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2009 Parks and Leisure Services Master PlanOakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 1  Letter of Transmittal May 18, 2009 Jenna LaFleur, CPRP Director Parks and Leisure Services City of Oakland Park 3650 NE 12 Avenue Oakland Park, Fl 33334 RE: Parks and Recreation Master Plan Dear Ms. LaFleur In accordance with our agreement with the City of Oakland Park to prepare a comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan, Miller Legg is pleased to make this final submittal for your use. The attached document includes an Executive Summary, Master Plan, and Appendices related to the planning process and final recommendations for the City’s implementation over the next 20-years. Your plan is based on sound planning principles and an understanding of the unique characteristics of Oakland Park and the determination of it’s residents and elected officials to make Oakland Park a wonderful place to live and recreate. These are the conditions that have caused the Plan to be prepared and hopefully the same conditions which will cause its recommendations to be implemented. Thanks to you, your staff, elected officials, and the people of Oakland Park for the assistance needed to prepare this document. We offer you the best of fortune as you go forward with accomplishment of the objectives you will find herein. Respectfully submitted, George Botner, ASLA, AICP Project Manager MILLER LEGG Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 2  Executive Summary Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan Introduction This document has been prepared pursuant to the City of Oakland Park’s Strategic Plan to, in part, “expand its parks, leisure facilities, and activities by development of a general Parks and Recreation Plan”. The basis for this plan is also found in the Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan - Recreation and Open Space Element, prepared in 2007, as mandated by Chapter 163, Florida Statutes. Mostly however, it has been prepared in response to the desire of the residents of Oakland Park to have an outstanding program of recreation and park facilities for themselves and future generations as the City continues to mature over the next 20-years. Process The Recreation and Parks Master Plan has followed a rigorous process of data gathering of existing parks and facilities information, assessment of the needs and desires of Oakland Park residents and City officials, and application of widely accepted recreation standards as applied to the unique characteristics of Oakland Park’s demographics and physical characteristics. In particular, public involvement has been stressed during development of the Plan through opinion surveys, public workshops, interviews, and a dedicated, special purpose website. Current Condition The City currently has a population of 44,000 residents, maturing to approximately 60,000 residents over the next 20-years. These residents enjoy use of 180-acres of park area, about half of which are lakes. Broward County requires that its municipalities provide 3 acres of park land per 1,000 residents which yields a need for 132 acres presently and 180 acres 20-years from now. On the basis of land area alone, it would seem that adequate area is available currently and throughout the development period of this Master Plan. However, City officials have determined, in both the City Comprehensive Plan and follow-up Strategic Plan to try to provide the citizens with “mostly dry land” to meet its park and recreation open space requirement. With this as a goal, this Plan shows how to make up the land area currently in water area, and meet facility requirements as well. The City’s existing parks tend to concentrate in the center of the older parts of the community, east of I-95. Therefore, distribution of existing parks is a challenge to another goal of an urban parks program: to provide at least a Neighborhood Park, within walking distance of one’s home. Most of the City’s current park program is provided by a larger type of park, the Community Park. While this is fine so far as park space goes, the challenge in Oakland Park is that many areas of the City do not have any type of park facility within walking distance. Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 3  Two other primary challenges are present currently: first, the City does not have any active sports fields and courts on the west side of I-95, and second, there are highly inadequate Community Centers available either by total square footage of building, or accessible distribution around the City. This Plan determines that up to 60,000 square feet of Community Center space should be available by the year 2030, concentrated in three (3) strategic locations in the city. Furthermore, one of these Centers should be the primary Center which would house a municipal swimming pool, gymnasium, and parks and recreation headquarters along with a compliment of outdoor sports fields and courts. This would be the “hub” of the recreation program in the City and equally accessible to all. This Plan shows locations and sizes for each of the proposed Community Centers. The lack of active sports fields and courts on the west side of the City is made even more challenging by the fact that there does not appear to be adequate open land available. To meet demand, approximately 25 to 30 acres of land is needed, preferably in one location for management and maintenance purposes. This site would also be the preferred location of one of the Community Centers described above. This Plan shows both a short-term solution to this problem by developing use agreements with adjacent Middle and Senior high schools and a long-term solution involving land reclamation at the existing Veterans Park lake. The City Commission has determined that this option is not a desirable one. Optionally, other land area, perhaps off-site of the City, may come available in the years ahead as the Plan is implemented. The plan provides the advance warning needed to do the search for property, or continue with lease agreements as needed to accomplish the goal of meeting this particular recreation need. Major Plan Recommendations 1. Provide additional dry land area as needed to accommodate the need for new facilities and balance the existing short-fall in overall land area as determined by the Comprehensive Land Use Plan. Provide up to 71 additional dry land acres now and a total of 109 acres of additional dry land by 2030. 2. Provide park land which is easily accessible to residents. Establish at least six (6) new Neighborhood Parks where shown on the Recreation and Parks Master Plan map along with one new large active sports Community Park on the west side of the City, along with three (3) Community Centers totaling up to 60,000 square feet by the year 2030. 3. Add additional facilities to the parks program in accordance with SCORP guidelines as adjusted by community input received in this master planning public outreach process. New soccer fields, tennis courts, tot lots, picnic areas, fresh water boating activities, head a comprehensive list of facilities needed to meet state standards and community need. 4. Establish a common design theme throughout the parks system by developing standard furnishings, signage, park architecture, shade structures, and the like. This will establish an identity for the parks program and provide for a common level of materials quality, maintenance requirements, and funding requirements. Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 4  5. Enhance and expand upon use of parks for arts programs. Ideally, this would locate at the existing Jaco Pastorius Park by upgrading existing structures for art instruction, display of community art, and accommodation of small performances. It is further recommended that a study be conducted to determine the feasibility of developing a larger facility which may support larger indoor performances in the area of Jaco Pastorius Park during the term of implementation of this Master Plan. 6. Funding resources must be established during all phases of implementation. It is recommended that the City designate staff to apply for grants on a continuous basis, using the demands for cash shown in this Plan as performance goals for grant procurement activities. The City should start one phase ahead of the anticipated need for funds to ensure the resources are there when needed. Additionally, given the need for significant infusions of funding for major new facilities, it is also recommended that the City carefully consider sponsoring a bond referendum to meet these major objectives of the Plan. 7. Phasing of costs for the parks development program must recognize that current economic conditions are a short-term phenomenon and should not deter the need to continue a focus on long-term objectives of the plan. Meeting the reality of funding shortages on the near term are met in this plan by employing low-cost techniques of adding facilities through joint use agreements with local schools, adjacent municipalities, and other entities which already have facilities built and available for use by Oakland Park residents. 8. The network of recommended Neighborhood Parks, Community Parks, and Community Centers requires connectivity with each other by establishment of a well designed and safe Urban Trails Program. In most cases this would entail upgrading the existing pedestrian walkways in designated street corridors. This provides the added benefit of providing for places for residents to walk; a highly desirable form of recreation in its own right. Conclusion This Master Plan is a comprehensive document which may serve as a guide for a wide range of recreationally oriented activities to be implemented by phases over a long time frame. It must be recognized that conditions can and will change during the life of the plan which may require amendments to be made. As a concluding recommendation, the City is advised to revisit the plan annually to assess progress being made, make whatever modifications need to be made, and then continue forward. The overall goals and direction would remain the same and continue in force. See the attached Recreation and Parks Master Plan, Figure 9. Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 5   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 6  Acknowledgements ________________________________________________________________________ Development of the Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan has truly been a collaborative effort involving the Board of City Commissioners, City Staff, the Parks and Leisure Services Department, and numerous City residents who took the time to attend Public Workshops and to respond to questionnaires throughout the planning process. Miller Legg and the City Parks and Leisure Services Department would like to extend a sincere “thank you” to everyone who participated in the process, and acknowledge the following individuals: Oakland Park City Commissioners Steven R. Arnst, Mayor Allegra Webb Murphy, Vice Mayor Anthony Niedwiecki, Commissioner ________Project Team_________ Suzanne Boisvenue, Commissioner Anne E. Sallee, Commissioner Jenna LaFleur, Director John Michael Perez, Project Manager - City Oakland Park City Manager’s Office Brian Pagliaro, Asst. Director - City John Stunson, City Manager Pat Himelberger, Asst. to the City Manager Horace McHugh, Asst. City Manager Michael Kroll, Principal in Charge – Miller Legg Pat Himelberger, Asst. to the City Manager George Botner, Project Manager/Author – Miller Legg Department of Parks and Leisure Services Jenna LaFleur, Director Brian Pagliaro, Asst. Director Engineering and Community Development Department John Michael Perez, Project Manager Miller Legg Michael Kroll, Vice President George Botner, Associate Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 7  Table of Contents   Table of Illustrations ……………………………………………… 8 Chapter 1 Introduction ………………………………………… 9 Chapter 2 Demographics ……………………………………. . 12 Chapter 3 Existing Parks and Facilities ………………….. 21 Chapter 4 Demand Analysis ………………………………... 48 Chapter 5 Planning Recommendations ........................... 60 Chapter 6 Implementation …………………………………… 69 Appendix A Oakland Park Demographic Charts …………………………………. 103 B Website Survey Results ………………………………………………..108 C Existing Parks: Site Analysis Plans ………………………………….146 D Workshop and Meeting Minutes ………………………………………167 E Workshop #1 and #2 PowerPoint …………………………………….. 177 F Workshop #3 PowerPoint ………………………………………………..198 G Existing City Properties: Map and List …………………………. …… 223 - 226 Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 8  Table of Illustrations FIGURES Figure 1: 2000 Population Density Distribution Figure 2: 2006 Population by Age Figure 3: Potential Park Use Sites Figure 4: Neighborhood Parks – Ideal Distribution Figure 5: Neighborhood Parks – Areas Outside ½ Mile Park Service Radii Figure 6: Existing Parks Figure 7: Site Analysis Example Figure 8: Website Home Page Figure 9: Recreation and Parks Master Plan Figure 10: Phase One – 2015 Implementation Plan Figure 11: Phase Two – 2020 Implementation Plan Figure 12: Phase Three – 2030 Implementation Plan TABLES Table 1: Year 2000 Demographic Data Table 2: Population and Demographic Projections by Age Category: 2006 – 2030 Table 3: City Owned Park Facilities: 2007 Table 4: Recreation Land Area Requirements Table 5: Potential Park Use Sites – Inside City Table 6: Potential Park Use Sites – Outside City Table 7: Oakland Park Recreation Programs Table 8: SCORP Population Guidelines for Outdoor Recreation Activities Table 9: 2008 Existing vs. Required Facility Quantities by Type Table 10: Recreation Facilities Required for Implementation Phases Table 11: Opinion of Probable Costs Table 12: Staff to Land Area Ratios Table 13: 2015 Facility Program Table 14-A: 2020 Facility Program Table 14-B: 2020 Facility Program + Costs Table 15: Projected 2030 Park Land Area Table 16-A: 2030 Facility Program Table 16-B: 2030 Facility Program + Costs Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 9  Chapter 1 Introduction Benefits of Recreation Public parks, recreation programs and open space are crucial elements of the urban environment. They define the built environment and support an improved quality of life for City residents, making Oakland Park a great place to live, work and play. Oakland Park has always had a strong commitment to recreation. City leaders have come to realize that open space and recreational opportunities have had a major influence on how residents and visitors perceive their community. The provision of parks, recreational facilities, and open space is based on the desire by most people to have opportunities for the enjoyment of the outdoors environment in an urban setting. The physical and psychological benefits of outdoor activities are well-accepted values. For example, evidence shows that access to parks leads to increased physical exercise, thus improving health and reducing risk of obesity and diseases such as heart disease and diabetes. Park land has also been shown to increase property values of adjacent property for both residential and commercial uses. Park availability can attract new residents and work force; and, park attendance can lead to increased numbers of patrons to nearby businesses. Social benefits include an enhanced sense of community and place. Park lands provide places for residents to come together at community events and programs. Park access has even been tied to crime reduction and reduced juvenile delinquency, providing safe places for youth to interact with one another.1                                                                                                                           1 Sherer, Paul. “The Benefits of Parks.” (San Francisco: The Trust for Public Land, 2006).   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 10  Open space and recreational lands are recognized for more than their individual benefits. There are broad public values in the improvement of air quality and reduction of noise provided by these spaces, protection of habitat for animal and plant species, and visual relief from the complexity of the urban environment. This Recreation and Parks Master Plan (Plan) was created to ensure that these values are met and continue to be provided to all citizens of Oakland Park. Plan Mandates The purpose of this Plan is to build upon the Goals, Objectives, and Policies established within Section 7, the Recreation and Open Space Element of the Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan (December 2007). The State of Florida has mandated that each local government prepare a Recreation and Open Space Element as an integral part of the Comprehensive Plan required by Chapter 163, Florida Statutes. This Element envisions a comprehensive system of public and private sites for recreation, including, but not limited to, natural reservations, parks and playgrounds, parkways, open spaces and other recreational facilities. Local governments are also charged with meeting what are called Level of Service (LOS) standards for their parks and recreation system. In the case of Oakland Park, a County Charter dictates that LOS minimum standards be set by Broward County, and that the City must meet or exceed these standards. Oakland Parks “Strategic Plan” Requirement This Master Plan is also a specific response to the City of Oakland Park’s “Strategic Plan” and represents one (1) of seven (7) “Strategic Performance Areas (SPA)” indicated in this strategic plan: Expand Parks, Leisure Facilities, and Activities. A Key Intended Result (KIR) of this SPA is development of a General Parks and Recreation Plan. This Plan has been developed by the firm of Miller Legg, which has worked closely with City staff and residents to provide a plan that best reflects the long-range goals and current needs of Oakland Park. The resulting Plan documents existing facilities, determines future needs, and provides for an implementation strategy over the next 20 years. Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 11 Plan Organization The Plan follows a general process of starting with analysis of existing conditions, then determining recreation needs of the residents, and finally, recommendation of future recreation programs for implementation. This process starts in Chapter 2 with an overview of demographic conditions to establish a background of the City’s major population characteristics. This is followed by an inventory and assessment of existing parks in Chapter 3. This assessment examines the various characteristics and facilities of existing parks and open space areas. The assessment methodology (including determining existing standards and establishment of a public input process) is outlined in Chapter 4. This provides an understanding of the “Demand” for recreation services. Level of Service (LOS) standards are also established in Chapter 4, including methodology and an application of public input to the requirements for parks and facilities. Recommendations for accommodation in the master plan are detailed here. Chapter 5 presents the Master Plan and documents specific facilities recommended. This city-wide physical plan blends existing facilities with new ones at recommended locations. Finally, this collection of existing and future parks is interconnected with a system of urban trails and walkways. Chapter 6 provides for an implementation strategy for meeting Parks and Recreation needs currently, and in 5, 10, and 20 year time frames. Specific schedules for land area acquisition and construction of facilities are recommended for each of these phases. Staffing, costs, and potential sources of funding are also included for each phase. Finally, an appendix is provided that gives detailed information as back-up to Plan process and content. Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 12 Chapter 2 Demographics An examination of existing and forecasted demographic conditions was undertaken in development of the Plan. City population data was gathered from sources such as the U.S. Census Bureau and Broward County, while parks data was gathered from field visits, mapping software, and the City of Oakland Park’s Comprehensive Plan. This chapter of the Plan provides information on the demographic profile of Oakland Park that is germane to recreation facility programming. Overview The City of Oakland Park is 6.90 square miles in size with a population of 44,184 according to 2006 population estimates. By 2030, the end of the planning period of this report, the population is expected to grow by 37.4% to 60,710 citizens. The City is largely built out with no large annexations planned. Therefore, overall City density is expected to rise as the population increases, mostly as a result of redevelopment into higher densities of housing. Age The median age in 2000 (according to the U.S. Census Bureau) was 36 years and the largest age group is the 20-44 age category, constituting 45.6% of the population. However, this percentage is expected to drop as other age categories grow. The 65+ age category is expected to see the most growth, with a projected increase of 146.5% by 2030 (from 4,047 persons in 2006 to 9,976 persons in 2030). (See Table 2, Page 10) The 0-19 and 45-64 age groups are similar in size to each other, falling approximately within 1% of one another. Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 13 Race The largest categories of population by race in Oakland Park residents in 2000 were comprised of 66% White and 22.6% African American. Additionally, 17.9% of the population identified themselves as Hispanic or Latino (of any race). In 2000, Oakland Park was tied with several other locations as the 15th most Brazilian-populated area in the U.S. Brazilian residents make up 2.1% of the City’s population. The City also had the 25th highest Haitian population in the U.S. in 2000. Haitian residents make up 7% of the City’s population. Additionally, 2% of the population identified themselves as Cuban. Anecdotal evidence since the year 2000 suggests that other categories of nationality and/or race are settling into Oakland Park. The overall numbers are still small and will be more clearly identified in the 2010 Census. Population and Age Distribution The information within this section provides data for population and age distribution within the City of Oakland Park. Oakland Park’s population in 2000 was 30,966 citizens (U.S. Census Bureau). Density distribution (by census block) is demonstrated in Figure 1: “2000 Population Density Distribution”. Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 14  FIGURE 1 2000 Population Density Distribution Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 15  Source: U.S. Census Bureau TABLE 1 Year 2000 Demographic Data Total Percentage Total Population 30,966 n/a Age Median Age 35.8 n/a Age 0-19 7,138 23% Age 20-44 14,094 45.6% Age 45-64 6,588 21.3% Age 65+ 3,146 10.2% Race White 20,432 66% Black or African American 7,013 22.6% American Indian and Alaskan Native 70 0.2% Asian 600 1.9% Native American and other Pacific Islander 41 0.1% Hispanic or Latino (of any race) 5,556 17.9% Some other race 1,379 4.5% Income Median Household Income (1999) $35,493 n/a Per Capita Income (1999) $18,873 n/a Families Below Poverty Level 946 13.3% Individuals below poverty level 5,127 16.5% Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 16   Age Distribution Oakland Park’s largest age category is the 20-44 age group, accounting for 42.4% of the total population in 2006. The 65+ group constitutes the smallest age population at 9.2% of the 2006 population. However, the 65+ age group is projected to show the highest increase over time with a 178% increase, accounting for 16.4% of the total population by 2030. 20‐4465+ Source: Broward‐by‐the‐Numbers, 2007; Percentages adapted from Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing 0‐1945‐64FIGURE 2 2006 Population by Age Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 17 Growth Projections The population of Oakland Park was estimated to be 44,184 residents in 2006. Population numbers are expected to increase to 46,356 by 2010. By 2020, population numbers are projected to rise by 22.3% to 54,070 and by 2030, totals are expected to have risen to 60,710, a 37.4% change from 2006 (see Table 2). Sources: Population totals retrieved from: Broward-by-the-Numbers, March 2007, Number 51, Rev. “Municipal Population Forecasts, 2006-2030” Demographic percentages adapted from data retrieved from the Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing Table 2 Population and Demographic Projections by Age Category 2006-2030 Age 2006 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 % change 2006-300-19 10,404 11,140 11,963 12,805 13,717 14,343 37.9% 20-44 18,754 19,540 21,581 23,29125,095 26,501 41.3% 45-64 10,979 13,458 14,714 15,394 15,402 15,240 38.8% 65+ 4,047 4,430 5,442 6,671 8,391 9,976 146.5% Total Population 44,184 46,356 50,269 54,070 57,852 60,710 37.4% Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 18 Recreation Planning Implications Population Growth A growth in the overall numbers of residents by almost 40% in the planning period will require development of a corresponding 40% increase in recreational resources available to residents above an established baseline of required facilities. This study will show that the current population is already under-served by facilities, meaning that just keeping up with population growth will be inadequate. A population of 60,000 persons can leverage better, more substantial facilities than a population of 40,000 persons. Critical thresholds will be met which can further justify capital intensive facilities like a top-notch Community Recreation Center and a gymnasium. More specialized programs like a Performing Arts Center or a new Athletic Sports Complex become feasible due to increased use and overall economic viability. The population barrier of 50,000 persons will have been passed, placing Oakland Park in the mainstream of medium-sized communities, making it more significant as a place to receive funding as a result of stronger demographics. Population Distribution As Figure 1 “2000 Population Density Distribution” shows, there are conceptually two communities in one at Oakland Park: East of I-95, and west of I-95. The east side far outweighs the west side in overall population numbers. Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 19 This distinction is further emphasized by the current disproportion of recreation land availability. The west side is under-served by municipal facilities in this regard. This population distribution and concentration of density in the geographical center of Oakland Park makes the location of future city-wide facilities an easy and logical decision to make. The sustainability of recreation programs are enhanced by placing them where they are most easily accessed by the greatest number of residents. A further attribute of having multiple population concentration centers is that there will be a need to provide additional facility locations to properly serve all of them. Future analysis shows the combination of this distribution of density along with overall population can support the notion of a total of three (3) community enclaves; one on the west, and two on the east, each providing service to a population of approximately 20,000 residents. Existing community centers have already been developed in the Collins Community Center (central location) and North Andrews Gardens Community Center (northern location). Each of these centers would need significant size increases to meet current and future demands. A third community center on the west side of the City would need to be developed. Age  At the present time Oakland Park has a somewhat “bell-shaped” curve of population along a base-line of youthful-to-elderly, slightly skewed to the youthful end. That is rapidly changing. Overall growth is increasing by 37%. Any change in a segment of population on either side of this percentage denotes change in a category of population. During the term of this Plan, 20 years, the most youthful segment, age 0-14 years, will change to 38% - almost no change from the current percentage. By contrast, the eldest segment of population age is forecast to grow by 146%. New facilities which accommodate an older population, like community recreation centers, performing arts, trails, and other forms of passive recreation will need to be made available to meet long term demands of an aging population. Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 20 Income The median household income is estimated at $46,385 compared with a national average of $50,007 in 2007*. Working class or lower income retirees, with lower than average income households, need recreational opportunities which are affordable and supported by public means. The key characteristics of income distribution are very apparent, as shown on the Income Profile Map for the 2000 census (see Appendix A). I-95 creates a distinctive north/south dividing line where lowest income levels are on the east and highest are on the west. A third income profile, a high-to-mid range is clustered on the north-east side of the City in the North Andrews Gardens area. This stratification by income further supports the existence of three (3) primary population enclaves, all of which have a distinctive identity. The existence of three (3) sub-communities in Oakland Park creates both a challenge and an opportunity: Development of a strong community center to provide a focus for the City as a whole and at the same time creation of a common meeting ground for a diverse population. Ethnicity The ethnic character of Oakland Park is very similar to the rest of southeast Florida, less Metro-Dade County: mostly Caucasian with high percentages of African Americans and Latin Americans. This is steadily changing over time to less Caucasian dominance, which in 2007 was estimated at 53%*. This mix of ethnic heritage supports a wide variety of recreation types with no significantly different need of facility type than found elsewhere in the region. * Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Fact Sheet: Oakland Park, FL.  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 21 Chapter 3 Existing Parks and Facilities Existing parks and facilities within the parks system of Oakland Park are discussed below, including a detailed analysis of each park. A review of recreational programs provided by the City is also included. The principal public recreation provider in the City is the City of Oakland Park Parks and Leisure Services Department. The Department has the responsibility for administering the recreation facilities provided by the City. The City provides neighborhood and community parks along with several community and special purpose centers. Most are active parks with facilities for sports and other recreation functions. Other agencies and jurisdictions providing recreation service to the City are the Broward County Parks and Recreation Division (BCP&R) and the State of Florida Division of Recreation and Parks. The BCP&R provides community and regional park facilities for County residents. The State provides recreation facilities for a multi-County region. State parks are generally large natural resource-based facilities. Land Area The State of Florida has mandated that each local government prepare a Recreation and Open Space Element as an integral part of the Comprehensive Plan required by Chapter 163, Florida Statutes (The section of Rule 9J-5 in the Florida Administrative Code addressing the requirements for this element was repealed). This element envisions a comprehensive system of public and private sites for recreation, including, but not limited to natural reservations, parks, playgrounds, pathways, open space and other recreational facilities. As mandated by Rule 9J-5, provision of adequate parks and recreation is guided by a set Level Of Services (LOS) standard, designed to ensure that local recreation facilities are provided concurrent with new and existing development. These local standards are set by the county government. Broward County has, through a County Charter, established minimum LOS standards for all municipalities within  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 22 the County. The County standard for all municipalities is three (3) acres of “land” per 1,000 persons for local parks. Each municipality may then provide more stringent requirements, if desired. This Recreation and Parks Plan reflects these minimum LOS standards, as well as future goals based on a community vision adopted by the City of Oakland Park. The City currently has a total of 189.36 acres of land in its recreation program of parks and community centers. (See Table 3-City Owned Park Facilities-2007). With a current estimated population of 44,184 persons, the land areas for parks should be 132.55 acres (44.184 X 3 acres). This calculation would imply that the City currently has an excess of park land in the amount of 56.81 acres. However, much of this land area considered for recreation use is actually water. Approximately 118 acres are lakes located in Royal Palm Park and Veterans Park. The breakdown of acreage in dry land and water is shown in Table 3: “City Owned Park Facilities, 2007”.  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 23  Table 3* City Owned Park Facilities, 2007 Neighborhood Parks: Acres: Wimberly Athletic Complex/Collins Community Center 14.00Spiher Recreation Center/Greenleaf Park 2.00Dr. Carter G. Woodson Park 0.85Stevens Field 3.00Cherry Creek Park (leased) 2.91Giusti Heart Parcours (leased) 5.00Lloyd Estates Park 0.42Mini-Park 0.12North Andrews Gardens Neighborhood Park 1.03North Andrews Gardens Community Center 6.23Schad Park 0.14Northeast High School (leased) 5.00Sub total (0.93 acres per 1,000 residents ) 40.70Community Parks: Royal Palm Park 52.00(1) City Boat Ramp 0.22Veterans Park 82.20(2) Oakland Bark Park 2.25Lakeside Sand Pine Preserve 5.00Jaco Pastorius Park 6.99Subtotal 148.66Total (4.3 acres per 1,000 residents) (3) 189.36Land Only (1.62 acres per 1,000 residents) (3) 71.36Land Only Non Leased (1.33 acres per 1,000 residents) (3) 58.45Notes: 1. Includes 42 acres of water 2. Includes 76 acres of water 3. Based on 2006 population estimate of 44,184 residents Sources: Oakland Park Parks and Leisure Services 2007. Carter Burges Inc., 2007. *Since this list was developed in 2007, the North Andrews Gardens Volunteer Park was added and is reflected in changes made later in this document.  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 24 The City of Oakland Park, in a desire to improve on the level of service provided by its parks has determined that it will provide a majority of dry land to meet the land area requirement. This goal is established in the City’s 2007 Comprehensive Plan as well as its Strategic Plan. Therefore, once water area is removed from available park land the City has an adjusted total of 71.36 acres in park lands, far less than the County requirement of 132.55 acres for local parks in Oakland Park. This deficit of 61.19 acres (132.55 required acres less 71.36 upland acres available) of dry land will need to be provided in the future implementation of this Master Plan to meet the current population of Oakland Park. Future Land Deficit Over the term of this Master Plan, the population of Oakland Park will increase, thus also increasing the park land area requirement. The population in 2030 of 60,121 persons will require a park dry land area of 180.36 acres, creating a total land area deficiency of 109 acres over the term of this Plan. To sum up, between 2009 and 2030, the City will need to make available 109 more acres for recreational use in order to meet City requirements. TABLE 4 Recreation Land Area Requirements Year Projected Population Recreation Land Area (Dry) Need 2009 (current) 44,184 132.55 AC 2015 (5 yr) 45,873 137.62 AC 2020 (10 yr) 53,523 160.57 AC 2030 (20 yr) 60,121 180.36 AC “The City will need another 61 acres of park land to meet present needs.” “Another 48 acres will be needed over the next 20‐years to meet projected needs.”   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 25 Other Potential Recreation Sites Oakland Park may consider use of other existing recreation sites. These are generally classified as school sites, church properties, agency lands, regional parks, and various private Home Owners Association (HOA) recreational facilities. In addition, the City can explore joint use of adjacent (outside-city boundary) parks and school sites which are close enough to specific Oakland Park service areas (one-half mile for neighborhood parks). This option would be recommended for temporary use only while long-term City owned or located properties are pursued. Ultimately, the City should seek to control the type of facilities and be able to provide full access to these resources. Potential Park Use Sites Since land within Oakland Park is not readily available due to a built-out condition in the City, potential use of other existing recreational facilities located at schools, public agencies, and other resources have been reviewed. Chapter 6, “Implementation” identifies specific opportunities for use of these sites. The first group of sites considered is located within the municipal boundaries of Oakland Park. The second group is located outside of the municipal boundaries in adjacent municipalities. Potential Park sites located inside Oakland Park: Oak Tree Golf Course – This would provide 100 ± acres of open space and meet the one-golf course requirement in the facilities schedule. It also captures the interest expressed by the public and City official’s interest as expressed in Chapter 4: “Demand Analysis”. C-13 Greenway - The City has won LAP funding to build a public trail through this segment of the C-13 canal that has public accessibility. This would provide one- half a mile of trails to the requirement for several miles of new trails needed in the city during the time frame of recreation program implementation. John D. Easterlin County Park - This existing 47 acre passive, resource-based park already provides facilities which are needed to meet the City’s program needs in camping, picnicking, and trails. By  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 26 County standards, the City may use 10 percent or up to 10 acres of this land area to meet it’s local park requirements. This could provide up to 4.7 acres of the additional park land needed for local City parks. Lloyd Estates Elementary School - This school provides some outdoor open space, especially at the north end, that could possibly be used for a small neighborhood park. This is especially useful since it also occurs in an area of need for local open space available to the local neighborhood. James C Rickards Middle School - This school, at the far north end of the City has four (4) tennis courts, two (2) basketball courts, and some open field play area. It is also in an area of need for a neighborhood park to serve the needs of the immediately adjacent residents. Space on the south side of the school is open and should be explored as a possible site for a new neighborhood park. North Andrews Gardens Elementary School - This school, located in the middle of the North Andrews Gardens community, does not have much in the form of outdoor space but may have some available land for a small neighborhood park on the north west corner of the site. This could serve the needs of the immediately adjacent residential community, including a tot-lot, picnicking, and casual relaxation. Oakland Park Elementary School – Located at NE 33rd St and NE 8th Avenue, on the south-central side of the City, could provide public use of a couple of basketball courts and a small outdoor play field. There does not appear to be available open space for Neighborhood park use other than perhaps some park benches adjacent to the basketball courts on the northwest side of the campus. St. Marks Episcopal School - This school is located in the far south east side of the City on the south side of Oakland Park Boulevard. This places it directly across the street from the Cherry Creek Park. Primary facilities which may be of use to Oakland Park include a softball field and two tennis courts. These sites, if made available for Oakland Park’s recreation programming, can contribute measurably to meeting specific demands, in the realm of both Neighborhood and Community park sites and specific facility needs. The 100 ± acre golf course makes a significant contribution in terms of overall recreation land area, if not by location, then certainly by area. See the attached map,( Figure 3) Potential Park Use Sites, for a location of all facilities discussed above. As additional support, Table 5: “Potential Park Sites – Inside City” provides a tabular account of facilities available in each of these properties.  