policy 1.6.2 The Land Use Plan shall maintain a current list of historically, architecturally significant properties and address the protection of these historic resources. Policy 1.6.3 The City shall retain procedures in the Land Development Code adhering to applicable state and federal laws pertaining to historic preservation. Policy 1.6.4 By 2009, the City shall consider establishing a Historic Preservation Ordinance and Advisory Board and land development regulations to protect existing City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 1-9 buildings, including housing, of historical significance and to evaluate the designation of additional historically significant buildings or districts. Objective 1.7 Use the Land Development Code to implement land use policies that correspond to the categories on the Future Land Use Map. Policy 1.7.1 Land use densities and intensities, expressed as a Floor Area Ratio (FAR), shall be consistent with the Future Land Use Plan Map and Volume I, Section 10 on Land Use Implementation. In particular, i Low Density Residential – allowing up to five (5) dwelling units per gross acre; i Low-Medium Density Residential – allowing up to ten (10) dwelling units per gross acre; i Medium Density Residential – allowing up to 16 dwelling units per gross acre; i Medium-High Density Residential – allowing up to 25 dwelling units per gross acre; i Commercial – (a) Allowing 4.0 FAR along transit corridors in the CRA, subject to conditions, mixed use projects may be established with a base density of 10 dwelling units per acre and a maximum density of 30 dwelling units per acre and a maximum FAR of 2.0 for nonresidential uses; (b) Allowing 4.0 FAR within the Federal Highway Mixed Use Business and Entertainment Overlay, subject to conditions, mixed use or townhome projects may be established with a base density of 25 dwelling units per acre, with additional incentives of up to 25 dwelling units per acre for townhome and “green” projects; (c) Other areas – allowing 1.0 FAR; i Industrial – allowing 1.5 FAR; i Utilities – allowing 0.5 FAR; i Community Facilities – allowing 0.5 FAR; i Parks/Recreation – allowing 0.1 FAR; i Conservation – allowing 0.1 FAR; i Water – allowing no development; i Roads – allowing no development; i Local Activity Center (LAC) – allowing the following development: o 1,800 dwelling units consisting of 80 single-family homes, 120 duplex, 700 villas, 500 townhomes and 400 garden apartments. (High-rise units may be substituted for the above units, if approved by the City Commission.) o Commercial land uses – up to 400,000 square feet. o Office land uses – up to 225,000 square feet. o Community facility land uses up to 165,000 square feet. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 1-10 o Recreation and open space land uses of at least 5.47 acres (including the Downtown Park of 3.21 acres at the 3900 block of North Dixie Highway). i Mixed Use Residential (MUR) – allowing the following development: o The Low designation permits up to five (5) residential dwelling units per gross acre and a floor area ratio (FAR) of 1.0 for combined development - residential and nonresidential. o The Medium designation permits up to 16 residential dwelling units per gross acre and a FAR of 1.5 for combined development - residential and nonresidential. o The Medium-High designation permits up to 25 residential dwelling units per gross acre and a FAR of 2.0 for combined development - residential and nonresidential. o The High designation permits up to 50 residential dwelling units per gross acre and a FAR of 2.5 for combined development - residential and nonresidential. i Transit Oriented Development (TOD) – allowing 2.5 FAR (Density and intensity standards for each TOD may be specified when the map designation is applied.) i Transit Oriented Corridor (TOC) – allowing 2.0 FAR (Density and intensity standards for each TOC may be specified when the map designation is applied.) Policy 1.7.2 The City shall reject rezoning, variance, and conditional use applications that would be detrimental to residential neighborhood quality by virtue of incompatibility of land use or excessive density. The City shall protect whenever possible existing and planned residential areas, including single family neighborhoods, from disruptive land uses and nuisances. When reviewing these types of applications the City shall consider compatibility of uses; intensity of uses; hours and types of operations; impacts (such as noise, lighting, and odors) that may negatively affect nearby residences, businesses, or community facilities; building mass and placement; and transportation access and connectivity. Policy 1.7.3 Through the Land Development Code and Zoning Ordinance, establish different intensities of commercial development compatible with adjacent and surrounding uses. Policy 1.7.4 The City of Oakland Park Land Use Plan shall encourage planned commercial or mixed use centers within nonresidential redevelopment. Policy 1.7.5 Proposed amendments to the Future Land Use Map shall provide data and analysis demonstrating that adequate water supply and associated public facilities will be available to meet projected growth demands. Objective 1.8 Encourage the construction of at least fifty (50) infill single family homes by the year 2015. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 1-11 Policy 1.8.1 During rezonings, the City shall consider whether a single family zoning district or a multi-family district supporting the building of townhomes would be more appropriate for the parcel being rezoned. Objective 1.9 Maintain the development code to assure adequate provisions for water and sewer system land requirements. Policy 1.9.1 By 2011, the City shall review the Utilities zone district text, other districts and the map to assure adequate provisions for sewer lift stations and other utility land requirements. Objective 1.10 Incorporate the relevant Objectives and Policies of the Broward County Land Use Plan into the City’s Land Use Element to facilitate Certification of the City’s Comprehensive Plan. Policy 1.10.1 The Future Land Use Element includes by reference the following other Comprehensive Plan Objectives and Policies: ALL OBJECTIVES AND POLICIES CONTAINED WITHIN THE TRANSPORTATION ELEMENT, Housing (3.1.1, 3.5.1 and 3.6.1), Infrastructure (4.1.1, 4.1.2, 4.2.1, 4.3.1, 4.3.2, 4.3.3, 4.3.4, 4.5.1 - 4.5.3, 4.6.1, 4.6.2,, 4.8.1,and 4.9.5), Coastal Management (5.1.2, 5.1.4, 5.2, 5.2.1, 5.2.2, 5.2.3, 5.2.4, 5.2.6, 5.4.1 5.5.1 - 5.5.3, 5.6.3, 5.7.2, 5.7.4, 5.8.1 and 5.8.2), Conservation (6.1.1, 6.1.4 - 6.1.6, 6.2.1, 6.2.2,6.2.3, 6.2.4, 6.2.7, 6.3.1 and 6.3.3 - 6.3.7), Recreation and Open Space (7.1, 7.1.1., 7.1.2, and 7.2), Intergovernmental Coordination (8.1.1, 8.2.3 and 8.3.2) and Capital Improvement (9.1.1, 9.1.4, 9.2.1, 9.2.2, 9.2.3, 9.2.4, and 9.3.3 ). Policy 1.10.2 Through the City’s Concurrency Management System, tourist population and the seasonal demands placed upon the County’s infrastructure will be considered when determining adequate provision of public services and facilities. Policy 1.10.3 By 2008, the City shall ensure the land development regulations include regulations which address the potentially adverse impacts of industry, including noise, odor, vibration, air pollution, glare, heat, solid wastes, hazardous materials, fire and explosion. Policy 1.10.4 The City shall monitor the cumulative impacts of proposed development by maintaining an inventory of proposed developments and their impact on individual services and facilities. Policy 1.10.5 The City shall direct new development into areas where necessary regional and community facilities and services exist. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 1-12 Policy 1.10.6 Except for schools, regional and community facilities shall be located close to major traffic corridors and mass transit routes adequate to carry the volume of traffic generated by such facilities. Policy 1.10.7 Priority shall be given to water dependent uses such as marinas and public access to waterways, in decisions affecting water front property. Policy 1.10.8 Through the land development regulations the City shall locate marinas, boat ramps and other water-dependent uses in a manner which protects manatees in those areas which they frequent. Policy 1.10.9 The land use plan shall meet the requirements of Chapter 163, Florida Statutes review process, prior to recertification by the Broward County Planning Council. Objective 1.11 The City shall continue to implement subdivision and other regulations promoting well planned, orderly, and attractive development which is consistent with locally adopted Capital Improvements Element and the Goals, Objectives and Policies of the Broward County Land Use Plan. Policy 1.11.1 The City shall continue to regulate the land use categories as depicted on the future land use map according to the Land Use implementation section of this Comprehensive Plan, consistent with the Broward County Land Use Plan. Policy 1.11.2 The City shall continue to implement, review (City shall perform a review a minimum of one (1) time every five (5) years) and, if necessary, revise land development regulations which at a minimum: a) Regulate the subdivision of lands; b) Ensures the compatibility of adjacent land uses, providing for open space and protecting adjacent residential areas; c) Protect groundwater quality; d) Protect potable water wellfields; e) Regulates signage; f) Ensures safe and convenient on site traffic flow and vehicle parking; and g) Provides for the issuance of development orders consistent with the requirements of the City’s Concurrency Management System, level of service standards, and adopted Capital Improvements Element. Objective 1.12 Identify and reduce incompatible land uses adjacent to existing and proposed airports/heliports. Policy 1.12.1 The area around existing and proposed airports/heliports shall be planned to promote compatible land uses. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 1-13 Policy 1.12.2 Inside areas surrounding existing or committed airports/heliports, do not issue development orders for land uses or structures that are incompatible with City Land Development and Zoning regulations. Policy 1.12.3 The recommendations of the Broward County Airport Noise and Land Use Compatibility Study shall be considered during airport/heliport land use decisions. Policy 1.12.4 Through the City Land Development and Zoning Codes, the City shall protect Federal Aviation Administration aircraft air corridors from obstruction. Objective 1.13 Ensure through the City’s future land use process that public elementary and secondary education facilities will be available to meet the current and future needs of Broward County’s school population. Policy 1.13.1 Public Schools, which are considered to be community facilities, are permitted uses in areas designated on the City of Oakland Park Future Land Use Plan Map as follows: i. All residential designations (L-5, LM-10, M-16, & MH-25); ii. Commercial; iii. Industrial; iv. Community Facilities; and v. Mixed use districts (LAC, MUR, TOC, TOD). Policy 1.13.2 The City shall utilize the following guidelines, as indicated in the Broward County Land Development Code, for land areas designated for individual school facilities: i. Elementary Schools - 12 acres; ii. Middle Schools - 20 acres; and iii. High Schools - 45 acres. Policy 1.13.3 The City shall encourage the location of any proposed public schools in close proximity to urban residential areas to the extent possible. Policy 1.13.4 The City shall coordinate with School Board of Broward County, Florida, to collocate new public schools with public facilities, such as parks, libraries, and community centers, to the extent financially feasible and practical. The following criteria shall be considered for collocating public schools and public facilities: a) Availability of vacant land of suitable size and dimensions for the collocated public uses; b) Compatibility of the collocated public uses with the adjacent land uses (e.g., noises, orders, glare, debris, dust, traffic, high voltage power transmission lines, etc.) and the compatibility of the collocated public uses’ future land use designation with the future land use designation of adjacent areas; City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 1-14 c) Concurrency (i.e., roadways, public transit, potable water, sanitary sewer, drainage, aquifer recharge, and public schools) and utility (e.g., electricity, gas, etc.) availability. d) Environmental limitations (e.g., wetlands, uplands, soil conditions, contaminated sites, potential brownfields sites, soil conditions, etc.); e) Access approaches, including roadways, public transit, bikeways and pedestrianways; f) Proximity to urban residential areas, including a range of housing types (e.g., types for very-low income, low income and affordable housing); and g) Demographic base for purposes of encouraging diversity. Policy 1.13.5 The City shall retain provisions in the Land Development Code which require new development, located adjacent to public schools or future public school sites to incorporate features such as walls, solid hedges or increased setbacks to ensure compatibility with the school, without compromising provisions to provide multi-modal access and connectivity to school sites. Policy 1.13.6 The City shall retain provisions in the Land Development Code which provide for safe pedestrian and bicycle access to public schools. Objective 1.14 The City shall encourage compact development reflecting characteristics which include a mixture of community serving uses such as commercial, office, employment, civic and institutional, recreation and open space and residential, characterized by an efficient infrastructure, close-knit neighborhoods and sense of community, preservation of natural systems, promotion of pedestrian and bicycle circulation and convenient access to mass transit facilities within a Local Activity Center Land Use category. Policy 1.14.1 The City will support the location of uses in a manner oriented around the five- minute (i.e., quarter-mile) walk within any proposed Local Activity Center. Multiple nodes of activity oriented around the five-minute (i.e., quarter-mile) walk will be included within a Local Activity Center. A Local Activity Center will support the location of uses and internal circulation such that pedestrian mobility is a priority. All land uses in a Local Activity Center shall be directly accessed via pedestrian ways, and accessible to existing or future alternate public transportation modes, including bicycle and transit. Policy 1.14.2 The City shall include park land and/or open space that is accessible to the public as a functional component within a proposed Local Activity Center. Policy 1.14.3 The City will include housing opportunities as a functional component within a proposed Local Activity Center. Policy 1.14.4 The City shall consider community needs for affordable housing when proposing a Local Activity Center. The City encourages affordable housing opportunities, through various mechanisms such as the utilization of City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 1-15 “affordable housing units,” the direction of public housing program funds into the Local Activity Center, reduced lot size for dwelling units, construction of zero lot line and cluster housing, vertical integration of residential units with nonresidential uses, the allowance of accessory dwelling units, or through other mechanisms proven effective in increasing the affordable housing stock. To promote Local Activity Centers which propose to include “low income” housing as a viable component, the Broward County Land Use Plan currently supports all reasonable means and methods to mitigate potential negative impacts to public facilities and services which may result from the amendment. Policy 1.14.5 The City promotes the rehabilitation and use of historic buildings within a proposed Local Activity Center. Policy 1.14.6 The City shall require design guidelines that incorporate pedestrian and bicycle paths and greenways to accomplish fully-connected routes to all destinations within the Local Activity Center. The paths should be spatially defined by buildings, trees and lighting, and should incorporate design which discourage high speed traffic. Policy 1.14.7 The City shall ensure convenient access to mass transit or multi-modal facilities within a proposed Local Activity Center to ensure the reduction of reliance on automobile travel. Policy 1.14.8 The City shall encourage internal transit systems to serve the residents and employees within a proposed Local Activity Center (e.g., trolley, community transit services). Transit shelters should be incorporated in the local design guidelines to provide safe and comfortable service and to encourage transit usage. Policy 1.14.9 The development of key intersections or major transit stops to create nodes of development should be promoted within a proposed Local Activity Center. Policy 1.14.10 Require pedestrian and bicycle facilities for all new development or redevelopment projects in the Local Activity Center or in relation to any other highway improvement projects. Policy 1.14.11 Require pedestrian sidewalk connections to all building entrances, transit stops and to multiple building sites for all new development or redevelopment projects in the Local Activity Center. Policy 1.14.12 Incorporate into the proposed Downtown Local Activity Center Zoning District regulations that require pedestrian sidewalk and bicycle facilities for all new development or redevelopment projects with appropriate connections being made to other facilities and any transit stops. Objective 1.15 The City shall promote mixed use land development patterns which combine residential and nonresidential uses to achieve an attractive, well City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 1-16 integrated, and pedestrian and transit friendly environment through the establishment of residential mixed future land use designations (MUR). Policy 1.15.1 The City shall provide for residential mixed future land use designations that allow a combination of residential, commercial, employment based and other appropriate uses. The types of uses permitted include all uses which are permitted under Residential, Commercial, Commercial Recreation, Community Facilities and Employment Center future land use designations. Specific uses shall be detailed in land development regulations. Policy 1.15.2 The City shall allow specific land areas for designation as Low, Medium, Medium-High or High Intensity Mixed Use - Residential. Residential use shall be a permitted use within each mixed land use category. Mixed Use areas may have four (4) ranges of density and intensity: i The Low designation permits up to five (5) residential dwelling units per gross acre and a floor area ratio (FAR) of 1.0 for combined development - residential and nonresidential. i The Medium designation permits up to 16 residential dwelling units per gross acre and a FAR of 1.5 for combined development - residential and nonresidential. i The Medium-High designation permits up to 25 residential dwelling units per gross acre and a FAR of 2.0 for combined development - residential and nonresidential. i The High designation permits up to 50 residential dwelling units per gross acre and a FAR of 2.5 for combined development - residential and nonresidential. The residential density shall not exceed the units per acre and the floor area ratio permitted. There is a minimum of two (2) uses required within the development and a minimum percentage of 10% for any one use. Residential development is a required use. MUR designation may be applied to parcels up to fifty (50) gross acres in size. Floor area ratio calculations are based on the Net Site Area. Net Site Area is the entire acreage of the site located inside the parcel boundary. Residential density is based on gross acreage as defined in the Plan Implementation Requirements of the Broward County Land Use Plan. Policy 1.15.3 By 2008, the City shall establish design guidelines in the land development regulations for areas designated as MUR. These guidelines may be based on similar principles to those established for the Local Activity Center and they shall promote an urban form with well-integrated land use combinations, balanced intensities and densities or uses compatible with surrounding uses, and promote mobility through safe and convenient interconnectivity of vehicular (including transit access), pedestrian and other non-motorized modes of travel. The design guidelines shall integrate public areas through City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 1-17 open space, urban public plazas, and/or recreational or community facility areas. These guidelines may include: i Buildings should front the street (zero or minimum setbacks are preferable). i Vehicle parking strategies which lessen conflicts with bicycles and pedestrians and promote transit usage (i.e. parking structures, off-site parking, reduced parking ratios, shared parking facilities and parking which does not front the street). i Other design features which promote transit (e.g. integrated transit stop, shelter or station on site). i A circulation system designed to strengthen bicycle and pedestrian connectivity to all areas of the site/area, including recreation areas, parks, adjacent uses, transit facilities and activity nodes. i The physical separation, such as walling off neighborhoods from adjacent development or roadways, is discouraged where it disrupts the connectivity of compatible uses, pedestrian and/or bicycle access. If a buffer is necessary, adequate landscaping could be used in place of a continuous wall. i Complement and support adjacent existing land uses and/or adopted future land use designations through the effective use of density, massing and other design elements. i Protect the integrity of existing single family neighborhoods through design elements that maintain consistency and/or improve the aesthetic quality of the neighborhood (i.e. maintaining an architectural style or quality of building materials and construction predominant in the neighborhood). i Incorporate designs which are environmentally sensitive (i.e. reduction of impervious surfaces, alternative material for spillover parking). Objective 1.16 The City shall facilitate mixed use development with access to transit stations or stops along existing and planned high performance transit service corridors (such as bus rapid transit or rapid bus) designated in the Broward County Comprehensive Plan Transportation Element, the Broward County Transit Master Plan and Broward County Metropolitan Planning Organization’s (MPO) Long Range Transportation Plan, Broward County Transit Development Plan, or local adopted financially feasible transportation or transit plan, through the establishment of a Transit Oriented Corridor (TOC) land use category. Policy 1.16.1 The TOC designation may only be applied to areas within approximately ¼ mile on either side of the mainline transit corridor. The area may extend beyond ¼ mile around all major intersections, activity nodes and in locations served by existing or funded community shuttle service. Policy 1.16.2 Residential use is required as a principal component within a Transit Oriented Corridor. Maximum residential density must be specified when the designation City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 1-18 is applied to the future land use map. Residential densities may be specified either as dwelling units per gross acre in geographically designated areas and/or as a maximum number of permitted dwelling units. When the density of the area is specified as dwelling units per gross acre the percentage distribution among the mix of uses must also be identified. Policy 1.16.3 At least two nonresidential uses must be permitted in a TOC designated area as a principal use: e.g. retail, office, restaurants and personal services, hotel/motel, light industrial (including “live work” buildings), research business, civic and institutional. Policy 1.16.4 Minimum and Maximum FAR (Floor Area Ratio) for nonresidential uses must be specified when the TOC designation is applied to the future land use map. Minimum nonresidential FARs (Gross) of 2.0 are encouraged. Nonresidential intensities may be specified either as a maximum FAR in geographically designated areas and/or as an overall maximum square footage by use [e.g. pool of square footage by permitted use (retail, office etc.) or land use category (commercial)]. When nonresidential intensity is specified as a maximum FAR the percentage distribution among the mix of uses must also be identified. Policy 1.16.5 Additional or expanded stand-alone automobile oriented uses such as: large surface parking lots; gas stations/auto repair/car washes; auto dealerships; self/equipment storage; “big box”/warehouse; single-family detached dwelling units; carwashes; and drive-through facilities are prohibited, unless the City Commission determines the use will be designed in a manner to encourage pedestrian and transit usage. Policy 1.16.6 Developments within a TOC area shall include internal pedestrian and transit amenities to serve the residents and employees within the area, such as seating on benches or planter ledges, shade, light fixtures, trash receptacles, information kiosks, bicycle parking, or other amenities that could be incorporated into adjacent publicly accessible areas and plazas, such as clocks, fountains, sculptures, drinking fountains, banners, flags and food and refreshment vendor areas. Policy 1.16.7 An interlocal agreement with Broward County shall be executed no later than six (6) months from the effective date of the adoption of a Transit Oriented Corridor specifying that the City of Oakland Park will monitor development activity and enforce the permitted land use densities and intensities. Policy 1.16.8 Within one year of the adoption of the first TOC designation on the future land use map, the City shall establish design guidelines in the land development regulations for areas designated as TOC. These guidelines shall promote an urban form with well-integrated land use combinations, balanced intensities and densities or uses compatible with surrounding uses, and mobility through safe and convenient interconnectivity of vehicular (including transit access), pedestrian and other non-motorized modes of travel. The design guidelines City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 1-19 shall integrate public areas through open space, urban public plazas, and/or recreational or community facility areas. The guidelines shall promote connectivity and access to transit stations and stops. These guidelines may include: i An integrated transit stop with shelter or station (within the TOC area). i Wide (five (5) feet shall be the minimum consistent with ADA requirements) pedestrian and bicycle paths that minimize conflicts with motorized traffic and are adequately landscaped, shaded and provide opportunities for shelter from the elements. i Buildings should front the street (zero or minimal setbacks are encouraged). i Vehicle parking strategies that encourage and support transit usage (such as parking that does not front the street, shared parking, parking structures, and/or reduced parking ratios). i Streets (internal and adjacent to the TOC) should be designed to discourage isolation and provide connectivity (such as streets in the grid pattern). Objective 1.17 The City shall encourage mixed use development in areas served by regional transit stations, such as Tri-Rail stations, major transit hubs, and neighborhood and regional transit centers as designated in the Broward County Comprehensive Plan Transportation Element, the Broward County Mass Transit Master Plan, Broward County Metropolitan Planning Organization’s (MPO) Long Range Transportation Plan, Broward County Transit Development Plan, or locally adopted financially feasible transportation or transit plan, through the establishment of a Transit Oriented Development (TOD) land use category. Policy 1.17.1 Residential use is required as a principal component within a Transit Oriented Development. Maximum residential density must be specified when the designation is applied to the future land use map. Residential densities may be specified either as dwelling units per gross acre in geographically designated areas and/or as a maximum number of permitted dwelling units. When the density of the area is specified as dwelling units per gross acre the percentage distribution among the mix of uses must also be identified. Policy 1.17.2 At least two nonresidential uses must be permitted in a TOD designated area as a principal use: e.g. retail, office, restaurants and personal services, hotel/motel, light industrial (including “live work” buildings), researc h business, civic and institutional. Policy 1.17.3 Minimum and Maximum FAR (Floor Area Ratio) for nonresidential uses must be specified when the TOD designation is applied to the future land use map. Minimum nonresidential FARs (Gross) of 2.0 are encouraged. Nonresidential intensities may be specified either as a maximum FAR in geographically designated areas and/or as an overall maximum square footage by use [e.g. pool of square footage by permitted use (retail, office etc.) or land use category City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 1-20 (commercial)]. When nonresidential intensity is specified as a maximum FAR the percentage distribution among the mix of uses must also be identified. Policy 1.17.4 Additional or expanded stand-alone automobile oriented uses such as: large surface parking lots; gas stations/auto repair/car washes; auto dealerships; self/equipment storage; “big box”/warehouse; single-family detached dwelling units; carwashes; and drive-through facilities are prohibited in a TOD, unless the City Commission determines the use will be designed in a manner to encourage pedestrian and transit usage. Policy 1.17.5 Developments within a TOD area shall include internal pedestrian, bicycle and transit amenities to serve the residents and employees within the area, such as seating on benches or planter ledges, shade, light fixtures, trash receptacles, information kiosks, bicycle parking, or other amenities that could be incorporated into adjacent publicly accessible areas and plaza, such as clocks, fountains, sculpture, drinking fountains, banners, flags and food and refreshment vendor areas. Policy 1.17.6 An interlocal agreement with Broward County shall be executed no later than six (6) months from the effective date of the adoption of a Transit Oriented Development specifying that the City of Oakland Park will monitor development activity and enforce the permitted land use densities and intensities. Policy 1.17.7 Within one year of the adoption of a TOD designation on the future land use map, the City shall establish design guidelines in the land development regulations for the area. These guidelines shall promote an urban form with well integrated land use combinations, balanced intensities and densities or uses compatible with surrounding uses, and mobility through safe and convenient interconnectivity of vehicular, transit, pedestrian and other non- motorized modes of travel. The design guidelines shall integrate public area through open space, urban public plazas, and/or recreational or community facility areas. The guidelines shall promote connectivity and access to transit stations and stops, while establishing a “sense of place”. These guidelines may include: i An integrated transit stop with shelter, or station (within the TOD area). i Wide (five (5) feet shall be the minimum consistent with ADA requirements) pedestrian and bicycle paths that minimize conflicts with motorized traffic and are adequately landscaped, shaded and provide opportunities for shelter from the elements. i Buildings should front the street (zero or minimal setbacks are encouraged). i Vehicle parking strategies that encourage and support transit usage (such as parking that does not front the street, shared parking, parking structures, and/or reduced parking ratios). City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 1-21 i Streets (internal and adjacent to the TOD) should be designed to discourage isolation and provide connectivity (such as streets in the grid pattern). Objective 1.18 The City shall identify areas in the City where the TOC, TOD, and MUR future land use designations are appropriate and desired to encourage transit-oriented and multimodal development patterns. Policy 1.18.1 By 2010, the City shall identify areas or corridors in the City where mixed use land uses are to be encouraged. These areas shall be identified through a citywide visioning or other consensus building process and they shall be specified in the land development regulations and comprehensive plan. Policy 1.18.2 By 2012, the City shall establish land development regulations providing incentives for privately-initiated land use changes consistent with the areas identified through Policy 1.18.1. Objective 1.19 The City shall evaluate the potential annexations of neighboring areas only if doing so will enable the more efficient delivery of municipal services. Policy 1.19.1 Almost all of the area surrounding the City has been annexed into municipalities. As such, the City shall only pursue voluntary annexations of unincorporated parcels. Policy 1.19.2 The City shall consider voluntary annexation of Fort Lauderdale enclaves (with the exception of the Fort Lauderdale water treatment plant adjacent to I-95) at the request of the land owner and with agreement of the City of Fort Lauderdale. Policy 1.19.3 Within three (3) years of an annexation, the City shall evaluate the need for additional community facilities, such as parks, libraries, police and fire stations, and water and wastewater infrastructure. Objective 1.20 Implement the post disaster redevelopment plan of the City. The measure of achievement shall be the annual review/update of the plan and plan implementation success in times of disaster. Policy 1.20.1 The physical post disaster redevelopment plan for the City is to rebuild in the same manner which exists consistent with the adopted Future Land Use Map. Policy 1.20.2 The City shall assess post disaster redevelopment opportunities to include acquisition of land for public purposes, if financially feasible. Policy 1.20.3 Structures existing within the City which suffer recurring damage (damage in excess of 50% of cost of construction or more) shall be modified in accordance with the most recent Florida Building Code requirements and all current federal, state and local regulations. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 1-22 Policy 1.20.4 Repair and Clean Up. In planning post disaster redevelopment activities, factors to be considered in order to protect the public health and safety shall include: 1. Repairs to potable water, wastewater and power facilities, 2. Removal of debris, 3. Stabilization or removal of structures in a perilous condition, and 4. Minimal repairs to make structures habitable. Policy 1.20.5 The short term recovery measures of repair and cleanup activities shall receive first priority in determining the appropriateness of emergency building permits. Long term redevelopment activities shall be postponed until the Recovery Task Force has coordinated immediate repair and clean-up operations. Policy 1.20.6 Permitting Decision Priorities. Immediate recovery actions needed to protect the public health and safety shall take priority in permitting decisions following hurricane storm events or natural disasters. Such priority actions will include, but not be limited to: debris removal; roadway and infrastructure repair; water use restrictions, if necessary; access restrictions, if required to protect lives or property; and other similar activities needed to assure the safe movement of people, goods and supplies within the impacted area. Long term repair or recovery actions, such as relocating infrastructure, rebuilding of damaged structures and the like, will be distinguished from the short-term actions herein described. Policy 1.20.7 The applicable provisions of the Florida Building Code, as may be amended from time to time, relating to hurricane precautions, inspections and permitting are hereby adopted by reference. Policy 1.20.8 Notwithstanding the preceding policies, no regulation, permitting procedure or post disaster redevelopment planning shall result in a taking or limitation of private property inconsistent with the provisions of the Private Property Rights Protection Act, Chapter 95-181, Laws of Florida. Policy 1.20.9 The City recognizes that certain vested developments rights may exist for property within the City. The City will consider such claims after petition is made to the City and after due public hearings the City Commission may grant approval to the request. Policy 1.20.10 The City will coordinate with Broward County in the preparation and implementation of the Countywide Emergency Preparedness Plan. The City shall adopt a Post Disaster Redevelopment Plan including all or portions of Broward County’s Plan no later than three (3) months subsequent to adoption by Broward County. Objective 1.21 Coordinate with Broward County, municipalities in Broward County, and the South Florida Regional Planning Council in the implementation of hazard mitigation strategies. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 1-23 Policy 1.21.1 The City shall use existing communication strategies, such as City newsletters and website, to inform the public and raise awareness regarding hurricane preparation, flood and thunderstorm mitigation strategies and other hazard mitigation techniques. Policy 1.21.2 The City shall use existing communication strategies, such as news releases and the CodeRED telecommunication system, to inform the public regarding emergency conditions. Policy 1.21.3 By 2012, the City shall review its land development regulations to assess whether modifications are necessary to address hazard mitigation in the development review process. Policy 1.21.4 By 2015, the City shall consider implementing a new program, or modifying an existing program, to assist residents and businesses in upgrading (or hardening) structures to meet revised building standards and encourage sheltering-in-place. Incentives to be considered include grant programs, zero- interest loans, and reduced permit fees for hardening upgrades, such as shutters. Policy 1.21.5 By 2012, the City shall assess the conditions of public buildings and structures and determine if upgrades are warranted to address potential hazard conditions. Policy 1.21.6 The City shall require redevelopment of repetitive loss properties (as identified in the Broward County Local Mitigation Strategy) to meet current building codes. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 2-1 Transportation Element Goal 2 To develop and maintain an overall transportation system which will provide for the transportation needs of all sectors of the community in a safe, efficient, cost effective and aesthetically pleasing manner. Objective 2.1 Provide for a safe, convenient and efficient motorized and non-motorized transportation system. Measure: Reduce the annual percentage rate of accidents occurring on roadway facilities during the long-term planning period by ten (10%) percent, including those involving vehicles, pedestrians and bicyclists. Policy 2.1.1 Monitor traffic frequencies by location and conduct studies to determine means of accommodating the traffic through development review. Policy 2.1.2 Improve traffic enforcement at high accident locations. Policy 2.1.3 Coordinate with Broward County and FDOT to minimize curb cuts on arterial and collector roadways through development review procedures. Policy 2.1.4 Provide safe and convenient on-site traffic circulation through development review procedures. Policy 2.1.5 Provide sufficient on-site parking for motorized and non-motorized vehicles through development review. Policy 2.1.6 At a minimum, continue annual roadway maintenance budget funding at existing levels. Policy 2.1.7 Coordinate with Broward County and FDOT to support the conversion of span traffic signals to mast arms to promote signal operation after storm events. Policy 2.1.8 Coordinate with Broward County Engineering to monitor on an annual basis, traffic accidents involving vehicles, pedestrians and/or cyclists. Policy 2.1.9 Require unobstructed sight lines and non-obstructive landscape plantings along medians and at development driveway/street locations. Policy 2.1.10 Continue to implement the citywide neighborhood planning program, including conducting appropriate traffic calming studies. Policy 2.1.11 Execute prompt responses to random hazards. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 2-2 Policy 2.1.12 Parking within the traffic lanes and right-of-ways of arterial or collector roadways, except on emergency basis, shall be prohibited to ensure maximum operational flows of traffic. Objective 2.2 The City shall continue to implement a safe and enjoyable bikeway/walkway system through coordination with other transportation agencies, private investment during development, and public improvement projects. Measure: Construct and/or reconstruct 10% of the missing links in the adopted bikeway/sidewalk plan by the year 2012. Policy 2.2.1 Support Broward County and the MPO in implementing the recommended bicycle route plan as stated in the MPO’s Long Range Transportation Plan. Policy 2.2.2 Where possible, include the construction of sidewalks in all improvement projects; include ample signage or pedestrian signalization provisions to designate and promote preferred non-vehicular routes. Policy 2.2.3 Participate in bicycle planning programs of the Broward County MPO and District IV of Florida DOT and include consideration of bicycle and pedestrian ways in transportation planning activities. Objective 2.3 Coordinate the transportation systems with existing and future land uses as shown on the Future Land Use Map. Measure: Apply LOS concurrency standards to all development applications and monitor for compliance. Policy 2.3.1 The City adopts the following level of service standards for transportation infrastructure. When calculating or evaluating level of service pursuant to this policy, all calculations and evaluations shall be based on the methodology contained in Transportation Research Board’s Highway Capacity Manual Special Report 2000, the Florida Department of Transportation’s 2002 Quality/Level of Service Handbook, or a methodology determined by the Department to be of comparable reliability. i I-95 (a Strategic Intermodal System (SIS) Corridor) - LOS E; i Cypress Creek Road from I-95 to Andrews Avenue and Andrews Avenue from Cypress Creek Road to the Tri-Rail station entrance (a SIS Connector) - LOS D; and i As part of the Broward County Central District using transit oriented concurrency – coordinate with the county to achieve headways of 30 minutes or less on 80% of routes (non-contract Broward County Transit (BCT) routes), establish at least one neighborhood transit center, and establish at least two additional community bus routes, increase bus shelters by 30%, and maintain the peak hour two-way maximum service volumes on arterial roads as listed below: o Two-lane arterials: 2,555; City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 2-3 o Four-lane arterials: 5,442; o Six-lane arterials: 8,190; o Eight-lane arterials: 10,605; and o For Local Roadways: LOS C ADT, PSDT and PKHR Policy 2.3.2 A local street is any roadway not designated as an arterial or collector facility on the Existing Roadway Functional Classification Map. Policy 2.3.3 The City will only issue development permits for projects that do not access an over capacity local street or result in a local street exceeding LOS C. Permits may be issued under any one of the following circumstances: i The Applicant shows that no local streets are accessed or those that are will operate at, or better than, LOS C at project buildout or within three (3) years after obtaining a building permit, whichever is earlier. i There is an approved Action Plan accompanying the traffic impacts of the proposed development, where an Action Plan refers to any combination of accepted transit, ride-sharing, transportation systems management methods, or other methods of traffic impact mitigation. i The necessary improvements to provide LOS C are under construction, under contract for construction, or the City Commission determines they will be under contract during the same fiscal year. i The necessary improvements to provide LOS C are included in an enforceable development agreement and the City agrees to, or has included, the improvement in its Capital Improvement Program in the Capital Improvements Element. The parties seeking development approvals (i.e. developers) will be responsible for preparing the Action Plan and providing the funding for any transportation improvements identified in the Action Plan. The City Commission will be responsible for approving Action Plans in instances where Broward County is not involved (i.e., development requests not requiring platting or impacts to local streets). In instances where Broward County is the responsible agency, the City Commission will provide a recommendation to the County. The Action Plan will specify how the impacts of the proposed development will be phased to be concurrent with the availability of traffic and or transportation capacity at the adopted level of service, the transportation improvements to be implemented, improvement costs and the funding mechanisms. Policy 2.3.4 For development and redevelopment within the City, all applicants shall contact Broward County Mass Transit during the platting and/or site plan process and provide, where feasible, any on-site transit improvements requested for existing or future mass transit routes. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 2-4 Policy 2.3.5 Monitor the impact on Strategic Intermodal System (SIS) roadway facilities by coordination with Broward County and participation/membership in the MPO Technical Coordinating Committee. Policy 2.3.6 Require developments within the City to provide sidewalks along adjacent roads identified as collectors and arterials on the Future Roadway Functional Classified Map. Policy 2.3.7 Based on updated Broward County Trips assignments, the City may reclassify any roadway segment within the City. The City may also reclassify a roadway segment if development from outside the City has affected traffic conditions within the City. Policy 2.3.8 Require trip generation studies from all proposed development and redevelopment within the City and traffic impact studies for nonresidential developments and all residential developments with more than four (4) dwelling units and allow development contingent upon meeting LOS Standards. Policy 2.3.9 The City, through its Concurrency Management System, will consider the individual and cumulative impacts of land use plan amendments on the existing and planned City transportation facilities. Objective 2.4 The City will coordinate with the plans and programs of the Broward County Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO), Broward County and the Florida Department of Transportation’s Five (5) Year Transportation Plan and any appropriate resource planning and management plans prepared pursuant to state statutes. Measure: Annually provide Broward County MPO with prioritized listing of needed improvements to the City transportation system for inclusion in the County Transportation Improvement Program (TIP). Include an operations or LOS analysis indicating the need for each improvement. Policy 2.4.1 Maintain an active, positive relationship with FDOT, Broward County, adjacent municipalities, and other relevant public and private entities in order to support and engage in cooperative funding of transportation improvements. Policy 2.4.2 Continue to participate in the Broward County Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) Technical Coordinating Committee. Policy 2.4.3 As part of the annual Capital Improvements Element update, provide a review of the number of roadway improvements constructed within the City and the amount of County, State and Federal transportation dollars spent in the City. Policy 2.4.4 When undertaking local transportation studies and improvements, the City will coordinate with Broward County and the MPO to ensure their criteria for studies and improvements are met and to assess whether County or MPO funding is available. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 2-5 Objective 2.5 Provide for the protection of existing and future public rights-of-way from building encroachment. Measure: Right-of-way area obtained and/or protected via platting and/or site plan approval. Policy 2.5.1 The City shall continue to require the conveyance of right-of-way or easements consistent with the City’s Plan, the Broward County Planning Council’s Trafficways Plan and with the plans of the Florida Department of Transportation and or Broward County when corridor right-of-way maps are filed in the Broward County Official Records Division. Policy 2.5.2 Retain land development regulations to ensure consistency with the Broward County Trafficways Plan right-of-way requirements and the City’s Transportation Element during development review activities. Policy 2.5.3 The City shall coordinate with Broward County and all local government entities in the consideration of the individual and cumulative impacts of land use plan amendments on the existing and planned transportation facilities within the County. Objective 2.6 Identify neighborhood and regional circulation areas which have traffic safety related problems and develop solutions. Continue to maintain the Neighborhood Traffic Committee to respond to citizen concerns and advise the City Commission about traffic calming solutions. Measure: Number citizen petitions for traffic calming and devices installed during the planning period and actions. Policy 2.6.1 Conduct studies of local neighborhood circulation patterns and, where demonstrated problems exist, implement modifications such as street closures, turn restrictions and traffic calming. Policy 2.6.2 By 2010, work with or encourage Broward County, the MPO and FDOT to undertake a regional network study to recommend comprehensive solutions to improve safety and mobility in the City, including travel through the City. Objective 2.7 Improve the operation of existing and proposed railroad crossings, including minimizing “down time” between closing of existing and opening of proposed new crossings. Measure: Reduce number of closings at peak hours by coordination with railroad operations. Measure 2.7 Coordinate with the County and State to encourage the delaying of an existing railroad crossing closure until new roadway crossings are opened. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 2-6 Measure 2.7.2 Identify substandard or deteriorated crossing locations and secure improvements in the crossing design or signage. Objective 2.8 Continue to require private sector responsibility to include project related transportation improvements. Measure: Number and types of improvements obtained through development approvals. Policy 2.8.1 Maintain the requirements of developer sponsored funding of project-related transportation improvements through negotiation and/or application of project impact fees. Policy 2.8.2 Require developers to construct transportation improvements in lieu of impact fee donations. Objective 2.9 Implement local improvements and support the implementation by other agencies of improvements identified in the Future Number of Through Lanes and Future Public Transit maps, on a priority basis compatible with the City’s Land Use Plan. Measure: Number of local transportation improvements made during planning period. Policy 2.9.1 Secure the funding of additional needed road improvements as identified in the Transportation Element. Policy 2.9.2 Establish transportation improvement priorities and provide or support funding in a consistent manner. Policy 2.9.3 Provide local funding necessary to satisfy the City’s Capital Improvement Plan/Program for road improvements. Policy 2.9.4 Approve additional city development consistent with maintenance of the adopted level of service standards. Policy 2.9.5 Continue to monitor the progress of all programmed road improvements as identified in the Transportation Element. Objective 2.10 Provide for effective coordination of local road improvements with minimal negative impacts to adjacent residential or business property owners. Measure: Number of local road improvements including discussion with adjoining property owners. Policy 2.10.1 Improve the implementation of road projects by coordinating meetings between agencies and adjacent property owners and by providing construction updates via existing notification means, such as the City’s website and newsletters. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 2-7 Policy 2.10.2 Require that on-street or private parking losses, or substantial negative impacts to on-site traffic circulation, be effectively mitigated and funded when planning local road improvements. Objective 2.11 Coordinate transportation improvements as part of the overall redevelopment strategies. Measure: Number and type of improvements identified and implemented in specific redevelopment plans. Policy 2.11.1 Where feasible, implement transportation improvements as part of the overall redevelopment strategies. Policy 2.11.2 Consider the funding of other redevelopment improvements in conjunction with programmed transportation improvements. Objective 2.12 Reduce overall transportation energy consumption and roadway traffic congestion by increasing the efficiency of the existing transportation system, implementing Transportation Demand Management (TDM) strategies, and by encouraging integrated transportation systems, mass transit facilities, bikeways, and pedestrian corridors throughout the City. Measure: Increase percentage of residents using forms of transportation other than single-occupancy vehicles for home-to-work based trips by one percent (1%) by 2030. Policy 2.12.1 Coordinate with the County on providing computerized traffic signal control and proper signal progression. Policy 2.12.2 Coordinate with Broward County Mass Transit Division and the Broward County MPO to reduce headways for bus routes and maintain or increase funding support for the City’s community bus routes. Policy 2.12.3 Continue to fund or seek funding for bikeway and pedestrian corridor improvements. Annually budget or seek funds for continued improvements. Policy 2.12.4 Support the prioritization and implementation of the Broward County Congestion Management Plan for improvements in the City, including identified corridor improvements along Oakland Park Boulevard and intersection improvements for Oakland Park Boulevard at NW 31 Avenue, NW 21 Avenue and Powerline Road. Policy 2.12.5 By 2012, encourage Broward County, the MPO and FDOT to undertake a corridor master plan for Oakland Park Boulevard, looking for financially feasible solutions to improve mobility in and through the area. Policy 2.12.5 Prior to the application for a building permit, an applicant must obtain a Transportation Concurrency Satisfaction Certificate from Broward County. The City of Oakland Park shall not accept a building permit application, or issue a City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 2-8 building permit, unless the corresponding Transportation Concurrency Satisfaction Certificate is presented. Policy 2.12.6 The Land Development Code shall require development applications to provide locations for bicycle storage and pathway connections shall be made between buildings and the public walkway system. Objective 2.13 By 2012, investigate revising the Land Development Code to provide citywide incentives for the incorporation of mass transit, car pool, pedestrian and bicycle amenities in major commercial, industrial and office buildings. Measure: a) Amend the Land Development Code. b) Coordinate with South Florida Commuter Services to provide informational material to business owners to encourage other than one person occupancy automobile usage. Policy 2.13.1 Require pedestrian and bicycle facilities, where feasible, on local roads. Encourage Broward County, the MPO and FDOT to include pedestrian and bicycle facilities when improving state- and county-maintained roadways. Policy 2.13.2 Promote and help coordinate Countywide ridesharing efforts. Policy 2.13.3 Encourage staggered and flexible work schedules. Objective 2.14 Provide City transportation facilities that are visually and functionally pleasing and that conform to City guidelines. Measure: Lineal feet of new or reconstructed roadways including pavement, drainage improvement, bikeways, landscaping, and curbing. Policy 2.14.1 Adopt Broward County and FDOT roadway and traffic design standards with revisions, if necessary, for roadway signage and lighting, for the entire City or designated subdistricts. Policy 2.14.2 Develop “gateway treatments” at major transportation facility entrances to the City. Policy 2.14.3 Establish/maintain an overall streetscape beautification program for public rights-of-way. Policy 2.14.4 Provide for adequate funding for landscaping and irrigation components in City transportation projects. Policy 2.14.5 Continue to enforce the Land Development Code to require the provision and maintenance of vegetative and/or screening of nonresidential parking areas where they abut residential property or roadways. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 2-9 Policy 2.14.6 Support the overall public provision of vegetation along major roadways for visual and noise buffering purposes. Species should be appropriate to their placing without invasive roots or brittle characteristics. Policy 2.14.7 Continue to enforce laws prohibiting dumping in public right-of-way. Goal 2A Support the development of a Public Transit System which serves as a viable alternative to the automobile, and adequately provides for the needs of the transportation disadvantaged segments of the population. Objective 2.15 Support mass transit improvements proposed by the Broward County Division of Mass Transit, the Broward MPO, South Florida Regional Transportation Authority (SFRTA)/Tri-Rail and the Florida Department of Transportation. Measure: Number of improvements proposed and implemented during the planning period. Policy 2.15.1 Support the transit shelter and terminal development programs of the Broward County Mass Transit Division, and SFRTA/Tri-Rail operations and plans. By 2010, coordinate with Broward County to determine the highest ridership stops in the City and implement shelters in priority locations. Policy 2.15.2 By 2012, modify the Land Development Code to encourage the provision of transit related shelters citywide in major land development projects. Retain existing requirements for transit infrastructure in mixed use areas. Policy 2.15.3 Prior to amending the future land use map notify the Broward County Mass Transit Division of the proposed change when a major trip generator or attractor is expected. Policy 2.15.4 Notify the Broward County Mass Transit Division of the proposed plans for development to ensure that those areas will be adequately served by mass transit including elderly and handicapped transportation. Policy 2.15.5 Retain a community bus transportation program to meet the demands in the City and to provide circulator service between residential and commercial areas and to provide access to other transit services. Every three (3) years, the City shall evaluate ridership and route data and consider enhancements to the services provided. Policy 2.15.6 As a participant/member of the MPO Technical Coordinating Committee, continue to monitor the provision of mass transit services to ensure the needs of the City are met. Policy 2.15.7 Continue to provide enhancements at bus stops such as shelters, benches and public information to encourage ridership. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 2-10 Objective 2.16 Increase local private sector participation in mass transit development and operations. Measure: Number and type of improvements made during the planning period. Policy 2.16.1 By 2009, modify the Land Development Code to require, where feasible, the private sector to provide on-site transit facilities as part of major developments throughout the City. Retain the existing land development regulations for such facilities in mixed use areas. Policy 2.16.2 Coordinate with local employers to provide route and service information to increase private sector transit use. Policy 2.16.3 Allow for limited advertising provisions at local transit shelters or terminal facilities. Objective 2.17 Secure right-of-way for transit services or facilities. Measure: Number of new and/or improved bus bays and/or stops during planning period. Policy 2.17.1 Work with Broward County Mass Transit Division and the Broward MPO to secure bus bays along major transit corridors. Policy 2.17.2 By 2012, modify the Land Development Code to require, where feasible, the private sector to provide on-site transit facilities as part of major developments throughout the City. Retain the existing land development regulations for such facilities in mixed use areas. Policy 2.17.3 Monitor and support the FDOT study investigating the provision of transit service in the FEC corridor and identify a potential station location in Downtown Oakland Park. Objective 2.18 Support the Broward County MPO, Broward County Mass Transit Division, SFRTA/Tri-Rail and FDOT’s transportation improvements to meet or exceed minimum elderly and handicapped transportation federal guidelines for service. Measure: Number of persons utilizing service compared to federal guidelines. Policy 2.18.1 Support Broward County’s provision of elderly and handicapped transportation services under all Federal guidelines for such service. Objective 2.19 Support the Broward County MPO, Broward County Mass Transit Division, SFRTA/Tri-Rail and FDOT’s transit improvements oriented to increase local transit ridership and farebox revenues. Measure: Increase ridership and fares by 5% during the planning period. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 2-11 Policy 2.19.1 Support marketing activities of the Broward County Mass Transit Division and SFRTA/Tri-Rail. Policy 2.19.2 Work with the Broward County MPO, Broward County Mass Transit Division, FDOT and the South Florida Regional Transportation Authority (SFRTA)/Tri- Rail to provide new/expanded route coverage and improved headways as shown in the Future Public Transit System Map and described in the Transportation Element. Policy 2.19.3 Maintain a close working relationship with the Broward County MPO, Broward County Mass Transit Division, SFRTA/Tri-Rail and the FDOT to communicate the ongoing transit needs and plans of the City. Policy 2.19.4 Work with the Broward County MPO, Broward County Mass Transit Division and SFRTA/Tri-Rail to continue to address the City’s needs in terms of connecting to rail stations and premium transit services via a feeder/distributor system. Objective 2.20 Coordinate with Broward County and surrounding municipalities to meet the existing level of transit service by route, headway and service area as determined by Broward County and communities in the Central District. Measure: Determine if LOS standards are being met during the planning period. Policy 2.20.1 Recognize Broward County as the principal provider of mass transit services in the City. To encourage more ridership, the City shall continue to provide service schedules at City Hall and implement the land development regulations concerning providing mass transit stops for major public transit generators and attractors. Policy 2.20.2 Continue to encourage Broward County and the FDOT to continue and expand funding of local mass transit service consistent with existing and proposed service standards. Policy 2.20.4 Coordinate with the Broward County MPO, Broward County Mass Transit Division and SFRTA/Tri-Rail to ensure the required transit services area available to meet the level of service criteria. Policy 2.20.5 Encourage the identification of persons with special transportation needs for shopping, recreational and hurricane evacuation purposes. Objective 2.21 Support the regional commuter rail system that serves residents and employers of the City. Measure: Number of users of Tri-Rail system during planning period. Policy 2.21.1 Support the funding and commuter rail improvements proposed by the South Florida Regional Transportation Authority. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 2-12 Objective 2.22 Support the development of comfortable and visually pleasing transit facilities proposed by the Broward County Mass Transit Division, the Broward County MPO, the Florida Department of Transportation and SFRTA/Tri-Rail. Measure: Land Development Code revisions made and number of improved transit facilities. Policy 2.22.1 By 2012, propose and adopt modifications to the Land Development Code that implement local design criteria to improve the aesthetics and comfortability at transit facilities. Policy 2.22.2 By 2012, propose and adopt modifications to the Land Development Code to improve the amount and appearance of transit facilities at the City’s main transfer points. Policy 2.22.3 Through participation/membership on the Technical Coordinating Committee provide recommendations for improvements at transit facilities to the Broward County MPO that will improve the aesthetics and comfortability. Policy 2.22.4 Support funding of Broward County Mass Transit Division and SFRTA/Tri-Rail to maintain local transit facilities. Goal 2B Coordinate with Broward County in the implementation of the countywide Transportation Element recognizing that the City includes parts of the Regional (County/State) Roadway System and other modes of transportation. Objective 2.23 The City will coordinate with Broward County in the implementation of their Transportation Element. Measure: Annually meet with the Broward County Transportation Planning Division and MPO staff to coordinate activities, programs and data. Policy 2.23.1 The City shall maintain its highest intensities of land use along major transportation routes and encourage the clustering of parking areas near major routes and transit stops. The City contains one designated public transportation corridor, that being the South Florida Rail Corridor. The City will participate in providing data to the County and/or FDOT and coordinate parking strategies and alternatives to utilizing the Strategic Intermodal System Corridors (namely, I-95) by local traffic. Policy 2.23.2 The Broward County transit oriented concurrency management system shall apply for the purpose of issuing development orders and permits. Objective 2.24 The City shall continue to coordinate with the implementation of the County’s Emergency Preparedness Plan and shall strive to maintain or reduce hurricane evacuation times. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 2-13 Policy 2.24.1 On an annual basis schedule at least one training session to maintain local emergency services personnel familiarity with Broward County’s adopted Emergency Preparedness Plan. Review with County Emergency Preparedness personnel the designation of controlled intersections or evacuation routes along City arterials and near designated evacuation centers. Policy 2.24.2 Participate in countywide emergency preparedness preparation and practice sessions. Policy 2.24.3 The City shall annually update a database and action plan for notification and evacuation of the City’s transit dependent population. Policy 2.24.4 The City shall coordinate with Broward County and the South Florida Regional Planning Council to maintain the following hurricane evacuation times. Evacuation Route Storm Category Evacuation Time Commercial Boulevard Category 1, 2 Category 3 Category 4,5 7.31 Hours 7.31 Hours 9.30 Hours Oakland Park Boulevard Category 1, 2 Category 3 Category 4,5 8.81 Hours 8.81 Hours 9.15 Hours Policy 2.24.5 The City shall support the efforts of Broward County and the South Florida Regional Planning Council to increase the capacities of designated hurricane shelters. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 3-1 Housing Goal 3 To maintain, improve and expand the existing single-family and multiple-family housing supply in a way that assures a desirable mix of a variety of housing types, protects sound neighborhoods and contributes to the revitalization of neighborhoods which have experienced decline. Objective 3.1 Affordable housing opportunities for very low, low and moderate income households exists in the City of Oakland Park, and the City shall continue to encourage and assist, as appropriate, property owners in the preservation and maintenance of such housing units. The City shall establish a housing program to assist in providing “in-fill” housing to accommodate demand by 2015. “In-fill” is new housing on scattered vacant lots in neighborhoods which are largely developed. The City’s program shall address a variety of housing types and encourage owner occupied units. Policy 3.1.1 Utilize the Future Land Use Plan and zoning map to assure a diversity of housing types, including encouraging mixed uses containing residential units. Policy 3.1.2 Continue a municipal development application review process that minimizes delay yet assures quality control. Policy 3.1.3 The City’s Development Services Department shall coordinate with private developers, non-profit partnerships, and appropriate governmental agencies, including HUD and the State of Florida Department of Community Affairs, whenever possible, to facilitate implementation of this Element. Policy 3.1.4 The City shall continue its infrastructure modernization program to support the private development of in-fill housing and multi-family housing, particularly in the community redevelopment area. Policy 3.1.5 The City shall continue to apply for CDBG funds to provide for the completion of additional improvements including demolition and rehabilitation of existing substandard housing units in the Rock Island Redevelopment Area and designated Community Redevelopment Area in order to increase the supply of quality affordable housing. Policy 3.1.6 A key component of the City’s affordable/workforce housing program shall be to maintain and rehabilitate existing housing units to preserve the City’s housing supply. The City shall continue to provide incentives to owners of substandard housing to rehabilitate existing housing through coordination with Broward County in the implementation of the Broward County Housing Rehabilitation Program and through enforcement of the City’s minimum housing code and other code enforcement action in order to maintain or improve the quality of the City’s existing housing stock. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 3-2 Objective 3.2 The City shall enhance its existing affordable/workforce housing programs to increase the supply of affordable housing for very low, low and moderate income households by working with the public and private sectors. Furthermore, the City shall continue to encourage a diversification of housing types, including single-family and multi-family renter and owner-occupied units for all income levels. The City’s target is a balance of units and occupants similar to the general demographics of Broward County as a whole, with at least 25 new dwelling units for very low or low income households by 2015 and one-fifth (20 percent) of new dwelling units for very low, low and moderate income households throughout the City, and predominately in the CRA, through 2030. Policy 3.2.1 Utilize the Future Land Use Plan and zoning map to assure a diversity of housing types, including encouraging mixed uses containing residential units. Policy 3.2.2 The City shall continue to coordinate with the Broward County Housing Finance Agency relating to Watts Estates to encourage its development and to obtain the necessary development orders/permits to allow for the construction of dwelling units affordable to lower income households. Policy 3.2.3 By December 31, 2008, the City shall consider establishing an inclusionary zoning ordinance or affordable/workforce housing ordinance to address the City’s demand for such housing. Mechanisms to be considered include, among others, impact fees, in-lieu fees, mandatory set-asides, density bonuses, and a public land bank. The ordinance shall incorporate a tracking mechanism to evaluate the number of affordable/workforce units added to the City’s housing stock and the number of units demolished. Policy 3.2.4 By December 31, 2008, the City shall evaluate its land development regulations to assess if there are impediments to the provision of affordable housing and whether additional incentives should be provided, such as expedited or streamlined permitting, reduced impact fees, set-back and lot size restrictions, energy saving requirements, and accessory dwelling unit restrictions. Policy 3.2.5 By December 31, 2008, the City shall consider establishing compatibility review provisions in the land development regulations to ensure a conversion of a rental unit property to condominiums is consistent and compatible with the comprehensive plan and land development regulations. Policy 3.2.6 The City shall retain its program of transferring city-owned lots to qualifying households for construction of single-family units. Policy 3.2.7 The City shall retain its bonus density program for affordable units allocated to the City through the Broward County Land Use Plan. The program will be in accordance with the Broward County Planning Council’s Administrative Rules Document, and bonus units may be granted for parcels with Commercial future City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 3-3 land use map designations and in areas identified in the land development regulations. Policy 3.2.8 The provision of affordable/workforce housing is a regional issue and the City shall continue to participate in Broward County programs and committees designed to study, plan for and implement housing solutions. Policy 3.2.9 By 2009, the City shall consider establishing a housing position (citywide or in the CRA) to serve as a local clearinghouse for assistance to residential renters and owners and developers interested in establishing affordable/workforce housing. The City shall consider providing local funding to operate a bootstrap program to rehabilitate the exterior of owner-occupied units and a revolving loan program to help subsidize the rehabilitation of rental properties. Tax credits for existing affordable rental projects and senior housing assistance also shall be considered, particularly in the CRA. Policy 3.2.10 The City shall work with the CRA to establish policies and procedures to address displacement of residents during redevelopment. Policy 3.2.11 The City shall retain its land development policies specifying streamlined site plan approval and permitting procedures for affordable housing and shall consider reducing fees associated with permitting. Policy 3.2.12 The City shall retain its mixed use regulations in the Downtown and encourage other opportunities to provide housing, including affordable housing, in existing nonresidential areas through horizontal and vertical integration of uses. Objective 3.3 The City shall continue to reduce the number of substandard units citywide through rehabilitation programs, code enforcement, and the unsafe structures process. Policy 3.3.1 Enforce the City’s minimum housing code, particularly in single-family areas, but also in other areas. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 3-4 Policy 3.3.2 Enforce the Florida Building Code as enacted by the City so as to eliminate unsafe buildings, particularly in single-family areas but also in other areas. Policy 3.3.3 The City shall work with the County Development Services Department to intensify its housing rehabilitation loan and demolition programs in the CDBG target area between Andrews Avenue and Dixie Highway. The Florida Statutes Chapter 163 Oakland Park Redevelopment Plan shall provide the principles to guide this program. Policy 3.3.4 The County Development Services Department and City Building Inspections Department shall jointly develop a relocation process that assists households displaced by public demolition or rehabilitation, to find a standard unit; it shall include the existing new construction program. Policy 3.3.5 The City shall participate in federal, state and county programs, such as SHIP, HOME and HOPE (as applicable), to provide for the purchase and rehabilitation of existing housing. Objective 3.4 The implementation section of the City’s Future Land Use Element shall continue to provide opportunities for adequate sites in residential areas to accommodate a fair share of the County’s group homes and the City shall continue to encourage the existing group home facilities to remain operational provided that the existing facilities comply with all applicable local, state, and federal regulations. Policy 3.4.1 Continue the current development code policy whereby group homes are permitted in the residential and appropriate nonresidential zoning districts; these districts are found throughout the City. The development code review process shall review the locational criteria to permit only category (1) group homes in single-family districts and avoid undue concentrations of category (2) and (3) in residential multi-family districts. Objective 3.5 Protect the viability of residential neighborhoods. Policy 3.5.1 Reject rezoning and variance applications that could be detrimental to neighborhood viability and stability. Items to be considered during the rezoning or variance process include, but are not limited to, compatibility and types of uses, building placement, mass and scale, lighting and noise conditions, traffic patterns, hours of operation, and buffering and aesthetics. Policy 3.5.2 The City shall continue to enforce development code regulations which prohibit residential densities which are out of character with existing sound and viable neighborhoods. Policy 3.5.3 By December 31, 2008, the City shall assess its land development regulations to ensure that when evaluating proposals for new development or redevelopment the effect a proposal will have on the stability of adjacent City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 3-5 neighborhoods is considered. Factors such as noise, odors, traffic volumes and circulation shall be reviewed and if it is determined that a proposed development will result in a degradation of any neighborhood, the project shall be modified accordingly or denied. Policy 3.5.4 As identified in the Future Land Use Element, the City shall continue and enhance its neighborhood planning program and work with residents and associations to maintain and improve the quality of life in the neighborhoods. The City may assist in the creation or running of community associations, prepare neighborhood plans addressing traffic calming, code enforcement or aesthetics improvements, or improve safety through providing support for crime watches and community policing, for example. Policy 3.5.5 The City shall encourage the creation and continuation of neighborhood or community associations. The City shall continue to provide notices to neighborhood representatives of upcoming meetings that involve land use and development activities that may potentially impact their neighborhoods. Policy 3.5.6 The City shall continue to publish, at least quarterly, a newsletter that is intended to provide information on services, events and activities that are of interest to the City’s residents. Policy 3.5.7 The City shall continue to promote Broward County programs and consider establishing City-specific programs such as Adopt-A-Street (litter control), “paint-up” programs, Adopt-A-Tree (street tree plantings), and similar programs intended to improve the appearance of neighborhoods. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 4-1 Sanitary Sewer, Solid Waste, Drainage, Potable Water and Natural Groundwater Aquifer Recharge (Infrastructure) Goal 4 To ensure that basic urban services of potable water, sanitary sewer and solid waste disposal, and land drainage capabilities are available and adequate to meet the needs of all City residents and businesses. Objective 4.1 The City shall continue to provide local infrastructure services in accord with the following Level of Service Standards: a) Average and peak flow per capita rates for sanitary sewer, b) Pickup frequency/per capita generation rate for solid waste, c) Storm drainage design criteria, and d) Minimum design flow and fire pressure and per capita consumption rate for potable water. Policy 4.1.1 Adopt the local level of service standards for infrastructure services as follows: i For sanitary sewer - 150 gallons per day per resident; i For potable water - 119 gallons per day per resident; i For fire flow - as required by the Fire Marshall; i For solid waste - 8 pounds per capita per day with bi-weekly pickup; i For drainage (Roadway Crown) - 10 year 3 day storm; i For drainage (Finished Floor) - floor elevation above 100 yr. 3 day storm. finished floor shall be no lower than the highest of: 1. One (1) foot above the FEMA Flood Insurance Rate Base Flood Elevation; or 2. The 100-year flood elevation as determined by the Broward County 100-year Flood Criteria Map; or 3. Twelve (12) inches above the adjacent road crown for residential development and six (6) inches above the adjacent road crown for nonresidential development. Policy 4.1.2 The City will work to achieve the following level of service standard target for drainage by 2030: x Finished floor elevation as specified in Policy 4.1.1 and zero discharge. Policy 4.1.3 By 2015, the City shall perform a wastewater infrastructure analysis and incorporate appropriate policies in the comprehensive plan. Any needed capital improvements projects shall be prioritized and incorporated in the City’s, or a service provider’s, capital improvements program. Policy 4.1.4 Maintain the level of service standards through perpetuation of the existing or future interlocal retail service agreements with Fort Lauderdale and Broward County. Policy 4.1.5 Review and, if appropriate, consider the adoption of revised level of service standards based on planning efforts of outside service providers to the City. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 4-2 Policy 4.1.6 Participate in the Countywide Resource Recovery Program. Policy 4.1.7 By 2017, establish an implementation program to increase the number of fire hydrants and improve fire flow as identified in the water distribution system analysis undertaken in 2005. Policy 4.1.8 By 2015 the City will evaluate the feasibility of establishing a potable water level of service standard for non-residential users. Objective 4.2 The City shall continue to implement land development regulations to assure that new development or redevelopment occurs concurrently with the adopted level of service standards. Policy 4.2.1 Approval of all City development and redevelopment plans shall be conditioned on service availability at the adopted standards concurrently with development. Objective 4.3 By the year 2030, provide wastewater collection service to the City’s existing, non-serviced area. Policy 4.3.1 By 2012, the City shall undertake a wastewater analysis in order to prepare a short-range improvement program that establishes the budget requirements and timetable for local capital improvement funds for the design and installation of sanitary sewer collection lines in the City’s already developed but non-serviced areas. Policy 4.3.2 The City shall continue to enforce land development regulations to require the extension of wastewater collection facilities as a condition of local plat approval. Policy 4.3.3 The City shall continue to enforce procedures and criteria on requiring sanitary sewer facility extensions as a condition of City building permit issuance for the construction or substantial modification of a principal building. Policy 4.3.4 Continue to coordinate wastewater treatment demands with the County and City of Fort Lauderdale. Objective 4.4 To provide for the continued maintenance of the City’s potable water distribution and sanitary sewer collection facilities. Policy 4.4.1 In concert with Broward County and Fort Lauderdale, the City should annually perform and periodically update inventories of water and wastewater facility conditions. Policy 4.4.2 The City shall annually prioritize water and sanitary sewer rehabilitation, replacement or expansion needs. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 4-3 Policy 4.4.3 On an annual basis, the City shall modify the capital improvement program to include funding for water and wastewater system rehabilitation, replacement or expansion based on the established criteria for prioritizing system needs. Objective 4.5 The City shall continue to implement the Master Drainage Plan adopted in 1998 for the entire City and assure that land development regulations provide for local and area wide protection of natural drainage and recharge areas. Policy 4.5.1 The City shall require conformance with the design criteria and water quality standards of the Broward County Environmental Protection Department (EPD) as contained in Chapter 27, Article V of the Broward County Code of Ordinances and the South Florida Water Management District as contained in the Management and Storage of Surface Waters, Permit Information Manual, Volume IV. Policy 4.5.2 Continue to enforce the City’s subdivision regulations to provide for increases in pervious area, improve on-site drainage retention capabilities, and where feasible, maintenance of wetland soils and vegetation characteristics. Policy 4.5.3 Continue to preserve all aquifer and ground water recharge areas in Oakland Park consistent with Article IX, Section 24-121 of the Land Development Code. Objective 4.6 By the Year 2012, eliminate existing storm drainage deficiencies in the central area of the City by implementing drainage system improvements and extensions to meet existing and future needs. Objective 4.7 Maintain the existing per capita solid waste disposal rate. Policy 4.7.1 Continue existing recycling programs and investigate implementation of additional activities to reduce existing per capita waste. Objective 4.8 Through the Year 2018, correct existing water distribution system deficiencies, extend water service to non-serviced areas as appropriate. Policy 4.8.1 Include in the annual modification of the Capital Improvement Program funding for correcting existing water distribution system deficiencies. Policy 4.8.2 Through implementation of the Land Development Regulations the City shall continue to require extension of water services to new developments. Policy 4.8.3 Retain a procedure, in conjunction with water suppliers and the South Florida Water Management District, to notify City residents of voluntary and mandatory water conservation practices during drought periods. Objective 4.9 Eliminate flooding problems while preserving groundwater quality through planned growth, the provision of drainage and stormwater management systems and the implementation of adopted development codes and regulations. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 4-4 Policy 4.9.1 New development shall provide water storage capacity equal to that which existed under predevelopment conditions consistent with the water management regulations and plans of the South Florida Water Management District, Broward County Environmental Protection Department, and independent drainage districts. Policy 4.9.2 New nonresidential development shall provide pre-treatment for stormwater runoff through grassy swales, wetlands filtration, ex-filtration trenches or other means consistent with the Best Management Practices of the South Florida Water Management District. Policy 4.9.3 By 2012, the City shall review its land development regulations to assess whether modifications are necessary to improve surface water quality, and adopt any such modifications. Furthermore, by 2012, the City shall undertake an assessment and work with property owners and tenants to retrofit existing industrial uses to provide pre-treatment of runoff. Policy 4.9.4 The City shall continue to participate in the National Flood Insurance Program Community Rating System and provide educational information to City residents and businesses. Objective 4.10 Prior to Plat approval, ensure that the public facilities and services necessary to meet the level of service standards established within the City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan will be available concurrent with the impacts of the development, consistent with Chapter 163.3202(g) Florida Statutes and the concurrency management policies included within Goal 1 of the Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan. Objective 4.11 Coordinate with Broward County and the City of Fort Lauderdale to address the City’s water supply and wastewater treatment needs for 2040. Policy 4.11.1 The City shall coordinate with Broward County and the City of Fort Lauderdale to ensure potable water and wastewater service is provided to all areas of the City. Objective 4.12 The City shall coordinate land use planning with the management of water source and supply plans through the Comprehensive Plan, coordination with the City’s water providers, and the South Florida Water Management District’s Lower East Coast Water Supply Plan. Policy 4.12.1 The City shall maintain a Water Supply Facilities Work Plan (Work Plan) for at least a ten (10) year planning period addressing water supply facilities necessary to serve existing and future development within the City and support other local and regional water supply plans. The Work Plan shall be incorporated wholly into the Infrastructure Element of the Comprehensive Plan. Other elements of the Comprehensive Plan shall be amended as necessary to support and be consistent with the Work Plan. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 4-5 Policy 4.12.2 Capital projects scheduled in the first five years of the ten year Work Plan shall be included in the Capital Improvements Element which is to be financially feasible. This schedule shall be updated annually as necessary to maintain consistency with the capital projects listed in the Work Plan and within 18 months following updates to the Lower East Coast Water Supply Plan, the City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Plan, or the Broward County Water Supply Plan. Policy 4.12.3 The City shall coordinate the Water Supply Facilities Work Plan with the adopted Future Land Use Map and the socio-economic data projections of the Comprehensive Plan. This coordination will occur in two ways: x Long range water supply planning to meet future service demand shall be based upon Broward County’s socio-economic data projections for the City. The City shall update its socio-economic data every seven years with the Evaluation and Appraisal Report or more frequently as needed. Coordination with the City of Fort Lauderdale and Broward County regarding their service areas will be completed as part of these updates. x Prior to issuing a building permit that increases density or intensity, the City shall continue to require a concurrency review finding that the calculated water service demand can be met by available and uncommitted facility capacity and water supply. Policy 4.12.4 The City shall coordinate with and be consistent with the South Florida Water Management District’s most current Lower East Coast (LEC) Water Supply Plan when proposing or amending the ten-year Water Supply Facilities Work Plan (Work Plan). At a minimum, this coordination shall take place within 18 months following an update to the LEC, generally done every five (5) years, and be documented in the text of the Work Plan. Policy 4.12.5 The City shall coordinate with its water suppliers through existing agreements, the Broward County Water Resources Task Force, and at an annual meeting (prior to adoption of the fiscal year budget), to collaborate on water supply planning issues such as population projections, the development of efficient, cost-effective, and technically feasible water supply sources that will supplement future demands, without causing adverse impacts to water quality, wetlands, and aquatic systems. Consideration and coordination efforts made for each major water project shall be noted in the Work Plan. Policy 4.12.6 The City shall seek to maximize the use of existing potable water facilities, when financially and technically feasible, through the implementation of conservation techniques as described in the Work Plan, including but not limited to reducing per capita water consumption rates through education, incentive programs (promoting utilization of water conservation kits, pre-rinse valves, and leak detection kits), the replacement of outdated water meters, and water conservation techniques (xeriscaping). City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 4-6 Policy 4.12.7 By 2020 the City shall continue to implement a water conservation type rate structure for the City’s retail service area. Policy 4.12.8 By 2020 the City shall continue to reduce losses in the water system by up to ten percent or less. Policy 4.12.9 The City will apply for a Water Savings Incentive Program (SIP) grant from the South Florida Water Management District to assist with the purchase and distribution of pre-rinse valves and water conservation kits. Policy 4.12.10 Reduce water demand to 119 gallons per capita per day through conservation strategies by the year 2028. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 5-1 Coastal Management Goal 5 To develop and maintain the coastal area of the City in a manner which protects human life, limits public expenditures in areas subject to destruction by natural disasters and perpetuates existing upland uses while best preserving local shoreline and tidewater resources. Objective 5.1 The City shall continue to protect, conserve or enhance remaining coastal wetlands, living marine resources, coastal barriers, and wildlife habitat. Policy 5.1.1 Continue to participate in and locally enforce all existing coastal regulatory activities of the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, Federal Emergency Management Administration, the Florida Department of Environmental Regulation and Natural Resources, South Florida Water Management District, Broward County Office of Natural Resource Protection and the Broward County Water Management Division. Policy 5.1.2 Continue to require building construction elevations consistent with minimum Federal Flood Insurance regulations. Policy 5.1.3 Continue to require building construction techniques in accord with the Florida Building Code. Policy 5.1.4 The City shall continue to implement Section 24-117 of the adopted Land Development Code, entitled, “Natural Resources Overlay Zone” and the City’s adopted Tree Preservation Ordinance and continue to coordinate with the South Florida Water Management District and Broward County Department of Natural Resource Protection during review of development and/or redevelopment in order to limit the cumulative impacts of development and redevelopment on wetlands, water quality, living marine resources and wildlife habitats. Objective 5.2 The City shall continue to implement a comprehensive local program in conjunction with the Broward County Environmental Protection Department to improve water quality in the City’s canals and estuaries. Policy 5.2.1 The City shall continue to implement land development regulations to require that all new drainage systems which discharge into coastal waterbodies include pollution control devices and comply with the standards of the Broward County Environmental Protection. Policy 5.2.2 The City shall evaluate the feasibility of priority improvement costs and cost- effectiveness of retrofitting existing canal or lake drainage systems with pollution control devices. Policy 5.2.3 The City shall continue to utilize adopted local building threshold criteria such that major modifications to existing uses conform to local and regional storm City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 5-2 drainage requirements. Redevelopment within identified floodplains will be required to address flooding problems. Policy 5.2.4 In conjunction with local beautification efforts, establish a long term program to revegetate coastal public property with drought tolerant native vegetation. Policy 5.2.5 The City shall implement a regular maintenance program on storm drainage systems which outfall into the City’s canals and estuaries. Policy 5.2.6 The City will continue to participate in Broward County’s Joint Municipal National Pollution Discharge Elimination Systems (NPDES) Permit and coordinate water quality efforts with the adjacent jurisdictions of Fort Lauderdale, Wilton Manors and Broward County. Policy 5.2.7 Once the Florida Department of Environmental Protection establishes Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) for the Middle River, the City will coordinate with other stakeholders (Broward County, cities of Wilton Manors, Lauderdale Lakes, and Fort Lauderdale, and the Florida Department of Transportation) on creation of a Basin Management Plan. Objective 5.3 The City shall maintain existing facilities and evaluate and provide for the implementation of new programs to improve the overall condition of shoreline public recreation facilities in the City’s coastal area. Policy 5.3.1 The City shall maintain an annual maintenance program for the City’s boat launching facility which includes improved signage, vehicle parking areas, picnic areas and exotic vegetation replacement. Policy 5.3.2 By 2010 improve code enforcement practices throughout the entire City. Policy 5.3.3 By 2015 develop a Plan for inventorying other publicly owned shoreline properties and providing recommendation for improvements. Objective 5.4 Restrict any facility siting or expansion/improvement of existing utilities in shoreline areas except for those necessary to serve existing development or improve environmental quality. Policy 5.4.1 In the coastal area of the City provide funding for utility and road maintenance primarily with respect to existing needs. Restrict nonrecreational capital improvements to those necessary to maintain adopted level of service standards for existing and planned designated uses or to improve local environmental quality. Objective 5.5 The City shall continue to coordinate with the implementation of the County’s Emergency Preparedness Plan and shall strive to maintain or reduce hurricane evacuation times. Policy 5.5.1 On an annual basis schedule at least one training session to maintain local emergency services personnel familiarity with Broward County’s adopted City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 5-3 Emergency Preparedness Plan. Review with County Emergency preparedness personnel the designation of controlled intersections or evacuation routes along City arterials and near designated evacuation centers. Policy 5.5.2 Participate in all countywide emergency preparedness preparation and practice sessions. Policy 5.5.3 The City shall annually update a database and action plan for notifying and evacuation transit dependents from the City’s mobile home or trailer parks. Policy 5.5.4 When reviewing applications for new development the City shall discourage proposed development which would increase the adopted residential densities along evacuation routes (Commercial Boulevard and Oakland Park Boulevard). Policy 5.5.5 The City shall coordinate with Broward County and the South Florida Regional Planning Council to maintain hurricane evacuation times. Evacuation Route Storm Category Evacuation Time Commercial Boulevard Category 1, 2 Category 3 Category 4,5 7.31 Hours 7.31 Hours 9.30 Hours Oakland Park Boulevard Category 1, 2 Category 3 Category 4,5 8.81 Hours 8.81 Hours 9.15 Hours Policy 5.5.6 The City shall support the efforts of Broward County and the South Florida Regional Planning Council to increase the capacities of designated hurricane shelters. Policy 5.5.7 By July 1, 2008, as required by state law, the City shall revise its Future Land Use and Coastal Management Elements to incorporate the new definition of coastal high-hazard area and modification of the Future Land Use Map to depict the coastal high-hazard area. (Note: Objective 5.6 and its policies are the only portions of this element affected by water supply amendments so only this objective and its policies are shown.) Objective 5.6 Provide for urban services consistent with the level of service standards of each Comprehensive Plan Element. Policy 5.6.1 The City will continue to maintain existing interlocal agreements for provision of potable water and wastewater collection with the City of Fort Lauderdale and Broward County. Policy 5.6.2 Adequately fund continued local maintenance and operation needs with respect to storm drainage, roadway surfacing and parks and recreation. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 5-4 Policy 5.6.3 Support and, where applicable, participate in water supply projects identified by the City of Fort Lauderdale, Broward County and the South Florida Water Management District to ensure adequate potable water for future development. Objective 5.7 Implement the post disaster redevelopment plan of the City. The measure of achievement shall be the annual review/update of the plan and plan implementation success in times of disaster. Policy 5.7.1 The coastal area of the City is that area defined by Chapter 380.24 F.S. which are adjacent to, or includes, waters of the state. Policy 5.7.2 The physical post disaster redevelopment plan for the City is to rebuild in the same manner which exists consistent with the adopted Future Land Use Map. Policy 5.7.3 Structures which are damaged in excess of fifty (50%) percent of their current replacement value shall be required to be rebuilt to meet current land development regulations and modified in accordance with the most recent Florida Building Code requirements. Policy 5.7.4 The City shall assess post disaster redevelopment opportunities to include acquisition of land for public purposes, if financially feasible. Policy 5.7.5 Structures existing within the City which suffer recurring damage (damage in excess of 50% of cost of construction more) shall be modified in accordance with the most recent Florida Building Code requirements and all current federal, state and local regulations. Policy 5.7.6 Repair and Clean Up. In planning post-disaster redevelopment activities, factors to be considered in order to protect the public health and safety shall include: 1. Repairs to potable water, wastewater and power facilities. 2. Removal of debris. 3. Stabilization or removal of structures in a perilous condition. 4. Minimal repairs to make structures habitable. Policy 5.7.7 The short term recovery measures of repair and cleanup activities identified in Policies 5.7.5 and 5.7.6 shall receive first priority in determining the appropriateness of emergency building permits. Long term redevelopment activities shall be postponed until the Recovery Task Force has coordinated immediate repair and clean-up operations. Policy 5.7.8 Permitting Decision Priorities. Immediate recovery actions needed to protect the public health and safety shall take priority in permitting decisions following hurricane storm events or natural disasters. Such priority actions will include, but not be limited to: debris removal; roadway and infrastructure repair; water use restrictions, if necessary; access restrictions, if required to protect lives or property, and other similar activities needed to assure the safe movement of City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 5-5 people, goods and supplies within the impacted area. Long term repair or recovery actions, such as relocating infrastructure, rebuilding of damaged structures and the like, will be distinguished from the short-term actions herein described. Policy 5.7.9 The applicable provisions of the Florida Building Code, as may be amended from time to time, relating to hurricane precautions, inspections and permitting are hereby adopted by reference. Policy 5.7.10 Notwithstanding the preceding policies, no regulation, permitting procedure or post disaster redevelopment planning shall result in a taking or limitation of private property inconsistent with the provisions of the Private Property Rights Protection Act, Chapter 95-181, Laws of Florida. Policy 5.7.11 The City recognizes that certain vested developments rights may exist for property within the City. The City will consider such claims after petition is made to the City and after due public hearings the City Commission may grant approval to the request. Policy 5.7.12 The City will coordinate with Broward County in the preparation and implementation of the Countywide Emergency Preparedness Plan. The City shall maintain a Post Disaster Redevelopment Plan including all or portions of Broward County’s Plan. Objective 5.8 The City shall protect and preserve the identified historically significant structures and properties located in the City’s coastal area as depicted on the Future Land Use Map Series from potential impacts caused by development and/or redevelopment activities. Policy 5.8.1 The City’s land development regulations shall continue to require developers to submit documentation as to historic structures which may potentially be impacted by new development and/or redevelopment activities as part of submittal requirements for development permit approval for properties located in the coastal area of the City. Policy 5.8.2 The City shall annually review the Florida Master File of Historic Places and coordinate with the City’s historic committee to refine the inventory of historic properties located in the City and amend the Future Land Use Map Series, as necessary to indicate additional identified historic structures. Policy 5.8.3 Upon the identification of potential impacts to potentially historically significant structures, the City shall evaluate the historical significance of impacted structures, and take necessary measures as deemed appropriate by the City Commission, to protect historically significant structures in order to minimize the impacts of new development and/or redevelopment within the City’s Coastal Area. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 6-1 Conservation Goal 6 The development and maintenance of a high quality natural environment based on the preservation, improvement and wise use of local existing open space sites, natural resources areas/habitats wetlands and conservation areas. Objective 6.1 Through the two planning horizons of 2012 and 2030, meet or exceed minimum air quality standards of the Broward County Environmental Protection Department for recognized air pollutants. Policy 6.1.1 Through implementation of the land development regulations the City shall continue to require compliance with the air quality monitoring and pollution control programs of the Broward County Environmental Protection Department. Policy 6.1.3 Through administrative policies the City shall continue to require the installation of pollution control devices on all existing and proposed major point sources of air pollution which are directly or indirectly funded by the City where studies indicate an exceedance or projected exceedance of the air quality standards of the Broward County Environmental Protection Department. Policy 6.1.4 The City shall continue to implement land development regulations to require the use of mulching, spraying and grassing during land development activities to minimize air pollution. Policy 6.1.5 The City shall continue to implement land development regulations to require demolition and renovation projects to comply with all local, county, state and federal asbestos regulations. Policy 6.1.6 The City shall cooperate with the Broward County Environmental Protection Department and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection to maintain acceptable air quality standards. Objective 6.2 Through the two planning horizons of 2012 and 2030, maintain local surface and groundwater quality equal to or better than existing levels for recognized pollutants as established by the Broward County Environmental Protection Department. Policy 6.2.1 Although currently there are no wellfield protection zones within its jurisdiction, the City shall continue to implement land development regulations to comply with Broward County wellfield protection ordinance to account for new wells that may be permitted in the future. Amendments to the Future Land Use Plan proposing land use categories which permit industrial uses shall be discouraged, to the greatest extent feasible, within wellfield protection zones of influence as identified by the Potable Water Supply Wellfield Protection Ordinance of Broward County. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 6-2 Policy 6.2.2 The City shall continue to enforce land development regulations consistent with the water quality regulatory and permit programs of Broward County and the South Florida Water Management District. Policy 6.2.3 Locally promote and participate in periodic area wide waterway clean-up programs. Policy 6.2.4 The City shall continue to implement land development regulations in compliance with the requirements of the Broward County Environmental Protection Department in regulating and discarding of hazardous wastes for households, small businesses and low-volume users. Policy 6.2.5 New septic tanks shall only be permitted when the Florida Department of Health determines they are consistent with Broward County’s Water and Septic Tank Ordinance and with the requirements of the Florida Administrative Code. Policy 6.2.6 Lakes shall be required to be constructed with vegetated shallow water habitat in accordance with the regulations of applicable government agencies. Objective 6.3 The City shall continue to preserve and protect the City’s existing open space sites, natural resource areas/habitats, wetlands and conservation areas. Policy 6.3.1 The City shall continue to implement land development regulations that prevent clear cutting, protect native vegetative communities and encourage the replacement of all stands of non-native, exotic vegetation such as Australian Pine, Brazilian Pepper, and Melaleuca trees. Policy 6.3.2 Consider using drought tolerant native vegetation species for local reforestation and/or beautification efforts in City parks and other City rights-of- way. Place particular emphasis on creating or improving understory conditions in those areas where none currently exist. Policy 6.3.3 The City shall continue to implement a tree protection ordinance which also protects native vegetative communities. Policy 6.3.4 By 2012, develop a master plan for improving and providing additional areas suitable for wildlife and marine habitats in existing City parks and public land holdings. Policy 6.3.5 The City shall continue to implement land development regulations requiring the identification of the potential impacts on flora, fauna, air quality, and water quantity and quality with applications for development and/or redevelopment which may potentially impact existing native wildlife habitat. During the development review process the City shall Coordinate with the Broward County Environmental Protection Department to prohibit activities known to adversely affect the survival of endangered and threatened wildlife unless City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 6-3 mitigation activities are implemented consistent with Objective 9.05.00 (Protection of Wetlands) of Broward County’s Comprehensive Plan. Policy 6.3.6 The City shall continue to coordinate activity with Broward County relative to the continued conservation and use of John Easterlin Park. Policy 6.3.7 The City shall continue to protect and conserve the natural functions of existing soils, wildlife habitats, canals, lakes, rivers and marine habitats during the review of applications for new development and/or redevelopment through the implementation of adopted land development regulations consistent with Broward County’s Comprehensive Plan which require at a minimum that: a) Site plans for new development identify the location and extent of wetlands located on the property; b) Site plans provide measures to assure that normal flows and quality of water will be provided to maintain wetlands after development; c) Where alteration of wetlands is necessary in order to allow reasonable use of property, either the restoration of disturbed wetlands will be provided or additional wetlands will be created to mitigate any wetlands destruction; d) Proposed developments comply with Broward County’s wellfield protection program; e) All endangered and threatened plant and animal populations are protected; f) All habitats of significant value to existing populations of endangered and threatened species are preserved; g) All nuisance vegetation (i.e. Brazilian Pepper, Australian Pine, and Melaleuca) is removed by the developer at the time of development or redevelopment of a site; h) All native woody vegetation of a significant size is preserved or replaced; and i) A written environmental assessment is prepared for all proposed development and land use amendments considered by the City Commission and/or City development review boards that are currently or were previously undeveloped with urban uses. The assessment shall include, at a minimum, impacts on flora, fauna, air quality, and water quantity and quality. Policy 6.3.9 Encourage the provision and maintenance of a buffer zone of native upland (i.e. transitional) vegetation and littoral zones in and around wetland and retention areas which are constructed or preserved on new development sites. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 6-4 Policy 6.3.10 Encourage the restoration of native vegetation along public waterways. Policy 6.3.11 Development orders and permits for development and redevelopment activities shall be issued only if the conservation of wildlife and natural systems is ensured consistent with goals, objectives, and policies of this Comprehensive Plan. Policy 6.3.12 The City shall coordinate review of proposed wetlands mitigation activities with the Broward County Environmental Protection Department to insure that Broward County’s “Wetlands Benefit Index” is utilized as one basis for determining the scope of needed mitigation. Policy 6.3.13 The City shall strive to remove all nuisance exotic vegetation from publicly owned areas by 2009 by adopting and funding on-going management efforts. Special attention will be given to eliminating Brazilian Pepper from shoreline areas. Policy 6.3.14 By 2010, the City shall complete a survey of existing wildlife habitat areas and develop appropriate policies and land development regulations that encourage the provision of additional wildlife habitat areas on both publicly and privately owned property. Policy 6.3.15 The proposed development of any sites designated as conservation that are zoned and used as open space and/or conservation shall be strongly discouraged. (Note: Objective 6.4 and its policies are the only portions of this element affected by the water supply amendments so only these are shown below.) Objective 6.4 Promote water conservation by advocating reduced consumption and encouraging development and redevelopment to include xeriscape and other water conservation techniques in its design. Policy 6.4.1 The City shall continue to utilize standardized procedures to notify City residents of voluntary and mandatory (when requested by the South Florida Water Management District) water conservation practices during drought periods. Policy 6.4.2 The City shall distribute information on water conservation techniques through water service bills and at City-owned civic locations such as City Hall and the Public Works Department. Policy 6.4.3 The City shall continue to participate in the National “Xeriscape” Council and continue to plant drought tolerant species, where feasible. Policy 6.4.4 The City shall continue to encourage green building in the Federal Highway Mixed Use Business and Entertainment Overlay District, and shall consider City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 6-5 including similar incentives for green building in other redeveloping areas of the City. Policy 6.4.5 The City shall continue to implement Section 24-117 of the adopted Land Development Code, entitled, “Natural Resources Overlay Zone” and the City’s adopted Tree Preservation Ordinance and continue to coordinate with the South Florida Water Management District and Broward County Environmental Protection Department during review of development and/or redevelopment in order to limit the cumulative impacts of development and redevelopment on wetlands, water quality, living marine resources and wildlife habitats. Policy 6.4.6 The City shall continue to implement the water conservation techniques identified in the Water Supply Facilities Work Plan including but not limited to reducing per capita water consumption rates through education, incentive programs (promoting utilization of water conservation kits, pre-rinse valves, leak detection kits, and the replacement of outdated water meters), and water conservation techniques (xeriscaping). Policy 6.4.7 The City will continue to apply for a Water Savings Incentive Program (SIP) grant from the South Florida Water Management District to assist with the purchase and distribution of pre-rinse valves and water conservation kits. Objective 6.5 The City shall continue to implement a comprehensive local program in conjunction with the Broward County Environmental Protection Department to improve water quality in the City’s canals and estuaries. Policy 6.5.1 The City shall continue to implement land development regulations to require that all new drainage systems which discharge into coastal waterbodies include pollution control devices and comply with the standards of the Broward County Environmental Protection Department. Policy 6.5.2 The City shall evaluate the feasibility of priority improvement costs and cost- effectiveness of retrofitting existing canal or lake drainage systems with pollution control devices. Policy 6.5.3 The City shall continue to utilize adopted local building threshold criteria such that major modifications to existing uses conform to local and regional storm drainage requirements. Redevelopment within identified floodplains will be required to address flooding problems. Policy 6.5.4 In conjunction with local beautification efforts, establish a long term program to revegetate riparian zone vegetation on publicly owned waterbodies. Policy 6.5.5 The City shall implement a regular maintenance program on storm drainage systems which outfall into the City’s canals and estuaries. Policy 6.5.6 The City will continue to participate in Broward County’s Joint Municipal National Pollution Discharge Elimination Systems (NPDES) Permit and participate in Broward County’s Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) in order City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 6-6 to coordinate water quality efforts with the adjacent jurisdictions of Fort Lauderdale, Wilton Manors and Broward County. Policy 6.5.7 Once the Florida Department of Environmental Protection establishes Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) for the Middle River, the City will coordinate with other stakeholders (Broward County, cities of Wilton Manors, Lauderdale Lakes, and Fort Lauderdale, and the Florida Department of Transportation) on creation of a Basin Management Plan. Objective 6.6 Through 2030, strive to meet or exceed Kyoto Protocol targets for reducing global warming pollution by taking actions in City operations and providing education and support to the Oakland Park community. Policy 6.6.1 By 2012, the City shall consider inventorying global warming emissions in City operations, set target reductions and create an action plan. Policy 6.6.2 By 2012, the City shall evaluate and amend the land development regulations to address energy efficiency and sustainable building practices, such as the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED program. Policy 6.6.3 By 2009, the City shall begin retrofitting existing City-owned and operated facilities with energy efficient lighting and climate controls, and shall encourage employees to conserve energy. Policy 6.6.4 During fleet assessments, the City shall consider increasing average fuel efficiency and alternate sources, where feasible. Policy 6.6.5 By 2030, the City shall evaluate opportunities to increase pump efficiency in water and wastewater systems. Policy 6.6.6 The City shall consider providing educational materials to residents and businesses through existing outreach sources, such as the City’s website and community newsletters. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 7-1 Recreation and Open Space Goal 7 Provide a desirable and affordable level of public recreation and open space and encourage the provision of private recreation and open space. Objective 7.1 Provide a diversified and balanced parks and recreation system of at least three (3) acres per 1,000 population for local parks. Policy 7.1.1 The City shall continue to own/lease, maintain and provide to the public neighborhood and community parks and recreation facilities. Policy 7.1.2 The City’s overall level of service standard for parks and recreational facilities will remain at three (3) acres per 1,000 population, with two (2) acres per 1,000 population provided by neighborhood parks or mini-parks and one acre per 1,000 population provided by community parks. By 2030, the City desires to meet its overall level of service standard through the provision of a majority of land-based facilities. Policy 7.1.3 By 2012, the City will complete a strategic assessment of its parks and recreational facilities to assess the condition of existing facilities and identify improvements necessary to support the existing and future population. This assessment shall include a study of the City’s neighborhoods to determine the need for, potential locations of, and desired amenities to be included at neighborhood parks. Policy 7.1.4 The City may maintain municipal leasehold on a community swimming pool during the three (3) months of expected peak use. Policy 7.1.5 The City shall continue to seek the cooperation of school board officials in order to make school facilities available for selected municipal recreation programs. Policy 7.1.6 The City will lobby County, State and Federal agencies for the provision of regional facilities favorable to Oakland Park. Policy 7.1.7 By 2012, the City shall develop a plan to encourage the provision of pedestrian and bicycle facilities for both transportation and recreation purposes in all areas of the City. Policy 7.1.8 By 2014, the City shall evaluate and if possible budget for first phase implementation of the bicycle and pedestrian facilities plan. Budgeting shall be accomplished by revision of the capital improvements element. Policy 7.1.9 The City shall continue to collect park land acquisition fees for residential developments to ensure that adequate park and recreation facilities are provided. Objective 7.2 The City shall continue to implement land development code provisions to ensure that open space in new development is provided and that City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 7-2 redevelopment maintains or increases parks/recreation, public and open space areas. Policy 7.2.1 The City will continue to enforce the landscaping code and other provisions in the land development code to ensure compliance with the open space standards set forth in the relevant policies of the land use element and this element. Policy 7.2.2 The City will continue to implement the provisions of the Downtown Mixed Use District that encourage open plazas. Policy 7.2.3 The City shall continue to implement the open space and park and recreation improvements identified in the adopted CRA Master Plan. Policy 7.2.4 The proposed development of any sites designated as park/recreation that are zoned and used as open space shall be strongly discouraged. Objective 7.3 All City park facilities shall remain open to the public during daylight hours. Policy 7.3.1 The City shall operate its park and recreational facilities in such a manner that the public has access to the grounds during daylight hours including boat and pedestrian access to the North Fork of the Middle River at City Boat Ramp Park. Objective 7.4 The City shall maintain existing recreational facilities and programs and evaluate opportunities for new facilities and programs. Policy 7.4.1 By 2010, the City shall complete an inventory of waterfront areas and provide recommendations for possible improvements to create publicly owned water- based recreation areas. Policy 7.4.2 By 2015, the City shall complete an inventory of park and recreation facilities that includes an assessment of the parking demand and recommends improvements to these facilities. Policy 7.4.3 By 2012, the City shall evaluate the feasibility of establishing a performing arts center. Policy 7.4.4 The City shall continue to provide a variety of recreational programs for residents of all ages. Policy 7.4.5 The City shall promote the creation of an “Art in Public Places” program. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 8-1 Intergovernmental Coordination Goal 8 To maintain a cooperative and effective local environment of communication and participation with other governments and government agencies in the overall best interest of City residents and businesses. Objective 8.1 To provide for the exchange of any necessary support information and guidance to other government agencies regarding the City's Comprehensive Plan or other planning or regulatory efforts. Policy 8.1.1 The City shall continue to exchange notifications and documentation and, where appropriate, consider the comments of Fort Lauderdale, Wilton Manors, Lauderdale Lakes, Tamarac, Pompano Beach and county, regional or state planning agencies with regard to local comprehensive planning. Policy 8.1.2 The City shall continue to support and participate in all environmental agency regulatory programs. Policy 8.1.3 The City shall continue to implement land development regulations which require notification to the Broward County Environmental Protection Department (EPD) of businesses that utilize potential groundwater contaminants at the time of application submittal for business occupational licenses. Policy 8.1.4 The City will continue to coordinate with the Broward County Urban Planning and Redevelopment Department and/or directly with the Broward County School District (as may be necessary) to monitor the progress of the Broward County Public Schools Facilities Element of the Broward County Comprehensive Plan in order to identify and address potential impacts to the City of Oakland Park. Within one year of Broward County’s adoption of a Public Schools Facilities Element, and in accordance with Florida Statutes, the City shall review the Element and incorporate all portions deemed appropriate by the City Commission into this Comprehensive Plan in order to maintain consistency with the Broward County Comprehensive Plan. Policy 8.1.5 Per the adopted Interlocal Agreement and as outlined in an adopted Public Schools Facility Element, the City will continue to coordinate at the staff level with the Broward County School District on any major rezoning, replatting, acquisition of adjacent open space, or change in land use within the City which may affect the safety of public school students, enhance public education or alter the City's existing or anticipated future needs for public schools facilities. Policy 8.1.6 The City Development Services Department will continue to provide to the County, quarterly reports for use in the preparation of population estimates and projections to be used in transportation, School District and other Countywide planning activities pursuant to the reporting requirements contained within the Broward County Administrative Rules Document. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 8-2 Policy 8.1.7 The City shall continue to coordinate with EPD as necessary to comply with the requirements of the Broward County Joint Municipal National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permit. Policy 8.1.8 The City will review Special District Facility Reports prepared by the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD) and the Broward County Solid Waste Disposal District (BCSWDD), pursuant to Chapter 189.415 F.S. and identify potential conflicts with the City's adopted Comprehensive Plan. Policy 8.1.9 The City will coordinate with the governing boards of the SFWMD and BCSWDD in order to resolve issues identified in Policy 8.1.8. Policy 8.1.10 The City of Oakland Park shall continue to coordinate with the Broward Alliance in order to support the continued economic development of Broward County and the City of Oakland Park. Policy 8.1.11 The City shall continue to implement a program to coordinate water quality efforts for the North Fork of the Middle River and the Almar Canal with the adjacent jurisdictions of Fort Lauderdale, Wilton Manors and Broward County. Policy 8.1.12 The City, through its membership on the Broward County Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO), will urge the responsible State and County implementing agencies to plan their roadway and transit systems to achieve and maintain the Level of Services as outlined in the Transportation Element policies. Policy 8.1.13 The City will coordinate with existing and future service providers which have no regulatory authority over the use of land within the City including, but not limited to, the FDOT, the Broward County School District, the Broward County Solid Waste Disposal District and the South Florida Water Management District to develop recommendations that address ways to improve existing and future coordination of the City's concurrency management methodologies and systems and to coordinate the establishment or amendment of level of service standards. Policy 8.1.14 The City shall pursue and support the establishment of joint planning areas with adjacent municipalities, Broward County and agencies or other governmental units providing services including but not limited to the maintenance of roadway, drainage, public schools, solid waste and parks and recreation facilities in order to enhance, improve or increase the efficiency with which these facilities are currently provided. Policy 8.1.15 "Joint Planning Areas" (JPAs) described in Policy 8.1.14 shall be established through formal agreements among the necessary governmental bodies in order to address intergovernmental coordination activities related to population projections as well as Policies 8.4.7 and 8.4.8 relating to locally unwanted land uses. JPAs shall include, but not be limited to, as many of the following planning considerations as possible: City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 8-3 i Cooperative planning and review of land development activities within the areas covered by an agreement; i Specification of service delivery; i Funding and cost sharing issues with joint planning areas; and i Enforcement/Implementation. Policy 8.1.16 The City will coordinate, as necessary, with the Broward County Brownfields Redevelopment Task Force, established to survey, assess and select any potentially contaminated sites as may be identified by the site owner. Policy 8.1.17 If a site is deemed to be potentially-contaminated, then the City shall coordinate with the Broward County Brownfields Redevelopment Task Force to have the site designated as an official 'brownfields' site and made eligible to become part of the County's remediation and redevelopment program after all site specific criteria have been addressed and complied with. Policy 8.1.18 The City and its Community Redevelopment Agency shall coordinate with Broward County in providing requested information necessary to obtain funds through the Redevelopment Capital Program (RCP) and shall meet the requirements of the RCP interlocal agreement(s). Policy 8.1.19 The City shall coordinate with Broward County, the South Florida Regional Planning Council, and other agencies or organizations as appropriate, in assessing existing needs and making recommendations to promote the provision and retention of affordable and workforce housing. Policy 8.1.20 The City shall coordinate the establishment of level of service standards for Public School Facilities and annual updates to the District Educational Facilities Plan with the School Board Per the adopted Interlocal Agreement. Objective 8.2 The City shall continue to coordinate with the appropriate jurisdictions of Fort Lauderdale, Broward County, Wilton Manors, Tamarac, Lauderdale Lakes and Pompano Beach to provide for cooperative analysis and decision making inputs to boundary, land use, service area modifications, or project development impacts with extra-territorial significance. Policy 8.2.1 The City shall continue to support the South Florida Regional Planning Council's informal process of conflict mediation regarding land use, zoning, or boundary disagreements with adjacent jurisdictions. If the City identifies an issue or conflict with the planning and permitting activities of an adjacent municipality, then the City shall resolve any identified impacts or conflicts through the Council's mediation process when agreed to by all parties. Policy 8.2.2 The City shall continue to consider entering into a contractual agreement with adjacent jurisdictions and Broward County regarding future annexation plans for unincorporated areas near the City's borders. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 8-4 Policy 8.2.3 The City shall continue to consider the relationship of proposed development in the City with the existing Comprehensive Plans of adjacent Fort Lauderdale, Wilton Manors, Lauderdale Lakes, Tamarac, Pompano Beach and Broward County prior to making a final decision on land use matters near the City boundaries. Policy 8.2.4 The City shall continue to participate in the periodic planning workshops coordinated by Broward County and the South Florida Regional Planning Council to ensure that Comprehensive Plan implementation is coordinated with the plans of adjacent municipalities, other governmental units and other agencies providing service, within, adjacent to, or benefiting the City of Oakland Park. Policy 8.2.5 If deemed appropriate by the City Commission, the City will consider amendments to its Comprehensive Plan to address issues affecting adjacent local governments, the County, the Region and/or the State identified through coordination with these entities. (Note: Objective 8.3 and its policies are the only portions of this element affected by the water supply amendments so only these are shown below.) Objective 8.3 The City shall continue to review local level of service (LOS) standards for sanitary sewer, potable water and solid waste for consistency with those of outside providers of City infrastructure services such as Fort Lauderdale and Broward County and amend the City's adopted LOS standards as necessary to ensure consistency and facilitate execution and renewal of interlocal agreements and service contracts, as deemed appropriate by the City Commission. Policy 8.3.1 When negotiating or renewing interlocal service agreements with Fort Lauderdale and/or Broward County, the City shall provide for contractual recognition of adopted local level of service standards. Policy 8.3.2 The City shall review the level of service standards subsequently adopted by other government service providers (Fort Lauderdale and Broward County) to the City through continued monitoring of the actions of the Broward County Planning Council and Board of County Commissioners with respect to the amendment of adjacent jurisdictional Comprehensive Plans. To identify consistency with local level of service standards, the City will annually contact all service providers to obtain current information, and evaluate if future modifications to either the service agreements or level of service standards should be included in subsequent Comprehensive Plan amendments. Policy 8.3.5 The City shall continue to coordinate with the SFWMD and the City’s potable water providers, Broward County and the City of Fort Lauderdale, in implementing the regional water supply plan as it applies to the City of Oakland Park, including identified traditional and alternate water supply projects. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 8-5 Policy 8.3.6 The City will work with Broward County on establishing emergency water main interconnections within their franchise area. Policy 8.3.7 As a means to achieve the adopted level of service for potable water, the City will coordinate with Broward County, the City of Fort Lauderdale and the South Florida Water Management District on improving water conservation practices. Water conservation best practices will also be discussed during the annual meetings with the City’s water suppliers. Policy 8.3.8 To continue to assist commercial and residential landowners with water conservation, the City will apply for a Water Savings Incentive Program (SIP) grant from the South Florida Water Management District to assist in the purchase and distribution of pre-rinse valves and water conservation kits. Goal 8 To maintain a cooperative and effective local environment of communication and participation with other governments and government agencies in the overall best interest of City residents and businesses. Objective 8.4 The City shall support and help coordinate the establishment and implementation of joint processes for collaborative planning and decision making on population projections, public school siting, the location of public facilities subject to concurrency and the siting of facilities with countywide significance. Policy 8.4.1 The City will notify Fort Lauderdale and Broward County of proposed Comprehensive Plan Amendments which may affect the City's anticipated needs for sanitary sewer or potable water service. Policy 8.4.2 The City will continue to provide information annually relating to the location and timing of anticipated capital improvement projects contained within the City's adopted Five Year Schedule of Capital Improvements to Broward County and the City of Fort Lauderdale for the purpose of achieving a coordination of efforts relating to the maintenance and/or extension of existing and location of new public facilities subject to concurrency. Policy 8.4.3 During review of the City's Five Year Schedule of Capital Improvements, the City will consider the schedules of adjacent municipalities and other providers of public facilities within, adjacent to, or benefiting the City in order to identify the potential for a coordination of efforts relating to the maintenance and extension of existing and location of new public facilities subject to concurrency. Policy 8.4.4 The City will pursue joint funding opportunities with the SFWMD, FDEP, BCEPD, Broward County, FDOT, and other public/private agencies or jurisdictions to establish joint processes and collaborative planning efforts, when feasible, to complete capital improvements. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 8-6 Policy 8.4.5 The City will consider amendment of its Comprehensive Plan and land development regulations based upon the recommendations contained within the adopted Broward County Local Mitigation Strategy. Policy 8.4.6 The City will continue to attend the meetings of the Hazard Mitigation Task Force, as necessary, to coordinate with the implementation and update of Local Mitigation Strategies. Policy 8.4.7 The City will coordinate with the Broward County Planning Council, the South Florida Regional Planning Council, appropriate Agencies or ad hoc committees, in the development, review and recommendation of efficient countywide guidelines to coordinate the identification and location of facilities with countywide significance which may be locally unwanted land uses. Policy 8.4.8 Upon identification of uniform countywide guidelines for the identification and location of facilities with countywide significance pursuant to Policy 8.4.7, the City will conduct a review of its locational standards to determine whether conflicts exist between its regulations and the regulations of other jurisdictions, what can be done to resolve any conflicts identified, and any improvements in the effectiveness or efficiency to be gained through the countywide approach to locational standards that would be more uniform in their application. Objective 8.5 The City shall continue to coordinate with the implementation of the County’s Emergency Preparedness Plan and shall strive to maintain or reduce hurricane evacuation times. Policy 8.5.1 On an annual basis participate in at least one (1) training session to maintain local emergency services personnel familiarity with Broward County’s adopted Emergency Preparedness Plan. Review with County Emergency preparedness personnel the designation of controlled intersections or evacuation routes along City arterials and near designated evacuation centers. Policy 8.5.2 Participate in all countywide emergency preparedness preparation and practice sessions. Policy 8.5.3 The City shall support the efforts of Broward County and the South Florida Regional Planning Council to increase the capacities of designated hurricane shelters. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 9-7 Capital Improvements Goal 9 To ensure the orderly and efficient provision of all public services and facilities necessary to serve existing and future local population needs. Objective 9.1 Retain a comprehensive and coordinated funding strategy for the implementation of existing or anticipated capital improvement needs identified in the adopted Capital Improvement Element, the Local Comprehensive Plan or through other local planning efforts. Policy 9.1.1 The City shall continue to utilize the local capital project review criteria which, at a minimum, objectively prioritizes projects on the basis of consistency with local comprehensive planning activities, cost feasibility and effectiveness, relative magnitude and term of need, intergovernmental commitments, the ability to take advantage of other jurisdictional capital improvements and overall budget impacts. Policy 9.1.2 The City shall continue to recognize that capital expenditures necessary to maintain or improve existing facilities take precedent over expansion or anticipated future facility needs. Policy 9.1.3 On an annual basis the City shall monitor, evaluate, and amend the Capital Improvements Element to incorporate the City’s Capital Improvement Program in conjunction with annual budget deliberations and adoption. Policy 9.1.4 The City shall continue to utilize budget review procedures which recognize the need and utilize priority criteria to fund capital improvement needs of the various Comprehensive Plan Elements. Policy 9.1.5 Subdivision regulations shall provide for both the timely completion and regular maintenance of all required capital improvements and amenities. Objective 9.2 The City shall continue to implement a Concurrency Management System that ensures development or redevelopment proposals are approved consistent with the programmed provision of additional services at the adopted level of service standards and meets existing and future facility needs. Policy 9.2.1 The City shall continue to review development proposals cognizant of the City’s adopted level of service standards, existing levels of service and where appropriate, the timeframe for implementation of additional facility improvements. Policy 9.2.2 The approval of proposed development or redevelopment projects shall be conditioned on the basis of project related service needs being concurrently available at the adopted level of service standards specified in Policy 9.2.4. Transportation facilities needed to serve development or redevelopment projects shall be in place or under construction within three (3) years after the building permit, or functional equivalent, is approved. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 9-8 Policy 9.2.3 Subject to Policy 9.2.2., the City shall allow for phasing of development related infrastructure improvements concurrently with project impacts on public facilities. Policy 9.2.4 The Level of Service (LOS) standards for capital facilities shall be: i For sanitary sewer - 150 gallons per day per resident; i For potable water - 119 gallons per day per resident; i For fire flow - as required by the Fire Marshall; i For solid waste - 8.0 pounds per capita per day with bi-weekly pickup; i For drainage (Roadway Crown) - 10 year, 3 day storm; i For drainage (Finished Floor) - Floor elevation above 100 year, 3 day storm; finished floor shall be no lower than the highest of: 1. One (1) foot above the FEMA Flood Insurance Rate Base Flood Elevation; or 2. The 100-year flood elevation as determined by the Broward County 100-year Flood Criteria Map; or 3. Twelve (12) inches above the adjacent road crown for residential development and six (6) inches above the adjacent road crown for nonresidential development. i For parks and recreation facilities – three (3) acres per 1,000 residents, with two (2) acres per 1,000 population provided by neighborhood parks or mini-parks and one (1) acre per 1,000 population provided by community parks; and i For transportation facilities: o I-95 (a SIS corridor) - LOS E; o Cypress Creek Road from I-95 to Andrews Avenue and Andrews Avenue from Cypress Creek Road to the Tri-Rail station entrance (a SIS connector) - LOS D; o As part of the Broward County Central District using transit oriented concurrency – coordinate with the county to achieve headways of 30 minutes or less on 80% of routes (non-contract BCT routes), establish at least one neighborhood transit center, and establish at least two additional community bus routes, increase bus shelters by 30%, and maintain the peak hour two-way maximum service volumes on arterial roads as listed below: ƒ Two-lane arterials 2,555 ƒ Four-lane arterials 5,442 ƒ Six-lane arterials 8,190 ƒ Eight-lane arterials 10,605; and o For Local Roadways - LOS C ADT, PSDT and PKHR. Policy 9.2.5 By 2015, the City shall review and modify as necessary the land development regulations to be consistent with the level of service standards and the requirements of Florida Statutes regarding the timing of development and the provision of facilities and infrastructure. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 9-9 Policy 9.2.6 By 2015, the City shall modify the Concurrency Management System to require written approval from water suppliers regarding available capacity to support new development as described in Policy 1.1.9 of the Future Land Use Element. Objective 9.4 Provide a capital program that can be adequately accommodated by projected revenues or other available financial resources. Policy 9.4.1 The City shall consider a range of revenue and project cost projections based on varying assumptions with regard to the local property tax base, shared tax revenues, inflation, contingency costs and the level and sources of shared project funding commitment by other jurisdictions. Policy 9.4.2 The City shall establish and maintain a minimum debt service coverage ratio of 1.1(110%) to guide the development and implementation of all future bond issues of the City. Policy 9.4.3 The City’s Capital Improvement Program shall identify funding sources for specific projects or project categories. Policy 9.4.4 Capital projects scheduled in the first five years of the Ten Year Work Plan shall be included in the Capital Improvements Element which is to be financially feasible. This schedule shall be updated annually as necessary to maintain consistency with the capital projects listed in the Work Plan and within 18 months following updates to the Lower East Coast Water Supply Plan, the City of Fort Lauderdale Water Supply Plan, or the Broward County Water Supply Plan. Policy 9.4.5 The following list identifies improvements the City would like to undertake. They are not specified in the City’s Five-Year Capital Improvement Program. (Costs, where identified, reflect FY 15 amounts and are subject to change.) Project Costs ($) PARKS AND CULTURAL Prospect Gardens Park 75,000 Parks & Leisure Services Storage Facility 705,000 Royal Palm Park North Building Upgrade 260,150 Dillon Tennis Center Facility Upgrades 236,500 Wimberly Fieldhouse 874,000 NW 21st Avenue Passive Park 130,000 Royal Palm Park Lighting 164,000 INFRASTRUCTURE Fire Rescue Services Storage Facility 252,500 City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 9-10 STREETSCAPES NW 38th Street CSX RR Crossing Quiet Zone 495,000 NE 34 Court from NE 12 Terrace to NE 16 Avenue Roadway Improvement 1,410,000 Objective 9.5 School District Work Program and the Capital Improvements (CIE) Element - The School Board shall annually update and adopt the District Educational Facilities Plan (DEFP) and transmit it, including any supplemental amendments, to Broward County and the municipalities, which then the City of Oakland Park shall amend the CIE to incorporate the updated DEFP consistent with the provisions and procedures of the ILA. Policy 9.5.1 The City shall monitor the School District’s Work Program in order to implement the requirements of Section 1013.33, F.S. and to ensure the provision of adequate Public School Facilities as new residential development occurs in the County/City. Policy 9.5.2 In accordance with the Public Schools Interlocal Agreement (ILA), the County and the City of Oakland Park will review, comment, and participate in the development of the School District’s 5-Year Work Program and will provide input with respect to the Work Program’s consistency with the City’s Comprehensive Plan. The City by reference adopts the Broward County School District’s September 2014 DEPP as a part of the 2007 Comprehensive Plan, as amended. Considering the input of the County and the City, the School District shall amend the Work Program annually by October 1st to include the immediately subsequent fifth year of Public School Facilities. Each annual update shall address the status of Public School Facilities, including, but not limited to the following: (i) The Available School Capacity by Concurrency Service Area; (ii) Anticipated increases in residential development within the County/City and the incorporated municipalities within the County; (iii) The existing and projected Level Of Service for each Concurrency Service Area by year for the 5 year planning period; (iv) For each Concurrency Service Area and each year of the 5-year planning period, the financial feasibility of providing the needed school facilities to achieve and maintain the Level of Service Standard; (v) The current need for any Public School Facilities resulting from changes in population trends, employment growth, or other relevant factors; (vi) The rate and location of development of Exempt Development; (vii) Any amendments necessary to effectuate the purpose and intent of this Ordinance and state law, including any demand assumptions, need factors, and other matters recommended by the School District for reconsideration or revision; and (viii) The projected financing for any additional School Capacity resulting from the factors set forth in subsections (i) through (v), above. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 9-11 Note: The tables below contain the City’s Capital Improvements Program. The City of Oakland Park is almost fully developed. No specific infrastructure improvements to achieve level of service standards are identified in the City's comprehensive plan. There are improvements identified in Table 12 related to water supply. These are projects being undertaken by one of the City’s water suppliers, Broward County, and are included as a separate table to comply with state law. Projects included in the capital improvements program are designed to ensure operational capacity and efficiency to maintain level of service standard. City of Oakland Park Capital Improvements Program – FY15 to FY19 “Tables 1 through 12 have been repealed and replaced in their entirety with the new tables below Project Name LOS Facility Type Estimated Cost (Six-year Program) Source/Element (1) Begin: FY 14 Finish: FY 19 Begin: FY 15 Finish: FY 16 Begin: FY 17 1,713,000$ Finish: FY 20 Begin: FY 15 230,000$ Finish: FY 17 Begin: FY 15 46,320$ Finish: FY 16 Begin: FY 14 104,650$ Finish: FY 15 Begin: FY 14 Finish: FY 15 Begin: FY 15 Finish: FY 21 Begin: FY 17 Finish: FY 17 Begin: FY 14 Finish: FY 17 Begin: FY 14 Finish: FY 15 Begin: FY 14 200,000$ Finish: FY 15 Begin: FY 14 1,206,767$ Finish: FY 15 Begin: FY 14 70,000$ Finish: FY 15 Begin: FY 14 Finish: FY 15 Begin: FY 16 Finish: FY 16 Begin: FY 11 Finish: TBD Begin: FY 11 Finish: FY 17 Begin: FY 12 Finish: FY 17 Begin: FY 15 Finish: FY 16 Begin: FY 17 Finish: FY 20 Begin: FY 13 Finish: FY 17 Begin: FY 14 Finish: FY 15 Begin: FY 15 Finish: FY 21 Begin: FY 12 Finish: FY 13 Begin: FY 11 Finish: FY 17 Begin: FY 12 Finish: FY 17 1,214,953$Infrastructure Element Royal Palm Park Lighting Parks and Recreation 164,000$Recreation and Open Space Element Recreation and Open Space Element 242,000$Infrastructure Element Potable Water/Sewer 54,456$Recreation and Open Space Element Lloyd Estates Drainage Expanded Scope 190,000$Infrastructure ElementNE 34 Court from NE 12 Ter to NE 16 Ave Roadway Infrastructure Element Bid Pack 10: Central Zone South of NE/NW Drainage Stormwater 172,000$ Infrastructure Element Infrastructure Element Bid Pack 11: Central Zone North Drainage 741,000$ Andrews Avenue Roadway Improvement Drainage 322,500$ Transportation Element Transportation Bid Pack 11: Central Zone North Bid Pack 13: Park Lane Phase V Infrastructure Element Potable Water/Sewer 3,278,870$Infrastructure Element Potable Water/Sewer 172,500$Bid Pack 13A: NW 10 Ave from NW 38 St to Propsect Bid Pack 8: East Zone South of NE 38th Street Infrastructure Element 495,000$Transportation Element Transportation Element Transportation Element Transportation 8,897,000$Infrastructure Element Potable Water/Sewer Transportation 70,000$ Transportation Element Transportation Element Transportation Element Transportation Transportation Transportation 935,000$Transportation Element Parks and Recreation Transportation Element 300,000$ Transportation 37,000$ Table 1: Capital Improvement Needs Identified in the Comprehensive Plan Target Dates Neighborhood and City-Wide Transportation Element Transportation Transportation Element Transportation Transportation 2,408,992$ 1,474,000$ Transportation Transportation Element Transportation Element Andrews Avenue Roadway Improvement Bid Pack 13: Park Lane Phase V Bid Pack 13A: NW 10 Ave from NW 38 St to Transportation Recreation and Cultural Lloyd Estates Drainage Expanded Scope 4,775,543$Infrastructure Element 1,218,994$ Bid Pack 1: Wastewater Collection System Relining Water & Sewer Potable Water/Sewer Potable Water/Sewer Potable Water/Sewer Transportation Bid Pack 10: Central Zone South of NE/NW 38 St Parks and Recreation Potable Water/Sewer Prospect Road & Andrews Avenue Royal Palm Natural Area Dixie Highway West Landscape Downtown Parking Lakeside Rock Island Entryway Features Lloyd Estates Drainage Expanded Scope NE 34 Court from NE 12 Ter to NE 16 Ave NW 38th St CSX Crossing Quiet Zone Oakland Park Blvd West Landscaping Oakland Station Crosswalk Park Lane East Underground Service Project Name LOS Facility Type Estimated Cost (Six-year Program) Source/Element (1)Target Dates Begin: FY 15 Finish: FY 16 Begin: FY 17 Finish: FY 20 Begin: FY 13 Finish: FY 17 Begin: FY 14 Finish: FY 15 Begin: FY 15 300,000$ Finish: FY 21 170,000$ Begin: FY 15 Finish: FY 15 Source: City of Oakland Park, Adopted FY15 Budget. Infrastructure ElementBid Pack 8: East Zone South of NE 38th Street Drainage 74,600$ 430,000$ 4,109,860$ Infrastructure ElementDrainageNE 5 Ave Drainage Improvements Bid Pack 13A: NW 10 Ave from NW 38 St to Drainage Infrastructure Element Drainage Infrastructure Element Lloyd Estates Drainage Expanded Scope Drainage 785,000$Infrastructure Element NE 34 Court from NE 12 Ter to NE 16 Ave Roadway Infrastructure ElementBid Pack 13: Park Lane Phase V Drainage 88,000$ (1) Source/Element Column - The City of Oakland Park is almost fully developed. No specific infrastructure improvements to achieve level of service standards are identified in the City's comprehensive plan. Projects included in the capital improvements program are designed to ensure operational capacity and efficiency to maintain level of service standards. City Roadways Begin 2012 $1,200,000 Finish 2015 Begin 2015 $3,000,000 Finish 2016 Begin 2013 $2,100,000 Finish 2015 Begin 2014 $50,000 Finish 2015 Intersections Begin $12,000,000 Finish Begin Finish State Roadways Begin 2014 Finish 2015 $1,858,000 Begin 2015 $3,700,000 Finish 2016 Begin 2013 $1,000,000 Finish 2014 Begin $3,900,000 Finish County Roadways Begin 2016 $429,000 Finish Begin 2016 $200,000 Finish Begin $1,540,000 Finish Begin $57,000 Finish Table 2: FDOT/MPO/GRANT PROJECT LIST Project ID Project Description Target Dates Estimated Project Cost Source FDOT: 425538-1 MPO TIP: 1703 NW 39 St. from NW 29 Ave. to NW 21 Ave. - Add bike lane, install sidewalk and landscaping FDOT 5-yr WP, MPO TIP Funded, MPO #5 FDOT: 431679-1 NW 38TH STREET FROM SR- 945 POWERLINE RD TO PARK DRIVE MPO TIP Unfunded FDOT 5-yr WP FDOT:427763-1 TIP # 1831 Park Lane East: Phase III NE 38 St. from NE 11 Ave. to Andrews - City CIP FDOT 5-yr WP TIP FUNDED TIP# 1906 LRTP#: 09L-Pg5 OAKLAND PARK, CITY OF FROM NE 18 AVENUE TO NE 12 AVENUE City Funded TIP Unfunded Priority #22 OP Priority #8 Powerline Rd. & OPB Intersection Improvements MPO TIP Unfunded FDOT: 4093592 I-95/SR-9 FROM N OF OAKLAND PARK BLVD TO S. OF ATLANTIC BLVD managed Lanes FDOT FUNDED LRTP#: Pg200 FDOT: 428732-1 LRTP#: 09R-Pg223 SR-816/OAKLAND PARK BLVD FROM E OF 31ST AVE. TO EAST OF I-95 FDOT 5-yr WP, MPO TIP Funded FDOT: 4295741 LRTP#: 09T-Pg138 PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION SHELTER State Managed FDOT OPB from NW 31 Ave. to I95 - Resurfacing along with ADA, lighting, and pedestrian facility improvements 5yr - WP FDOT: 431663-1 NE 6TH AVENUE FROM FR SR-816/OAKLAND PK BLVD TO PROPECT ROAD BIKE LANES/SDWK FDOT 5-yr WP, MPO TIP Unfunded FDOT: 431660-1 Nw 21st Avenue Fr Sr- 816/Oakland Pk Blvd To Sr- 870/Commercial Blvd Bike Lanes Sidewalks MPO TIP Unfunded Bike Needs Line #2 Andrews Ave. from Prospect to NE 62 St. - Add Bike Lanes MPO LRTP Bike Needs Line #45 NE 6 Ave. from OPB to NE 38 St. - Resurfacing and Bike Lane addition MPO LRTP Bike Needs Line #46 Powerline Road at NW 40th Begin $59,000 MPO LRTP Begin $2,000,000 Finish Begin $15,000,000 Finish County Roadways - Complete Streets Program N. Andrews Ave Roadway Improvement Prospect Road to Oakland Park Blvd. Begin 2016 TAP Grant & City Begin $7,000,000 Finish Miscellaneous Projects Begin $500,000 Finish Begin $800,000 Finish Sources: City of Oakland Park FY15 Budget Broward County MPO FDOT District IV Bike Needs Line #63 Propest Rd. from Commerical to Dixie Hwy. - Add Bike Lane MPO LRTP Highway Needs Line #63 NW 21 Ave. from OPB to Commercial - Reconstruct roadway from 2 lanes to 4 lanes MPO LRTP OP Priority #11 Parking Structure & Cornerstone for Redevelopment City CRA Highway Needs Line #144 Sr-816/Oakland Park Blvd From E Of 31st Ave. To East Of I-95 MPO LRTP OP Priority #4 Bridge Repairs City CIP Revenue Source DOR Code (Department of Revenue) FY 14-15 External Sources Ad Valorem Taxes $ 14,184,020 Franchise Fees $ 2,383,526 Utility Taxes $ 4,223,000 Other Taxes $ 3,379,517 Intergovernmental $ 4,071,069 Program Revenues Charges for Services $ 12,764,366 Permits, Fees & Special Assessments $ 3,708,427 Fines and Forfeitures $ 439,800 Miscellaneous $ 303,760 Enterprise Revenues Water Revenue $ 9,910,000 Sewer Revenue $ 7,313,500 Interest Income $ 20,000 Miscellaneous $ 78,000 Commercial Solid Waste $ 3,115,000 Solid Waste Assessment $ 2,182,430 Other Charges for Services $ 117,000 Permits $ 20,000 Sales-Recyclable Goods $ 1,400,000 Stormwater Assessment $ 2,992,107 Stormwater Fees $ 252,000 CIP Revenues Grants / JPA $ 5,657,486 Source: City of Oakland Park, Adopted FY15 Budget. Table 3: Oakland Park Local Government Revenue Sources Revenue Source DOR Code (Department of Revenue) FY 15 External Sources Grants / JPA / Other (1) $ 5,657,486 FUND TOTAL $ 5,657,486 Internal Sources CIP Fund Balance (2) $ 514,555 General Fund Transfer $ 455,962 Water/Sewer Fund Balance $ 2,287,000 Stormwater Fund Balance $ 274,747 Special Revenue Balance $ - FUND TOTAL $ 3,532,264 Financing Stormwater Bonds - Series 2011 $ 136,750 Water/Sewer Bonds - Series 2012 Bonds $ 8,297,000 FINANCING TOTAL $ 8,433,750 TOTAL $ 17,623,500 (2) Funds carried over from prior years for current year projects. Source: City of Oakland Park, Adopted FY15 Budget Table 4: Fund Accounts (1) Grants/JPA are funds committed by other entities to the City and do not reflect unfunded sources. Table 11 provides details of the sources. Fund DOR Code FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FY 2017-18 FY 2018-19External SourcesGrants / JPA / Other (1) $ 5,657,486 $ - $ - $ 1,000,000 $ 1,850,000 FUND TOTAL $ 5,657,486 $ - $ - $ 1,000,000 $ 1,850,000 Internal SourcesCIP Fund Balance (2) $ 514,555 $ - $ - $ - $ - General Fund Transfer $ 455,962 $ 295,000 $ - $ - $ - Water/Sewer Fund Balance $ 2,287,000 $ 3,966,000 $ 15,000 $ 15,000 $ 332,500 Stormwater Fund Balance $ 274,747 $ 102,100 $ - $ 295,000 $ - FUND TOTAL $ 3,532,264 $ 4,363,100 $ 15,000 $ 310,000 $ 332,500 FinancingStormwater Bonds - Series 2011 $ 136,750 Water/Sewer Bonds - Series 2012 Bonds $ 8,297,000 $ 10,066,938 $ - $ - $ - FINANCING TOTAL $ 8,433,750 $ 10,066,938 $ - $ - $ - TOTAL $ 17,623,500 $ 14,430,038 $ 15,000 $ 1,310,000 $ 2,182,500 (2) CIP Fund Balance - Funds carried over from prior years for current year projects.Source: City of Oakland Park, Adopted FY15 Budget.Table 5: Revenue Projections Affecting Capital Improvements(1) Grants/JPA are funds committed by other entities to the City and do not reflect unfunded sources. Table 11 provides details of the Fund FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FY 2017-18 FY 2018-19Grants / JPA / Other (1)Neighborhood & City-WideBid Pack 13: Park Lane Phase V $ 948,250 Bid Pack 13A: NW 10 Ave from NW 38 St to Propsect Road $ 1,000,000 NE 34 Court from NE 12 Ter to NE 16 Ave Roadway ImprovementAndrews Avenue Roadway Improvement $ 1,000,000 NE 34 Court from NE 12 Ter to NE 16 Ave Roadway Improvement $ 850,000 Prospect Road & Andrews Avenue Parking Lot $ 999,733 FUND TOTAL $ 1,947,983 $ - $ - $ 1,000,000 $ 1,850,000 4,797,983$ StormwaterLloyd Estates Drainage Expanded Scope $ 3,563,250 NE 5 Ave Drainage Improvements $ 146,253 FUND TOTAL $ 3,709,503 $ - $ - $ - $ - 3,709,503$ General Fund TransferNeighborhood & City-WideBid Pack 13: Park Lane Phase V $ 14,750 NE 34 Court from NE 12 Ter to NE 16 Ave Roadway Improvement $ 15,000 Park Lane East Underground Service Lines $ 200,000 Prospect Road & Andrews Avenue Parking Lot $ 90,267 FUND TOTAL $ 320,017 $ - $ - $ - $ - 320,017$ Recreation and CulturalLloyd Estates Drainage Expanded Scope $ 60,000 Dixie Highway West Landscape Improvements $ 20,000 Oakland Park Blvd West Landscaping $ 275,000 Lakeside Rock Island Entryway Features $ 26,445 Royal Palm Natural Area $ 49,500 FUND TOTAL $ 135,945 $ 295,000 $ - $ - $ - 430,945$ FinancingWater & SewerBid Pack 10: Central Zone South of NE/NW 38 St (Park Lane) $ 8,297,000 FUND TOTAL $ 8,297,000 $ - $ - $ - $ - 8,297,000$ StormwaterLloyd Estates Drainage Expanded Scope $ 136,750 FUND TOTAL $ 136,750 $ - $ - $ - $ - 136,750$ CIP Fund Balance (2)Neighborhood & City-WideProspect Road & Andrews Avenue Parking Lot $ 10,000 Bid Pack 13: Park Lane Phase V $ 425,000 Oakland Station Crosswalk $ 30,000 FUND TOTAL $ 465,000 $ - $ - $ - $ - 465,000$ Recreation and CulturalLakeside Rock Island Entryway Features $ 49,555 FUND TOTAL $ 49,555 $ - $ - $ - $ - 49,555$ Table 6: Expenditure Projections for Scheduled Capital Improvements* Fund FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FY 2017-18 FY 2018-19Water & SewerLloyd Estates Drainage Expanded Scope $ 1,085,000 Bid Pack 1: Wastewater Collection System Relining Project $ 1,000,000 Bid Pack 8: East Zone South of NE 38th Street $ 2,963,000 Bid Pack 11: Central Zone North $ 1,003,000 Bid Pack 13: Park Lane Phase V $ 202,000 Bid Pack 13A: NW 10 Ave from NW 38 St to Propsect Road $ - $ - $ 15,000 $ - $ 157,500 NE 34 Court from NE 12 Ter to NE 16 Ave Roadway Improvement $ 15,000 $ 175,000 FUND TOTAL $ 2,287,000 $ 3,966,000 $ 15,000 $ 15,000 $ 332,500 6,615,500$ StormwaterBid Pack 8: East Zone South of NE 38th Street $ 74,600 Bid Pack 10: Central Zone South of NE/NW 38 St (Park Lane) $ 172,000 NE 5 Ave Drainage Improvements $ 23,747 Bid Pack 13: Park Lane Phase V $ 79,000 Andrews Avenue Roadway Improvement $ - $ 27,500 $ - $ 295,000 $ - FUND TOTAL $ 274,747 $ 102,100 $ - $ 295,000 $ - 671,847$ TOTAL $ 17,623,500 $ 4,363,100 $ 15,000 $ 1,310,000 $ 2,182,500 (2) CIP Fund Balance - Funds carried over from prior years for current year projects.*Excludes components where funding is to be identified.Source: City of Oakland Park, Adopted FY15 Budget.(1) Grants/JPA are funds committed by other entities to the City and do not reflect unfunded sources. Table 11 provides details of the sources. Source of Funds to Pay for Debt Service DOR Code FY 13-14 FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FY 2017-18 Water & Sewer Bonds, Series 2010A&B Principal 285,000$ 310,000$325,000$ 335,000$ 335,000$ Interest 764,356$ 758,656$752,069$ 744,350$ 735,137$ Bonds, Series 2012 Principal 300,000$ 290,000$290,000$ 300,000$ 305,000$ Interest 606,925$ 597,925$589,225$ 580,525$ 571,525$ FMLC II Principal 45,000$ 45,000$ 45,000$ 50,000$ 50,000$ Interest 73,894$ 72,038$ 70,125$ 68,156$ 62,906$ General Obligation Wachovia Principal 158,825$ 165,924$173,341$ 181,089$ 189,184$ Interest 143,675$ 136,417$128,835$ 120,913$ 112,637$ Ref Bonds,Series 2010 Principal 406,239$ 422,957$435,566$ 454,661$ 469,532$ Interest 367,786$ 352,445$336,563$ 320,094$ 302,996$ USBancorp Principal 94,390$ 96,132$ 97,906$ 99,713$ 101,553$ Interest 11,831$ 10,089$8,315$6,508$ 4,668$ Stormwater Ref Bonds,Series 2010 Principal 171,626$ 178,689$184,016$ 192,083$ 198,366$ Interest 155,380$ 148,899$ 142,189$ 135,232$ 128,008$ Bonds, Series 2011 Principal 120,000$ 120,000$125,000$ 125,000$ 130,000$ Interest 219,000$ 216,600$213,600$ 210,475$ 206,725$ TOTAL $ 3,923,926 $ 3,921,771 $ 3,916,749 $ 3,923,797 $ 3,903,237 Source: City of Oakland Park, FY 13 CAFR Table 7: Loan and Bond Payments Facility Type FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FY 2017-18 FY 2018-19 Sanitary Sewer $ 5,276,000 $ 521,000 $ 10,000 $ - $ 100,000 5,907,000$ Stormwater Management $ 4,121,000 $ 843,100 $ 60,000 $ 320,000 $ 1,000,000 6,344,100$ Potable Water $ 5,308,000 $ 3,445,000 $ 5,000 $ 15,000 $ 232,500 9,005,500$ Parks and Recreation $ 79,500 $ - $ 164,000 $ - $ - 243,500$ Transportation $ 2,839,000 $ 540,000 $ 790,000 $ 2,220,000 $ 2,433,000 8,822,000$ TOTAL 17,623,500$ 5,349,100$ 1,029,000$ 2,555,000$ 3,765,500$ Source: City of Oakland Park, Adopted FY15 Budget. Table 8: Needed Capital Improvements Facility Type FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FY 2017-18 FY 2018-19 Transportation $ 10,000 $ 10,500 $ 10,500 $ 28,000 Recreation $ 5,000 $ 12,000 $ 15,000 $ 17,000 Potable Water (1) $ 5,000 $ 5,000 $ 5,000 $ 5,000 Sanitary Sewer (1) $ 2,500 $ 2,500 $ 2,500 $ 2,500 Drainage (1) $ 9,500 $ 9,500 $ 9,500 $ 12,000 TOTAL -$ 32,000$39,500$ 42,500$ 64,500$ (1) Larger service areas are assumed to be absorbed in existing operating costs. Rehabilitation and maintenance activities do not increase operating costs. Source: City of Oakland Park, Adopted FY15 Budget. Table 9: Cumulative Operating Cost Increase Due to New Capital Fund FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FY 2017-18 FY 2018-19 Grants / JPA / Other Revenues 5,657,486$-$-$ 1,000,000$ 1,850,000$ - Non-Capital Expenses - Debt Payments - Operating Cost Increase - Capital Improvements 5,657,486$-$-$ 1,000,000$ 1,850,000$ Balance -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ General Fund Transfer Revenues 455,962$ 295,000$-$-$-$ - Non-Capital Expenses - Debt Payments - Operating Cost Increase - Capital Improvements 455,962$ 295,000$-$-$-$ Balance -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ Water/Sewer Fund Balance Revenues 2,287,000$ 3,966,000$ 15,000$ 15,000$ 332,500$ - Non-Capital Expenses - Debt Payments - Operating Cost Increase - Capital Improvements 2,287,000$ 3,966,000$ 15,000$ 15,000$ 332,500$ Balance -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ Stormwater Fund Balance Revenues 274,747$ 102,100$-$ 295,000$-$ - Non-Capital Expenses - Debt Payments - Operating Cost Increase - Capital Improvements 274,747$ 102,100$-$ 295,000$-$ Balance -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ General Fund CIP Fund Balance Revenues 514,555$-$-$-$-$ - Non-Capital Expenses - Debt Payments - Operating Cost Increase - Capital Improvements 514,555$-$-$-$-$ Balance -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ Financing Revenues 8,433,750$-$-$-$-$ - Non-Capital Expenses - Debt Payments - Operating Cost Increase - Capital Improvements 8,433,750$-$-$-$-$ Balance -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ Other Revenues -$-$-$-$ - Non-Capital Expenses - Debt Payments - Operating Cost Increase - Capital Improvements Balance -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ FINAL BALANCE -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ Fund Balance - Funds carried over from prior year for current year projects Source: City of Oakland Park, Adopted FY15 Budget. Table 10: Fiscal Assessment Project Number Project Name Funding Source Prior to FY 15 FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FY 2017-18 FY 2018-19 Total Project CostNeighborhood and City-Wide1Bid Pack 13: Park Lane Phase V General Fund Balance $ 86,000 $ 425,000 $ - $ - $ - $ - $ 511,000 Bid Pack 13: Park Lane Phase V General Fund Transfer $ - $ 14,750 $ - $ - $ - $ - $ 14,750 Bid Pack 13: Park Lane Phase V Grant Revenue $ - $ 948,250 $ - $ - $ - $ - $ 948,250 $ - 2Bid Pack 13A: NW 10 Ave from NW 38 St to Unfunded General Fund $ - $ - $ - $ 130,000 $ - $ 583,000 $ 713,000 Bid Pack 13A: NW 10 Ave from NW 38 St to Grant Revenue $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ 1,000,000 $ 1,000,000 3NE 34 Court from NE 12 Ter to NE 16 Ave General Fund Transfer $ - $ 15,000 $ - $ - $ - $ - 15,000$ NE 34 Court from NE 12 Ter to NE 16 Ave Unfunded General Fund $ - $ - $ - $ - $ 70,000 $ - 70,000$ NE 34 Court from NE 12 Ter to NE 16 Ave Grant Revenue $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ 850,000 850,000$ -$ 4Dixie Highway West Landscape Improvements General Fund Transfer $ - $ - $ 20,000 $ - $ - $ - 20,000$ Dixie Highway West Landscape Improvements Unfunded General Fund $ - $ - $ - $ 210,000 $ - $ - 210,000$ -$ 5Oakland Park Blvd West Landscaping General Fund Transfer $ 25,000 $ - $ 275,000 $ - $ - $ - 300,000$ -$ 6NW 38th St CSX Crossing Quiet Zone Unfunded General Fund $ - $ - $ 45,000 $ 450,000 $ - $ - 495,000$ -$ -$ 7Park Lane East Underground Service Lines General Fund Transfer $ - $ 200,000 $ - $ - $ - $ - 200,000$ -$ 8Andrews Avenue Roadway Improvement General Fund Balance $ 58,992 $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - 58,992$ Andrews Avenue Roadway Improvement Unfunded General Fund $ - $ - $ 200,000 $ - $ 1,150,000 $ - 1,350,000$ Andrews Avenue Roadway Improvement Grant Revenue $ - $ - $ - $ - $ 1,000,000 $ - 1,000,000$ -$ 10Prospect Road & Andrews Avenue Parking Lot General Fund Balance $ 1,500 $ 10,000 $ - $ - $ - $ - 11,500$ Prospect Road & Andrews Avenue Parking Lot General Fund Transfer $ - $ 90,267 $ - $ - $ - $ - 90,267$ Prospect Road & Andrews Avenue Parking Lot Grant Revenue $ 105,267 $ 999,733 $ - $ - $ - $ - 1,105,000$ -$ 11Downtown Parking General Fund Balance $ 46,320 $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - 46,320$ -$ 12Oakland Station Crosswalk General Fund Balance $ 7,000 $ 30,000 $ - $ - $ - $ - 37,000$ -$ 13Lakeside Rock Island Entryway Features General Fund Balance $ 28,650 $ 49,555 $ - $ - $ - $ - 78,205$ Lakeside Rock Island Entryway Features General Fund Transfer $ - $ 26,445 $ - $ - $ - $ - 26,445$ -$ 14Lloyd Estates Drainage Expanded Scope General Fund Transfer $ 40,000 $ 30,000 $ - $ - $ - $ - 70,000$ Neighborhood and City-Wide Total $ 398,729 $ 2,839,000 $ 540,000 $ 790,000 $ 2,220,000 $ 2,433,000 9,220,729$ Recreation and Cultural1Lloyd Estates Drainage Expanded Scope General Fund Transfer $ 40,000 $ 30,000 $ - $ - $ - $ - 70,000$ -$ 2Royal Palm Natural Area General Fund Transfer $ 4,956 $ 49,500 $ - $ - $ - $ - 54,456$ 3Royal Palm Park Lighting Unfunded General Fund $ - $ - $ - $ 164,000 $ - $ - 164,000$ -$ Recreation and Cultural Total $ 44,956 $ 79,500 $ - $ 164,000 $ - $ - 288,456$ Table 11: Six-Year Schedule of Capital Improvements Project Number Project Name Funding Source Prior to FY 15 FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FY 2017-18 FY 2018-19 Total Project CostWater & Sewer1Bid Pack 1: Wastewater Collection System Water/Sewer Fund Balance $ - $ 1,000,000 $ - $ - $ - 1,000,000$ Bid Pack 1: Wastewater Collection System Water/Sewer Bonds $ 3,775,543 3,775,543$ 2Bid Pack 8: East Zone South of NE 38th Street Water/Sewer Bonds $ 315,870 $ - $ - $ - $ - 315,870$ Bid Pack 8: East Zone South of NE 38th Street Water/Sewer Fund Balance $ - $ - $ 2,963,000 $ - $ - 2,963,000$ 3Bid Pack 10: Central Zone South of NE/NW 38 Water/Sewer Bonds $ 425,000 $ 8,297,000 $ - $ - $ - 8,722,000$ Bid Pack 10: Central Zone South of NE/NW 38 Water/Sewer Fund Balance $ 175,000 $ - $ - $ - $ - 175,000$ 4Bid Pack 11: Central Zone North Water/Sewer Bonds $ 215,994 $ - $ - $ - $ - 215,994$ Bid Pack 11: Central Zone North Water/Sewer Fund Balance $ - $ - $ 1,003,000 $ - $ - 1,003,000$ 5Bid Pack 13: Park Lane Phase V Water/Sewer Fund Balance $ - $ 202,000 $ - $ - $ - 202,000$ Bid Pack 13: Park Lane Phase V Water/Sewer Bonds $ 40,000 $ - $ - $ - $ - 40,000$ 6Bid Pack 13A: NW 10 Ave from NW 38 St to Water/Sewer Fund Balance $ - $ - $ - $ 15,000 $ - $ 157,500 172,500$ Bid Pack 13A: NW 10 Ave from NW 38 St to -$ 7NE 34 Court from NE 12 Ter to NE 16 Ave Water/Sewer Fund Balance $ - 0 0 0 $ 15,000 175,000 190,000$ -$ 8Lloyd Estates Drainage Expanded Scope Water/Sewer Fund Balance $ 129,953 709,054 0 0 $ - 0 839,007$ Lloyd Estates Drainage Expanded Scope Water/Sewer Operating $ - 375,946 0 0 $ - 0 375,946$ Water & Sewer Total $ 5,077,360 $ 10,584,000 $ 3,966,000 $ 15,000 $ 15,000 $ 332,500 19,989,860$ Project Number Project Name Funding Source Prior to FY 15 FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FY 2017-18 FY 2018-19 Total Project CostStormwater1Bid Pack 8: East Zone South of NE 38th Street Stormwater Fund Bal $ - $ - $ 74,600 $ - $ - 74,600$ -$ 2Bid Pack 10: Central Zone South of NE/NW 38 Stormwater Operating $ - $ 172,000 $ - $ - $ - 172,000$ -$ 3Bid Pack 11: Central Zone North Unfunded Stormwater $ - $ - $ 741,000 $ - $ - 741,000$ -$ 4NE 5 Ave Drainage Improvements Stormwater Operating $ - $ 23,747 $ - $ - $ - 23,747$ NE 5 Ave Drainage Improvements Grant Revenue $ - $ 146,253 $ - $ - $ - 146,253$ 5Bid Pack 13: Park Lane Phase V Stormwater Operating $ - $ 79,000 $ - $ - $ - 79,000$ Bid Pack 13: Park Lane Phase V Stormwater Bonds $ 9,000 $ - $ - $ - $ - 9,000$ -$ 6Bid Pack 13A: NW 10 Ave from NW 38 St to Unfunded Stormwater $ - $ - $ - $ 60,000 $ - $ 725,000 785,000$ -$ 7NE 34 Court from NE 12 Ter to NE 16 Ave Unfunded Stormwater $ - $ - $ - $ - $ 25,000 $ 275,000 300,000$ -$ 8Lloyd Estates Drainage Expanded Scope Stormwater Bonds $ 20,000 $ 136,750 $ - $ - $ - $ - 156,750$ Lloyd Estates Drainage Expanded Scope Grant Revenue $ 389,860 $ 3,563,250 $ - $ - $ - $ - 3,953,110$ -$ 9Andrews Avenue Roadway Improvement Stormwater Fund Bal $ - $ - $ 27,500 $ - $ 295,000 $ - 322,500$ -$ Stormwater Total418,860 4,121,000 843,100 60,000 320,000 1,000,000 6,762,960 5,939,905$ 17,623,500$ 5,349,100$ 1,029,000$ 2,555,000$ 3,765,500$ 36,262,005$ Fund Balance - Funds carried over from prior year for current year projectsSource: City of Oakland Park, Adopted FY15 Budget. Total Table 12: Water Supply Facilities Work Plan Projects and Programs BC Water/Alternative Water Supply Capital Improvement Plan Program FY 2014 FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 Water Treatment Plant 1A Treatment Expansion Design 1,273,990 3,300,000 4,573,990 Construction 33,803,000 33,803,000 Subtotal 1,273,990 37,103,000 - - - 38,376,990 Water Treatment Plant 2A Treatment Expansion Design 700,000 2,160,000 2,860,000 Construction 1,800,000 1,800,000 Subtotal - - 700,000 - 3,960,000 4,660,000 1,273,990 37,103,000 700,000 - 3,960,000 43,036,990 74,726,900 141,834,030 39,525,530 47,314,300 67,021,580 370,422,340 Total Alternative Water Supply Projec 1,273,990 37,103,000 700,000 - 3,960,000 43,036,990 Other Projects 37,595,770 18,250,060 17,039,900 8,192,110 114,451,230 195,529,070 Subtotal 38,869,760 55,353,060 17,739,900 8,192,110 118,411,230 238,566,060 All Projects 30,193,200 85,868,450 10,999,000 34,994,170 48,087,740 210,142,560 Subtotal 30,193,200 85,868,450 10,999,000 34,994,170 48,087,740 210,142,560 All Projects 5,663,940 612,520 10,786,630 4,128,020 522,610 21,713,720 Subtotal 5,663,940 612,520 10,786,630 4,128,020 522,610 21,713,720 74,726,900 141,834,030 39,525,530 47,314,300 167,021,580 470,422,340 Total Alternative Water Supply Projects Project Number Project Name Expenditure Five-Year Total Alternative Water Supply Projects Regional Transmission Total Appropriations Source: Adopted from Broward County Enterprise Capital Budget FY 2014 Funding Source p Total Revenues Appropriations Retail Water & Wastewater Regional Treatment Projects City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 10-1 Land Use Implementation The County Land Use Plan is the effective land use plan for the City until the City Land Use Plan is certified as being in substantial conformity to the County Land Use Plan. A major thrust of the City’s Comprehensive Plan is to receive certification/recertification of the Land Use Plan by the Broward County Planning Council. In order to be considered for certification, a local land use plan shall include the following items: i A Land Use Plan Map; i Goals, Objectives and Policies consistent with and furthering those contained within the Broward County Land Use Plan; i Implementation Provisions which establish a land use and density classification system including a detailed listing of permitted land uses and densities allowed within each land use classification; and i Provisions for fulfilling the requirements for local Park and Open Space acreage. This portion of the adopted Plan provides the land use implementation provisions required for Broward County Land Use Plan certification. [The Future Land Use Map Series text below is taken from Sections III and IV of Volume I of the existing comprehensive plan.] Future Land Use Map The City’s Future Land Use Plan, Figure A1, is located in Volume III, the Map Series. Oakland Park lies within several Flexibility Zones of the Broward County Land Use Plan. The City thus has area wide flexibility in the rearrangement of land uses and distribution of residential densities while remaining in conformance with the County Plan. The Land Use Plan also includes, by reference, right- of-way reservation provisions of the Transportation Element. The City will preserve these right-of-way widths as per requirements of the Broward County Trafficways Plan. The Comprehensive Plan must include natural resources on either the Future Land Use Map or in a Map Series, which is the approach used here. With the closure of the Prospect wellfield, there are no existing or planned waterwells and cones of influence located within the City and hence a map is not provided. There are no beaches, bay, harbors, or shores in the City. There are however, several mad made canals and lakes and the North Fork of the Middle River is located in the City. Figure A2 in Volume III, the Map Series, depicts the man-made canals, waterways, lakes, natural rivers and major drainage features of the City. According to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), a major portion of the City has topographic elevations that would be subject to a 100 year flood. Figure A3highlights the FEMA flood zones within the City. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 10-2 Because the City is almost completely developed, there are no longer any areas outside of recreation, conservation, and open spaces sites with unique vegetation. Wetlands and groundwater recharge areas within the City are shown in Figure A4 in Volume III, the Map Series. In addition, there is one (1) historical site, The Oakland Park Elementary School, within the City, which is shown in Figure A7 in Volume III, the Map Series. The majority of the City’s soils are those associated with man’s alteration of soils to support development. The soils and elevation contours within the City are shown in Figures A5 and A6 in Volume III, the Map Series, respectively. As required by Florida Administrative Code, Transportation Concurrency Management Areas must be shown on the Future Land Use Map or Map Series. Broward County and municipalities within the County have adopted concurrency districts and the City of Oakland Park is part of the Central Transit Oriented Concurrency District as shown in Figure A8 in Volume III, the Map Series. Section 1. Definitions 1.01 “Accessory use” shall mean a use naturally and customarily incidental, subservient or subordinate to the principal use. 1.02 “Accommodations” means any apartment, condominium or cooperative unit, cabin, lodge, hotel or motel room, campground, or other private or commercial structure which is situated on real property and designed for occupancy or use by one or more individuals. 1.03 “Administration Commission” means the Governor and the Cabinet of the State of Florida. 1.04 “Administrative Rules Document” means a publication containing rules, guidelines, procedures, and methodologies reviewed, revised, adopted and amended by the Broward County Planning Council and Board of County Commissioners for the purpose of providing assistance and guidance to local governmental entities and providing direction to Council staff in implementing the Broward County Land Use Plan. 1.05 “Affected Persons” includes the affected local government; persons owning property, residing, or owning or operating a business within the boundaries of the local government whose plan is the subject of the review; and adjoining local governments that can demonstrate that adoption of the plan as proposed would produce substantial impacts on the increased need for publicly funded infrastructure or substantial impacts on areas designated for protection or special treatment within their jurisdictions. Each person, other than an adjoining local government, in order to q ualify under this definition, shall also have submitted oral or written objections during the local government review and adoption proceedings. 1.05.1 “Affordable Housing” means housing for which monthly rents or monthly mortgage payments (including taxes and insurance) do not exceed 30 percent (30%) of an amount representing the percentage (very low = 50%; low = 80%; moderate = 120%) of the median income limits adjusted for family size for the households. 1.06 “Agricultural Uses” means activities within land areas which are predominantly used for the cultivation of crops and livestock including: cropland, pastureland, orchards, City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 10-3 vineyards, nurseries, ornamental horticulture areas, groves, confined feeding operations, specialty farms, and silviculture areas. 1.07 “Airport Clear Zone” means a designated area of land which is subject to peak aircraft noise and on which there is the highest potential of danger from airport operations. 1.08 “Airport Facility” means any area of land or water improved, maintaine d or operated by a governmental agency for the landing and takeoff of aircraft, or privately owned paved runways of 4,000 or more feet in length, and any appurtenant area which is used for airport buildings, or other airport facilities or rights-of-way. 1.09 “Airport Obstruction” means any structure, object of natural growth, existing condition, or use of land which obstructs the airspace required for the flight of aircraft in landing or taking off at an airport or which otherwise increases the risk of danger to aircraft operations. 1.10 “Alley” means a right-of-way providing a secondary means of access and service to abutting property. 1.11 “Amendment” means any change to an adopted comprehensive plan, except corrections, updates and modifications of the capital improvements element concerning costs, revenue sources, acceptance of facilities or facility construction dates consistent with the plan as provided in Subsection 163.3177(3) (b), Florida Statutes, and corrections, updates or modifications of current costs in other elements, as provided in Section 163.3187(2), Florida Statutes. 1.12 “Annexation” means the adding of real property to the boundaries of an incorporated municipality, such addition making such real property in every way a part of the municipality. 1.13 “Aquatic Vegetation” means a plant characteristically growing wholly or partly submerged in water. 1.14 “Area or Area of Jurisdiction” means the total area within Broward County including all of the lands lying within the limits of an incorporated municipality and the unincorporated lands within the county. 1.16 “Areas Subject to Coastal Flooding” see “hurricane vulnerability zone”. 1.17 “Arterial Road” means a roadway providing service which is relatively continuous and of relatively high traffic volume, long trip length, and high operating speed. In addition, every United States numbered highway is an arterial road. 1.18 “Beach” means the zone of unconsolidated material that extends landward from the mean low water line to the place where there is marked change in material or physiographic form, or to line of permanent vegetation, usually the effective limit of storm waves. “Beach”, as used in the coastal management element requirements, is limited to oceanic and estuarine shorelines. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 10-4 1.19 “Bicycle and Pedestrian Ways” means any road, path or way which is open to bicycle travel and traffic afoot and from which motor vehicles are excluded. 1.20 “Broward County Coastal Area” means the land and water eastward of U.S. Highway 1 to the Atlantic Ocean. 1.21 “Broward County Coastal High Hazard Area” means the land and water eastward of the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway to the Atlantic Ocean including any coastal protection structures. 1.22 “Broward County Land Use Plan” means the future land use plan element for all of Broward County adopted by the Broward County Commission in conformance with the requirements of the Broward County Charter and the Local Government Comprehensive Planning and Land Development Regulation Act. 1.23 “Broward County Trafficways Plan” means the plan promulgated by the Broward County Planning Council pursuant to Chapter 59-1154, Laws of Florida, as amended, and the Broward County Charter, which depicts a network of trafficways for Broward County (also known as the Broward County Planning Council Trafficways Plan). 1.24 “Building” means any structure having a roof and used or built for the shelter or enclosure of persons, animals, chattels, or property of any kind. 1.25 “Building Permit” means: a) Any permit for the erection or construction of a new building required by Section 105 of the Florida Building Code, 2004 Edition, as amended. b) Any permit for an addition to an existing building which would: a) Create one or more additional dwelling units, or b) Involve a change in the occupancy of a building as described in Chapter 3 of the Florida Building Code, 2004, Edition, as amended. c) Any permit which would be required for the nonresidential operations included in Section 105 of the South Florida Building Code, 1999 2004, Broward Edition, as amended. 1.26 “Capital Budget” means the portion of the City’s annual budget which reflects capital improvements scheduled for a fiscal year. 1.27 “Capital Improvement” means physical assets constructed or purchased to provide, improve or replace a public facility and which are large scale and high in cost. The cost of a capital improvement is generally nonrecurring and may require multi-year financing. For the purpose of this rule, physical assets which have been identified as existing or projected needs in the individual comprehensive plan elements shall be considered capital improvements. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 10-5 1.28 “Certified Land Use Plan” means the City of Oakland Park land use plan which has been certified by the Broward County Planning Council as being in substantial conformity with the Broward County Land Use Plan and which has been adopted by the City in conformance with the requirements of the Local Government Comprehensive Planning and Land Development Regulation Act. 1.29 “City” means the City of Oakland Park, Florida. 1.30 “Coastal Construction Control Line” means the line established by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection after a determination, through comprehensive engineering study and topographic survey, that the establishment of such control line is necessary for the protection of upland properties and the control of beach erosion, pursuant to Section 161.053, Florida Statutes. 1.31 “Collector Road” means a roadway providing service which is of relatively moderate traffic volume, moderate trip length, and moderate operating speed. Collector roads collect and distribute traffic between local roads or arterial roads. 1.32 “Commercial Uses” means activities within land areas which are predominantly connected with the sale, rental and distribution of products, or performance of services. 1.32.1 “Community Cultural Facility” means a facility that is readily accessible to all segments of the community for cultural activities (performing, visual and literary arts). Includes classroom, workshop, exhibit and performance space and cultural programming by professional artists for all age groups. 1.33 “Community Park” means acreage listed in the “Community and Regional Parks” subsection of the Plan Implementation Requirements Section of the Broward County Land Use Plan that is utilized by local governments to meet the community level parks requirement of the Broward County Land Use Plan. 1.33.1 “Community Redevelopment Area” – see Designated Redevelopment Area. 1.34 “Community Shopping Center” means a shopping center which typically ranges from approximately 100,000 to 300,000 square feet of gross leasable area and is generally built around a junior department store or variety store and supermarket as the major tenants. Community shopping centers typically range in area from approximately 10 acres to 30 acres and serve trade areas ranging from roughly 40,000 people to 150,000 people. 1.35 “Comprehensive Plan” means a plan that meets the requirements of §163.3177 and §163.3178, Florida Statutes. 1.36 “Concurrency” means public facilities and services needed to support development shall be available consistent with concurrency requirements as per Section 163.3180 Florida Statutes (1993). 1.37 “Concurrency Management System” means the provisions in the local government comprehensive plan including implementation regulations, encompassing the restrictions, methods, resources, timing and solutions intended to be compatible with City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 10-6 and further compliance with the statutory requirement to provide public facilities and services needed to support development consistent with concurrency requirements and Section 163.3180 Florida Statutes (1993). 1.38 “Cone of Influence” (Zone of Influence) means an area around one or more major water wells the boundary of which is determined by the government agency having specific statutory authority to make such a determination based on ground water travel or drawdown depth. 1.39 “Conservation Uses” means activities within land areas designated for the purpose of conserving or protecting natural resources or environmental quality and includes areas designated for such purposes as flood control, protection of quality or quantity of groundwater or surface water, floodplain management, fisheries management, or protection of vegetative communities or wildlife habitats. 1.40 “Consistent” means compatible with and furthers. “Compatible with” means not in conflict with. “Furthers” means to take action in the direction of realizing the goals and policies. As applied to the local plan, a local plan shall be consistent with the state plan and the regional plan. 1.41 “Contiguous” means in close proximity, touching or adjacent. 1.42 “Contraction” means the reversion of real property within municipality boundaries to an unincorporated status. 1.43 “County Commission” means the Board of County Commissioners of Broward County, Florida. 1.44 “County Land Planning Agency” means the agency designated to prepare the comprehensive plan for the County or in case of Chartered Counties, the agency which has the planning responsibility between the County and the municipalities as stipulated in the Charter. 1.45 “County Land Use Plan” means the Broward County Land Use Plan originally adopted by the County Commission on November 9, 1977 and subsequently amended. 1.46 “Dashed-Line Area” means an area on the Oakland Park Future Land Use Plan Map bordered by a dashed line and designated as having a particular maximum overall density of dwelling units for all land and land uses within the area, and/or a particular total number of dwelling units permitted within the area. 1.47 “Deepwater Ports” as defined in Chapter 9J-5, Florida Administrative Code, including Port Everglades. 1.47.1 “Designated Redevelopment Area” means those areas depicted within the Future Broward County Land Use Plan Map (Series) which have been determined to be redevelopment areas by the Broward County Board of County Commissioners. Criteria for designated redevelopment areas are contained within Section IV.D. of the Broward County Land Use Plan. Policies which encourage redevelopment within designated City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 10-7 redevelopment areas are located under Objective 14.03.00 of the Broward County Land Use Plan. 1.48 “Developer” means any person, including a governmental agency, undertaking development. 1.49 “Development” means: 1. The carrying out of any building activity or mining operation, the making of any material change in the use or appearance of any structure or land, or the dividing of land into two or more parcels. 2. The following activities or uses shall be taken for the purposes of this chapter to involve “development”, as defined in this section: (a) A reconstruction, alteration of the size or material change in the external appearance of a structure or land; (b) A change in the intensity of use of land, such as an increase in the number of dwelling units in a structure or on land or a material increase in the number of businesses, manufacturing establishments, offices, or dwelling units in a structure or on land; (c) Alteration of a shore or bank of a seacoast, river, stream, lake, pond, or canal, including any “coastal constructure” as defined in Section 161.021, Florida Statutes; (d) Commencement of drilling, except to obtain soil samples, mining, or excavation on a parcel of land; (e) Demolition of a structure; (f) Clearing of land as an adjunct of construction; or (g) Deposit of refuse, solid or liquid waste, or fill on a parcel of land. 3. The following operations or uses shall not be taken for the purpose of this chapter to involve “development” as defined herein: a) Work by a highway or road agency or railroad company for the maintenance or improvement of a road or railroad track, if the work is carried out on land within the boundaries or the right-of-way. b) Work by any utility and other persons engaged in the distribution or transmission of gas or water, for the purposes of inspecting, repairing, renewing, or constructing on established rights-of-way any sewers, mains, pipes, cables, utility tunnels, powerlines, towers, poles, tracks, or the like. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 10-8 c) Work for the maintenance, renewal, improvement, or alteration of any structure, if the work affects only the interior or the color of the structure or the decoration of the exterior of the structure. d) The use of any structure on or land devoted to dwelling uses for any purpose customarily incidental to enjoyment of the dwelling. e) The use of any land for the purpose of growing plants, crops, trees, and other agricultural or forestry products; raising livestock; or for other agricultural purposes. f) A change in use of land or structure from a use within a class specified in an ordinance or rule to another use in the same class. g) A change in the ownership or form of ownership of any parcel or structure. h) The creation or termination of rights of access, apiarian rights, easements, covenants concerning development of land, or other rights in land. 4. “Development,” as designated in an ordinance, rule, or development rule includes all other development customarily associated with it unless otherwise specified. When appropriate to the context, “development” refers to the act of developing to the result of development. Reference to any specific operation is not intended to mean that the operation or activity, when part of other operations or activities are not development. Reference to particular operations is not intended to limit the generality of subsection (1). 1.50 “Development Order” means any order granting, denying, or granting with conditions an application for a development permit. 1.51 “Development Permit” includes any building permit, zoning permit, plat approval, or rezoning, certification, variance, or other action having the effect of permitting development. 1.52 “Downtown Development Authority” means a local governmental agency established under Part III of Chapter 163 or created with similar powers and responsibilities by special act for the purpose of planning, coordinating, and assisting in the implementation, revitalization, and redevelopment of a specific downtown area of a city. 1.52.1 “Downtown Revitalization” means the physical and economic renewal of a central business district of a community as designated by local government, and includes both downtown development and redevelopment. 1.53 “Drainage Basin” means the area defined by topographic boundaries which contributes stormwater to a drainage system, estuarine waters, or oceanic waters, including all areas artificially added to the basin. 1.54 “Drainage Facilities” means a system of man-made structures designed to collect, convey, hold, divert or discharge stormwater, and include stormwater sewers, canals, detention structures, and retention structures. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 10-9 1.55 “Dune” means a mound or ridge of loose sediments, usually sand-sized sediments, lying landward of the beach and extending inland to the landward toe of the dune which intercepts the 100-year storm surge. 1.56 “Dwelling Unit” means a house, apartment, or condominium unit, trailer, group of rooms, or a single room intended for occupancy as separate living quarters with direct access from the outside of the building or through a common hall and with complete kitchen facilities for the exclusive use of the occupants, including the rental units contained in a multi-unit structure or complex which are licensed by the State Department of Business Regulation, Division of Hotels and Restaurants, as “apartments”, “rental condominiums” and “retirement housing” or live aboard vessels located in multi-family “Residential” designated areas which are required to hookup to marine sanitation systems. 1.57 “Easement” means any strip of land created by a subdivider for public or private utilities, drainage, sanitation, or other specified uses having limitations, the title to which shall remain in the name of the property owner, subject to the right of use designated in the reservation of the servitude. 1.58 “Ecological Community” means a distinctive combination of two or more ecologically related species, living together and interacting with each other in a characteristic natural habitat. 1.59 “Educational Uses” means activities and facilities of public or private primary or secondary schools, vocational and technical schools, and colleges and universities licensed by the Florida Department of Education, including the areas of buildings, campus open space, dormitories, recreational facilities or parking. 1.59.1 “Electrical Power Plant” means an electrical generating facility where electricity is produced for the purpose of supplying twenty-five (25) megawatts (MW) or more to utility power systems. 1.59.2 “Enhancement” shall mean the alteration of an existing wetland to increase the functional value. 1.60 “Environmentally Sensitive Land” means those areas containing Natural Resources, as depicted in the Natural Resource Map Series of the Broward County Land Use Plan, which have been determined to be environmentally sensitive by the Broward County Board of County Commissioners. The criteria for designation of Environmentally Sensitive Land are contained within the Plan Implementation section of the Broward County Land Use Plan. Policies which ensure the protection of Environmentally Sensitive Lands, consistent with the requirements of Section 163.3202 Florida Statutes, are located under Objective 9.01.00 of the Broward County Land Use Plan. 1.61 “Estuary” means a semi-enclosed, naturally existing coastal body of water in which saltwater is naturally diluted by freshwater and which has an open connection with oceanic waters. “Estuaries” include bays, embayments, lagoons, sounds and tidal streams. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 10-10 1.62 “Evacuation Routes” means routes designated by county civil defense authorities or the regional evacuation plan, for the movement of persons to safety, in the event of a hurricane. 1.63 “Flexibility Zone” means a geographic area, as delineated on the flexibility zone boundary maps in the Administrative Rules Document of the Broward County Planning Council, within which residential densities and land uses may be redistributed through the plan certification process. 1.64 “Floodplains” means areas inundated during an identified flood event or identified by the National Flood Insurance Program as an A Zone or V Zone on Flood Insurance Rate Maps or Flood Hazard Boundary Maps. 1.64.1 “Floor Area” generally means the total square footage of all floors measured to the outside surface of the building or portion of the building. This may include hallways, stairways, elevators, storage and mechanical rooms whether internal or external to the structure. Floor area may also be limited to what is considered leasable space. 1.64.2 “Floor Area Ratio” (FAR) means the square footage of the floor area of a building divided by the square footage of the lot (net site area) on which the building is located. FAR of 1.0 can be achieved several ways. The first is a one story building covering the entire lot; the second is a two story building covering 50% of the lot and the third, a four story building covering 25% of the lot. 1.65 “Freshwater Marsh” means a wetland having more than 25 percent vegetative cover by terrestrial herbs but 40 percent or less cover by woody plants, occasionally or regularly flooded by fresh water (e.g., sawgrass). 1.66 “Freshwater Swamp” means a wetland having more than 40 percent cover by woody plants and that is occasionally or regular flooded by freshwater (e.g., cypress swamp). 1.67 “Future Broward County Land Use Plan Map (Series)” means the series of maps adopted by the Broward County Board of County Commissioners as part of the Broward County Land Use Plan. These include the Broward County Land Use Plan Map, Historic District and Historically Significant Properties Map, Natural Resources Map Series- Eastern Broward County and Natural Resources Map Series-Western Broward County. 1.68 “Goal” means the long term end toward which programs and activities are ultimately directed. 1.69 “Governing Body” means the City Commission of Oakland Park, Florida. 1.70 “Governmental Agency” means: 1. The United States or any department, commission, agency, or other instrumentality thereof; 2. The State of Florida or any department, commission, agency, or other instrumentality thereof; City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 10-11 3. Any local government, or any department, commission, agency, or other instrumentality thereof; 4. Any school board or other special district, authority, or other governmental entity. 1.71 “Gross Acre” means the total number of acres within a parcel of land, including acreage used or proposed for streets, lakes, and waterways (excluding waterways under the responsibility of the South Florida Water Management District). 1.72 “Gross Density” means the number of dwelling units constructed or proposed to be constructed within a parcel of land, divided by the gross acreage of the parcel of land. In determining the gross acreage of the parcel, the area encompassed by an extension of the parcel’s boundaries to the centerline of adjacent public right -of-ways such as streets, roadways, alleys, canals and waterways (exclusive of expressways and the primary drainage system) can be added to the parcel area. 1.73 “Group Home” means a facility which provides a living environment for unrelated residents who operate as the functional equivalent of a family, including such supervision and care as may be necessary to meet the physical, emotional and social needs of the residents. Adult Congregate Living Facilities comparable in size to group homes are included in this definition. It shall not include rooming or boarding homes, clubs, fraternities, sororities, monasteries or convents, hotels, residential treatment facilities, nursing homes or emergency shelters. 1.74 “Hammock” means a dense growth of broad-leaved trees on a slight elevation, not considered wet enough to be a swamp. 1.75 “Hardwood” means a broad-leaved angiosperm (flowering) tree having wood characterized by the presence of specialized cells called vessels. 1.75.1 “Hazardous Liquid Pipeline” means a pipeline, a right-of-way, or a facility, used or intended to be used in transporting petroleum or petroleum products. 1.76 “Hazardous Waste” means solid waste, or combination of solid wastes, which because of its quantity, concentration, or physical, chemical, or infectious characteristics, may cause, or significantly contribute to, an increase in mortality or an increase in serious irreversible or incapacitating reversible illness or may pose a substantial present or potential hazard to human health or the environment when improperly transported, disposed of, stored, treated or otherwise managed. 1.77 “Historic Resources” means all areas, districts or sites containing properties listed on the Florida Master Site File, the National Register of Historic Places, or designated by a local government as historically, architecturally, or archaeologically significant. 1.77.1 “Historic Trees” includes trees designated by the Broward County Board of County Commission pursuant to Chapter 27 of the Broward County Code which are (1) located on historically significant property and related to an historic event: (2) uniquely related to the heritage of Broward County: or (3) at least seventy-five (75) years old. Requests for designation can be made by State. County. Municipality, Historical Preservation Group, or by the Property Owner. Removal of a tree designated as City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 10-12 “Historic” requires the approval of the County Commission. (Chapter 27-4 12 Broward County Code) 1.78 “Hurricane Shelter” means a structure designated by local officials as a place of safe refuge during a storm or hurricane. 1.79 “Hurricane Vulnerability Zone” (also “areas subject to coastal flooding”) means the areas delineated by the regional or local hurricane evacuation plan as requiring evacuation. The hurricane vulnerability zone shall include areas requiring evacuation in the event of a 100-year storm or Category 3 storm event. 1.80 “Improvements” may include, but are not limited to street pavements, curbs and gutters, sidewalks, alley pavements, walkway pavements, water mains, sanitary sewers, storm sewers or drains, street names, signs, landscaping, permanent reference monuments, permanent control points, or any other improvement required by a governing body. 1.81 “Industrial Uses” means the activities within land areas predominantly connected with manufacturing, assembly, processing, or storage of products. 1.82 “Infrastructure” means those man-made structures which serve the common needs of the population, such as: sewage disposal systems, potable water systems, potable water wells serving a system, solid waste disposal sites or retention areas, stormwater systems, utilities, piers, docks, wharves, breakwaters, bulkheads, seawalls, bulwarks, revetments, causeways, marinas, navigation channels, bridges, and roadways. 1.83 “Lake” means a natural depression fed by one or more streams and from which a stream may flow; occurs due to widening or natural blockage of a river or stream or occurs in an isolated natural depression that is not part of a surface river or stream; usually too deep to permit the growth of rooted plants from shore to shore. 1.84 “Land” means the earth, water, and air, above, below, or on the surface, and includes any improvements or structures customarily regarded as land. 1.85 “Land Development Code” means various types of regulations relating to development within the City when combined in a single document. 1.86 “Land Development Regulation” means ordinances enacted by governing bodies for the regulation of any aspect of development and includes any local government zoning, rezoning, subdivision, building construction, or sign regulations or any other regulations controlling the development of land. 1.87 “Land Development Regulation Commission” means a commission designated by a local government to develop and recommend, to the local governing body, land development regulations which implement the adopted comprehensive plan and to review land development regulations, or amendments thereto, for consistency with the adopted plan and report to the governing body regarding its findings. The responsibilities of the land development regulation commission may be performed by the Local Planning Agency. 1.88 “Land Use” means the development that has occurred on the land, the development that is proposed by a developer on the land, or the use that is permitted or permissible on the City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 10-13 land under an adopted comprehensive plan or element or portion thereof, land development regulations, or a land development code, as the context may indicate. 1.89 “Land Use Plan” means the Land Use Plan for the City of Oakland Park, Florida, adopted as the Future Land Use Plan Element of the Local Government Comprehensive Planning Act of 1975, Sections 163.3161 - 163.3211, Florida Statutes, and certified by the Broward County Planning Council as being in substantial conformity with the Broward County Land Use Plan pursuant to Article VI of the Broward County Charter. 1.90 “Level of Service” means an indicator of the extent or degree of service provided by, or proposed to be provided by, a facility based on and related to the operational characteristics of the facility. Level of service shall indicate the capacity per unit of demand for each public facility. 1.90.1 “Light Manufacturing” means a use engaged in the manufacture, predominantly from previously prepared materials, of finished products or parts, including processing, fabrication, assembly, treatment, packaging, incidental storage, sales, and distribution of such products, but excluding basic industrial processing. 1.91 “Limited Access Facility” means a roadway especially designed for through traffic, and over, from, or to which owners or occupants of abutting land or other person have no greater than a limited right or easement of access. 1.92 “Littoral” means that portion of a body of water extending from shoreline toward the middle of the water to the limit of occupancy by rooted plants. 1.92.1 “Live-Aboard Vessel” means any vessel which is a habitable vessel on which habitation is occurring and which is used as a person’s primary legal residence or temporary or seasonal residence even though it is not used solely as a residence but is also used for other purposes. A person’s primary legal residence is a vessel where a person is presently living with the present intention of making it his or her permanent abode. A temporary or seasonal residence means habitation aboard a floating home or a vessel occupied by one (1) or more persons, while the home or vessel is moored or docked. Habitable vessel means a vessel that is equipped with an on-board toilet. The term live- aboard vessel shall not include commercial fishing boats. Nothing within this definition shall be construed to prohibit or regulate the anchorage of non-live-aboard vessels engaged in the exercise of rights of navigation. 1.92.2 “Local Area of Particular Concern” means an area designated on the Natural Resource Map Series of the Broward County Land Use Plan which has been declared to be environmentally sensitive. Those areas are subject to environmental impact report provisions of the Broward County Land Development Code and policies under Broward County Land Use Plan Objective 9.01.00. The criteria for Local Areas of Particular Concern are contained in the Plan Implementation Requirements section of the Broward County Land Use Plan. 1.93 “Local Comprehensive Plan” means any or all local comprehensive plans or elements or portions thereof prepared, adopted, or amended pursuant to the Local Government Comprehensive Planning and Land Development Regulation Act. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 10-14 1.94 “Local Government” means a unit of government or any officially designated public agency or authority of a unit of government with less than statewide jurisdiction, or any officially designated public agency or authority of such a governmental entity. The term includes a county, an incorporated municipality, a consolidated city-county government, a metropolitan planning organization, an expressway or transportation authority, a turnpike project, a regional planning council, or a school board or other special district. 1.95 “Local Planning Agency” means the agency designated to prepare the comprehensive plan required by Chapter 163, Florida Statutes. 1.96 “Local Road” means a roadway providing service which is of relatively low traffic volume, short average trip length or minimal through traffic movements, and high volume land access for abutting property. 1.97 “Lot” includes tract or parcel - means the least fractional part of subdivided lands having limited fixed boundaries, and an assigned number, letter, or other name through which it may be identified. 1.98 “Lot or Parcel of Record” means a quantity of real property as a single unit described and identified in a deed and/or plat recorded in the public records of a county in the State of Florida. 1.99 “Low Income Families” means “lower income families” as defined under the Section 8 Assisted Housing Program or families whose annual income does not exceed 80 percent of the median income for the area. The term “families” includes “households”. 1.99.1 “Low-Income Person” means one (1) or more natural persons or a family, not including students, that has a total annual anticipated income for the household that does not exceed 80 percent of the median annual income adjusted for family size for the county. While occupying a rental unit, a Low-Income Person's annual anticipated gross income may increase to an amount not to exceed 140 percent of 80 percent of the applicable median income adjusted for family size. 1.100 “Major Trip Generators or Attractors” means concentrated areas of intense land use or activity that produces or attracts a significant number of local trip ends. 1.101 “Marine Habitat” means areas where living marine resources naturally occur, such as mangroves, seagrass beds, algae beds, salt marshes, transitional wetlands, marine wetlands, rocky shore communities, hard bottom communities, oyster bars or flats, mud flats, coral reefs, worm reefs, artificial reefs, offshore springs, nearshore mineral deposits, and offshore sand deposits. 1.102 “Marine Resources” means living oceanic or estuarine plants or animals, such as mangroves, seagrasses, algae, coral reefs, and living marine habitat; fish, shellfish, crustacea and fisheries; and sea turtles and marine mammals. 1.103 “Marine Wetlands” means areas with a water regime determined primarily by tides and the dominant vegetation is salt tolerant plant species including those species listed in Subsection 17-4.02(17), Florida Administrative Code, “Submerged Marine Species”. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 10-15 1.104 “Mass Transit” means passenger services provided by public, private or non-profit entities such as the following surface transit modes: commuter rail, rail rapid transit, light rail transit, light guideway transit, express bus, and local fixed route bus. 1.105 “Mean High Water” means the average height of the high waters over a 19 -year period. For shorter periods of observation, “mean high water” means the average height of the high waters after corrections are applied to eliminate known variations and to reduce the result to the equivalent of mean 19-year value. 1.106 “Mean High-Water Line” means the intersection of the tidal plane of mean high water with the shore. 1.107 “Mean Low Water” means the average height of the low waters over a 19 -year period. For shorter periods of observation, “mean low water” means the average height of low waters after corrections are applied to eliminate known variations and to reduce the result to the equivalent of mean 19-year value. 1.108 “Mean Low Water Line” means the intersection of the tidal plane of mean low water with the shore. 1.109 “Minerals” means all solid minerals, including clay, gravel, phosphate rock, lime, shells (excluding live shellfish), stone, sand, heavy minerals, and any rare earths, which are contained in the soils or waters of the state. 1.109.1 “Minimization” shall mean to reduce the wetland impacts of development by considering all aspects of a proposed development so that wetland impacts are reduced to the smallest possible amount, extent, size or degree consistent with Article XI. Chapter 27- 335 of the Broward County Code of Ordinances enacted December 18, 1990. 1.110 “Mining” means the removal of minerals from their site, solely for commercial purposes which may include crushing, batching, mixing and forming of mined materials. 1.111 “Mobile Home” means a structure, transportable in one or more sections, which, in the traveling mode, is eight body feet or more in width, and which is built on a metal frame and designed to be used as a dwelling with or without a permanent foundation when connected to the required utilities, and includes the plumbing, heating, air conditioning and electrical systems contained herein. If fabricated after June 15, 1976, each section bears a U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development label certifying that it is built in compliance with the Federal Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standards. 1.111.1 “Moderate-Income Person” means one (1) or more natural persons or a family, not including students, that has a total annual anticipated income for the household that does not exceed 120 percent of the median annual income adjusted for family size for households within the county. While occupying a rental unit, a Moderate Income Person's annual anticipated gross income may increase to an amount not to exceed 140 percent of 120 percent of the applicable median income adjusted for family size. 1.112 “Municipality” means any incorporated city, town, or village. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 10-16 1.112.1 “Native Vegetative Communities” means those areas which contain ecological communities, such as coastal strands, oak hammocks, and cypress swamps, which are classified based on the presence of certain soils, native vegetation and animals. 1.113 “Natural Drainage Features” means the naturally occurring features of an area which accommodate the flow of stormwater, such as streams, rivers, lakes and wetlands. 1.114 “Natural Reservations” means areas designated for conservation purposes, and operated by contractual agreement with or managed by a federal, state, regional or local government or non-profit agency such as: national parks, state parks, lands purchased under the Save Our Coast, Conservation and Recreation Lands or Save Our Rivers programs, sanctuaries, preserves, monuments, archaeological sites, historic sites, wildlife management areas, national seashores, and Outstanding Florida Waters. 1.115 “Natural Resources” means those natural resources identified in Section 9J-5.006(4) (b) Florida Administrative Code: existing and planned water wells and cones of influence; beaches and shores, including estuarine systems; rivers, bays, lakes, floodplains, and harbors; wetlands; minerals and soils. 1.116 “Neighborhood Park” means a park which serves the population of a neighborhood and is generally accessible by bicycle or pedestrian ways. 1.117 “Neighborhood Shopping Center” means a shopping center typically ranging from 30,000 to 100,000 square feet of gross leasable area for the sale of convenience goods (food, drugs and sundries) and personal services which meet the daily needs of an immediate neighborhood. Neighborhood shopping centers range in area from approximately 3 acres to 10 acres and generally require a minimum market support population ranging from 2,500 to 40,000 people. 1.117.1 “Net Site Area” means the entire acreage of the site located inside the parcel boundary, less existing and future right-of-way. 1.118 “Newspaper of General Circulation” means a newspaper published at least on a weekly basis and printed in the language most commonly spoken in the area within which it circulates, but does not include a newspaper intended primarily for members of a particular professional or occupational group, a newspaper whose primary function is to carry legal notices, or a newspaper that is given away primarily to distribute advertising. 1.119 “Nonpoint Source Pollution” means any source of water pollution that is not a point source. 1.120 “Objective” means a specific, measurable, intermediate end that is achievable and marks progress towards a goal. 1.121 “Ocean Waters” means waters of the Atlantic Ocean, Gulf of Mexico, or Straits of Florida, but does not include bays, lagoons, or harbors. 1.122 “Open Spaces” means undeveloped lands suitable for passive recreation or conservation uses. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 10-17 1.123 “Parcel of Land” means any quantity of land capable of being described with such definiteness that its location and boundaries may be established which is designated by its owner or developer as land to be used or developed as a unit or which has been used or developed as a unit. 1.124 “Park” means a community or regional park. 1.125 “Parties Affected” means any persons or firms owning property in, or residing in, either a municipality proposing annexation or contraction or owning property that is proposed for annexation to a municipality or any governmental unit with jurisdiction over such area. 1.126 “Peat” means a dark-brown or black substrate produced by the partial decomposition and disintegration of mosses, sedges, trees and other plants growing in areas of its deposition; peat characteristically is deposited in certain wetland types. 1.127 “Person” means an individual, corporation, governmental agency, business trust, estate, trust, partnership, association, two or more persons having a joint or common interest, or any other legal entity. 1.27.1 “Phase 1 Environmental Assessment” means a thorough evaluation of the present and past uses and environmental condition of a property. It includes a database search, review of property history, site inspection and comprehensive report (no collection of physical samples). 1.27.2 “Phase 2 Environmental Assessment” a thorough evaluation and report of the present environmental condition of a property based on physical samples used for various evaluations. This may include evaluation of soil, ground water, underground tanks, and material samples that can be used to check for asbestos, lead, hazardous chemicals and biological agents, such as bird droppings, mold and bacteria. 1.128 “Planning Act” means the Local Government Comprehensive Planning and Land Development Regulation Act, Sections 163.3161 et.seq., Florida Statutes. 1.129 “Planning Council” means the Broward County Planning Council. 1.130 “Plat” means a map or delineated representation of the subdivision of lands, being a complete exact representation of the subdivision and other information in compliance with the requirement of all applicable sections of this chapter and of any local ordinances, and may include the terms “replat”, “amended Plat”, or “revised Plat”. 1.131 “Playground” means a recreation area with play apparatus. 1.132 “Point Source Pollution” means any source of water pollution that constitutes a discernible, confined, and discrete conveyance, including but not limited to any pipe, ditch, channel, tunnel, conduit, well, discrete fissure, container, rolling stock, concentrated animal feeding operation, or vessel or other floating craft, from which pollutants are or may be discharged. This term does not include return flows from irrigated agriculture. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 10-18 1.133 “Policy” means the way in which programs and activities are conducted to achieve an identified goal. 1.134 “Pollution” is the presence in the outdoor atmosphere, ground or water of any substances, contaminants, noise, or manmade or man-induced alteration of the chemical, physical, biological, or radiological integrity of air or water, in quantities or at levels which are or may be potentially harmful or injurious to human health or welfare, animal or plant life, or property, or unreasonably interfere with the enjoyment of life or property. 1.135 “Pond” means a small, quiet body of standing water, usually sufficiently shallow to permit the potential growth of rooted plants from shore to shore. 1.136 “Port Facility” means harbor or shipping improvements used predominantly for commercial purposes including channels, turning basins, jetties, breakwaters, landings, wharves, docks, markets, structures, buildings, piers, storage facilities, plazas, anchorages, utilities, bridges, tunnels, roads, causeways, and all other property or facilities necessary or useful in connection with commercial shipping. 1.137 “Potable Water Facilities” means a system of structures designed to collect, treat, or distribute potable water, and includes water wells, treatment plants, reservoirs, and distribution mains. 1.138 “Principal Building” means a building which is occupied by, or devoted to, a principal use or an addition to an existing principal building which is larger than the original existing building. In determining whether a building is of primary importance, the use of the entire parcel shall be considered. There may be more than one principal building on a parcel. 1.139 “Principal Use” means the primary or main use of a parcel of land as distinguished from an accessory use. There may be more than one principal or main use on a parcel of land. 1.140 “Private Recreation Sites” means sites owned by private, commercial or non-profit entities available to the public for purposes of recreational use. 1.141 “Protected Potable Water System” means a community water supply which has been given a consumptive use permit by the South Florida Water Management District and which is protected by the Broward County wellfield protection program. 1.142 “Public Access” means the ability of the public to physically reach, enter or use recreation sites including beaches and shores. 1.143 “Public Building and Grounds” means structures or lands that are owned, leased, or operated by a government entity, such as civic and community centers, hospitals, libraries, police stations, fire stations, and government administration buildings. 1.144 “Public Facilities” means major capital improvements, including, but not limited to, transportation, sanitation, solid waste, drainage, potable water, educational, parks and recreational, and health systems and facilities. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 10-19 1.145 “Public Notice or Due Public Notice” as used in connection with the phrase “public hearing” or “hearing to be held after due public notice” means publication of notice of the time, place, and purpose of such hearing at least twice in a newspaper of general circulation in the area, with the first publication not less than 14 days prior to the date of the hearing and the second to be at least 5 days prior to the date of the hearing. 1.146 “Public Recreation Sites” means sites owned or leased on a long -term basis by a federal, state, regional or local government agency for purposes of recreational use. 1.147 “Public Utility” includes any public or private utility, such as, but not limited to, storm drainage, sanitary sewers, electric power, water service, gas service, or telephone line, whether underground or overhead. 1.148 “Recertification” means a local land use plan which has previously been certified by the Broward County Planning Council, but because of amendments, decertification, or amendments to the Broward County Land Use Plan, is no longer in conformity, and must be recertified by the Broward County Planning Council as being in substantial conformity with the Broward County Land Use Plan. 1.149 “Recreation” means the pursuit of leisure time activities occurring in an indoor or outdoor setting. 1.150 “Recreation Facility” means a component of a recreation site used by the public such as a trail, court, athletic field or swimming pool. 1.151 “Recreational Uses” means activities within areas where recreation occurs. 1.152 “Recreational Vehicle Park” means a place set aside and offered by a person or public body, for either direct or indirect remuneration of the owner, lessor or operator of such place, for the parking and accommodation of six or more recreational vehicles (as defined in Section 320.01(1) (b) Florida Statutes) or tents utilized for sleeping or eating; and the term also includes buildings and sites set aside for group camping and similar recreational facilities. 1.153 “Regional Park” means acreage listed in the “Community and Regional Parks” subsection of the Plan Implementation Requirements Section of the Broward County Land Use Plan that is utilized by the Broward County Board of County Commissioners to meet the regional level parks requirement of the Broward County Land Use Plan. 1.154 “Regional Plan for South Florida” means the plan prepared and adopted by the South Florida Regional Planning Council, pursuant to the provisions of Section 185.507 Florida Statutes governing comprehensive regional policy plans. 1.155 “Regional Planning Agency” means the regional planning council created pursuant to Sections 186.501-186.515 to exercise responsibilities under Sections 186.001-186.031 and 186.801-186.911, Florida Statutes, in a particular region of the state. 1.156 “Regional Roadway Network” means the roads contained within the Broward County Metropolitan Planning Organization’s adopted Year 2030 Highway Network, except for those roads functionally classified as city collector roads. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 10-20 1.157 “Regional Shopping Center” means a shopping center which typically ranges from approximately 300,000 square feet to 1,000,000 square feet or more of gross leasable area and provides a full range of shopping goods, general merchandise, apparel, furniture, and home furnishings. Such center is usually built around a full-line department store as the major drawing power. Regional shopping centers are approximately 30 acres in size or larger and generally require a minimum market support population in excess of 150,000 people and a trade area extending 10 to 15 miles or more modified by such factors as competitive facilities and travel time over access highways. 1.158 “Regulated Plant Index” means the total number of species native to the State of Florida that are listed as commercially exploited plants, endangered plants, and threatened plants. 1.159 “Remnant Natural River” means a naturally occurring watercourse or riverine system, or a portion or segment thereof, whose channel has remained unaltered over time as evidenced by historical surveys or other appropriate documentation. Examples of remnant natural rivers in Broward County include portions of the following: South Fork of the Middle River, North Fork of the New River, New River, Tarpon Creek, South Fork of the New River and Whiskey Creek. 1.160 “Resident Population” means inhabitants counted in the same manner utilized by the United States Bureau of the Census, in the category of total population. Resident population does not include seasonal population. 1.161 “Residential Uses” means activities within land areas used predominantly for housing. 1.162 “Resource Planning and Management Committee” means a committee appointed pursuant to Section 380.045, Florida Statutes. 1.163 “Retail Shopping Area” means a miscellaneous collection of individual stores which stand on separate lot parcels along streets and highways or which are clustered as a concentrated business district, with or without incidental off-street parking (as distinguished from a shopping center). 1.163.1 “Research Laboratory” means an establishment or other facility for carrying on investigation in the natural, physical, or social sciences, which may include engineering and product development. 1.163.2 “Revetment” means a facing of resistant material such as stone or concrete that is built to protect a scarp, embankment, or other shoreline feature against erosion. 1.164 “Right-of-Way” means land dedicated, deeded, used, or to be used for a street, alley, walkway, boulevard, drainage facility, access or ingress and egress, or other purpose by the public, certain designated individuals, or governing bodies. 1.165 “Roadway Functional Classification” means the assignment of roads into categories according to the character of service they provide in relation to the total road network. Basic functional categories include limited access facilities, arterial roads, and collector City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 10-21 roads, which may be subcategorized into principal, major or minor levels. Those levels may be further grouped into urban and rural categories. 1.166 “Rural Purposes” means that land which is used as a resource for agricultural, equestrian, managed forests or mining uses, or maintained in a natural state as wetlands, fields or forests. 1.167 “Saltwater Marsh” means a wetland having saline (including brackish) soils with 40 percent or less cover by woody plants and 25 percent or more cover by terrestrial herbs that is occasionally or regularly flooded by brackish or saline water (e.g., smooth cordgrass marshes). 1.168 “Saltwater Swamp” means a wetland having saline (including brackish) soils with 40 percent or more cover by woody plants and occasionally or regularly flooded by brackish or saline water (e.g., mangrove swamps). 