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 27  MAP: Figure 3: Potential Park Use Sites  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 28 TABLE 5 Potential Park Sites - In City Site Name Location Facilities Present James S. Rickards Middle School 6000 NE 9 Ave. Oakland Park, FL 2-basketball, 4-tennis courtsOakland Park Elementary School 476 NE 33 St. Small softball field and basketball court - minimal North Andrews Gardens Elementary School 345 NE 56 St. No current outdoor facilitiesLloyd Estates Elementary School NW 40 Ct. at NW 7 Ave. Potential Neighborhood Park open space youth softball field – minimal C-13 Drainage Canal West side I-95 Linear Park – Passive use only. John D. Easterlin Regional Park W. Oakland Park Blvd at I-95Natural resource, camping, nature trails Oak Tree Golf Course W. Commercial Blvd. at W. Prospect Rd. 18-hole golf course, swimming pool, clubhouse (Community Center) St. Marks Episcopal School E. Oakland Park Blvd. at 1800 block 1-softball field, 2-basketball courts  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 29 Potential Park Sites Outside of Oakland Park: A discussion of potential park and recreation facilities outside Oakland Park is important in the event that sharing may be possible between municipalities. These sites would be useful if located immediately adjacent to the City where actual use by residents may be anticipated to occur. And, in one case, these adjacent facilities provide for a significant need which may not be possible to accommodate within the City due to very limited land resources: an active recreation complex on the west side of the City. Boyd H. Anderson High School – This large high school is located on the west side of the City, immediately adjacent to the municipal boundary in the City of Lauderdale Lakes. It contains high quality track and field facilities along with three tennis courts, a baseball and softball field. Use agreements via lease may be possible for specific and controlled use of some of these facilities, especially for the adjacent western community of Oakland Park. This may be a temporary solution for the active recreation needs of this area of the City while the City continues to develop other opportunities within municipal boundaries for a battery of active parks and related community center building. Lauderdale Lakes Middle School – This school is located immediately south of Boyd H Anderson High School and can provide additional active sports facilities including four tennis courts, two basketball courts, a 1/8 mile track, and two open fields. The school also has a swimming pool which may be available for City use. Pine Crest Preparatory School - This private school is located at the far northeast corner of Oakland Park and may be a source for additional outdoor facilities including, baseball, track, football, soccer, swimming pools and tennis. All are top-grade facilities and would require careful attention to maintenance in lease arrangements. Floranada Elementary School - This school site is located on the east side of North Dixie Highway, just north of East Commercial Boulevard. It has a couple of small softball fields and four basketball courts. This site would be accessible to the community to the south of Commercial Boulevard. However, fields are already available to the City by agreement at Northeast High School. St. Clements Catholic School – This school is located on the south side of Oakland Park Boulevard in Wilton Manors. This site has an open field and track combination and a tennis court. Access from Oakland Park for pedestrians is limited by the river located along the north property line.  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 30 Mickel Field - This small park is located in Wilton Manors about a quarter- mile from Oakland Park along NW 9th Avenue. It has a small baseball and softball field which could be programmed for use by ball clubs in Oakland Park. Mills Pond Park - This is a significant active park in the City of Ft. Lauderdale parks program. Use relationships should be established with Ft. Lauderdale to provide for Oakland Park’s use of these outstanding sports field facilities. This site, along with Boyd Anderson High School and Lauderdale Lakes Middle School could combine to serve the needs for active recreation facilities in the south and west sides of Oakland Park if programmed carefully. This 130 acre site offers baseball, softball, football, and open fields, large recreation center, along with other facility types. This park is heavily used by league play almost every night, so use access may be challenging. As an option, the City should seek to facilitate resident’s membership in existing leagues. It would be a short-term solution to Oakland Park’s need for active recreation facilities on the west side of the City. Osswald Park - This 30-acre park is located on the south west side of Oakland Park in the City of Ft. Lauderdale. It offers pavilions, playground, racquetball courts, basketball courts, tennis courts, and lighted athletic fields. It also has a 3-hole golf course. All of the above park use opportunities could augment a short-range solution to Oakland Park’s recreation needs, and probably already do to some extent, given favorable proximity to City residents. It is not recommended that this be a long-range solution, since these parks are already in service to other communities. The above map, Figure 3, “Potential Park Use Sites” shows the location of each of the above properties. And, below, Table 6: “Existing Recreation Sites – Outside City” gives a tabular account of facilities available at these properties.  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 31   TABLE 6 Potential Park Sites – Outside City Site Name Location Facilities Present Osswald Park City of Ft. Lauderdale NW 21 Ave. at NW 26 St. 2-softball fields, 2- tennis courts, 2- basketball courts, 3-holes golf Lauderdale Lakes Middle School3991 NW 30 Ave. City of Lauderdale Lakes 2-small soccer fields, 4-tennis, 2-basketball, track Boyd H. Anderson High School 3050 NW 41 St. City of Lauderdale Lakes 2-baseball, 3-tennis, football/track Pine Crest Preparatory School - Private NE 62 St. at NE 15 Ave. City of Ft. Lauderdale 1-baseball, 8-tennis, 1-football/track, 2 swimming pools, soccer Floranada Elementary School 5251 NE 14th Way City of Ft. Lauderdale 4-basketball, 2-small softballSt. Clements Catholic School N. Andrews Ave. at NE 29 St. Town of Wilton Manors 1-open field, 1/2-track, 1-tennis Mickel Field NW 9 Ave. at NW 26 St. Town of Wilton Manors 1-baseball, 1-softball (small)Mills Pond Park I-95 at NW 19 St. 5-softball fields, large open fields, 130-acres, others Source: Google Map and Broward County Property Appraisers map search, 2009, Miller Legg.  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 32 Park Types  The local parks in Oakland Park consist of both City-owned and leased properties, which are further divided into Neighborhood and Community park classifications based on park size and/or facilities. Definitions of the Neighborhood and Community parks are provided below, with more detail found in Chapter 4: Demand Analysis. And, Table 3: “City Owned Parks Facilities” provides a list of City parks separated into Neighborhood and Community park classifications along with land area calculations. Neighborhood Parks Oakland Park maintains 40.70 acres of Neighborhood parks (See Table 3). A Neighborhood park serves the residents of the surrounding neighborhood and can be easily accessed by bicycle or walking. This park may be up to ten (10) acres in size. All residents should be within ½ mile of a Neighborhood park. Amenities found in Neighborhood parks can vary and should be tailored to serve the needs of the immediately adjacent community. Typical features accommodate passive and/or active recreational activities and may include:  recreational centers/facilities • athletic fields  benches • playground equipment  walkways and trails • picnic areas  athletic courts (basketball, tennis, shuffleboard, etc) Community Parks Oakland Park maintains 47.85 acres of Community parks. A Community park is designed to serve the residents of multiple neighborhoods and is generally a minimum of ten (10) acres in size according to State of Florida standards. A number of parks in Oakland Park are smaller in size but still serve a community-wide function. Amenities provided within Community Parks typically include:  recreational centers/facilities • playground equipment  benches • group picnic areas  walkways and trails • swimming pools  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 33  athletic fields • off-street parking  athletic courts (basketball, tennis, shuffleboard, etc) • natural areas Leased Parks There are 12.91 acres of leased parks (Northeast High School, Cherry Creek Park, Giusti Heart Parcours) in the Oakland Park parks system (See Table 3). Leased parks fall into either the Neighborhood or Community park category, depending on size and/or the type of facility provided. They represent a partnership between the City and other entities, such as schools, churches, utility companies, public agencies, etc. Size and facilities vary but generally may include:  athletic fields • playground equipment  athletic courts • open play space  recreational buildings/facilities • trails  exercise paths It is anticipated that the City will expand on this opportunity to provide new facilities and land area over time to meet the growing requirement for top-quality facilities according to schedules shown in this Master Plan. Neighborhood vs. Community Parks The City of Oakland Park has determined in its Comprehensive Plan that the ratio of land area for its park system shall be 2:1: two (2) acres of Neighborhood parks to one (1) acre of Community parks. This approach is supported by a number of factors. First, Neighborhood parks are smaller and can be more conveniently distributed amongst the residents that use them. The ideal of “all residents being able to walk to a park” is a highly regarded attribute of any urban park system. A park, of some description, should be within a half-mile of all residents so that they may be accessible by walking. A second reason for a greater emphasis on Neighborhood Parks, as shown on the City Comprehensive Plan, is that smaller properties are more available in a built-out community such as Oakland Park.  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 34 A third reason is that a program of many smaller open space parcels, evenly distributed about the community, makes it a less harsh environment to live in. This is consistent with several life-style objectives in the City Comprehensive Plan and adds value to the community, even if one does not personally visit these parks. To demonstrate the “ideal” park distribution for Neighborhood parks, the attached map, Figure 4: “Neighborhood Parks – Ideal Distribution” has been prepared. This map shows what the best distribution would be if park locations were established from a blank slate. It also represents a goal for planning to achieve as a new plan is retrofitted into a mature community. Ideal Park Land by Park Type Neighborhood parks should represent two-thirds of overall park land inventory. The existing ratio is 40 acres to 189 acres, or approximately one–fifth of total land area in Neighborhood Parks. To achieve, or improve this ratio, Oakland Park should strive to provide 80 acres of Neighborhood Parks in the overall deficit of 109 acres. Therefore, on a strictly land area basis, the new land acquisition needed to cover the year 2030 deficit is as follows: Additional Park Area Needed by 2030 New Neighborhood Park Land 80 acres New Community Park Land 29 acres Total New Park Land 109 acres  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 35   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 36 Current parks in Oakland Park are not evenly distributed about the City. As the attached map, (Figure 5) “Neighborhood Parks – Areas Outside ½ Mile Park Service Radii” shows, parks are concentrated in the center, older areas of the City, leaving large areas of the City under-served. While the under-served area seems small in comparison to served areas, the situation of access is magnified when one considers that much of the existing served area is covered by Community Parks rather than Neighborhood parks. In order to provide the additional Neighborhood park service capability, existing Community parks will need to be retrofitted with new Neighborhood park facilities such as tot-lots, picnic tables, benches and shade structures. Size of Neighborhood Parks There is a deficiency with regard to size of existing Neighborhood Parks as well as the deficiency in location/distribution. The average size of Oakland Park’s existing Neighborhood Parks is 3.3 acres, far below the ideal maximum size of 10 acres. This explains why, even though the City has 21 parks in inventory, there is a significant deficiency in overall park land area. There are two (2) issues to be recognized here: First, it will be difficult to add land to existing parks given a lack of vacant land surrounding these parks. Second, new Neighborhood Parks will likely be of smaller size as well, for the same reason. Therefore, a greater number of smaller sized parks will be relied on to make up the deficiencies in overall land area and distribution.  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 37   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 38 Community Parks and Community Centers Community Parks are the focal points of a recreation program and should be strategically located around the City, to respond to major concentrations of residents and distinctive demographic conditions. These larger sites also provide larger program facilities that serve a broader community context, usually a collection of several neighborhoods. This is where athletic fields, community centers, administration, performing arts and gymnasiums are normally located. At present, Oakland Park has two, rather small, Community Recreation Centers. The Collins Community Center, while centrally located within the City, is far too small to provide the major recreational programming for a city of 44,000. As the Needs Assessments will show, this facility will require significant up-sizing in area as well as function to meet Oakland Park’s needs now, and in the future. Another very small community center is provided on the north side of the City: the North Andrews Gardens Community Center. This will require an increase in size or replacement in the future so that it can function as a regional Community Center. This would provide the focus of recreation activities for the North Andrews Garden’s resident population. The west side of the City has no public community center at present. This area will also need a regional Community Center which may be associated with a complex of athletic fields. Active recreation facilities are non-existent on this side of the City. This is especially important due to a significant active recreation demographic: households with families and young active adults. Therefore, by demographics, and population growth during the time frame of this plan, up to three (3) community recreation centers with related park facilities should be developed to serve the needs of Oakland Park residents. One of these should house the Parks and Recreation administration function in addition to other recreation needs as determined by the demand analysis component of this Plan. Existing Park Facilities During the course of this plan’s development, each of the 20 existing parks have been visited and analyzed as to current condition and functional attributes. Contents of each of these parks are shown. The source of this information is the “Recreation Element of the City of Oakland Park Comprehensive  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 39 Plan, Volume II, 2007”, and has not been updated to the current condition. A site analysis drawing over lain on an air photo map for each park is provided in Appendix C:” Existing Parks: Site Analysis Plans”. Park Facilities Currently Available (2009) 1. Oakland Bark Park 971 NW 38th Street Park Type: Community Area: 2.25 acres Facilities: a dog park that includes separate play areas with equipment for small and large dogs and agility equipment. Pavilions with seating are provided in each area. Restrooms and Storage. 2. Lloyd Estates Park 3420 NW 5th Avenue Park Type: Neighborhood Area: 0.42 acres Facilities: play equipment. 3. Dr. Carter G. Woodson Park 3490 NE 34th Court Park Type: Neighborhood Area: 0.85 acres Facilities: Basketball court – lights, 3 picnic tables, 3 barbeque grills, pavilion, parcours (exercise stations), play equipment, and racquetball court. 4. Jaco Pastorius Park / Community Center 1098 NE 40th Court Park Type: Community Area: 6.99 acres.  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 40 Facilities: 8,476 square foot Community Building and 14,280 square foot Storage Building including Restrooms, Office, Storage, and Kitchen. Passive park, including a walking path, benches and trash receptacles. 5. Spiher Recreation Center (in Greenleaf Park) 1246 NE 37th Street Park Type: Neighborhood Area: 2 acres Facilities: 4,000 square foot Community Center, including indoor community center, and pool tables, 2 Tennis courts, 1 Basketball court, 2 Picnic grills, Swing set,1 Climber and 1 Slide. 6. Cherry Creek Park (leased) 1701 E Oakland Park Boulevard Park Type: Neighborhood Area: 2.91 acres Facilities: Jogging/Exercise Trail 7. North Andrews Gardens Neighborhood Park 300 NW 56th Street Park Type: Neighborhood Area: 1.03 acres Facilities: This facility includes playground equipment and a picnic area. 8. Lakeside Sand Pine Preserve 2820 NW 27th Avenue Park Type: Neighborhood Area: 5.00 acres Facilities: Sand Pine forest with a nature trail, observation deck, restrooms and outdoor classroom.  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 41 9. Wimberly Athletic Complex 3901 NE 5 th Avenue Park Type: Neighborhood (per 2007 Comprehensive Plan) Area: 14 acres Facilities: 800 square foot concession stand, batting cage, 4 softball field, 1 football field, 6 tennis courts (presently adding 2 more),1 basketball court, swing set, spring animal play equipment, climbers, slide, pavilion, and inline hockey rink. 10. Oakland Park Boat Ramp 2960 NE 12th Terrace Park Type: Community Area: 0.22 acres Facilities: a boat access ramp into the north fork of the New River. 11. Veterans Park 3601 NW 21st Avenue Park Type: Community Area: 82.2 acres (6.2 acres land, 76.0 acres water) Facilities: Passive nature trail, benches, playground, observation deck/boardwalks, WWII Tank Relic. 12. Royal Palm Park 1701 NW 38th Street Park Type: Community Area: 52 acres (10.0 acres land, 42.0 acres water) Facilities: 722 square foot pavilion, 2,236 square foot activity building, 11 Picnic tables 2 Grills, 44 Parking spaces,1 Basketball court with lights, 1 Volleyball court, 4 Tennis courts, 2 Bocce courts: lighted walk path with exercise stations, floating dock, restrooms, playground.  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 42 13. Northeast High School 700 N.E. 56th Street Area: 5 acres Park Type: Community Facilities: 4 Basketball courts, 3 Baseball/softball fields, 1 All-purpose fields, 1 Outdoor swimming pool. 14. Dillon Tennis Center 4091 N.E. 5th Avenue Park type: Community Facilities: 8 lighted clay tennis courts, 3 court gazebos, and pavilion. 15. Collins Community Center 3900 N.E. 3rd Avenue Park Type: Community Facilities: 5,184 square foot, Multiple Use Community Center, contains Offices, Stage, Multi-purpose room, Restrooms, Kitchen, 161 parking spaces. 16. Active Adult Center (closed in 2009) 250 NE 33rd Street Facilities: 6,300 square foot center containing Multi-purpose Rooms, Restrooms, Kiln, and ceramic room, active adult programming. 17. Giusti Heart Parcours (Leased) 600 NE 38th Street Park Type: Neighborhood Area: 5 acres Facilities: one mile, 20- station lighted parcours (exercise path).  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 43 18. Stevens Field 3800 NE 6th Avenue Park Type: Neighborhood Area: 3 acres Facilities: 1,696 square foot field house, 54 Parking spaces, 2 Baseball fields with lights. 19. North Andrews Gardens Community Center 250 NE 56th Court Park Type: Neighborhood Area: 6.23 acres Facilities: 1,750 square foot multipurpose Community Center with meeting rooms, basketball court, and playground. 20. Schad Park NE 38th Street & NE 16th Avenue Park Type: Neighborhood Area: 0.14 acres Facilities: open space area. 21. North Andrews Gardens Volunteer Park (previously “North Andrews Gardens South Neighborhood Park”) NW 5th Ave at NW 48th Court Area: 0.25acres+/  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 44     Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 45 Existing Parks Analysis Each of the existing parks, except Jaco Pastorius Park (newly constructed), has been analyzed. Comments are shown on the maps provided in Appendix C under “Existing Parks: Site Analysis Plans.” Figure 7: “Site Analysis Example” below is an example of one analysis map prepared. The purpose of these analyses was to determine what, if any, upgrades to existing parks may be appropriate as part of future improvement plans. For the most part, these parks have been built-out and are in good to excellent condition. Buildings which occur on park sites are not included in this study and are part of a separate City facilities study prepared by others. Figure 7: Site Analysis Example  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 46  Recreation Programs Oakland Park organizes and conducts a wide variety of programs, special events, and activities throughout the year. See the attached Table 7: “Oakland Park Recreation Programs” provided by the Parks and Leisure Services Department representing current programming status. This report does not address subjects like programs and special events. These subjects are under the purview of the Recreation and Leisure Services Department since they need to be highly flexible and respond to community programming on an as-needed basis. This Recreation and Parks Master Plan is primarily focused on identifying and providing the land and facilities needed to support this programming rather than recommending programs themselves. Table 7 Oakland Park Recreational Programs as of January, 2009 Activity Season Resident Non-Resident Divisions & Breakdown Ages Flag Football Aug – Nov 119 19 3 Coed 6-8, 9-11, 12-15 Cheerleading Aug – Nov 27 1 2 Coed 6-8, 9-11 Soccer Nov – Feb 446 65 5 (3 are boy/girl separate) 4-5, 6-7, 8-10, 11-13, 14-16 T-Ball Feb – May 32 5 1 Coed 4 & 5 Coach Pitch Feb – May 58 12 1 Coed 6 & 7 Softball Feb – May 119 51 3 8-9, 10-12, 13-16 Basketball June – Aug 118 34 3 (1 is boy/girl separate) 7-9, 10-12, 13-16 Mens Soccer Jan – April N/A N/A 10 teams max. 15/team 18+ ASCOOP (SRC) Aug – June 65 4 K-6 Grade K-6 Grade ASCOOP (NAG) Aug – June 70 0 K-6 Grade K-6 Grade Escapade in the Shade 12 0 Approx. 12/day (Tues & Thur) Summer Program June – Aug 342 33 3 sites (K-2, 3-5, 6-8)/grade 5 thru 15 Creation Station Oct – May (Thursdays) 10 15 20-30 Children & Parents 3 thru 5 Moms, Pops & Tots Aug – June ( Fridays) 8 0 5-8 Participants 3 thru 5 Kids Night Out Nov – May N/A N/A 15-20 Participants 8 thru 12  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 47 Table 7, Continued Girls Night In Aug – June (2 Fridays/month) N/A N/A 25-30 Participants 8 thru 12 S.T.R.O.N.G. Year Round (Mondays & Thursdays) 8 0 6-8 Participants 50+ OP Teen Spot 27 0 Approx. 27/day (Wednesday) Teen Dances Sept – May (monthly) 150 25 175 Participants Active Adults – Ceramics Year Round (3 times a week) 32 16 Approx. 48/month 50+ Active Adults – Arts & Crafts Year Round (weekly) 72 28 Approx. 100/month 50+ Active Adults – Luncheons Year Round (monthly) 30 10 Approx. 40/month 50+ Active Adults – Bridge Year Round (weekly) 40 72 Approx. 112/month 50+ Active Adults – Red Hatters Sept – June 15 15 Approx. 30/month 50+ Active Adults – T.O.P.S. Year Round (weekly) 60 20 Approx. 80/month 50+ Active Adults – Aerobics Year Round (2 times a week) 24 8 Approx. 32/month 50+ Game Day - Seniors Year Round - daily 5 5 Approx. 50/week 50+ Special Events Dr. Carter G. Woodson Festival February N/A N/A Approx. 200 in attendance ALL Youth Day March N/A N/A Approx. 10,000 in attendance ALL Father’s Day Weekend Fishing Tournament June N/A N/A 1st Annual 06/14/08 ALL Performing Arts Programs Year Round N/A N/A Approx. 1,800 total 6 shows ALL Halloween Fun October N/A N/A Approx. 4,000 in attendance ALL Oktoberfest October N/A N/A Approx. 4,500 in attendance ALL Evening with Santa December N/A N/A Approx. 750 in attendance ALL Santa’s Phone Calls December N/A N/A Approx. 50 children called ALL  Source: City of Oakland Park: Dept. of Parks and Leisure Services    Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 48 Chapter 4 Demand Analysis The previous chapter dealt with existing facilities and available land. This chapter addresses the demand for services to be accommodated on this land throughout the implementation of this Master Plan over the next 20 years. Two primary sources of this information have been explored: Technical Standards available from the State of Florida, and Public Opinion in Oakland Park. Each of these are addressed in turn and together create the recreation development program to be accommodated by this Recreation and Parks Master Plan. Technical Standards The most widely used source of data regarding quantity and type of recreation facilities comes from the State of Florida Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan, known widely by the acronym “SCORP”. This guideline provides quantity ranges of recreation facilities needed by population quantities. Current SCORP guidelines for many common types of facilities are shown in Table 8: “SCORP Population Guidelines for Outdoor Recreation Activities”. This table shows a suggested range in numbers of facilities needed by a quantity of population represented as Minimum, Maximum and Median. The range selected for use in Oakland Park was determined from community input received during workshops, individual meetings, and from surveys.  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 49  Table 8 SCORP Population Guidelines for Outdoor Recreation Activities Activity Facility Population Served Minimum Maximum Median Bicycle Riding Linear mile of trail 1,500 10,000 5,000 Camping, (RV, trailer and tent) Acre of camp area 5,60025,0006,750 Freshwater and saltwater beach activities Mile of freshwater or saltwater sandy beach shoreline 25,000 211,200 25,000 Freshwater and saltwater fishing (non-boat) 800 feet of pier, catwalk or jetty 5,00025,000 5,600 Boat Ramps Boat ramp lane 1,500 12,500 5,000 Hiking Linear mile of trail 5,00010,0006,750 Nature study Linear mile of trail 6,250 10,000 6,750 Picnicking Picnic Area 5,00010,0006,000 Baseball/Softball Baseball/Softball field 2,000 10,000 5,000 Basketball Basketball court 50020,0005,000 Football/soccer/rugby Football/soccer field 4,000 25,000 6,000 General play Equipped play area Multipurpose field Multipurpose court 5005003,50015,00010,0004,00010,000 3,750 3,500 Golf 9-hole golf course 18-hole golf course 8,00025,00050,00065,20025,000 50,000 Physical Exercise (jogging and hiking) Exercise/Parcours Trails (one-mile length) 10,00050,00015,000 Racquetball/Handball Racquetball court 2,500 20,000 10,000 Shuffleboard Shuffleboard court 1,00012,0006,000 Swimming pool* Swimming pool1 1,000 50,000 25,000 Tennis Tennis court 1,06710,0002,000 Volleyball Volleyball court 4,000 12,000 6,000 1 Based on a standard community pool measuring 81 feet X 60 feet (4,800 feet). * Source: State of Florida “Outdoor Recreation in Florida, 2000”, Table 4.3  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 50 Application of Standards Three time frames are addressed in application of recreation standards: 2015, 2020, and 2030. Each of these time frames respond to city population forecasts as shown in Table 4: Recreation Land Area Requirements. Table 9: “2008 Existing vs. Required Facility Quantities by Type” represents the current number of facilities versus the SCORP selected population standard numbers of facilities. This provides the standard to be used for implementation by Phase as shown in Table 10: “Recreation Facilities Required for Implementation Phases”. Table 9 2008 Existing vs. Required Facility Quantities by Type Activity Facility Type Current Number of Facilities In 2008* Required Number of Facilities Now Selected SCORP Population Served Boat Ramps Lanes 1 4 12,500Camping Acres of camping 0 2 25,000Freshwater activities Miles of shoreline 0 2 25,000Jogging Trail Trail 1 3 15,000Nature Trail/Hiking Trail Linear Mile of Trail 2 6 6,750Picnicking Picnic Area 4 9 5,000Baseball/Softball Field 8 9 5,000Basketball Court 9 9 5,000Bicycle Path Linear mile trail 0 9 5,000Community Building/Game Room Community Facility 2 4 10,000Football/Soccer/Rugby Field 3 7 6,000Golf 18-Hole Course Golf Course 0 1 65,200Racquetball/Handball Court 1 4 10,000Shuffleboard Court Court 0 2 12,000Swimming Pool Pool 1 1 50,000Tennis Court 13 22 2,000Volleyball Court Court 2 4 12,000Fishing 800 feet of pier 0 2 25,000*The above quantities have been updated from the 2007 Comprehensive Plan Camping requirements can be met at the Regional Park – The City can use up to 4.7 acres of John D. Easterlin Park for this purpose.   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 51 Table 10 Recreation Facilities Required for Implementation Phases Activity Facility Number of Facilities Required by 2015 Number of Facilities Required by 2020 Number of Facilities Required by 2030 Boat Ramps Lanes 4 4 5 Camping Acres of camping 2 2 2 Freshwater activities Miles of shoreline 2 2 2 Jogging Trail Linear Mile of Trail 3 3 4 Nature Trail/Hiking Trail Linear Mile of Trail 7 8 9 Picnicking Picnic Area 10 11 12 Baseball/Softball Field 10 11 12 Basketball Court 10 11 12 Bicycle Path Linear mile trail 10 11 12 Community Building/Game Room Community Facility 5 (50,000 SF) 5 (50,000 SF) 6 (60,000 SF total) Football/Soccer/Rugby Field 8 9 10 Golf 18-Hole Course Golf Course 1 1 1 Racquetball/Handball Court 5 5 6 Shuffleboard Court Court 2 2 2 Swimming Pool Pool 1 1 1 Tennis Court 25 27 30 Volleyball Court Court 4 4 5 Fishing 800 feet of pier 2 2 2.5 Community centers are based on overall building square footage – The City should have a total of 60,000 SF by 2030.   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 52  Community Opinion The previous section dealt with facility programming by use of SCORP recreational standards as developed by the State of Florida for a variety of common facility types. These state standards were produced by a variety of public opinion surveys and polls conducted prior to the year 2000. Since Oakland Park may not be adequately represented by state-wide surveys, and since demographics have altered since the year 2000, it is essential to localize an understanding of recreational needs and desires. To achieve this understanding of local needs, several simultaneous activities have taken place over the past six (6) months as part of this Plan’s development as described below. A. Website - a special purpose website by the name www.parksinoaklandpark.com was established and maintained. This website provides information about the planning process and solicits opinion through an interactive public opinion survey. See Figure 8: Website Home Page. B. Opinion Survey – An opinion survey asking a variety of demographic and recreation preference questions has been conducted continuously over the past six (6) months. The results of this survey are provided in this chapter and represent the most detailed form of information gathering for this study. C. Elected Official’s Surveys – City Commissioners were interviewed to determine their opinions regarding recreation and parks programming, and for ideas about future development of recreation over the 20 year implementation schedule. D. Staff Survey – The City Manager, Parks and Leisure Services Director and Assistant Director, and Parks Superintendent were all interviewed for their respective input. In addition, the entire staff (40+ persons) of the Parks and Leisure Services Department was solicited for their input during a special purpose presentation and workshop. E. Pubic Workshops – Miller Legg and senior staff of the Parks and Leisure Services Department, conducted a total of three (3) public workshops at strategic points of the planning process. Public opinion and actual use of facilities are the means by which the numbers of different types of facilities are determined – This is how we “localize” state standards.   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 53 Figure 8: Website Home Page  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 54  Two (2) of these workshops, lasting 2 hours each, were conducted at two (2) different locations in the City to determine recreation needs. The first two (2) workshops provided data about recreation to attendees and solicited input through a number of break-out groups. The results of the break-out group evaluations were then evaluated by the entire group. This resulted in preparation of a list of needs and specific facilities to be evaluated in preparation of a preliminary Master Parks and Recreation Plan. Finally, a third public workshop was held to present preliminary findings and recommendations for the Plan. This workshop’s results were largely supportive of recommendations and provided additional direction for finalization of the Plan. F. Special Purpose Meetings – From the start of the planning process to conclusion, a number of meetings were held with staff, and others, to help with refinement of the Plan and to provide on-going opportunities for quality control and to solicit reactions to, and comment on, the emerging product. Of particular importance was an on-going interface with consultants preparing a Facilities Master Plan. That work considered all types of City buildings, including those used for recreation. Demand Summary The following is a summary of demand for recreation in the City of Oakland Park based on the above sources of information. This information contains a wide range of suggestions, desires, and needs. The common theme found is that all involved have a strong desire to improve their City through parks and recreational facilities. Through these comments, it has become evident that the community has a strong desire to have these types of amenities nearby. Both City staff and residents alike would prefer to see parks and recreational facilities evenly distributed throughout the City in order for all to have adequate access and enjoyment. Respondents to surveys and participants in workshops have stated that the availability of these resources is important in maintaining peaceful environments, good health, enjoyable activities, and positive community interaction. Meetings and consultation with the City’s Facilities Master Plan Consultant has enhanced the coordination of recommendations in this Plan.   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 55 A few types of recreational components have stood out as being especially important in Oakland Park. Each of the following recreational components help to create the foundation for a successful Master Plan and are addressed in detail here. Community Centers A common request heard through all sources of input was for newer, larger, and better programmed Community Centers which house a strong recreation function. This type of facility also serves as the focus of identity for residents in the area composed of several neighborhoods. The service area of a Community Center, according to SCORP, as adapted to Oakland Park, is one for every 10,000 residents. The program for these Centers includes meeting rooms, restrooms and lockers, gymnasium (optional), administrative offices, exercise rooms/equipment, meeting/performance hall, swimming pool (optional), kitchen or food assembly area, and indoor sports such as racquetball/paddleball courts, as needed. During the implementation period of this Plan (2009 – 2030) the population will increase from 40,000 to 60,000 persons in Oakland Park. This ultimate population develops a need for a total of 60,000 square feet of Community Center space. Demographics and facility needs suggest that this building area be distributed in 3 separate buildings strategically located within the City. Distribution by demographics and accessibility requires locating two (2) centers east of I-95 and one (1) west of I-95. Many survey respondents and workshop attendees suggested that one (1) center should be a dominant, iconic facility that contained administration along with a gymnasium and pool. This would be the center-piece of the recreation program in Oakland Park and be centrally located to provide greatest accessibility to all. This would allow for a hierarchy of Community Centers where city-wide facilities could be located in the central facility, supported by up to two (2) additional regional centers which could bring services and community identity to other major areas of the City. Urban Trails Along with Community Centers, an interconnected system of safe and convenient walkways represents a highly desirable aspect of a park and recreation program for Oakland Park. And, as mentioned in the demographic analysis of this report, it will increase in desirability as the population in Oakland Park ages over time. Walking will become the most important recreational activity. Using this activity to An iconic, centrally located center could establish the hub of Oakland Parks’ recreation program and meet demand for facilities requiring greater space. A network of sidewalks connecting the City’s  system of parks and community centers is highly desirable in Oakland Park.   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 56 interconnect various Community and Neighborhood parks and Community Centers will enhance the value and accessibility of the entire recreation program. This Master Plan suggests an initial network of trails which achieve this result, but further, more detailed evaluation, should be conducted in the future. Issues such as connectivity, walkway type, furnishings, signage, traffic, and costs will need to be determined in such an evaluation. Grants should be pursued that can make the needed upgrades to public rights-of-way as soon as practical during the 20-year implementation schedule of this Plan. Water-Based Recreation A third most-heard recommendation from the Oakland Park public, staff, and officials is to make much better use of the 118 acres of water that the City has in its recreation and open space land inventory. This is comprised of two (2) large lakes; one in Royal Palm Park (42 acres of water) and one in Veterans Park (76 acres of water). When these lakes are combined with the massive Lake Emerald and other lakes and canals in Oakland Park, there is a very significant waterfront image and use to be enhanced in the City. Other than casual observation of these water bodies as an amenity, little use is made of them at the present time. Potential use supported by public comments are: additional dock facilities, non-motorized boating (kayaking, canoeing, rowing and sailing), fishing (in specially designated areas) and perhaps floating wharfs that could be used as destinations by boaters. Other ideas such as an aqua golfing range using floating golf balls have been mentioned sporadically by respondents and workshop attendees but not at the significant levels needed for implementation. Water frontage also provides an opportunity for the City to promote using lakes with at least 1200 linear feet of shoreline as competitive non-motorized boat racing courses. National clubs and associations conduct these events on an annual basis and could be contacted by City event programmers to determine levels of interest and specific support required. Recommendations for specific water-based recreation, including potential expansion of the boat ramp at the Boat Ramp Park, are made in Chapter 6: “Implementation” of this Plan. Oakland Park should enhance its image as a waterfront community by making much greater use of this existing resource.   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 57 Preferred Recreation Activities and Facilities Public opinion in Oakland Park, as gathered from the various means described above, was condensed to provide the following order of preference for various types of recreation activities: FACILITY ORDER OF PREFERENCE What people REALLY WANT: SOCCER (Significantly more than half TENNIS of respondents desire these) AEROBICS BIKE PATHS EXERCISE TRAILS DOG PARKS PLAY GROUNDS SWIMMING POOLS WATER PLAYGROUND PICNIC TABLES AND GRILLS ARTS AND MUSIC CULTURAL EVENTS SHELTERS AND PAVILIONS What people APPRECIATE: SOFTBALL BOAT DOCKS (about half of respondents BOCCE BOAT RAMPS want these) FOOTBALL BOAT RENTAL SKATE PARK SAILING BASKETBALL CANOEING BASEBALL NATURE PARKS RACQUETBALL VOLLEYBALL KAYAKING FISHING MULTI-PURPOSE STADIUM MEETING FACILITIES  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 58  What people DON’T NECESS- LACROSSE AIRLY NEED: (significantly less of OBSERVATORY than half of respondents want these) VELODROME CRICKET DISC GOLF HORSESHOES SHUFFLEBOARD EQUESTRIAN TRAILS ROCK CLIMBING TARGET RANGE AQUA GOLF PERSONAL WATERCRAFT CREWING MODEL AIRPLANES AND RAIL ROADS Multi-Purpose Arts Center Surveys, workshops and interviews with staff and officials all have pointed out an interest in an indoor multi-purpose arts facility. Local experience with performance events in the past has been very positive as measured by high attendance and satisfaction expressed by attendees. Performing arts do provide both passive forms of recreation through attendance at events, and active forms of recreation through participation in dance, gymnastics and other athletic forms of performance. However, quantifiable standards for performing arts facilities are not as prevalent as the use of SCORP for other forms of active and passive recreation. A desire/demand determination comes from personal interest as expressed by the community during the opinion survey process of this Plan’s development. At this point we cannot provide a recommended size for a facility, but do acknowledge that it would be at least a city-wide demand, and probably regional, comprised of several cities in a potential service area. Performing Arts can qualify as both active and passive forms of recreation.   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 59 It is recommended that the City facilitate preparation of a specific study of demand to determine broadly based levels of public support for attendance, programming, and funding. Irrespective of this recommendation, this Plan finds that there is significant interest and proposes there be further specialized study of this activity type. Site/Location A performing arts facility will have its own specific access and site configuration requirements. As a city-wide facility, a central location connected with other central-city development and redevelopment programs, good visibility, and servicing are important considerations. The general area of the US-1 redevelopment corridor downtown, near the recently opened Jaco Pastorius Park presents obvious advantages of symbiotic use and support. This general location is recommended subject to the caveat of available property and results of the previously recommended special purpose demand study. Existing structures on the site, in particular, the “L” shaped building, could be used for smaller, more intimate types of performances such as musical recitals, poetry readings, and art displays. A theatre and stage for larger performances would require significant expansion of the “L-shaped” building and may not be practical without additional land availability.  