1.169 “Sanitary Sewer Facilities” means structures or systems designed for t he collection, transmission, treatment, or disposal of sanitary sewage, and includes trunk mains, interceptors, treatment plants and disposal systems. 1.170 “Seasonal Population” means part-time inhabitants who utilize, or may be expected to utilize, public facilities or services, but are not residents. Seasonal population shall include tourists, migrant farm workers, and other short-term and long-term visitors. 1.171 “Septic Tank” means an on-site sanitary sewage disposal system, consisting of a watertight receptacle constructed to promote separation of solid and liquid components of wastewater, to provide limited digestion of organic matter, to store solids, and to allow clarified liquid to discharge for further treatment and disposal in a soil absorption system. 1.172 “Services” means the program and employees determined necessary by local government to provide adequate operation and maintenance of public facilities and infrastructure as well as those educational, health care, social and other programs necessary to support the programs, public facilities, and infrastructure set out in the local plan or required by local, state, or federal law. 1.173 “Shopping Center” means a group of architecturally unified commercial establishments built on a site which is planned, developed, owned, and managed as an operating unit related in its location, size, and type of shops to the trade area that the unit serves. The unit provides on-site parking in definite relationship to the types and total size of the stores. 1.174 “Shoreline or Shore” means the interface of land and water and, as used in the coastal management element requirements, is limited to oceanic and estuarine interfaces. 1.175 “Solid Waste” means sludge from a waste treatment works, water supply treatment plant, or air pollution control facility or garbage, rubbish, refuse, or other discarded material, including solid, liquid, semisolid, or contained gaseous material resulting from domestic, industrial, commercial, mining, agricultural, or governmental operations. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 10-22 1.176 “Solid Waste Facilities” means structures or systems designed for the collection, processing, or disposal of solid wastes, including hazardous wastes and includes transfer stations, processing plants, recycling plants, and disposal systems. 1.177 “Solid Waste Processing Plant” means a facility for incineration, resource recovery, or recycling of solid waste prior to its final disposal. 1.178 “State Comprehensive Plan” means the goals and policies contained within the state comprehensive plan, Section 187.201, Florida Statutes. 1.179 “State Land Planning Agency” means the Department of Community Affairs and may be referred to in this part as “DCA”. 1.180 “Stormwater” means the flow of water which results from a rainfall event. 1.181 “Stream” means any mass of water with a unidirectional flow. 1.182 “Street” includes any access way such as a street, road, lane, highway, avenue, boulevard, alley, parkway, viaduct, circle, court, terrace, place, or cul-de-sac, and also includes all of the land lying between the right-of-way lines as delineated on a plat showing such streets, whether improved or unimproved, but shall not include those access ways such as easements and rights-of-way intended solely for limited utility purposes, such as for electric power lines, gas lines, telephone lines, water lines, drainage and sanitary sewers, and easements of ingress and egress. 1.183 “Structure” means anything constructed, installed or portable, the use of which requires a location on a parcel of land. It includes a movable structure while it is located on land which can be used for housing, business, commercial, agricultural, or office purposes either temporarily or permanently. “Structure” also includes fences, billboards, swimming pools, poles, pipelines, transmission lines, tracks, and advertising signs. 1.184 “Subdivision” means the platting of real property into two or more lots, parcels, tracts, tiers, blocks, sites, units, or any other division of land, and includes establishment of new streets and alleys, additions, and resubdivisions and, when appropriate to the context, relates to the process of subdividing or to the lands or area subdivided. 1.185 “Substantial Conformity” refers to the Broward County Charter requirement contained in Article VI, Section 6.05, Paragraphs D & E that local governmental future land use plans shall be materially and pertinently compatible with and further the Broward County Land Use Plan in order to be certified or recertified. 1.186 “Support Documents” means any surveys, studies, inventory maps, data, inventories, listings or analyses used as bases for or in developing the local comprehensive plan. 1.187 “Surface Waters” means lakes or ponds excavated to generate fill material for a development and/or to provide recreational and aesthetic amenities. Other water upon the surface of the earth, contained in bounds created naturally or diffused, including water from natural springs, is defined as “lake”, “pond” or “stream”. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 10-23 1.188 “Threatened Species” means any species of fish and wildlife naturally occurring in Florida which may not be in immediate danger of extinction, but which exists in such small populations as to become endangered if it is subjected to increased stress as a result of further modification of its environment. 1.189 “Tide” means the periodic rising and falling of the waters of the earth that result from the gravitational attraction of the moon and the sun acting upon the rotating earth. 1.190 “Time-Share Period” means that period of time when a purchaser of a time-share plan is entitled to the possession and use of the accommodations or facilities, or both, of a time- share plan. 1.191 “Time-Share Plan” means any arrangement, plan, scheme, or similar device, other than an exchange program, whether by membership, agreement, tenancy in common, sale, lease, deed, rental agreement, license, or right-to-use agreement or by any other means, whereby a purchaser, in exchange for a consideration, receives ownership rights in or a right to use accommodations or facilities, or both, for a period of time less than a full year during any given year, but not necessarily for consecutive years, and which extends for a period of more than 3 years. 1.192 “Time-Share Property” means one or more time-share units subject to the same time- share instrument, together with any other property or rights to property appurtenant to those units. 1.193 “Time-Share Unit” means an accommodation of a time-share plan which is divided into time-share periods. 1.194 “Tourist Unit” means a house, an apartment, a group of rooms, or a single room occupied or intended for occupancy as a separate living quarter which is licensed, or intended for license as a “hotel” or “motel” by the State Department of Business Regulation, Division of Hotels and Restaurants. 1.195 “Urban Character” means an area used intensively for residential, urban recreational, commercial, industrial, institutional, or governmental purposes or an area undergoing development for any of these purposes. 1.195.1 “Urban Infill” means the development of vacant parcels in otherwise built-up areas where public facilities such as sewer systems, roads, schools, and recreation areas are already in place and the average residential density is at least five (5) dwelling units per acre, the average nonresidential intensity is at least a floor area ratio (FAR) of 1.0 and vacant, developable land does not constitute more than 10 percent of the area. 1.195.2 “Urban Purposes” means that land is used intensively for residential, c ommercial, industrial, institutional, and governmental purposes, including any parcels of land retained in their natural state or kept free of development as dedicated greenbelt areas. 1.195.3 “Urban Redevelopment” means the demolition and reconstruction or substantial renovation of existing buildings or infrastructure within urban infill or existing urban service areas. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 10-24 1.196 “Urban Services” means services offered by a municipality, either directly or by contract, to any of its present residents. 1.197 “Vegetative Communities” means ecological communities, such as coastal strands, oak hammocks, and cypress swamps, which are classified based on the presence of certain soils, vegetation and animals. 1.197.1 “Very Low-Income Person” means one (1) or more natural persons or a family, not including students, that has a total annual anticipated income for the household that does not exceed 50 percent of the median annual income adjusted for family size for households within the county. While occupying a rental unit, a Very Low-Income Person's annual anticipated gross income may increase to an amount not to exceed 140 percent of 50 percent of the applicable median income adjusted for family size. 1.198 “Vested Rights” means rights which have so completely and definitely accrued to or settled in a person, to the extent that it is right and equitable that government should recognize and protect, as being lawful in themselves, and settled according to then current law. 1.199 “Water Conservation Area” means designated conservation areas on the Future Broward County Land Use Map (Series) including reserve water supply areas such as the 790 square miles of Broward County west of Levees 33, 35A, 36, L-37 and L-35 and includes the natural reservations. 1.200 “Water Dependent Uses” means activities which can be carried out only on, in or adjacent to water areas because the use requires access to the water body for: waterborne transportation including ports or marinas, recreation, electrical generating facilities, or water supply. 1.201 “Water Recharge Areas” means land or water areas through which groundwater is replenished. 1.202 “Water-Related Uses” means activities which are not directly dependent upon access to a water body, but which provide goods and services that are directly associated with water-dependent or waterway uses. 1.203 “Water Wells” means wells excavated, drilled, dug, or driven for the supply of industrial, agricultural or potable water for general public consumption. 1.204 “Wetlands” means those areas that are inundated by water, with sufficient frequency to support, and normally do support an assemblage of organisms that is adapted to saturated or seasonally saturated soil conditions for growth and reproduction including, but not necessarily limited to swamps, marshes, bogs, sloughs, potholes, wet meadows, river flood plains, mud flats and wet prairies. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 10-25 Section 2. General Requirements 2.01 The Land Use Plan shall be implemented by the adoption and enforcement of appropriate land development regulations and no development shall be permitted within the City’s jurisdiction unless the development is consistent with the Land Use Plan. 2.02 The City shall initiate and actively process the adoption of land development regulations, a land development code or amendments thereto, and the rezoning of all parcels of land within the City’s jurisdiction as to permitted uses and densities as may be necessary to comply with the Land Use Plan within a reasonable time after its adoption. 2.03 Following the effective date of the Land Use Plan, the City may not grant a development permit unless: 1. The proposed development would be consistent with the Land Use Plan; 2. The proposed development would be in compliance with applicable City land development regulations, which are consistent with the Land Use Plan; and 3. The development permit is granted in compliance with the requirements of Section 4 of this chapter (Development Review Requirements). 2.04 After the effective date of the Comprehensive Plan, the City shall not grant an application for a building permit for the construction of a principal building on a parcel of land unless a plat including the parcel or parcels of land has been approved by the County Commission and recorded in the official records of Broward County subsequent to June 4, 1953. However, such platting requirement shall not apply to applications for a building permit which meets any of the following criteria: a) Construction of one single-family dwelling unit or duplex unit on a lot or parcel which lot or parcel was of record as such in the applicable public records as of March 1, 1989; b) Construction on any multi-family or nonresidential lot or parcel which is less than five (5) acres in size and specifically delineated on a plat recorded on or before June 4, 1953; provided that in addition to meeting the above criteria, the issuance of the building permit shall be subject to all of the following: a) Compliance with the applicable land development regulations; and b) Any land within the lot or parcel which is necessary to comply with the Broward County Trafficways Plan has been conveyed to the public by deed or grant of easement. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 10-26 Section 3. Zoning as to Permitted Uses and Densities 3.01 City zoning as to permitted uses and densities must be in compliance with or be more restrictive than the requirements of the Land Use Plan. For purposes of this section “more restrictive” means zoning which permits less than all of the uses permitted by the Land Use Plan on a parcel of land, or, for a parcel of land designated residential by the Land Use Plan Map, a lower residential density than permitted by the Land Use Plan. 3.02 City zoning as to permitted uses and densities shall be in compliance with the City’s Land Use Plan if the following requirements are met: A. Each parcel of land within an area which is designated in a Residential Land Use category by the Land Use Plan must be zoned in a zoning district which permits any one or more of the following uses, but not other uses: 1. Residential dwelling units at a maximum density that does not exceed the maximum gross residential density designated for the parcel of land by the Land Use Plan Map. 2. Home occupations and other activities and uses accessory to a dwelling unit. 3. Parks, golf courses and other outdoor recreational facilities and recreational, civic or cultural buildings ancillary to the primary outdoor recreational use of the site. 4. Community facilities designed to serve the residential area, such as schools, day care centers, churches, clinics, nursing homes, governmental administration, police and fire protection facilities, libraries and civic centers. 5. Public utilities, including water and wastewater treatment plants, pumping stations, power plant substations and transmission facilities and solid waste disposal and transfer stations, excluding landfills and electrical power plants. 6. Communication facilities. 7. Agriculture. 8. Offices and/or retail sales of merchandise or services, subject to the following limitations and provisions: a) No more than a total of five percent (5%) of the area designated for residential use on the Future Broward County Land Use Plan Map (Series) within a flexibility zone may be used for offices and/or retail sales of merchandise or services. b) No contiguous area used for offices and/or retail sales of merchandise or services may exceed ten (10) acres. For the purpose of this provision, contiguous is defined as: attached; located within 500 feet; or separated only by streets and highways, canals and rivers, or easements. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 10-27 c) Space within residential buildings in areas designated for Medium-High (25) Residential or High (50) Residential density may be used for offices and/or retail sales of merchandise or services, as long as no more than 50% of the floor area is used for said purpose. d) Space within residential buildings in areas designated for Medium (16) Residential density may be used for offices, as long as no more than 50% of the floor area is used for offices. 9. Recreational vehicle park sites in the Low-Medium (10), Medium (16), Medium- High (25) and High (50) Residential density ranges. The maximum number of recreational vehicle park sites permitted is: a) Equal to the maximum number of dwelling units designated for that parcel on the Land Use Plan Map if the local land development regulations allow permanent location of recreational vehicles on the sites; or b) Double the maximum number of dwelling units designated for that parcel on the Land Use Plan Map if the local land development regulations prohibit permanent location of recreational vehicles on the sites. 10. Special Residential Facilities subject to: meeting one of the Category definitions as contained in the Special Residential Facilities Permitted Uses subsection of the Plan Implementation Requirements section of the Broward County Land Use Plan; meeting density provisions by Category type stated below; and the limitations as expressed by the certified land use plan map; and if applicable, the provisions regarding the use and allocation of reserve units, flexibility units or bonus sleeping rooms as contained in the “Administrative Rules Document” of the Broward County Planning Council. Density Provisions: a) Special Residential Facility Category (1) development shall count as one (1) dwelling unit each. b) Special Residential Facility Category (2) development shall count as two (2) dwelling units each. c) Special Residential Facility Category (3) development shall count as one (1) dwelling unit per every two (2) sleeping rooms regardless of the number of kitchens or baths. B. Residential Density 1. Density Standards. Residential areas are shown on the Oakland Park Land Use Map consistent with Policy 1.7.1 of this Plan. The following ranges of density apply: City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 10-28 i The Low Density Residential category permits up to five (5) dwelling units per gross acre. i The Low-Medium Density Residential category permits up to ten (10) dwelling units per gross acre. i The Medium Density Residential category permits up to sixteen (16) dwelling units per gross acre. i The Medium-High Density Residential category permits up to twenty-five (25) dwelling units per gross acre. The following other land use categories and land uses are subject to density standards as provided within Section 3. Zoning as to Permitted Uses and Densities: a) Special Residential Facilities. b) Recreational vehicle sites. 2. Density Calculation All references to density within the Broward County Land Use Plan mean gross density. Gross density means the number of dwelling units constructed or proposed within an area, divided by the gross acreage of the area. Gross acreage means the total number of acres in the area, including acreage used or proposed for streets, lakes, waterways, and other proposed land uses permitted in residential areas by the Broward County Land Use Plan. Calculations of acreage covered by different land use categories on the Future Broward County Land Use Plan Map (Series) will necessarily be approximate, due to the scale of the map. Where edges of land use categories are close to property lines, streets, transmission lines or other existing lines, edges should be construed to follow these lines. 3. Arrangement of Dwelling Units Any arrangement of dwelling units on a parcel of land designated for residential use is compatible with the City Land Use Plan as long as the maximum number of dwelling units permitted within the parcel is not exceeded. For example, the City Land Use Plan does not regulate whether a developer uses 100 acres of land designated for Low (5) Residential density to build 500 single family homes or whether the same 100 acres are used to build a 500 unit high-rise structure, with the balance of the land maintained as permanent open space. The distribution of units will be determined by City zoning and land development regulations. 4. Dashed-Line Areas (Irregular Density Residential) Some areas, such as selected Developments of Regional Impact, planned unit developments and partially completed large scale developments, have been marked on the City Land Use Plan Map by dashed lined circumscribing their edges. For each of these areas, the maximum overall density in dwelling units per acre is the number which appears in the circle inside the dashed line. That City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 10-29 number can be multiplied by the number of acres inside the dashed line, including areas not designated for residential use, to ascertain the maximum number of dwelling units allowable within the dashed line. The dwelling units that are permitted within areas circumscribed by a dashed line may only be applied within the boundaries of the circumscribed area and may not be transferred. Within the areas circumscribed by the dash line, the water area can be counted towards the overall density. 5. Flexibility Units “Flexibility units” means the difference between the number of dwelling units permitted within a flexibility zone by the Future Broward County Land Use Plan Map (Series) and the number of dwelling units permitted within the flexibility zone by a City’s certified future land use plan map. Since the certified City land use plan map may be more restrictive than the Future Broward County Land Use Plan Map (Series), available flexibility units may be utilized by the City of Oakland Park to rearrange residential densities consistent with County Land Use Plan provisions. Rearrangement of residential densities utilizing flexibility units will be administered within “flexibility zones”. The boundaries of and rules governing “flexibility zones” and rearrangement of residential densities there, as referenced in County Land Use Plan Policy provisions, will be established within the Broward County Planning Council’s “Administrative Rules Document”. The maximum number of dwelling units permitted in a flexibility zone by the City land use plan map shall not exceed the number of dwelling units permitted in the flexibility zone by the Future Broward County Land Use Plan Map (Series). 6. Reserve Units “Reserve units” mean additional permitted dwelling units equal up to two percent (2%) of the total number of dwelling units permitted within a flexibility zone by the Future Broward County Land Use Plan Map (Series). The City may establish provisions with the City land use plan, consistent with County Land Use Policy provisions, to allocate residential densities, utilizing reserve units, which exceed those shown on the City land use plan map. Allocation of reserve units will be administered within “flexibility zones” and not require amendment of the certified City land use plan. The boundaries of and rules governing “flexibility zone” and allocation of reserve units there, as referenced in County Land Use Plan Policy provisions, will be established within the Broward County Planning Council’s “Administrative Rules Document”. The number of reserve units in a flexibility zone will be fixed at the adoption of the Future Broward County Land Use Plan Map (Series). The number of reserve units assigned to a parcel designated for residential use on the City land use plan map may not exceed 100% of the maximum number of dwelling units indicated City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 10-30 for the parcel by the City land use plan map. However, the City land use plan, the zoning, and the applicable land development regulations shall not permit any density higher than fifty dwelling units per gross acre. C. Each parcel of land within an area designated in a Commercial Land Use category by the City’s Land Use Plan Map must be zoned in a zoning district which permits any one or more of the following uses, but no other uses: 1. Retail uses. 2. Office and business uses. 3. Wholesale, storage, light fabricating and warehouses uses, if deemed appropriate by the City. 4. Hotels, motels and similar lodging. 5. Recreation and open space, cemeteries, and commercial recreation uses. 6. Community facilities and utilities excluding landfills and electrical power plants. 7. a) Special Residential Facility Category (2) development as defined in the Special Residential Facilities Permitted Uses subsection of the Plan Implementation Requirements section of the Broward County Land Use Plan; subject to the allocation of two (2) reserve or flexibility units in accordance with the Special Residential Facility provisions and policies for the application of these units as contained in the “Administrative Rules Document” of the Broward County Planning Council. b) Special Residential Facility Category (3) development as defined in the Special Residential Facilities Permitted Uses subsection of the Plan Implementation Requirements section of the Broward County Land Use Plan; subject to the allocation of reserve or flexibility units in accordance with the Special Residential Facility provisions and policies for the application of these units as contained in the “Administrative Rules Document” of the Broward County Planning Council; each flexibility or reserve unit shall permit two (2) sleeping rooms regardless of the number of kitchens or baths. 8. Nonresidential agriculture uses. 9. Residential uses are permitted in the same structure as a commercial use provided that the local government entity applies flexibility or reserve units to the parcel and: a) The residential floor area does not exceed 50% of the total floor area of the building; or b) The first floor is totally confined to commercial uses and/or City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 10-31 c) For parcels 5 acres in size or less, free standing multi-family residential uses are permitted; within areas designated on the County Plan as Urban Infill, Urban Redevelopment or Downtown Revitalization Areas or Chapter 163 Redevelopment Areas, free standing multi-family residential uses are permitted on parcels 10 acres in size or less; and/or d) For mixed commercial/residential developments greater than 5 acres in size (or 10 acres within areas designated on the County Plan as Urban Infill, Urban Redevelopment or Downtown Revitalization Areas or Chapter 163 Redevelopment Areas) free standing multi-family residential uses are permitted provided that the gross residential acreage does not exceed 5 acres (10 acres within areas designated on the County Plan as Urban Infill, Urban Redevelopment or Downtown Revitalization Areas or Chapter 163 Redevelopment Areas) or 40% of the total gross acreage of the commercially designated parcel, whichever is greater, and that the entire mixed commercial/residential development be governed by specific zoning regulations that establish criteria to ensure proper integration and compatibility of land uses within and surrounding the development; and/or e) Residential units within the same structure as commercial uses for the owner, manager or caretaker of the commercial uses may be located in areas designated commercial without the application of flexibility units or reserve units. 10. Recreational vehicle park sites at a maximum density of the (10) sites per gross acre if permanent location of recreational vehicles on the site is permitted by the City land development regulations, twenty (20) sites per gross acre if such permanent location is prohibited by the local land development regulations, subject to allocation by the City government entity of available flexibility or reserve units. 11. Transportation and communication facilities. D. Each parcel of land within an area designated in a Community Facility Land Use category by the City’s Land Use Plan Map must be zoned in a zoning district which permits one or more of the following uses: 1. Community facilities, including schools, churches, hospitals, governmental administration, police and fire stations, libraries, civic centers, nursing homes, cemeteries, and parks and recreation facilities, and judicial and correctional facilities. 2. a) Special Residential Facility Category (2) development as defined in the Special Residential Facilities Permitted Uses subsection of the Plan Implementation Requirements section of the Broward County Land Use Plan; subject to the allocation of two (2) reserve or flexibility units in accordance with the Special Residential Facility provisions and policies for the application of these units as contained in the “Administrative Rules Document” of the Broward County Planning Council. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 10-32 b) Special Residential Facility Category (3) development as defined in the Special Residential Facilities Permitted Uses subsection of the Plan Implementation Requirements section of the Broward County Land Use Plan; subject to the allocation of reserve or flexibility units in accordance with the Special Residential Facility provisions and policies for the application of these units as contained in the “Administration Rules Document” of the Broward County Planning Council. Each flexibility or reserve unit shall permit two (2) sleeping rooms regardless of the number of kitchens or baths. E. Each parcel of land within an area designated in a Park and Recreation Land Use category by the City’s Land Use Plan Map must be zoned in an open space or park and recreation zoning district which permits one or more of the following uses, but no other uses: 1. Passive recreational uses, including, but not limited to: nature centers and trails, scenic areas, wildlife sanctuaries and feeding stations, aquatic preserves, and picnic areas. 2. Golf courses which are intended to remain permanent open space. 3. Camping ground and facilities. 4. Cemeteries. 5. Active recreational uses, including, but not limited to: tennis courts, playgrounds, swimming pools, athletic fields and courts, beaches and bikeways. 6. Boat ramps and docks. 7. Outdoor cultural, educational and civic facilities, including, but not limited to: animal exhibits, habitats, bandshells and outdoor classrooms. 8. Concessions only when accessory to the above uses. Examples of such concessions are refreshment stands, pro shops, souvenir shops and rental facilities. F. Although other uses are permitted in areas designated Industrial, at least 80 percent of such land area must be devoted to industrial use, such as manufacturing, warehouse distribution, research and development, or other substantial employment based activities. Each parcel of land within an area designated in an Industrial Land Use category by the City’s Land Use Plan Map must be zoned in an industrial zoning district which permits one or more of the following uses, but no other uses: 1. Light and heavy industrial uses. 2. Heavy commercial uses including new and used automobile, truck, motorcycle, boat and trailer display, sales, and service; newspaper, magazine, and printing plants; bakeries, carpentry, cabinet shops and other trade shops; motion picture studios; ice houses; propane gas sales and repair; and salvage yards. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 10-33 3. Educational, scientific and industrial research facilities, research laboratories, and medical or dental laboratories. 4. Office uses. 5. Transportation and communication facilities. 6. Recreation and open space, cemeteries, and commercial recreation uses, as long as the location of these uses does not preclude or adversely affect the future use of surrounding areas for industry. 7. Community facilities and utilities excluding electrical power plants. 8. Nonresidential agriculture uses. 9. Ancillary commercial uses within buildings devoted to primary industrial uses. 10. Wholesaling uses. 11. The following uses may also be permitted if certified by the Broward County Planning Council in the City land use plan as long as the total area of these uses does not consume more than 20 percent of the industrial land designated on the Future Broward County Land Use Plan Map (Series) within a flexibility zone, and as long as the location of these uses does not preclude or adversely affect the future use of surrounding areas for industrial uses. a) Commercial and retail business uses. b) Hotel, motel and similar lodging. G. Special Residential Facilities development includes group homes and foster care facilities as defined by category type below and the limitations as expressed by the certified land use plan map, and if applicable, the provisions regarding the use and allocation of reserve units, flexibility units or bonus sleeping rooms as contained in the “Administrative Rules Document” of the Broward County Planning Council. Special Residential Facilities are not specifically designated on the Future Land Use Plan Map (Series) as a special land use category but are permitted within the residential land use category. Definitions of Special Residential Facilities Categories: Special Residential Facility, Category (1) - means a housing facility which is licensed by the State of Florida for no more than eight (8) individuals who require treatment, care, rehabilitation or education. The facility is usually referred to as a group home. This includes individuals who are elderly, dependent children, physically disabled, developmentally disabled or individuals not overtly of harm to themselves or others. The facility provides a family living environment including supervision and care necessary to meet the physical, emotional and social needs of the individuals. It may or may not provide education or training. There may be City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 10-34 more than one kitchen within the housing facility. There may be more than one Special Residential Facility Category (1) on a parcel. Special Residential Facility, Category (2) - means a housing facility which is licensed by the State of Florida for nine (9) to sixteen (16) non-elderly individuals who require treatment, care, rehabilitation or education. The facility is usually referred to as a group home. This includes individuals who are dependent children, physically disabled, developmentally disabled or individuals not overtly of harm to themselves or others. The facility provides a family living environment including supervision and care necessary to meet the physical, emotional and social needs of the individuals. It may or may not provide education or training. There may be more than one kitchen within the housing facility. There may be more than one Special Residential Facility Category (2) on a parcel. Special Residential Facility, Category (3) - means a) A housing facility which is licensed by the State of Florida for more than sixteen (16) non-elderly individuals who require treatment, care, rehabilitation or education. This includes individuals who are dependent children, physically disabled, developmentally disabled or individuals not overtly of harm to themselves or others; or b) A housing facility which is licensed by the State of Florida for more than eight (8) un-related elderly individuals; or c) Government subsidized housing facilities entirely devoted to the care of the elderly, dependent children, the physically handicapped, developmentally disabled or individuals not overtly of harm to themselves or others; or d) Any not-for-profit housing facility for unrelated elderly individuals; or e) Any housing facility which provides a life-care environment. A life-care environment shall include, but is not limited to, creation of a life estate in the facility itself and provision of off-site or on-site medical care. H. Each parcel of land within an area designated in a Conservation Land Use category by the City’s Land Use Plan Map must be zoned in a conservation zoning district which permits one or more of the following uses, but no other uses: 1. Natural Reservations including public lands which are conservation areas operated by contractual agreement with or managed by federal, state, regional, local government or non-profit agency. Within the City of Oakland Park, John Easterlin Park is designated for Conservation use on the City’s Land Use Plan. 2. Uses permitted in Natural Reservations areas designated for conservation are as follows: a) Passive outdoor recreational uses such as wildlife sanctuaries and feeding stations, nature centers and trails, outdoor research stations and walkways. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 10-35 b) Uses which do not impair the natural environment or disturb the natural ecosystem of the area and which are not in conflict with any applicable contractual agreement or management policies of the federal, state, regional, county, municipal or non-profit agency which manages the Natural Reservation. I. Each parcel of land within an area designated in a Utility Land Use category by the City’s Land Use Plan Map must be zoned in an utility zoning district which permits one or more of the following uses, but no other uses or are also allowed in areas designated residential and commercial industrial: 1. Utilities such as water and wastewater treatment plants, pumping stations, electrical substations, solid waste disposal and transfer stations excluding electrical power plants. 2. Other uses determined to be ancillary to the primary uses described in “1”. 3. The following uses may also be permitted in the areas designated utilities as long as the location of these uses does not preclude or adversely affect the future use of the surrounding areas for utility facilities: a. Recreation and open space uses. b. Nonresidential agricultural uses. c. Communication facilities. J. Each parcel of land within an area designated in a Transportation Land Use category by the City’s Land Use Plan Map must be zoned in a transportation zoning district which permits one or more of the following uses, but no other uses: Expressways. K. Each parcel of land within an area designated in a Water Land Use category by the City’s Land Use Plan Map can be zoned in any zoning district. The permitted uses for the water land use category are lakes, waterways, rivers, and canals. No residential units or nonresidential development can be located on areas designated as water. Water acreage cannot be used in determining the number of residential units or the amount of other development which can be located on land adjacent to water except when located in an irregular land use category. L. (Reserved) M. Consistent with Objective 1.14 of the Future Land Use Element, the intent of the Local Activity Center Land Use category is to support a balanced mix of land uses characterized by compactness, pedestrian friendly design, neighborhood-scale and framed by architecture and landscape design appropriate to local history and ecology. Development patterns within Local Activity Centers shall generally reflect planning and design principles such as walkable neighborhoods oriented around the five-minute walk, primary orientation toward public transit systems, a centrally City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 10-36 located community-serving land use or land uses and greater integration of housing, employment, shopping and recreation at the neighborhood level. For an area to qualify as a Local Activity Center, the following criteria must be met: 1. A Local Activity Center shall be a specific geographic area not exceeding 160 gross contiguous acres, unless located within an approved chapter 163, Florida Statutes, Redevelopment area. At such time as 75% of the originally designated Local Activity Center is developed/redeveloped, consistent with Objective 1.16, and expansion to a subject Local Activity Center up to 100% may be proposed. 