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 60  Chapter 5 Planning Recommendations The previous chapter, Demand Analysis, provides a program for recreation and park facilities to be implemented over the next 20 years. This chapter provides the resulting recommendations to be accommodated by a physical city-wide plan and, the next Chapter, “Implementation”, provides schedules, staffing, and funding requirements by phase. Recommendations: Recreation Land Area The City is currently meeting the requirement for raw land acreage of three (3) acres per 1,000 people: the required amount is 132 acres as compared with the current area of 189 acres. However, since 118 acres consist of water and the City’s intent is to have three (3) acres of uplands per 1,000 people, there is a shortage of 71 acres at the present time. This recommendation is that upland acreage shortfalls can be made up by purchasing new land or by entering into additional strategic alliances with schools, churches, public agencies, as needed, to increase land area. Pocket parks, or those of one-acre or less, could be created by strategic acquisition of properties in the targeted areas shown on the Master Plan (see Figure 9, Page 63). A map and listing of existing City properties is provided in Appendix G. This shows land parcels already under City ownership. These properties have been analyzed for potential use for parks and there does not appear to be any which would be suitable. Provide an additional 71 acres of Park land now and a total of 109 acres of land by the year 2030.   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 61  2. Park Types The City has a number of Neighborhood and Community parks. However the mix of Neighborhood to Community Parks should be altered to provide additional Neighborhood Parks. In order to meet the number of Neighborhood Parks required, additional park areas should be considered in areas that are deficient of Neighborhood Parks. Some existing Community Parks could be considered as meeting the requirement for Neighborhood Parks based on usage and future addition of neighborhood facilities. The Plan recommends establishing at least six (6) new neighborhood parks at the present time; enlarging two existing Community Centers and developing a new one; and developing a new large, active recreation Community Park on the west side of the City. 3. Facility Types The City will need to install or provide leased facilities needed to meet the SCORP suggested LOS (Level of Service) for recreational activities. Determining the required numbers of facilities based upon population is an appropriate method when adjustments are made based on public demand. As shown in the previous chapter, the City comes close to providing adequate quantities of many facility types. Deficient numbers of facilities identified in this study have been scheduled for installation to meet an increasing population during the time frame of this Plan. See Table 10: “Recreation Facilities Required for Implementation Phases” in the Chapter “Demand Analysis” for a list of the quantity of facilities needed by type over the next 20-years. 4. Park Enhancements (Kit-of Parts) Over time, the City is recommended to develop and install a standard park “KIT-OF-PARTS” for all existing and proposed park and recreation facilities, so that a common character and quality is provided for every park and facility in the recreation and parks system. Common responses to surveys and recommendations heard during workshops were to add unifying elements to Neighborhood and Community parks as a standard practice. The Oakland Park system should maintain a consistent image by use of similar furnishings and levels of maintenance.   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 62 Each Neighborhood and Community park should incorporate some or all of the following enhancements, as space and function will allow. All of these elements are to be of similar design or manufacture: “Kit of Parts” Components:  Barbeque Facilities  Picnic Table/Pavilions  Drinking Fountains  Bathrooms  Shade Structures  Canopy Trees  Benches  Trash Receptacles  Signage  Kiosks (information)  Exercise Stations 5. Future Neighborhood and “Pocket” Park Locations As discussed earlier in this Plan, the City will need a better distribution of Neighborhood parks to meet level of service (LOS) requirements based on accessibility. It is desirable for all residents to be within one-half mile of a Neighborhood park. To aid in understanding where these additional Neighborhood parks should go, a map of existing parks and their service areas is provided at Figure 9: “Recreation and Parks Master Plan (See Page 63). Areas within city limits that do not have park coverage are where new Neighborhood parks are required. Figure 6: “Neighborhood Parks – Areas Outside ½ Mile Park Service Radii” located at page 31, shows where these under-served areas are. Several geographic areas which, as a minimum, will require new neighborhood parks are described below: DESIRED NEW NEIGHBORHOOD PARK LOCATIONS A. North Andrews at NE 44th St. (Lloyd Estates Elementary School vicinity) This is an area of built-out single family detached homes. There does not appear to be any existing city-owned properties within this Neighborhood park service area of large enough size. However, Lloyd Estates Elementary School shows a clearing at the north end which may be suitable for a small (1/2 acre) Neighborhood park.  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 63  If this site is not available, it will be necessary for the City to lease or acquire an existing residential property in order to meet this park requirement. B. Floranada Road (between NE 13th Ave. and North Federal Highway) This area is comprised mostly of older single-family detached homes and is completely built-out. There does not appear to be existing city properties available in this area. Single family lots may be available in this area, which would require City acquisition. A lake front location would also provide for a canoe/kayak launch accessing an interesting waterway excursion route in this area. However, care must be taken in retrofitting public use areas into existing residential areas due to perceived land use conflicts by local residents. Otherwise, locations on Floranada Road may present the least amount of conflict with local residents. C. East Commercial Blvd. and NE 6th Ave. – This is an area of older single-family homes entirely built-out at the present time. This area requires at least a small (up to one-half acre) parcel as a recreational walking destination. The City should focus on a property search within one-quarter mile of this intersection for such a parcel. The best prospect would be a tear-down of an existing commercial or residential structure since no obvious open space exists presently. During the time the City searches for a parcel in this vicinity, it is recommended that the City immediately provide facilities in the quarter-acre pocket park in the area called the North Andrews Gardens Volunteer Park. This site is located at the end of NW 48th Court at NW 5th Avenue. D. James S Rickards Middle School area – If possible, a small tract of land adjacent to the water tower on the south side of James S. Rickards Middle School could be a desirable Neighborhood park location, if available. This would serve residents of the adjacent neighborhood by providing a walking destination and other recreation elements. If this site is unavailable, a search in the adjacent neighborhood should be conducted for a one-quarter to half-acre site that can meet this requirement. E. Coral Heights neighborhood area – This is an area of built-out single-family residences located between NE 18th Avenue on the east and NE 16th Terrace on the west, north of NE 38th  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 64 Street. This area between the canal and North Federal Highway does not have park accessibility within walking distance and should be the target of small Neighborhood Park site acquisition activities. A property on the canal could provide an additional dimension of water front ambiance. Since an undeveloped property does not appear to be available at present, the City may need to undertake a property search for a commercial or residential property to convert to park use. F. South West Neighborhood Area: NW 28th Street at NW 17th Terrace – A small Neighborhood park of one acre or larger could provide recreation for this older community immediately west of I-95 on the south side of the City. This area appears to have brownfield properties which could be redeveloped for park use. Alternatively, open properties appear to be undeveloped along NW 28th Street, east of 21st Avenue which could serve this neighborhood. This site would provide for a couple of basketball courts and an open play field, along with the package of Neighborhood Park facilities as chosen from the previously mentioned “Kit-of-Parts”. 6. Future Community Park Locations Development of three (3) comprehensive multi-use recreational complexes is recommended. Increases in size and programming for two existing Community Centers along with development of a third Community Center are needed as follows. A. Western Community Active Recreation Center - Existing residential areas located within the City on the west side of I-95 are devoid of active sports fields required to serve the needs of teens and young adults. This deficiency is difficult to fill due to the lack of large parcels of land in this region. The opportunity for City acquisition of an existing golf course in this area may serve to lessen the impact that is caused by a lack of open space in this area of the City. However, by itself, this would be a potential trade-off of space for use. A greater need is for active sports fields to provide a place for soccer, football and baseball in this region. At present, the long-term solution could involve land reclamation of a portion of the lake at Veterans Park. A 30 acre site could accommodate six to eight soccer fields and four to five baseball fields, a Community Center building, along with required parking spaces. Lack of available land for athletic fields could be temporarily satisfied by joint use agreements with area schools.   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 65  The short-term solution may be to enter into a lease with the Broward County School Board (BCSB) to use the sports fields and tennis courts at Boyd Anderson High School, and fields at Lauderdale Lakes Middle School. The City is recommended to research this possibility with the BCSB during the first phase of Plan implementation to determine feasibility. Failing either leases with the BCSB for school site access or the ability to reclaim existing lake area for sports field development, this area of the City has access to facilities at Mills Pond Park, 2 1/2 miles away, or sports fields at Wimberly Athletic Field and Stevens Field approximately 3 1/2 miles away. Mills Pond is heavily used with league play scheduled almost every evening and weekends and will therefore not be a suitable long-term option. B. Central City-Wide Sports/Recreation Complex - Respondents to surveys and participants at workshops indicated an interest in a city-wide sports and recreation complex that may be tied in with a large Community Center. An existing dynamic exists in the area of a cluster of recreational facilities made up of four (4) existing parks: Dillon Tennis Center, The Collins Community Center, Stevens Field, and the Wimberley Athletic Field. This cluster of open space elements, if augmented by additional tennis, and basketball facilities, along with a much larger Community Center, could establish a recreational “Hub” for Oakland Park. This type of facility could expand to the east and include Brownfield redevelopment of existing older commercial/industrial use areas, if needed. With this central location, this Center could be easily reached by both pedestrians and bicyclists if a system of safe bikeways and walkways were established. These could be located in the existing vehicular corridors of the adjacent street grid. C. North Andrews Gardens Community Center - A third Community Center located in the recently refurbished North Andrews Gardens Community Center will continue to be needed to serve residents of the North Andrews Gardens area. However, this current building will be inadequate to serve recreation needs during the later phases of the recreation program implementation. A new building of 8,000 to 10,000 square feet will be required. Since this building is not forecasted to be in service until 2030, it could replace the existing building on the same site. Adaptive reuse of the existing church building, if it comes available to the City, may also be a prospect for future use as a regional community and recreation center.  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 66  7. The Arts Development of a multi-purpose Arts facility would meet the needs of the arts community and provide a permanent venue for historically successful events programming. As mentioned in Chapter 4: “Demand Analysis”, there is community interest in an arts facility. It is envisioned that a theatre could be constructed as a new structure located nearby the Jaco Pastorius Park, or for smaller performances, adaptive reuse of the “L-shaped” building on the Jaco Pastorius site could suit the immediate need. Either of these structures could also be used as for large meeting space during the majority of time. Additional arts educational and recreational programming could take place there as well. Collections of the works of local artists and artisans could be on display along with the works of local student art classes. Food service delivery capability, adequate parking, and accessibility during peak programming would also be desirable. During the near term, the City could partially renovate the L-shaped building for use as a multi-faceted arts facility as local programming may support music, graphic arts, sculpture, digital arts, theatre arts could all be supported by available space in this structure. The benefit that Jaco Pastorius Park provides is that performing arts are consistent with the theme of this park. In this broader context, Jaco Pastorius Park would become the center for the arts of all kinds in Oakland Park. 8. Recreation Program In accordance with the Parks and Recreation programming work, the Plan requires accommodation of the following elements over the next 20 years:  109± acres of new park dry land, evenly distributed.  Three (3) Community Centers.  Six to eight neighborhood parks, depending on land availability  A Multi-Purpose Arts Center.  One (1) active Community Park on the west side of the City, with Community Center.  An interconnected pedestrian trail system.  Staffing levels as required to service the above elements as shown in Chapter 6: “Implementation”.  Costs and sources of funding, as shown in Chapter 6: “Implementation”.  Active and passive facilities as detailed in Chapter 6: “Implementation”.  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 67  Initial upgrade of existing parks facilities to “catch-up” with immediate needs. This is detailed in Chapter 6: “Implementation”. Master Plan Mapping Two maps are provided to illustrate the above Recreation and Park Master Plan recommendations. POTENTIAL PARK USE SITES This map shows potential sites inside and immediately outside of Oakland Park which may be used to support short-term park demands. See Figure 3: “Potential Park Use Sites”, located in Chapter 3. RECREATION AND PARKS MASTER PLAN Figure 9 shows a comprehensive location of existing and proposed park sites and recommended connections between them. It provides the basis upon which the year 2015, 2020, and 2030 phases are developed as shown in Chapter 6: “Implementation”. Areas which are recommended for new parks are represented by a symbol which is a generalized location. Specific recommended properties to acquire are not shown here and will require identification in future property searches conducted within this generalized area. These areas DO NOT represent known properties that are available at the present time and only serve as a guide for the search. This allows the City some competitive advantage in having alternative sites from which to choose. Pedestrian trails shown are located within existing city street rights-of-way and represent a network for connections between park and recreation facilities. Additional streets may be added in the future. These streets are locations for improved sidewalks, safe pedestrian street crossings, sidewalk lighting, directional signs, benches and trash receptacles.  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 68   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 69 Chapter 6 Implementation Introduction Oakland Park’s Recreation and Parks Master Plan as delineated in Chapter 5 will be implemented over the next 20 years. During this time period a number of related components must be scheduled in time increments of 5, 10, and 20 years. The purpose of this final chapter is to identify land needed, facilities required, staffing, and budgeting of financial resources needed by each of the three time frame increments. Improvement Phases Based on the Recreation and Parks Master Plan and facilities discussed in the previous chapters, the following improvements are recommended by time frames for the immediate condition, 5-years, 10-years, and 20-years. Immediate Improvements (the “now” phase) In addition to land, a number of improvements to existing facilities are required. These are all to be implemented on existing park lands. Miller Legg has worked with staff of the Recreation and Leisure Services Department to prepare a list of improvements. Order-of-magnitude implementation costs are also provided for funding implications. See the attached Table 11: “Opinion of Probable Costs”.  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 70 REV:DATE: 1/12/2009REV: 6/23/2009QTY ITEMUNIT UNIT PRICE TOTALTOTALBoat Ramp Park 6,483 sf: 0.15 acres$33,550.002 Picnic tables EA 5,000$ $10,000.001 BBQ grills EA 1,200$ $1,200.001Trash CanEA 750$ $750.001Boat RampLS 15,000$ $15,000.003 Parking SpacesEA 1,200$ $3,600.004 Benches-to face water EA 750$ $3,000.00Cherry Creek Park 3.5 acres$50,650.002 8’x12 shade structures EA 16,500$ $33,000.006 BenchesEA 750$ $4,500.001Trash CanEA 750$ $750.001 informational KioskEA 5,000$ $5,000.001 Landscape w/ Canopy Tree LS 5,000$ $5,000.002Picnic TablesEA 1,200$ $2,400.00Dillon Tennis Center 2.5 ac.Improvements in process and budgetedDr. Carter G. Woodson Park 1.87 ac.Improvements in process and budgeted OPINION OF PROBABLE COSTCity of Oakland Park - Initial Park Improvements for existing parks - to 5 Years Table 11: Opinion of Probable Costs  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 71  Table 11 Continued: Page 2  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 72 Oakland Bark Park 2.26 acres$25,500.0020 canopy trees in area of Large Dog Run EA 450$ $9,000.001 Shade structure 8x12 EA 16,500$ $16,500.00Royal Palm Park 33.68 acres$121,500.003 Picnic tables - at south end near launch EA 1,200$ $3,600.001 Kayak/Canoe Launch - 30'x100' sand beach w/wood timber bulkhead EA 25,000$ $25,000.001 Shade Structure at Launch - 8'x12' EA 16,500$ $16,500.00150 Fishing Pier - at south end, with pier head 24'x24' LF 120$ $18,000.00576 North Pier head, 24'x24' SF 25$ $14,400.00200 Fishing Pier - at north end, with pier head 12'x50' LF 120$ $24,000.00600 South Pier head, 12'x50' SF 25$ $15,000.001 Kiosk with signage at South Entry EA 5,000$ $5,000.00Spiher Recreation Center and Greenleaf Park 1.92 acres $23,500.006 BenchesEA 750$ $4,500.001 pathway near ficus tree LS 2,000$ $2,000.001 Shade Pavilion, north side of totlot EA 12,000$ $12,000.001 Entrance Kiosk and signage EA 5,000$ $5,000.00Stephens Field 3.95 acres$304,500.004 Replace dugoutsEA 20,000$ $80,000.001 Replace Restrooms, NE Corner LS 75,000$ $75,000.004 Replace Picnic Shelters EA 12,000$ $48,000.007,500 Resurface asphalt SE corner SF 5$ $37,500.00500 Landscape Buffer along 38th Street LF 75$ $37,500.001 Enhance landscape at SW Corner LS 10,000$ $10,000.001,650 Fencing-8' Chain Link LF 10$ $16,500.00Veterans Park 14.17 ac/land, 9.50 ac/water: 23.67 ac total $5,000.00300 Shoreline restorationOut to bid200 Pier with 12'x48' pier headOut to bid1 Information KioskLS 5,000$ $5,000.00Wimberly Athletic Field 8.60 acres$120,000.001 update softball fields, new fencing, dugouts, etc LS 120,000$ $120,000.00 $906.050.00Total Table 11 Continued: Page 3 Legend _______________ CY = Cubic Yard EA = Each LS = Lump Sum SF = Square Feet  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 73  Location The improvements are listed by park name, as shown on the Recreation and Parks Master Plan (Figure 9). The locations for potential City land acquisitions, or use of other recreation sites located both inside and outside Oakland Park City limits, are shown on maps located in each implementation phase. It is not anticipated that acquisition of land is needed to meet the current condition. Projected Costs The costs for improvements create a base condition upon which to implement future Master Plan facilities. The costs shown are in 2009 dollars and may require modification over time due to fluctuations in material and labor costs. Projected Staffing Current year (2009) staffing is budgeted at 18 persons in the Recreation division and 26 persons in the Parks Division for Full Time employees for a total of 44 total staff. Part-time staff is additional. The Parks division is also responsible for maintenance of City building grounds and City street landscapes. It has been difficult to separate out the grounds and streetscape landscape staffing utilization from parks operations and maintenance. Therefore, we will continue to include staffing levels for all service functions, except the Library. Staffing Guidelines – Setting the Standard Through research of standards and activities of several other local municipalities to determine staffing utilization, a ratio of Full Time staff numbers to park land area has been developed. This is without discrimination as to uplands or water area. These findings for 2008 are shown on Table 12 as follows:  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 74  Table 12: Staff to Land Area Ratios Municipality Land Area Full-time staff Staff/Land Area Ratio Oakland Park 189 Acres 44 persons 1:4 Coral Springs 675 Acres 70 persons* 1:9.6 Pembroke Pines 450 Acres 103 persons 1:4.5 Miramar 369 Acres 108 persons 1:3.4 Plantation 427 Acres 112 persons 1:4 Note: * The relatively low staffing ratio found in Coral Springs relates to incorporation of large acreage passive recreation areas in this City’s inventory. Passive parks with lower density use and native landscaping result in lower staffing requirements. Oakland Park has only one such park in its inventory, Lakeside Sand Pine Preserve which is 5 acres in size, and represents only 2.5 % of the inventory. It is important to recognize that this tool for calculating staffing needs can only serve as a guide. Actual staffing requirements depend on actual park and facility needs, a community’s expected level of maintenance and attention, and a variety of other factors. These factors can be used to enhance ultimate staffing needs once parks are in place and operational characteristics are learned over time. Results from all of the demand survey techniques employed in this study have mentioned need for more Rangers and grounds maintenance staff, but could not quantify this need. Therefore, we will use the current level of staff since it is generally corroborated in the local marketplace of park staffing. Therefore, as each phase of implementation is considered, one new staff position will be budgeted for each four (4) acres of land added to the program. Funding Options In the Current condition, no new staff persons are contemplated for implementation since no new land area will be required. Therefore, funding options for the improvements recommended will be a combination of the following:  Ad Valorem taxes and Recreation Impact Fees  Parks Municipal Service Taxing Unit (MSTU)  Grants (FRDAP, LWCF, BIF, others)  General obligation Bonds  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 75  Since most of the improvements are near term small improvements to a number of facilities, and are not typically supported through the identified grant programs, it is recommended that the majority of improvements be funded through the General Fund over the next two to three years. These types of improvements are also frequently funded through Recreation Impact Fees, depending upon the availability of these funds at the present time. Phase One: FIVE YEARS (2015) This first implementation phase recognizes that it begins in a recession economy. Therefore, the Plan features growth of facilities by leasing, rather than purchasing them. There will be a need to start a property acquisition program, but a minor one. Along with leasing land that already has facilities, some additional facilities must be added to meet both the current deficiency (what we need now) along with the needs projected based on population increases over the next 5-years. Toward the end of this Phase, it is recommended that a phased construction of the Central Community Center start. The timing of this will need to respond to improved economic conditions a few years hence. Land Area Suggested by Standards Over the first five years, the population is projected to increase by another 1,500 persons (44,184 increasing to 45,873 persons). This population increase requires another 4.5 acres of park land using the standard of 3-acres per 1,000 residents. Add to that the existing deficiency of 61 acres, and there is a total of 65.5 acres of land suggested for this Phase. However, there are opportunities to exceed this total when existing recreation resources are added to the program in order to meet facility demand caused by large land uses such as golf, sports fields, and courts. Recreation Facilities Needed Phase One recreation facilities, as previously determined, includes a minimum of the elements as shown in the 2015 Facility Program (Table 13). In some cases, due to geographic distribution requirements and the need to install new parks, more facilities are recommended than minimum SCORP standards suggest. For example, only 10 basketball courts are suggested by population, and  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 76 the City already has 9. Since it is known that this sport is desired by certain neighborhoods, we propose additional courts be installed with some of the new parks. TABLE 13 2015 Facility Program Activity Facility Quantity to Install this Phase Site Boat Ramps Lanes 3 each City Boat Ramp Camping Acres of camping 2 acres Easterlin Regional Park Freshwater Activities Miles of shoreline 2 miles C-13 Canal Royal Palm Park Veterans Park Jogging Trail Miles of trails 3 miles C-13Canal – ¾ mile City Streets – 2 ¼ miles Nature Trail Miles of trails 7 miles C-13 Canal Easterlin Regional Park Picnicking Picnic area (3 tables) 6 each needed/ 7 to install Oakland Park Boat Ramp Active Adult Center Cherry Creek Park N. Andrews Gardens Royal Palm Park Baseball/Softball Field 2 Boyd Anderson – 2 existing Basketball Court 1 min; provide 4 Richards MS – 2 SW Neighborhood Park – 2 Bicycle path Lin. Mile trail 9 miles C-13 Canal – ¾ mile City Streets Community Facility Community Recreation Building 1 Collins Center – 30,000sf  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 77  Table 13, continued Activity Facility Quantity to Install this Phase Site Football/Soccer/Rugby Field 5 Lauderdale Lakes MS – 2 Temporary use of Mills Pond Park – 3 fields Golf 18 holes 1 Oak Tree Golf Course Racquetball/Handball Court 4 Defer to future phase if needed Shuffleboard courts 2 courts min 2 Defer to future phase if needed Swimming Pool Pool 1 Defer to Phase Two, with Central Community Center Tennis Court 8 (need 12) Boyd Anderson – 2 James Rickards – 4 Dillon Tennis – 2 Defer 4 to future phases Volleyball Court 2 SW Neighborhood Park - 2 Fishing 100’ pier 2 Veterans Park – 1 Royal Palm Park - 1 Provided Land and Facilities COMMUNITY PARKS LEASED SCHOOL FACILITIES New opportunities for active sports fields are needed on the west side of the City which equate to Community Park size facilities. Joint-use arrangements with the Broward School Board should be pursued to use facilities at Boyd H. Anderson High School, Lauderdale Lakes Middle School, and James S. Rickards Middle School. This will add the following land area and facilities to the City’s recreation program: Boyd H. Anderson High School 5 acres +/- 2-baseball fields and 2-tennis courts. Lauderdale Lakes Middle School 5 acres +/- 2-soccer fields  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 78  James S. Rickards Middle School 5 acres +/- 2-basketball and 4-tennis courts OAK TREE GOLF COURSE This Plan also encourages the City to pursue some form of use opportunity with current and/or future owners of the OAK TREE GOLF COURSE. The City would not necessarily need to own the golf course so long as it could be made accessible for public use and that the land area remains in open space in perpetuity. This action would fill the needed golf recreation facility as well as provide a large land area in open space. Oak Tree Golf Course 105 acres +/- 18-hole Golf Course REGIONAL PARK ALLOCATION (John D. Easterlin Regional Park) Broward County allows for up to 10 percent of an existing Regional Park located within a municipality to be counted toward the land area requirement for local parks. John D. Easterlin Park can provide this opportunity and can be counted as 4.7 acres for use by Oakland Park (10% of 47 acres). More importantly, Easterlin Park also provides needed Trails, Camping, and Picnicking as shown in the Facilities Program, Table 13, above. John D. Easterlin Regional Park 4.7 acres Tent camping, nature trails, picnicking Total land area for new Community Parks in Phase One: 125 +/- acres NEIGHBORHOOD PARKS Neighborhood parks are needed in areas shown on the Recreation and Parks Master Plan map, Figure 9. Specific sites are not identified for all areas in need, but the following should serve as a guide for site acquisition during Phase One 2015: Lloyd Estates Elementary School ½ acre +/- Tot lot, shelter and 2-picnic tables South West Neighborhood Park 1 acre 2-basketball courts, shelter, 4- picnic Tables, tot lot, 2 volleyball courts  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 79  Total land area for new Neighborhood Parks: 1 ½ acres+/- GRAND TOTAL NEW PARK LAND AREA PHASE ONE 2015: 126 ½ +/- ACRES COMMUNITY CENTERS In addition to new park sites and refurbishment of existing parks, major activity is required for the Central Community and Recreation Center during the 2015 time frame. Interaction with Facilities Master Planners indicates that there is a possibility for redevelopment of the existing Collins Community Center. This redevelopment would require demolition of the existing center building and construction of a new Community Center building. This structure would encompass 30,000 square feet of interior space. A new community center is also needed on the west side of the City. It is recommended that this be located at Veterans Park on reclaimed lake land during Phase Two (2020). However, the need for sports fields and courts will be addressed in this Phase by utilization of existing facilities located at Boyd Anderson High School and Lauderdale Lakes Middle School, as described above. 2015 Master Plan Map: See Figure 10 below showing location of sites for the 2015 Phase One improvement program as described above.  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 80   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 81 Projected Costs Construction and site acquisition costs are minimized for Phase One since the parks included are all existing facilities except for one and a half (1 ½) acres. Market rate for new site acquisition is highly variable. For purposes of this study a rate of $200,000 per acre for ready-to-build property will be used. Current market conditions may provide for significantly reduced rates. Each park is budgeted by using the start-up expenses shown below in Capital Outlay Costs. Projected costs include capital outlay costs, staffing costs and operation costs as shown below. Capital Outlay Costs are for the entire Phase. Staffing and Operations costs are for the ending year of the Phase, 2015 only. Capital Outlay Costs (includes New Parks and Centers and Facilities Costs) Boyd Anderson High School Use acquisition Costs……………………………. $10,000.00 Legal Fees, staff time Facilities Development Costs…………………… $ 5,000.00 Site furnishings, if needed Lauderdale Lakes Middle School Use acquisition Costs …………………………… $10,000.00 Legal Fees, staff time Facilities Development Costs…………………… $ 5,000.00 Site furnishings, if needed James S Rickards Middle School Use acquisition Costs …………………………… $10,000.00 Legal Fees, staff time Facilities Development Costs…………………… $ 5,000.00 Site furnishings, if needed Lloyd Estates Elementary School Use acquisition Costs …………………………… $10,000.00 Legal Fees, staff time Facilities Development Costs …………………… $25,000.00 Tot lot, Shelter, furnishings, signage  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 82 Collins Community Center, (30,000 SF)………………… $5,000,000.00 Construction costs @ 167.00 per SF SW Neighborhood Park Land Development Costs………………………….. $250,000.00 Purchase one acre, staff time Facilities Development Costs ……………………… $150,000.00 Tot lot, 2- basketball courts, furnishings, signage, drinking fountain, fencing, site prep, design, 2 volleyball courts. John D. Easterlin Regional Park………………………………No Costs Anticipated SUB-TOTAL PHASE ONE NEW PARKS AND COMMUNITY CENTER COSTS: $5,480,000.00* SUB-TOTAL INITIAL PHASE COSTS (Improvements to existing facilities): $ 906,050.00 TOTAL CAPITAL OUTLAY COSTS PHASE ONE 2015 $6,386,050.00 *Not included: Access costs for public use of Oak Tree Golf Course. Projected Staffing Requirements and Costs per Annum Staffing will require an increase during this 5-year implementation period corresponding with the additional land area to be maintained as determined by the standards developed in the “Staffing-Setting the Standard” section described above. While A total of 126 ½ acres are added to the program, only 16 ½ acres require staff at the same level of care as properties currently in the City’s system. The Regional Park and Golf Course are not proposed to be maintained by the City and therefore would only require programs management of activities which the City would run on them. It is projected that the equivalent of one program management position would be required for these two parks.  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 83 New Staff Quantities Staffing quantities will adjust by the factor of 1-full-time staff person per 4-acres for 16 1/2 acres of additional land. Total new full-time staff, undifferentiated by role, would be 4 new full time staff. An additional full time position would be needed for program management as described above for the Regional Park and Golf Course use. Finally, if the upgraded Central Community and Recreation Center is built to the 30,000 square foot size another 6-full time staff may be required. Therefore, the total full-time staff requirement for this Phase is estimated to be 11-full time additional staff. Full Time Staff The Phase One total full time staffing for the Parks and Recreation Division of the Parks and Leisure Services Department would be 55 persons (44 existing + 11 = 55). Part Time Staff Current (2009) part-time staff includes 36 persons. Growing at the same ratio as full-time staff, another 6 positions will be needed by 2015. Therefore, part-time staff will increase to 42 positions in Phase I (36+6=42). Total Staff This Phase for the year 2015 will require a total of 97 staff persons (55 Full Time + 42 Part Time). New Staff Costs Full-Time Personnel Service expenses are projected from the FY 2009 Adopted Budget for Parks and Leisure Services Department-Parks and Recreation Division. That budget is $3,269,590.00. Since costs for Part-time and Temporary personnel are not included in this calculation, the budget is reduced by $367,328.00 to $2,902,262.00, or $2.9 Million. This budget develops an average annual cost per employee of $65,960.00. With escalation at a presumed rate of 3.5%, this figure increases to $75,690.00 per full time employee for 2015. Personnel Services Expenses for Full-Time staff for FY 2015 are projected at $4,162,950.00 (55 full-time staff x $75,690. each). 2009 costs for part-time staff are $10,000.00 per person (ref: FY 2009 Adopted Budget). At an escalation of 3.5% per annum, this Part-Time annual staffing cost increases to $ 11,475.00. per staff position. Therefore, Part-Time staff costs FY 2015 are estimated at 481,950.00 (42 part time staff x $11,475.00.)  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 84  Staffing Requirement Synopsis: Total Staffing requirements for FY 2015 are: Full-Time Staff: 55 Persons @ $75,690.00 = $4,162,950.00 Part-Time Staff: 42 Persons @ $11,475.00 = $ 481,950.00 Total Staff: 97 Persons $4,644.900.00 Projected Operating Costs per Annum Operating costs are projected as a factor of Personnel Costs. This factor is 50% according to the 2009 City Budget. Costs shown in this budget to operate parks for the year 2009 are $1,533,291. Therefore the Projected Operating Costs FY 2015 are forecasted to be $2,322.450.00 using an escalation factor of 3.5% per annum. Funding Resources Funding for the above costs come from a variety of resources. The City has at its disposal a wide variety of funding sources. Funds from grants vary from year to year, with new programs emerging every year while others disappear. The City is recommended to develop staffing capability in parks grant writing since many programs require specialized capabilities to track available programs and to win these funds on a regular basis. This Phase requires a significant funding requirement of $5,000,000.00 for a new Community Center. It is recommended that this source of funds come from a new general obligation bond that could include this facility and others which are determined to be needed by the City Facilities Master Plan.  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 85 Funding resources by generic types include the following:  General Obligation (G.O.) Bonds  Ad Valorem taxes  Parks Municipal Service Taxing Unit (MSTU)  Grants (FRDAP, LWCF, BIF, others)  Impact Fees  Sales Tax (Lands for You)  Development Exactions  Donations/ Contributions  Land Swaps  Tax Increment Financing (TIF) – if available to projects within the City’s CRA.  Lease agreements with existing facility owners  The City’s “Tree Fund”. Phase Two: Ten Years (2020) This second implementation phase will require acquisition of park lands and/or lease arrangements with existing facility owners both inside and outside of Oakland Park. Along with land, facilities must be added to meet the needs projected based on population increases over the period of time between 2015 and 2020. Land Area Suggested by Standards Over the second five years, the population is projected to increase by another 8,200 persons (45,873 persons increasing to 54,070 persons). This population increase by itself requires another 25 acres of park land. However, presuming that an arrangement for joint use of the Oak Tree Golf Course has been made in Phase One, land area requirements will have been met. The primary concern then becomes having the required land area to provide the actual facilities needed.  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 86  Recreation Facilities Needed The Table below (14-A) shows facilities to be installed in Phase Two. This derives from Table 10: “Recreation Facilities Required for Implementation Phases” provided in Chapter 4, Demand Analysis. TABLE 14-A 2020 Facility Program Proposed Land and Facilities COMMUNITY PARKS In Phase One, it was recommended that a temporary joint use agreement (lease) be established with the Broward County School Board for use of 5 acres each at Boyd Anderson High School and Lauderdale Lakes Middle School. In this phase, it is recommended that the City identify and acquire new properties amounting to 25-30 acres. This will provide the opportunity to develop soccer and football fields, baseball fields, and tennis courts in the quantities shown on the above Table 14-A. ACTIVITY FACILITY QTY TO INSTALL INSTALL SITE Nature Trail Linear mile 1 Easterlin Picnicking Picnic area 1 Western Center Baseball Fields 4 Western Center Basketball Courts 1 Western Center Bicycle Path Linear mile 1 City Streets Football/Soccer Fields 6 Western Center Racquetball/Handball Court 4 Western Center Shuffleboard 2 Courts 2 Central Center Swimming Pool – 25m 1 Central Center Tennis Courts 8 Western Center  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 87  The 10 acres used for Phase One under lease at Boyd Anderson and Lauderdale Lakes Middle School will no longer be needed and will be reduced from the overall total land area needed for Phase II accordingly. Western Community Park and Center 25 Acres Total Community Center Land area this Phase: 25 Acres NEIGHBORHOOD PARKS Additional Neighborhood parks are needed to reach the goal of having an accessible parks program. The additional sites recommended for Phase Two of the Parks Master Plan are as follows. Oakland Park Elementary School 3 Acres +/- Floranada Road N.P. ½ Acre +/- Total Neighborhood Park Land Area this Phase 3 ½ Acres +/- Total Land Area (Community and Neighborhood Parks) 28 ½ Acres Less Land Area from Phase One (closed leases) <10 > Acres Net Land Area Required in this Phase: 18 1/2 Acres COMMUNITY CENTERS Western Community Center – This 10,000 square foot Center along with parking is proposed to be constructed on a one and a half acre portion of lake reclamation at Veterans Park or new land to be acquired in the future. This facility will be programmed at that time but would anticipate needing to include support facilities for the sports fields also to be constructed at this location. See attached Figure 11: Phase Two 2020 Implementation Map showing locations of sites for this phase.  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 88  FIGURE 11  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 89 Projected Costs Projected costs include capital outlay costs, staffing costs and operation costs as shown below. Capital Outlay Costs are for the entire Phase. Staffing and Operations costs are for the ending year of the Phase, 2020 only. Capital Outlay Costs (includes New Parks and Centers and Facilities Costs) New Parks and Centers Oakland Park Elementary School Use Acquisition Costs……………………….. ……….$10,000.00 Legal Fees, staff time Facilities Development Costs…………………………$20,000.00 Site furnishings, field upgrade and shelter Floranada Road Neighborhood Park Use Acquisition Costs…………………………………$200,000.00 Purchase ½ acre, staff time Facilities Development Costs………………………...