2. The density and intensity of land uses permitted within a proposed Local Activity Center shall be specified within the Land Use Implementation section of the City Comprehensive Plan. 3. Uses proposed within a Local Activity Center shall include residential uses and park land and/or open space. One or more other uses such as commercial, civic, institutional, or employment-based activity shall also be included within a Local Activity Center. 4. Park land must reflect no net loss of acreage of existing and designated parks within the proposed Local Activity Center. Park and open space may include squares, greenbelts, greenways and playgrounds; ill-defined residual areas such as buffers and berms, for purposes of these criteria, are not considered park land or open space. 5. To address proposed residential density above what is yielded by the present land used designations, the City shall first utilize at least 75% of available “flexibility units” and “reserve units” from the flexibility zone where the local activity center is located, before an increase in density is requested via the land use plan amendment process. A proposed Local Activity Center located within and approved Chapter 163, Florida Statutes, Redevelopment Area is exempt from these criteria. 6. A proposed Local Activity Center must have a geographic configuration of appropriate depth and frontage to support the location uses in a manner oriented around the five-minute (i.e., quarter-mile) walk. Multiple nodes of activity oriented around the five-minute (i.e., quarter-mile) walk may be included within one Local Activity Center. 7. Seventy-five percent (75%) of the land within a Local Activity Center must be located within a quarter-mile of mass transit or multi-modal facilities or are included within an adopted plan to be located within a quarter-mile of mass transit or multi-modal facilities upon buildout of the Local Activity Center. The City shall ensure convenient access to mass transit, community shuttle of multi-modal facilities where such facilities are in place or planned to be in place at the time the Local Activity Center is proposed. Where such facilities are not in place or planned to be in place at the time of the proposal, the local government shall require design standards in the local land use element for a Local Activity Center that ensure that the primary priority is a safe, comfortable and attractive City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 10-37 pedestrian environment that will allow for convenient interconnection to transit, will reduce the number of automobile trips internally and will ultimately support an integrated multi-modal transportation system. 8. A proposed Local Activity Center shall demonstrate consistency with the goals, objectives and policies and other requirements of the Broward County Land Use Plan. 9. An Interlocal Agreement between the City and Broward County must be executed no later than six (6) months from the effective date of the adoption of a Local Activity Center which provides that monitoring of development activity and enforcement of permitted land uses densities and intensities shall be the responsibility of the City. The following area has been designated Local Activity Center within the City Comprehensive Plan: DOWNTOWN OAKLAND PARK LOCAL ACTIVITY CENTER Acreage: Approximately 148.2 acres General Location: Located north of East Oakland Park Boulevard between NE 13 Avenue and NE 10 Avenue on the south and between the east property line of Oakland Park Station and NE 10 Avenue on the north and south of the north property line of Oakland Park Station and NE 38 Street on the east and NE 42 Street (Dixie Landmark Plat) on the west. Proposed Density and Intensity of Land Uses: Residential Land Uses 1,800 dwelling units* 80 single-family 120 duplexes 700 villas 500 townhouses 400 garden apartments Commercial Land Uses 400,000 square feet Office Land Uses 125,000 square feet Community Facilities Land Uses 100,000 square feet Recreation and Open Space 5.47 acres (LAC Area includes the City’s proposed Downtown Park located in the 3900 block of N. Dixie Highway that consists of 3.21 acres. Acquisition of the recreation and open space site was accommodated through the Broward County Safe Parks and Land Preservation Bond Program.) Employment Center (High) 200,000 square feet Industrial 120,000 square feet (60%) Office 40,000 square feet (20%) Commercial 40,000 square feet (20%) *Consisting of 80 single-family homes, 120 duplexes, 700 villas, 500 townhomes and City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 10-38 400 garden apartments. High-rise units may be substituted for the above units, if approved by the City Commission. † Note: High-rise units are defined as four (4) stories or more, consistent with the effective Broward County Land Development Code definition at the time of the adoption of the Broward County Land Use Plan amendment. Existing Density and Intensity of Land Uses: Residential Land Uses 596 dwelling units 148 single-family 104 duplexes 344 garden apartments Retail Land Uses 187,272 square feet Office Land Uses 61,931 square feet Industrial Land Use 192,000 square feet Community Facilities Land Uses 80,000 square feet Recreation and Open Space 2.00 acres (net) Remarks: 1. Site is part of a designated Chapter 163 Redevelopment Area and has direct access to Tri-County Commuter Rail Station and a Broward County Mass Transit Station. 2. In order to achieve the objectives and opportunities for redevelopment as identified in the Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA), the City has established a Downtown Local Activity Center. 3. The Downtown Local Activity Center provides the ultimate flexibility for mixed-use redevelopment, park land and/or open space, commercial, employment-based activity, civic activities and for preserving single-family residential neighborhoods within the area. 4. The Downtown Local Activity Center has a geographic configuration that supports the location of uses around the five-minute (i.e., quarter-mile) walk with existing mass transit bus stops and other multi-modal facilities that are anticipated to be completed by buildout of the Local Activity Center. 5. A Downtown Zoning District will be established to provide permitted uses, design guidelines, dimensional regulations, intensity/density maximums, commercial and mixed-use development that will be compatible with residential uses. 6. The proposed development program and structure design for the Downtown Local Activity Center may change based on market conditions and design criteria approved by the City. N. Consistent with Objective 1.15 of the Future Land Use Element, the intent of the Mixed Use – Residential is to support a balanced mix of land uses, emphasizing residential uses. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 10-39 Within the Mixed Use – Residential categories, urban form could include several variations; vertical mixed use, where commercial/retail uses are located on the ground floor with residential uses located on upper floors. It may also include horizontal (attached) mixed use; where separate uses are located side by side in the same building. In addition, it may include horizontal (detached) mixed use; where separate uses are located in separate buildings within the same site. a) Density and Intensity Standards Mixed Use areas shown on the Future Land Use Map (Series) according to four (4) ranges of density and intensity: i The Low 5 Mixed Use (permits up to 5 residential dwelling units per gross acre and a FAR of 1.0 for combined development - residential and nonresidential). i The Medium 16 Mixed Use (permits up to 16 residential dwelling units per gross acre and a FAR of 1.5 for combined development - residential and nonresidential). i The Medium-High 25 Mixed Use (permits up to 25 residential dwelling units per gross acre and a FAR of 2.0 for combined development - residential and nonresidential). i The High 50 Mixed Use (permits up to 50 residential dwelling units per gross acre and a FAR of 2.5 for combined development - residential and nonresidential). The residential density shall not exceed the units per acre and the floor area ratio permitted. There is a minimum of two (2) uses required within the development and a minimum percentage of 10% for any one use. Residential development is a required use. These categories may be applied to parcels up to fifty (50) gross acres in size. For example, a development on a one gross acre (43,560 sq. ft.) within an MUR Low Intensity-5 category with a FAR of 1.0 could be represented as follows: Gross Site Area = One (1) Gross Acre * Net Site Area = 0.9 acre** Use Percentage of Use Square Footage of Use Residential 25.5% 5 units @ 2,000 sq. ft. = 10,000 sq. ft. Commercial 74.5% 39,204 – 10,000 = 29,204 sq. ft. Total 100% 39,204 sq. ft. (10,000 residential; 29,204 commercial) * Includes dedicated adjacent public rights-of-way ** Excludes dedicated adjacent public rights-of-way Floor area ratio calculations are based on the Net Site Area. Net Site Area is the entire acreage of the site located inside the parcel boundary. Residential density is based gross acreage. b) Design Guidelines City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 10-40 The design guidelines for Mixed Use – Residential shall promote an urban form which creates well integrated land use combinations, balances intensity and density, promotes the safe, interconnectivity of vehicular, pedestrian and other non-motorized movement and promotes the public realm. These guidelines may include: i Buildings should front the street (zero or minimum setbacks are preferable); i Vehicle parking strategies which lessen conflicts with bicycles and pedestrians and promote transit usage (i.e., parking structures, off-site parking, reduced parking ratios, shared parking facilities and parking which does not front the street); i Other design features which promote transit (e.g., integrated transit stop, shelter or station on site); i A circulation system designed to strengthen bicycle and pedestrian connectivity to all areas of the site/area, including recreation areas, parks, adjacent uses, transit facilities and activity nodes; i Integration of the public realm through open space or urban public plazas and/or recreational areas; and i The physical separation, such as walling off neighborhoods from adjacent development or roadways, is discouraged where it disrupts the connectivity of compatible uses, pedestrian and/or bicycle access. If a buffer is necessary, adequate landscaping could be used in place of a continuous wall. Design guidelines shall ensure a mixed use development is compatible with surrounding land uses and/or adjacent adopted Future Land Use Plan designations. These guidelines should address the following: i Complement and support adjacent existing land uses and/or adopted Future Land Use Plan designations through the effective use of density, massing and other design elements; i Protect the integrity of existing single family neighborhoods through design elements which maintain consistency and/or improve the aesthetic quality of the neighborhood. (i.e., maintaining an architectural style or quality of building materials and construction predominant in the neighborhood); i Promote connectivity, open space, pedestrian and other non-motorized networks and landscaped streetscapes; and i Incorporate designs which are environmentally sensitive (i.e., reduction of impervious surfaces, alternative material for spillover parking). c) Uses permitted under the Mixed Use – Residential categories Under the Mixed Use – Residential categories, all uses which are permitted under the Residential, Commercial, Commercial Recreation, Community Facilities and Employment Center Uses of the Broward County Land Use Plan may be applied. There may be permitted uses within these categories which a municipality could deem inappropriate. O. Transit Oriented Corridor – none specified. P. Transit Oriented Development – none specified. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 10-41 Section 4. Development Review Requirements 4.01 Following the effective date of the Land Use Plan, the City shall not grant a development permit for a proposed development unless the City has determined that public facilities are adequate to serve the needs of the proposed development or unless the developer agrees in writing that no certificate of occupancy shall be issued for the proposed development until public facilities are adequate to serve its needs. 4.02 Public facilities may be determined to be adequate to serve the needs of a proposed development when the following conditions are met: 1. Traffic circulation, drainage and flood protection, potable water, solid waste and sanitary sewer public facilities and services will be available to meet established level of service standards, consistent with Section 163.3202(g), Florida Statutes, and the concurrency management policies included within this Plan. 2. Local streets and roads will provide safe, adequate access between buildings within the proposed development and the trafficways identified on the Broward County Trafficways Plan prior to occupancy. 3. Fire protection service will be adequate to protect people and property in the proposed development. 4. Police protection will be adequate to protect people and property in the proposed development. 5. School sites and school buildings will be adequate to serve the proposed development. 6. Parks and recreation facilities will be adequate to serve the proposed development. In determining the adequacy of parks and recreation facilities, the City shall apply a standard of three (3) acres of public or private property for neighborhood, community, and urban parks and recreational facilities for each one thousand (1,000) residents of the City projected by the Land Use Plan. 7. Development does not include a structure, or alteration thereof, that is subject to the notice requirements of Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR), Part 77, Subpart B, unless the Federal Aviation Administration issues, or has issued within ninety (90) days, a written acknowledgment that said structure or alteration would not constitute a hazard to air navigation and does not require increases to minimum instrument flight altitudes within a terminal area, increases to minimum obstruction clearance altitudes, or other operational modifications at any existing airport or heliport or any planned or proposed airport as described in FAR Part 77.21(c)(2). Section 5. Reporting Requirements 5.01 Following the effective date of the Land Use Plan, no land development regulation, land development code, or amendment thereto shall be adopted by the City Council until such regulation, code or amendment has been referred to the City’s Local Planning City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 10-42 Agency for review and recommendation as to the relationship of such proposal to the Land Use Plan. 5.02 The City shall prepare and transmit to the Broward County Planning Council the information listed below within time periods as specified. This is for the purposes of monitoring compliance with the Broward County Land Use Plan and for maintaining countywide records of land development activities on which to base future planning. Information shall be transmitted in a format to prescribed by the Broward County Planning Council. a) A quarterly summary of all permits issued for demolition of buildings. b) A yearly summary regarding allocation of acreage proposed for commercial or residential uses with lands designated residential, commercial, industrial and employment center utilizing the flexibility provisions of the Broward County Land Use Plan as described within the Permitted Uses subsection of this Plan, if certified within the City Land Use Plan. 5.03 In any legal action in which the validity of the Land Use Plan or a portion thereof is in issue, the City shall notify the County Commission and provide copies of all papers in connection therewith. Section 6. Amendments 6.01 Land Use Plan A. The City shall submit to the Planning Council for certification all proposed amendments to the Land Use Plan. A proposed amendment to the Land Use Plan must be certified by the Planning Council prior to adoption by the City. B. All amendments to the Land Use Plan shall be adopted in the manner prescribed by the Planning Act and other applicable provisions of law. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 11-1 Capital Improvements Implementation Capital Improvements Implementation The City of Oakland Park has used a variety of financing strategies to implement Local Capital Improvements. Historical financing efforts have included direct expenditures of local tax revenue, long term revenue and general obligation bonding, revenue funds, Florida League of Cities loans, grants, and special assessments and the use of impact fees or other developer exactions. All of these financing mechanisms have been considered and to some extent may be utilized in funding strategies for future Capital Improvements. An individual project listing of proposed Capital Improvements is provided in the Capital Improvements Element of this Plan. The City annually reviews the needed and proposed Capital Improvements in order to ensure financial feasibility and address changing needs. The listing of Capital Improvements in the Capital Improvements Element of this Plan is considered feasible within the five-year period based on current revenue projections. While the listing of Capital Improvements is considered feasible within the five (5) year time horizon, additional funding source will be explored to augment existing revenues and to fund additional desirable improvements consistent with the overall goals, objectives and policies of the City’s Comprehensive Plan. Level of Service Standards The minimum criteria for Comprehensive Plans require that Level of Service Standards be included for public facilities described in the plan. The Level of Service Standards for the City of Oakland Park are provided in the Capital Improvements Element. Subsequent to the adoption of this Comprehensive Plan, all future development approvals will be conditioned upon the provision of services at the local level of service standards. Monitoring and Evaluation Along with level of service standards, the minimum criteria for Comprehensive Plans require that procedures for the monitoring and evaluation of necessary and/or desirable capital improvements be identified. In this respect, the Capital Improvements Element, and other relevant portions of the plan, will be reviewed on an annual basis to assess projected revenues, to modify and otherwise update data with regard to listed improvements, and to provide for the inclusion of additional “fifth year” capital improvements projects. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 11-2 The annual review of the Capital Improvements Element will be the joint responsibility of the City’s Development Services, Engineering and Construction Management, and Finance Departments along with the City Manager and his or her designee. A summary report with respect to the findings and modifications necessary as a result of this effort will be presented to the City Commission during a public meeting to occur at the approximate time of annual budget deliberations. The City Commission will direct staff to take the appropriate action as deemed necessary based upon findings and recommendations contained in the annual summary report. The following minimum activities will be included in the review: i Modifications necessary to the estimated date, costs and scope of specific projects currently listed in the Element; i The inclusion of new priority projects due to unanticipated conditions and the respective modifications to other, already listed projects; justification of new projects to be provided; i The inclusion of additional “fifth year” capital improvement projects based on project priority and justification; i Project priority ranking criteria as refined and/or otherwise modified from that existing in the Capital Improvements Element; i An assessment of the Capital Improvements Element and project listing in terms of its effectiveness of carrying out the goals, objectives and policies of the Comprehensive Plan; i The City’s ability to maintain the adopted level of service standards and to eliminate existing deficiencies or problem conditions; i A status report with regard to grants received, pending or anticipate to be applied for as these relate to the City’s Comprehensive Plan; i A status report with regard to local capital improvements undertaken by other agencies and the private sector as these relate to the City’s Comprehensive Plan; and i Any additional information with regard to capital improvements and the City’s Comprehensive Plan considered appropriate by the Committee. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010 & Jan 2015) 12-1 Monitoring and Evaluation As part of the continuing phase of comprehensive planning, the City has developed procedures for monitoring, updating and evaluating the progress of the Comprehensive Plan. The purpose of this section of the Comprehensive Plan is to ensure that the Plan remains timely and current. The required Evaluation and Appraisal Report will be prepared every seven (7) years. On an annual basis, the reporting requirements provided to the Broward County Planning Council on development approvals and the annual assessment of Capital Improvements will be performed. Evaluation and Appraisal Report Every seven (7) years, or sooner if conditions dictate, the City will prepare an Evaluation and Appraisal of the Comprehensive Plan. This written report will assess the following items: i Citizen participation in the planning process; i Need and/or requirement for updating baseline data in the Comprehensive Plan supporting documentation; i Update, if necessary, short and long term Plan objectives; i Identification of major local issues, the ability of the Comprehensive Plan to address these issues, and/or the identification of necessary modifications to the Comprehensive Plan to address the identified local issues; i Accomplishments or progress made in implementation of the Plan’s goals, objectives and policies; i Unanticipated problems or obstacles which have hindered implementation of the Plan’s goals, objectives and policies; i Changes in legislative requirements, the State Comprehensive Plan, or the South Florida Regional Policy Plan that cause needed amendments to the City’s plan; i Reformulated goals, objectives and policies for the Comprehensive Plan; and i A means for ensuring continuous monitoring and evaluation of the Plan during the seven (7) year period. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 13-1 Public Schools Facilities Element Goal 13.1 Public School Concurrency - The Broward County Board of County Commissioners (Broward County) in collaboration with the School Board of Broward County (School Board) and Broward County municipalities (municipalities) shall ensure that public school facilities will be available for current and future students consistent with available financial resources and adopted level of service standards (LOS). This will be accomplished recognizing the School Board’s statutory and constitutional responsibility to provide a uniform system of adequate public school facilities and the authority of Broward County and the municipalities for development permitting and comprehensive planning. Objective 13.1.1 Financially Feasible District Educational Facilities Plan - The School Board, pursuant to Chapters 163.3177 and 163.3180 F.S. and the Interlocal Agreement for Public School Facility Planning (ILA), shall prepare and annually update and adopt the Five-Year District Educational Facilities Plan (DEFP) which shall contain a five-year financially feasible schedule of capital improvements to address existing deficiencies and achieve and maintain the adopted level of service in all concurrency service areas (CSAs). The School Board shall also ensure that school facilities are planned to meet the long-term planning period of the Public School Facility Element (PSFE) of the Broward County Comprehensive Plan. Policy 13.1.1 The DEFP shall include a financially feasible schedule of capacity additions to existing schools and construction of new schools to eliminate existing level of service deficiencies and meet the needs of projected growth for the five-year planning period. This financially feasible schedule shall be annually adopted into the Broward County Comprehensive Plan Capital Improvements Element (CIE) and the capital improvement elements of the municipalities. This adoption may either be by reference or by restatement of the relevant portions of the adopted DEFP, but in no event shall the County or municipality attempt to modify the adopted DEFP. Policy 13.1.2 The DEFP shall provide year-by-year projections of the capacity needed to achieve and maintain the adopted LOS within the CSA for each school for the five- year planning period. These projections are included in the supporting documents of the PSFE. Policy 13.1.3 The DEFP’s five-year financially feasible schedule shall provide for the remodeling/renovation of existing schools to meet the identified needs of aging schools and replace worn facilities. Policy 13.1.4 The DEFP shall be amended on an annual basis to: 1) add a new fifth year; 2) reflect changes in estimated capital revenues, planned capital appropriations costs, planned capital facilities projects, CSAs and school usage; and, 3) ensure the DEFP continues to be financially feasible for the five-year planning period. Policy 13.1.5 Annually adopted updates to the DEFP and CSA maps shall be coordinated with annual plan amendments to the CIE of the Broward County Comprehensive Plan and City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 13-2 comprehensive plans of the municipalities. The annual plan amendments shall ensure that the schedule of capital improvements within the CIE continues to be financially feasible and the LOS will be achieved and maintained. Objective 13.1.2 Concurrency Management System - Broward County shall adopt a county-wide public school facilities concurrency management system for implementation of public school concurrency to ensure that public school facilities are available at the adopted level of service standard concurrent with the impact of proposed residential development. Policy 13.1.2.1 Broward County and the municipalities, in collaboration with the School Board shall implement concurrency management systems consistent with the policies included in the Broward County and municipal public school facility elements, procedures and requirements included within the ILA and Broward County and municipal land development regulations (LDRs). Policy 13.1.2.2 The CSAs shall be the annually adopted school attendance boundaries for each elementary, middle and high school. The maps of the CSAs are maintained in the data and analysis section of the PSFE. Policy 13.1.2.3 The Level of Service standard shall be 110% of the permanent Florida Inventory of School Housing (FISH) capacity for each public elementary, middle and high school. Policy 13.1.2.4 If adequate capacity is not available in a CSA for a proposed residential development, but capacity exists in one or more contiguous CSAs, the development may proceed consistent with the provisions and procedures in the ILA and County and municipal LDRs. Policy 13.1.2.5 If adequate capacity is not currently available in a CSA or contiguous CSA, for a proposed residential development, but capacity is scheduled in the DEFP to be available within 3 years after the issuance of final subdivision or site plan approval, (or functional equivalent), development of the project may proceed in accordance with the provisions and procedures in the ILA and County and municipal LDRs. Policy 13.1.2.6 Broward County and the municipalities shall not approve a residential plat or site plan (or functional equivalent) until the School Board has reported that the school concurrency requirement has been satisfied consistent with the provisions and procedures in the ILA and County and municipal LDRs. Policy 13.1.2.7 The CSAs shall be established and subsequently modified to maximize available school capacity and make efficient use of new and existing public schools in accordance with the level of service standards and the permanent capacity, taking into account special considerations such as, core capacity, special programs, transportation costs, geographic impediments, diversity programs, and class size reduction requirements to prevent disparate enrollment levels between schools of the same type (elementary, middle, high) and provide an equitable distribution of student enrollment district-wide. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 13-3 Policy 13.1.2.8 The projected student impact of a proposed residential development shall be determined using the student generation rates approved by the School Board and adopted within the Broward County Land Development Code. The student generation rates shall be reviewed and updated at least every 3 years. Policy 13.1.2.9 The public school concurrency approval for residential plats shall expire if development within the plat does not commence within 5 years following the date of County Commission approval. Objective 13.1.3 Proportionate Share Mitigation - The School Board, pursuant to Chapter 163.3180 F.S. and the ILA, shall adopt proportionate share mitigation alternatives which provide an option for residential developments unable to meet the public school concurrency requirement. Upon approval of a proportionate share mitigation alternative by the School Board and completion of necessary binding agreements, a development will be deemed to have met the public school concurrency requirement and may proceed. Policy 13.1.3.1 A residential development’s proportionate share mitigation value shall be determined by multiplying the number of additional student stations needed to mitigate the impact of the proposed development on schools within the affected CSA(s) not meeting the adopted LOS standards by the State cost per student station for each school type plus a land impact cost share, if any. Pursuant to Section 163.3180(13)(e)(2), F.S., the applicant’s proportionate share mitigation obligation shall be credited towar d any other impact or exaction fee imposed by local ordinance for the same need, on a dollar-for dollar basis, at fair market value. Policy 13.1.3.2 Proportionate share mitigation shall enhance the capacity of the schools (or provide for the construction of new schools) serving the proposed residential development. The mitigation shall equate to at least one permanent classroom, which may be funded by one or more residential developments, or other identified funding sources. Mitigation that results in the need for school site(s) shall primarily be the dedication of land. Proportionate share mitigation shall include the following options, as further defined and subject to, procedures and requirements in the ILA; 1. Purchase or dedication of needed elementary, middle or high school sites. 2. Construction of capacity improvements identified in years four (4) or five (5) of the DEFP including advancement of such improvements into the first three years of the DEFP. 3. Construction of previously unplanned schools, classroom additions, modular classrooms or similar facilities. Such facility capacity shall be included in the first three years of the DEFP through an amendment approved by the School Board. 4. Construction of the needed capacity at one or more charter schools. 5. Other mitigation options approved by the School Board on a case by case City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 13-4 basis contingent upon a School Board finding that the option mitigates the impact of the proposed development. Policy 13.1.3.3 Mitigation shall be assured by a legally binding agreement between the School Board, the applicant and the County or municipality (as applicable), which shall be executed prior to the issuance of the final subdivision plat or the final site plan approval (or functional equivalent). If the School Board agrees to the mitigation, the School Board must commit in the agreement to placing the improvement required for mitigation in the first three years of the DEFP. GOAL 13.2 Collaborate and Coordinate to Maximize Quality Education - Maximize collaboration and coordination between Broward County, the School Board and the municipalities, to effectively plan for public elementary and secondary school facilities to meet the current and future needs of Broward County's public school population. Pursuant to Chapter 163.3177 F.S., Broward County and all non-exempt municipalities within the County, shall coordinate and cooperate to ensure the adopted public school facilities elements are consistent with each other. Objective 13.2.1 Land Use Consistency, Compatibility & Adequate Infrastructure - Broward County, the School Board and the municipalities shall establish coordination mechanisms to ensure that the locations of existing and proposed school sites are compatible with and proximate to the existing and planned land uses they serve. Such coordination shall also ensure there is adequate public infrastructure available to serve existing and planned school sites including infrastructure which provides safe access to schools. Policy 13.2.1.1 Broward County, the School Board, and the municipalities will coordinate through the procedures established in the ILA and the Broward County and municipal land use planning process to ensure that existing and proposed public school facility sites are consistent and compatible with the land use categories, future land use maps and policies of the County and municipal comprehensive plans and enable a close integration between existing and planned schools and surrounding land uses. Policy 13.2.1.2 Broward County, the School Board and the municipalities shall coordinate to prepare projections of future development and public school enrollment growth and to ensure such projections are consistent with the Broward County and municipal future land use maps and the School Board’s Long Range Public School Facilities Map consistent with the procedures and requirements identified in the ILA. Policy 13.2.1.3 Consistent with Section 163.3177 (12) (g), F.S., the Broward County PSFE shall include future conditions maps showing existing and anticipated school facilities for the short-term (5 year) and long-term (10 year) planning time frames. Maps 1 through 12 depict the short and long term existing and anticipated public school facilities and ancillary plants. Policy 13.2.1.4 Consistent with provisions and procedures in the ILA, the School Board will advise Broward County and the municipalities of inconsistencies in comprehensive plans and plan amendments with the DEFP and Long-Range School Facilities Plan. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 13-5 Policy 13.2.1.5 The School Board shall monitor and participate in the Broward County and/or local government plat review and site plan review processes, the Development of Regional Impact (DRI) process, the land use plan amendment process and other development order/permit processes that may have an impact on current or planned public educational facilities in Broward County. Policy 13.2.1.6 Broward County, the School Board and the municipalities shall utilize the procedures identified within the ILA, including the Staff Working Group and Oversight Committee established by the ILA, to coordinate the annual review of school enrollment projections in addition to the preparation and annual reviews of public school facilities elements and ensure that the elements are consistent with each other. Policy 13.2.1.7 The School Board shall annually update and adopt the DEFP and transmit it, including any supplemental amendments, to Broward County and the municipalities, which then shall amend their CIEs to incorporate the updated DEFP consistent with the provisions and procedures of the ILA. Policy 13.2.1.8 Broward County, the School Board and the municipalities shall share and coordinate information through the plat, site plan and school siting processes and procedures identified in the ILA to ensure the location, phasing, and development of public school facilities, including additions to existing facilities, is coordinated with the provision of necessary public infrastructure including water and sewer, roads, drainage, sidewalks, mass transit and other infrastructure required to support the public school facilities. Policy 13.2.1.9 Broward County shall coordinate with the School Board and the municipalities through the school siting process identified in the ILA and Broward County and municipal platting and site plan approval processes to implement strategies, consistent with Florida’s Safe Ways to School Program, which reduce hazardous conditions and provide direct, unobstructed and safe access for pedestrian travel (including sidewalks, bicycle paths, signage and signalization) to existing and new school facilities. City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan, Volume I (Adopted December 2007; Rev Feb 2009, April 2010; Jan 2015 & March 2015) 13-6 Objective 13.2.2 School Facility Siting, Collocation & Design - Broward County, the School Board and the municipalities, pursuant to the ILA, shall coordinate the location of public school facilities relative to the location of other public facilities such as parks, libraries and community centers and promote schools to be focal points within the community. Policy 13.2.2.1 In the planning, siting, land acquisition, permitting and development of a new school facility or significant renovation or expansion, the School Board shall coordinate with Broward County and the municipalities on the availability of public facilities, services and grounds (especially for the purposes of collocating parks, libraries, ball fields, community centers, public safety facilities, parking facilities, drainage facilities and other appropriate facilities). Policy 13.2.2.2 Broward County, the School Board and the municipalities shall pursue shared-use and co-location of school sites with County and municipal facilities having similar facility needs, such as libraries, parks, ball fields, other recreation facilities. At a minimum, per the ILA, Broward County will look for opportunities to collocate and share use of County facilities when preparing updates to the Schedule of Capital Improvements within the Comprehensive Plan and planning and designing new or renovated facilities. Policy 13.2.2.3 Through the design of school facilities, establishment of school siting standards and pursuit of collocation opportunities, the School Board shall encourage school facilities to serve as community focal points. Policy 13.2.2.4 Broward County will coordinate with the School Board and the municipalities on efforts to build new school facilities, which are designed to serve as emergency shelters as required by Section 1013.372, F.S., Broward County will also collaborate and coordinate with the School Board and the municipalities on emergency preparedness issues through the County’s Emergency Operating Center.