$ 50,000.00 Tot lot, signage, landscape, fencing, furnishings, signage, drinking fountain Western Community Park and Center Lake reclamation *25 acres …………………...... $2,800,000.00 or $112,000 / AC Community Center 10,000 SF …………………… $1,750,000.00 @ 175.00 / SF ___________ TOTAL NEW PARKS AND CENTERS COSTS……………$4,830,000.00 * Utilizes $2.00 per cubic yard fill costs in clean waste disposal and placemen costs for lake filling. This amount may need to be revised subject to availability of other lands for this Phase instead of development by means of lake reclamation. This cost will require adjustment accordingly.  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 90  Recreation Facilities Recreation facilities costs are in addition to the above Capital Outlay Costs. Costs for Phase Two (2020) recreation facilities to be constructed for this phase are shown in Table 14-B: “2020 Facility Program + Costs”. TABLE 14 - B 2020 Facility Program + Costs ACTIVITY FACILITY QTY TO INSTALL INSTALL SITE *COST EST. Nature Trail Linear mile 1 Easterlin no cost Picnicking Picnic area 1 Western Center $ 5,000.00 Baseball Fields 4 Western Center $300,000.00 Basketball Courts 1 Western Center $ 25,000.00 Bicycle Path Linear mile 1 City Streets NA Football/Soccer Fields 6 Western Center $600,000.00 Racquetball/Handball Court 4 Western Center $110,000.00 Shuffleboard 2 Courts 2 Central Center $ 40,000.00 Swimming Pool – 25m 1 Central Center $250,000.00 Tennis Courts 8 Western Center $600,000.00 FACILITIES SUB-TOTAL $1,930,000.00Miscellaneous Facility Contingency @ 10% $200,000.00FACILITIES Soft costs @ 15% *Includes soft costs: Design, Permitting $300,000.00 TOTAL Facilities costs PHASE TWO (2020) $2,430,000.00 TOTAL OUTLAY COSTS PHASE TWO (2020)………………………………………………..$7,260,000.00 Projected Staffing Requirements and Costs - 2020  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 91 Staffing will require an increase during this 5-year implementation period corresponding with the additional land area to be maintained as determined by the standards developed in the “Staffing-Setting the Standard” section described above. A total of 18.5 acres are added to the program. New Staff Quantities Staffing will adjust by the factor of 1-staff per 4-acres or, 18.5 acres divided by 4. The total new staff, undifferentiated by role, would be 5 (rounded) new staff. Full Time Staff At conclusion of this phase, total full time staffing for the Parks and Recreation Division of the Parks and Leisure Services Department would be 60 persons, more or less (55 existing + 5 = 60). Part Time Staff Part-Time staff, at current ratios to Full Time staff, will yield 48 Part-Time staff positions for this Phase. Total Staff This creates a total of 108 staff positions (60 FT + 48 PT) by 2020. New Staff Costs Staffing costs are budgeted at an average annual cost per employee of $75,690.00 for FY 2015 (see Projected Staffing Requirements and Costs, Phase One - 2015). An escalation factor of 3.5% per year for this 5 year period increases this cost per employee to $86,856.00 for FY 2020. Personnel Services Expenses for Full-Time staff for FY 2020 are projected at $5,211,360.00 Part-time staff will cost an average rate, adjusted for inflation, (3.5%) of $13,167. per employee. Therefore, Part-Time staff costs FY 2020 are estimated at $632,016.00 Staffing Requirement Synopsis: Total Staffing requirements for FY 2020 are: Full-Time Staff: 60 Persons @ $86,856 = $5,211,360.00 Part-Time Staff: 48 Persons @ $13,167 = $ 632,016.00  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 92  Total Staff: 108 Persons $5,843,376.00 Total Staffing costs for FY 2020 are estimated to be $5,843,376.00 Projected Operating Costs per Annum As shown in Phase One, Operating Costs are determined as a ratio of 50 % of Personnel Costs, in accordance with current conditions in Oakland Park. This may change in time as the development programs determined herein are in place and actual costs are managed over time. Projected Operating Costs FY 2020 are forecasted to be approximately $2,921,688. Funding Resources Phase Two implementation should consider a special bond issue (General Obligation) for two major projects – Developing the land and facilities for the Western Community Park and Recreation Center, and construction of the Central Community Center Pool. It is also possible that grants, in particular FRDAP, may be successfully attained for funding the lake reclamation needed to create land for the Western Community Recreation Center Site, if that option is pursued. Alternatively, it could be a source of funds to purchase a number of land parcels within the area of the Western Community Center to provide needed lands for this facility and associated active recreation fields and courts. Funding resources by generic types include:  General obligation (G.O.) Bonds  Ad Valorem taxes  Parks Municipal Service Taxing Unit (MSTU)  Grants (FRDAP, LWCF, BIF, others)  Impact Fees  Sales Tax (Lands for You)  Development Extractions  Donations/ Contributions  Land Swaps  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 93  Tax Increment Financing (TIF)  User fees at Community Centers  Lease agreements with existing facility owners  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 94 Phase Three: Twenty Years (2030) This final Phase in the Recreation and Parks Master Plan development program will focus on installation of the North Andrews Gardens Community Center in addition to installing the remaining facilities needed to serve a population increase of approximately 10,000 residents. Compared to the previous Phases, less capital cost is required for this Phase. The previous Phases needed to “catch-up” with the pent up demand for land and facilities which made them more costly. However, since this Phase is twice as long in time, the costs may appear to be similar. It is anticipated that the pedestrian and bikeway system needed to interconnect all parks and the three community centers will have been installed by this time. This work would have been planned and executed through street and public right-of-way improvement programs during the previous 10 years. Highway beautification grants and LAP funds, along with ongoing street maintenance funds, are the primary sources of capital for these types of improvements which are somewhat different funding sources than those for park development. The City parks and public works programs need to coordinate respective improvement projects to ensure that this occurs. Land Area Suggested by Standards At a population of 60,000+ persons, the City ideally should have approximately 180 acres of park lands available for use (See Table 4: “Recreation Land Area Requirements”). Presuming that the improvement program as outlined in this Chapter is followed by this point in Plan implementation, the City would actually have a total of 219.7 acres in its recreation program. However, two additional sites need development to complete the Master Plan’s facilities and accessibility requirements. This requirement would be met as follows. COMMUNITY PARKS North Andrews Gardens Community Center 5 acres NEIGHBORHOOD PARKS East Commercial Boulevard N.P. 1 acre TOTAL PHASE THREE NEW LAND AREA 6 acres  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 95 Total land area for development of the Plan by the year 2030, including the additional acreage for Phase 3 is shown in the table below (Table 15): TABLE 15 PROJECTED 2030 PARK LAND AREA Existing Parks (dry land only) 71.0 acres Veterans Park Expansion 25.0 Oak Tree Golf Course Park 105.0 New Neighborhood Parks 10.0 North Andrews Gardens C. C. 5.0 J.S. Rickards M.S. (portion) 5.0 Easterlin Park (portion) 4.7______ TOTAL 225.7 acres Recreation Facilities Required Table 16-A: “2030 Facility Program” shows the facilities required to complete recreation programming in the Plan. Corresponding sites are also shown. Table 16-A 2030 Facility Program ACTIVITY FACILITY QTY TO INSTALL INSTALL SITE Boat ramp Ramp 1 Boat Ramp Park Jogging Trail Mile of Trail 1 City Streets Nature Trail Mile of Trail 1 (existing) Easterlin Park Picnicking Picnic Area 1 North Andrews Baseball/ Softball Field 1 North Andrews Basketball Court Court 1 North Andrews Bicycle Path Mile of Trail 1 City Streets Football/Soccer Field 1 Western C.C. Racquetball/Handball Court 1 East Commercial Tennis Courts 2 N. Andrews Volleyball Court 1 East Commercial  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 96   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 97 Projected Costs Projected costs include capital outlay costs, staffing costs and operation costs as shown below. Capital Outlay Costs are for the entire Phase. Staffing and Operations costs are for the ending year of the Phase, 2030 only. Capital Outlay Costs (includes New Parks, Community Center and Facilities) New Parks and Center North Andrews Community Center Land Acquisition Costs………………… $500,000.00 5 acres @ $100,000 per acre. Development Costs…………………….$2,000,000.00 10,000 SF Building @ $200/SF East Commercial Blvd. N.P. Land Acquisition Costs………………… $100,000.00 One acre @$100,000.00 Development Costs……………………. …$50,000.00 Tot Lot, 2 picnic sites, volleyball, shade pavilion, site work TOTAL NEW PARKS AND CENTERS……………. $2,650,000.00 Recreation Facilities As in the prior two phases of implementation, Recreation Facilities Costs are in addition to the above Capital Outlay Costs. Phase Three (2030) recreation facilities to be constructed for this phase include the items shown in Table 16-B: “2030 Facility Program + Costs”.  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 98 TABLE 16-B 2030 Facility Program + Costs ACTIVITY FACILITY QTY TO INSTALL INSTALL SITE COST ESTIMATE Boat ramp Ramp 1 Boat Ramp Park $50,000.00 Jogging Trail Mile of Trail 1 City Streets N/A Nature Trail Mile of Trail 1 Easterlin Park N/A Picnicking Picnic Area 1 North Andrews 20,000.00 Baseball/ Softball Field 1 North Andrews 100,000.00 Basketball Court Court 1 North Andrews 35,000.00 Bicycle Path Mile of Trail 1 City Streets N/A Football/Soccer Field 1 T.B.D. – North Side 150,000.00 Racquetball/Handball Court 1 East Commercial 35,000.00 Tennis Courts 2 Wimberly Field 150,000.00 Volleyball Court 1 East Commercial 25,000.00 Facilities Sub-Total $565,000.00 Miscellaneous Facility Contingency @ 15% $ 84,750.00 Facilities Sub-Total $649,750.00 Facilities Soft Costs @ 15% $ 97,462.00 Total Facilities Costs PHASE THREE (2030) $747,213.00 TOTAL OUTLAY COSTS PHASE THREE (2030)……………………………………… $3,397,213.00  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 99 Projected Staffing Requirements and Costs – 2030 (per Annum) Staffing will require an increase during this 10-year implementation period corresponding with the additional land area to be maintained and managed using the ratio of 1-staff per 4-acres. Additionally, staffing will be required for the new Community Center at North Andrews Gardens. New Staff Quantities Six (6) acres of new park land will generate a need for two (2) full-time staff, plus two (2) full-time staff dedicated to the new Community Center for a total of four (4) Full-Time staff persons. Full Time Staff At the conclusion of Phase Three, total Full-Time staffing for the Parks and Recreation Division of the Parks and Leisure Services Department would be 64 persons (60 + 4 = 64). Part Time Staff Part-Time staff, at current ratios to Full Time staff, will increase to 51 Part-Time staff. Total Staff Total staff required FY 2030 will be 115 staff. New Staff Costs Staffing costs are budgeted at an average annual cost per employee in Phase Two of $86,856 plus a cost of living escalation of 3.5% per year over 10 years. This yields an annual cost per Full-Time staff of $122,516.00 for the year 2030. Total Full -Time staffing costs FY 2030 are $7,841,024.00. Part-Time staff costs are budgeted at an inflation-adjusted cost of $18,572 per staff. Therefore, Part-Time staff costs FY 2030 are estimated at $947,172.00 (51 part-time staff x $18,572.00 each)  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 100 Staffing Requirement Synopsis: Total Staffing requirements for FY 2030 are: Full-Time Staff: 64 Persons @ $122,516 = $7,841,024.00 Part-Time Staff: 51 Persons @ $ 18,572 = $ 947,172.00 Total Staff: 115 Persons $8,788,196.00 Total Staffing costs for FY 2030…………………………………..$8,788,196.00 Projected Operating Costs per Annum Using the rate of 50% of staffing costs to determine approximate projected operating costs, the Operating Costs for FY2030 is estimated to be $4,394,098. ($8,788,196. x 50%) Funding Resources FRDAP grants, or equivalent grant resources for funding recreational property acquisition, would be a primary funding resource for acquiring the 6-acres of land required in this implementation Phase. Park Impact Fees would also apply as a primary resource of funds. Both of these are somewhat unstable resources due to a variety of external factors outside the control of applicants and need back-up plans. As in Phase Two, trails, pathways, and bikeways may be partially funded through the LAP program, along with local (county) and state beautification grants. Since this phase of implementation is so distant, and grants programs evolve over time, the City is encouraged to employ either an on-staff grant writer, or engage these services on an out-source basis – continuously, as part of the parks implementation process. At this point in development of the network of Community and Recreation Centers, the City may consider partially funding the operations of its 3-community centers with membership programs which could allow use of all centers, to make such memberships attractive in the marketplace. User fees have often been considered by Oakland Park but may have renewed interest due to the attractiveness of new multi-functional Community Centers available in the parks program. This Plan allows the City to start developing the funding needed one Phase ahead of the need for construction.   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 101 One of the major benefits of forecasting capital and operating costs is the opportunity it provides in getting a head start on securing the revenues needed for a future phases of implementation while working within the current phase. This is largely true of land acquisition needs as well. Several of the Neighborhood park sites referenced in this Master Plan are to be located on lands the City does not presently own. This search must be commissioned well in advance of the forecasted requirements shown herein. Conclusion Flexibility This Plan provides a roadmap for understanding the City’s recreation and open space needs over the next 20 years, and a corresponding scenario for filling those needs. The ultimate implementation of this Plan will undoubtedly include alternative solutions which may work as well and that better match changing conditions over time. Regardless, recreational needs of the residents remain the objective to be met and this Plan provides the information necessary to explore alternative pathways toward fulfilling those needs. The idea here is to use this document as a guide, rather than dictum, which could slow, rather than enhance, the process. It is also possible that some of the approaches suggested here may not be achievable when tested: Leases may not be granted; land reclamation may be too difficult to permit; and new land exactly where needed, may not be available. If these specific opportunities do not materialize, the City can move on in other directions, using goals provided in this Plan as a guide. Reassessment This Plan has as its foundation what is known about the City and its recreation needs at the present time. Since conditions, needs, and funding resources all change over time, this Plan will also change. The City should do a formal review of the Plan, at least annually, and make whatever modifications or  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 102 updates that are necessary at those times. However, the structure of the plan should remain intact since it is based on sound planning principles and the physical and social conditions unique to Oakland Park. Plan Modifications As the Plan may evolve over time, care should be taken to ensure that modifications represent the interests of the public which were engaged in its development, and that professional resources are reapplied to test the advisability of amendment. Most importantly, the elected officials or their successors who commissioned the study should be engaged to reassess the “fit” proposed changes would have on the community being served at the time. The minimal Neighborhood Park: A spreading tree and shady place to sit  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 103  APPENDIX Appendix A Demographic Charts Appendix B Website Survey Results Appendix C Existing Parks: Site Analysis Plans Appendix D Workshop and Meeting Minutes Appendix E Workshops #1 and #2 PowerPoint Appendix F Workshop #3 PowerPoint Appendix G Existing City Properties: Map and List  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 104  Appendix A Demographic Charts City of Oakland Park RECREATION AND PARKS MASTER PLAN MILLER LEGG  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 105   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 106   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 107   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 108   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 109   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 110  Appendix B Website Survey Results City of Oakland Park RECREATION AND PARKS MASTER PLAN MILLER LEGG  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 111   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 112   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 113   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 114   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 115   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 116   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 117   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 118   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 119   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 120   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 121   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 122   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 123   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 124   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 125   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 126   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 127   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 128   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 129   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 130   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 131   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 132   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 133   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 134   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 135   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 136   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 137   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 138   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 139   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 140   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 141   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 142   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 143   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 144   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 145   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 146   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 147   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 148  Appendix C Existing Parks: Site Analysis Plans City of Oakland Park RECREATION AND PARKS MASTER PLAN MILLER LEGG  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 149   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 150   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 151   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 152   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 153   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 154   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 155   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 156   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 157   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 158   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 159   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 160   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 161   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 162   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 163   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 164   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 165   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 166   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 167   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 168   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 169  Appendix D Workshop and Meeting Minutes City of Oakland Park RECREATION AND PARKS MASTER PLAN MILLER LEGG  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 170  Date: 7/2/2009 To: Jenna La Fleur, CPRP Cc: John M. Perez, Brian Pagliano, Brian Hopper, Ray Lubomski, & Greg Gomez From: George Botner & Cristóbal Betancourt Re: Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan, Task I-Meeting to Establish Goals and Objectives It was a pleasure meeting with you and the representatives of the city to establish goals and objectives for the project. The following is a summary of our conversation held on April 8, 2008 at the Collins Community Center in Oakland Park, Florida. It details the major points that we discussed and will be incorporating into our process in developing the Master Plan for Parks and Recreation. Information Assembly 1. As discussed with Greg Gomez from Public Works, Miller Legg will share and coordinate information gathering with ADG as much as possible to avoid overlap and use resources more efficiently. Our analysis will include many of the same items that ADG will study in their survey of existing facilities. These include, but are not limited too, ADA compliance, land disposition, equitable distribution of services, security, and appropriate uses and programming for location. As discussed, we would like to be involved in the initial meeting with ADG in order to coordinate our efforts. 2. We request that the City provide us with all available base information in order to determine what is needed to complete a thorough physical and programmatic evaluation of existing recreation and park facilities. These should include physical locations of all facilities, neighborhood demographics, recreation programs, maintenance schedules, etc. These will be useful in developing a strategy for gathering missing data. 3. City staff suggested interviewing key staff at different recreational facilities throughout the City that interact with end users of the facilities. Miller Legg will incorporate this suggestion into its strategy for data gathering. 4. Miller Legg will inventory all Park and Leisure Services land and hold its first public participation workshop within the next 45 days. Website  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 171 1. The interactive website will be in operation as soon as possible. 2. The purpose of the website will be to inform the public of the process taking place in developing the Recreation and Parks Master Plan and allow them to voice their opinion throughout the process.  As per staff comments, we will determine what use the website can serve after the master planning project is complete.   Communications 1. Staff believes a more coordinated marketing effort from the city would increase participation in available recreation programs.  Staff suggests the inclusion of the City’s Public Information Officer in communicating the current master planning process to the public and in future efforts. 2. Staff believes that better marketing materials incorporating the locations and amenities available at each location would help promote city recreation programs.  Marketing materials should also provide some kind of character snapshot of each of the facilities. 3. The transient nature of Oakland Park also plays a role in how city recreation programs are marketed.  Staff feels they are marketing to a new user group annually as people move in and out of the area.  Staff estimates an approximately 50 % population turnover rate annually.  Transient population tends to be Central or South American living in rental housing.  Recreation programs geared toward this group should be studied and developed. 4. Parks and Leisure has access to local television and radio stations, the marquis by the police station, city website, and Activenet software for interacting with the public. 5. Current marketing efforts include articles in the Oakleaf, e‐mail blasts on a regular schedule to HOA’s, and registered users of the city website.  Staff would like to incorporate more articles in the Oakleaf announcing future events. 6. Staff is developing a 24 page brochure to be mailed to residents approximately every 6 months listing future events and available services.  Programming/Facilities: Active Uses 1. Staff identified a general feeling among residents that services are concentrated in the eastern part of the city as opposed to the western.  Miller Legg should be aware of this in making their proposals and analyzing the equitable distribution of services. 2. Popular programs include after school care, summer programs, tennis, and youth soccer. 3. The City needs more basketball and tennis facilities.   4. Lakes are available within existing park facilities for water based recreation.  There is an opportunity to develop water based recreation activities.   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 172 5. More Northeastern based sports are infiltrating the area.  An example is lacrosse, which is becoming popular among school aged children.  Multi‐use facilities that can accommodate Lacrosse would be favorable. 6. Miller Legg should consider reprogramming of existing facilities, such as indoor soccer as a possible use for existing roller hockey facilities which are under utilized. 7. Baseball is currently offered by three separate entities.  Not all groups are professionally run. Is there an opportunity to consolidate? 8. City doesn’t have an active adult softball program and may not want to compete with neighboring communities which have existing well attended programs. 9. Focus on multi‐purpose opportunities with City facilities. 10. City is interested in developing services for adults such as aerobics, soccer, volleyball, etc.  Passive Uses 1. Few opportunities exist for passive park use.  There are no interconnected trail systems; establishing systems (biking, hiking, nature, etc.) would be desirable. 2. There is potential for connection to a system in Lauderdale Lakes near the Florida Turnpike. 3. Additional opportunities to interact with nature and passive use of the parks should be identified. 4. Jogging paths, exercise stations, and playgrounds are all desirable uses. 5. Park opportunities that can meet the needs of immediate neighborhoods should be identified.  Amenities should reflect the demographics of the immediate neighborhood.  Staffing/Maintenance 1. Parks and leisure currently has 45 full time and 29 part time employees.  Department considers itself understaffed. 2. Subcontract mowing and maintenance. 3. Interested in developing an intern program. 4. Recreation portion currently has 300 volunteers (coaches, etc.) 5. Volunteer program would benefit from additional organization. 6. Rotary and Kiwanis provide volunteer maintenance and special event staffing. 7.  Miller Legg requests to the greatest extent possible a breakdown by facility of maintenance costs.  Team Structure  City of Oakland Park Primary Contacts  Jenna La Fleur, CPRP, Director, Parks and Leisure Services   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 173 Date: 10/14/2009 Re: Oakland Park Recreation and Parks – Workshop #1 (Aug. 20th)  1. Desired Recreational Program a. Year round baseball (4‐16 years old) b. Teen Center/Toddler Program c. After School Program/Transportation to Programs d. Expand building at North Andrews e. Move Park Rangers f. Program for History, Literature, Environmental g. Skate Park 2. East a. Programs/Centralized Community Center (All Ages) b. Kids/Adults/Community Center/ Library (at Carter G. Woodson) c. Barbeque Pits d. Teams to staff ‐ after school programs e. Interactive Signage/namesakes f. Lighting for evening use of parks 3. West of I‐95 a. Community Center with Reading Room b. Library at Fire Station c. Veterans Park – Boat Ramp/Gazebos d. Tree Covered Areas for Chess/Backgammon e. Bird Houses/ Bird Watching f. Staff on Bikes g. Facility for Historical House/Artifacts h. Concerts in the Park 4. Locations of New Parks (i.e. Lloyd Estates or Andrews Garden) a. NE High School Fields b. Wimbley Field (SP) c. Stevens Field d. Only 3 fields currently available for baseball e. Need for 3 or more fields   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 174 f. North Andrews – Dense and without Parks g. Hospital Area – open lot h. Oak tree – golf course i. North of Joco Park – by the farm   j. Addition at Wimbley Park  5. Upgrade Existing Parks a. Recycling Center b. Solar Lighting c. Wimberley – Pin‐wheel Baseball o Score Board upgrade o Track around field (Baseball) d. Miracle Field e. Shade Canopy/Trees f. Identify School lands to be used by adults in the evening (weekends) g. Expand Computer Programs h. Expand the usage of the library i. More Tennis Courts j. Vacant buildings for Gyms or Gymnastic k. Lighting cover for safety/Shelters l. Water Fountains available at parks m. More bike paths – connect parks  n. Lighting detection at city‐wide Parks  6. Maintenance and Staffing a. Volunteered based programs (i.e. Baseball) o Revenue savings/generator o Support + local economy b. More Park Rangers c. Mom Volunteers – Adopt a Park/Safety d. Volunteer/Credit programs for other services e. Training with a professional  7. Level of Importance a. CHILD FREE TIME (IMPORTANT) b. Teach good sportsmanship c. Promote self‐discipline   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 175 d. Teach community involvement e. Support local economy f. Market our city for our great Parks g. Balance between Active and Passive Parks h. Passive Parks are important to get away i. Keep kids off streets o Great for social standing o EXTREMELY IMPORTANT – it will help elevate the City   8. Community Notes a. Year Round Baseball o Covering ages: 4‐16 o Programs: Basic Fundamentals    Competitive Fun    Competitive Excellence    Travel Representation 9. Tournament Baseball a. Exposes Oakland Park to other communities b. Brings community revenue c. Retains talent pool currently leaving to ply in other communities  d. Desired Location o Wimberley Field (New Layout) o Stevens Field o N.E. High school (New Layout  10. Recommendations for Upgrades a. Baseball o Moveable bases o Moveable mounds o Centralized diamonds (Example) o Changeable between Baseball & Softball o Scoreboards     Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 176 11. Thoughts on Maintenance and Staffing a. Baseball o All volunteer o Possible very big pay commissioners o Program can pa for itself o Generate revenue for community  12. Level of Importance (Parks to Communities) a. Baseball is America’s pass time‐ holds significant level of importance to every community b. Organizes child free‐time c. Teaches good sportsmanship d. Promotes self‐discipline e. Teaches community involvement f. Supports local economy  13. Public Comments a. Upgrade Tennis Courts (Dillon Center) b. Community Center (i.e. Coconut Creek/Tamarac) to provide programs for Youth – Seniors  c. Bike Trials d. Passive Park/Nature Center – teaching facility    Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 177 Oakland Park Recreation and Parks – Workshop No. 2 (Aug. 21st, 2008) 1.Desired Recreational Programs e. Kiddie Park f. Resource Center with Computers g. Water Park – Learn to Swim and Swim Teams h. 2 Tennis and 2 Racquetball Courts i. Walking and Bike Trails j. Weight Lifting Room k. Pet‐friendly Park l. Multi‐purpose (Community) Center: meeting rooms with kitchens m. Teen Community Center n. Bingo/Tai Chi Classes o. Chess/Tabletop Games p. Purchase Oak Tree Golf Course q. Community Garden‐properly irrigated o Vegetable Gardens (Personal plots ) r. Rain Demonstration s. Skate Park t. Protect Cherry Creek u. Fishing place(s) – Places to go fishing v. Floating Docks w. Place for ATV or motorized vehicles x. Kayaks y. Boat ramps z. Big open fields/kites and radio controlled planes aa. BBQ grills bb. Connectivity to parks cc. Music events/concerts dd. Pool that includes tournaments (revenue‐producing)   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 178 Desired Location for New Park a. East/West side of 21st i. South of Oakland Park b. NE 43 near NE 16th Ave. c. Bulldoze Sykes Tile to build Aquatic Center d. Use vacant warehouses i. Use for gyms/community center/bingo hall e. North of Oswald‐21st and 26th i. Bulldoze 19th Ave. f. 38th and Dixie 3. Upgrade Existing Parks a. More Parking – use swale areas b. More shade trees c. Floating dock/boat ramps d. Finish repairs e. Provide pooper scoopers f. Permit pets g. Shelter areas h. Game tables i. BBQ grills j. Restrooms k. Water fountains l. Floating boardwalks i. Fish from them ii. Vegetative Islands  4. Maintenance and Staffing a. Facilities must be staffed (Community Centers) b. Park Rangers should be available c. Solar lighting d. Eco‐friendly materials should be used e. Volunteer should get credit towards paying for other available classes f. Cut out invasive species g. Vagrants (less)   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 179  Appendix E Workshop #1 and #2 PowerPoint City of Oakland Park RECREATION AND PARKS MASTER PLAN MILLER LEGG  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 180  Oakland ParkRECREATION AND OPEN SPACE MASTER PLAN  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 181 Purpose and Scope of Parks and Recreation• Public parks, recreation are crucial elements of the urban environment. • They define the built environment and support a satisfactory quality of life. • Make Oakland Park a great place to live, work and play. • Must meet the recreation and leisure needs of city residents : a vital asset for any community.  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 182 Comprehensive Plan Determines need for this studyThe purpose of this Master Plan is to meet the Goals, Objectives, and Policies established within Section 7, the Recreation and Open Space Element of the Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 183 Level-of-Service(LOS)• Local governments establish standards for the parks and recreation system. • a County Charter dictates that LOS minimum standards be set by Broward County• the City must meet or exceed these standards.  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 184 Total Acreage• 2006 Population estimate of 44,000Persons. • Broward County Requirement of 3acres of parks per 1,000population.•Need133acres of parks. •Have182 acres of parks.• Have a surplus of 50 acres of Parks. BUT,  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 185 Land Needed for Parks• Oakland Park has 182acres of parks now.• Of that land, 118acres of parks are water.• 64.27acres of parks are land.• The City has adopted the goal of the majority of parks being land-based.•68 acresof dry land for parks is needed now. •60 acresadditional over the next 20-years.•128 acrestotal land over the next 20-years.  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 186 Concurrency• What is concurrency?• Why is it necessary?• How do we apply it?• When should it apply?• Where does it impact the community?  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 187 3 acres/1000populationTotal Required Acres: n/a25,000 1 mile radiusvariesSchool Park1 acre25,0003 mile radius10 acre minimumCommunity Park2 acres5,000 0.5 mile radiusUp to 10 acresNeighborhood ParkAcres per 1,000 population (Per Comprehensive Plan)1Population Served (Suggested)Service Area (Suggested)Size Range (Suggested)ClassificationTable ALevel of Service StandardsSize, Service Radius, and Population Characteristics  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 188 6,00010,0005,000Picnic AreaPicnicking6,75010,0005,000Linear Mile of TrailNature Trail/Hiking Trail15,00050,00010,000TrailJogging Trail25,000211,20025,000Mile of shorelineFreshwater Beach Activities6,75025,0005,600Acre of camp areaCamping5,00012,5001,500Boat Ramp LaneBoat RampsMedianMaxMinResource-Based UsesSCORP Suggested Population Served:Resource/FacilityActivity/FacilityTable BLevel of Service StandardsRecreational FacilitiesParks & Recreational Uses  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 189 6,00012,0004,000Volleyball CourtVolleyball court2,00010,0001,067Tennis CourtTennis25,00050,0001,000Swimming Pool1Swimming Pool125,00050,0001,000Shuffleboard CourtShuffleboard10,00020,0002,500Racquetball CourtRacquetball/Handball10,0003,7503,50015,00010,0004,0005005003,000Equipped Play AreaMultipurpose FieldMultipurpose CourtGeneral PlaySkating RinkInline Skating/Hockey25,00050,00050,00065,2008,00025,0009-Hole Golf Course18-Hole Golf CourseGolf – 9-Hole CourseGolf – 18-Hole Course6,00025,0004,000FieldFootball/Soccer/RugbyCricket FieldCricketCommunity FacilityCommunity Building/Game Room5,00010,0001,500Linear mile of trailBicycle Path5,00020,000500Basketball CourtBasketball5,00010,0002,000Baseball/Softball FieldBaseball/SoftballAqua RangeAqua RangeMedianMaxMinActivity-Based Uses  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 190 Existing Park Service Areas  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 191 Ideal Neighborhood Park Distribution  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 192 Miscellaneous City Properties  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 193 Four Types of ParksIn Oakland ParkNeighborhood Park:– Oakland Park has 45.82 acres of Neighborhood parks. – Serves the residents of the surrounding neighborhood: easily accessed by bicycle or walking. – May be up to 10 acres in size, but usually One acre or less. – Amenities should be tailored to serve the needs of the surrounding community.  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 194 Four Types of ParksIn Oakland ParkCommunity Park:– Oakland Park maintains 47.85 acres of community parks. – designed to serve the residents of multiple neighborhoods. – A minimum of ten acres in size.– Where most Active sports are found  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 195 Four Types of ParksIn Oakland Park3. School Park:– There are 4.52 acres of school parks (Northeast High School) in Oakland Park. – Either the neighborhood or community park category, depending on its size. A partnership between two public entities. – Size and facilities vary.  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 196 Four Types of ParksIn Oakland Park4. Leased Parks– In addition to park ownership, the city supplements the park system through lease agreements. – Three parks are leased for a total of 12.46 acres. – All are under ten acres.  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 197 Land-based vs. Water-based Parks• If water area were completely removed from the calculations, the city would have a deficit of 68.28acresto meet County standards. • And, removing leased landsfrom the calculation reduces the acreage provided to 51.36 acres, or 1.16 acres per 1,000 residents. • Therefore, Oakland Park needs 68 additional acres of park land AT THE PRESENT POPULATION  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 198 Public Input• Public input is an integral part of creation of this Recreation and Open Space Master Plan. • This determines the typeof recreation needed. • This determines wherethe recreation is needed.• It is an important method to provide insight to actual needs and conditions that may not be reflected in other analyses.  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 199 Discussion• Questions on the Planning so far…• Need to determine tonight:– Your desired recreation program– Your desired location for new parks– Your recommendations for upgrade of existing parks– Your thoughts on maintenance and staffing– Your level of importance of Parks to your community  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 200  Appendix F Workshop #3 PowerPoint City of Oakland Park RECREATION AND PARKS MASTER PLAN MILLER LEGG  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 201   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 202   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 203   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 204   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 205   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 206   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 207   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 208   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 209   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 210   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 211   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 212   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 213   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 214   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 215   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 216   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 217   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 218   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 219   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 220   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 221   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 222   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 223   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 224   Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 225  Appendix G Existing City Properties: Map and List City of Oakland Park RECREATION AND PARKS MASTER PLAN MILLER LEGG  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 226  EXISTING CITY PROPERTIES KEY MAP  Oakland Park Recreation and Parks Master Plan 227