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2017-2022 CRA Strategic Action PlanPrepared by: R. Miller Consulting Group, LLC April 19, 2017 TABLE OF CONTENTS I: Executive Summary Page 1 II: General Information Page 3 III: Oakland Park CRA in Retrospect Page 4 IV: Oakland Park CRA The Future 2017 – 2022 Page 12 V: Conclusion Page 33 VI: CRA Project List Page 34 VII: 2017 – 2022 Action Plan Page 36 VIII: Appendix Page 38 i. Downtown Mobility Plan Presentation ii. Facilities Study – Phase One iii. Downtown Mixed Use District Zoning Map City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Agency 2017 - 2022 Strategic Action Plan 1 | P a g e I. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY In 2002, the Board of County Commissioners of Broward County delegated and conferred upon the City Commission of Oakland Park the authority to create a Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) and the authority to prepare a Community Redevelopment Plan. The City of Oakland Park, utilized the services of a planning team comprised of EDSA, Iler Planning Group, and Carter and Burgess to complete the CRA Plan. The CRA Plan and the activities associated within it were designed to solve the underlying conditions of slum and blight throughout the urban core and its surrounding neighborhoods through sound planning and sustainable development and redevelopment strategies. The 2005 , CRA Plan set an overarching guideline for the creation of a vibrant, safe, and walkable atmosphere for residents and visitors to the City of Oakland Park. The final plan was approved by the Community Redevelopment Agency and the City of Oakland Park City Commission in November of 2005. The Board of County Commissioners of Broward County subsequently approved the Oakland Park CRA Plan on December 13, 2005. Broward County Commission approval of the plan, did not include a commitment of funding for the Oakland Park CRA. In June of 2007, after a long negotiation process, the City and the County established a funding agreement that released the County from its obligation to provide tax increment financing to the City’s CRA Trust Fund, instead opting for the payment of $13 million in dedicated Redevelopment Capital Program (RCP) funds. RCP funding established a loan-to-grant funding model through which the County would reimburse the City for an approved list of projects over a five-year term. The repayment amount would be mitigated by the taxable value increase associated with the projects. Unfortunately, the very year the CRA funding agreement with the County was approved marked the beginning of the worst economic recession in the United States since the Great Depression. Despite the financial challenges that existed for all municipal organizations from 2007 – 2012, the City continued throughout this time to allocate resources to the CRA in the amount of $ 2.1 million. Furthermore, the Oakland Park CRA was able to complete Redevelopment Capital Program Projects in the amount of $4.9 million. The CRA managed its responsibility to the County through a series of contract revisions meant to responsibly balance its capital commitments in the midst of the worldwide financial crisis. The CRA made strides towards completing its capital program at a more conservative pace due to the economic climate and showed its commitment and trust in its partnership with the County by opting to contract for only what it could afford to complete within the initial five-year agreement. In preparation for the return of the economy, and in keeping with the requirements set forth in the Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Agency Plan, the City developed a five-year Strategic Action Plan to guide the investment of CRA resources. This Plan was intended to focus and guide the activity of the CRA for Fiscal Years 2012 through 2017. In 2011, the City engaged City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Agency 2017 - 2022 Strategic Action Plan 2 | P a g e the services of the Redevelopment Management Associates (RMA) to complete this Strategic Action Plan which was ultimately adopted in November 2011. Since that time, the City of Oakland Park has seen the return of positive economic conditions, and as such, the CRA has been steadfast in the completion of capital improvement projects by leveraging City contributions of general fund dollars with various state, local, and federal funding streams to accomplish the projects identified in the document. In addition, the CRA has successfully been able to attract private invest ment through the implementation incentive programs, strategic public investment in concentrated areas, and an aggressive branding and marketing campaign to promote the Culinary Arts District Concept. Despite the adversity encountered during the startup of the CRA, the efforts of the Oakland Park CRA have rendered a 55 % growth in taxable value since the base year, which equates to a $254 million in taxable value. The CRA’s annual taxable value increase has outpaced Broward County several years since the start of the recovery in 2012. Oakland Park CRA is at a critical launch point in its maturation. Therefore, it is essential that the agency remain focused and strategic in its investment strategy. In preparation for the 2018 fiscal year, the City of Oakland Park CRA h as engaged R. Miller Consulting Group to develop the FY 2017 - 2022 Strategic Action Plan. Following the overarching goals established the in the City’s CRA Plan, the 2017 - 2022 plan seeks to focus on strategic investment, innovative public private partnerships, and smart growth principles to propel the redevelopment plans for the CRA. In addition, this Strategic Action Plan focuses on developing a sustainable culinary arts district by expanding the downtown customer base and providing culinary business development resources and programs. It is the CRA’s desire to complete catalytic projects to spark increased private investment as the City and the econom y rebound from the previous period of decline. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Agency 2017 - 2022 Strategic Action Plan 3 | P a g e II. GENERAL INFORMATION The Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) consists of approximately 1,007 acres of industrial, residential, and commercial uses and makes up slightly more than 19% of the City’s land area. The CRA is charged with the responsibility of eliminating conditions of blight that exist within the City and helping improve the quality of life by revitalizing the City’s physical, economic, and social resources. The linchpin of the Community Redevelopment Plan is the Downtown Mixed Use District (DMUD) also known as the Culinary Arts District. The DMUD is located along Dixie Highway, north of Oakland Park Boulevard, consists of approximately 150 acres and represents 15% of the CRA District. This area was designated a Local Activity Center in 2004, a land use category designation that promotes compact, mixed use development. Specific land development regulations and design guidelines were adopted by the City in 2004 for the DMUD. Capital Improvement Projects set forth in the CRA plan were meant to enhance and distinguish Downtown Oakland Park as a local destination. While Downtown Oakland Park is important to the Community Redevelopment Area, the CRA Plan also paid attention to other commercial and residential areas. The approach to the improvements within the neighborhoods outside of Downtown was to improve pedestrian circulation, green spaces and connections to the urban core. CRAs generally use tax increment financing (TIF) as a tool to promote economic development by earmarking property tax revenue from increases in assessed values within a designated TIF district, The Oakland Park CRA is referred to as a “TIF-less” CRA, which means that the only tax increment funding that CRA receives is from the City’s General Fund. Approved in 2005, the Oakland Park CRA will sunset in the year 2045, per the approved CRA Plan. The City Commission of the City of Oakland Park acts in the capacity of the CRA Board of Directors. The Agency has a dedicated staff of two professionals. The City Manager is the Executive Director and has delegated authority to the Director of Community and Economic Development to manage the day to day operation of the Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Agency. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Agency 2017 - 2022 Strategic Action Plan 4 | P a g e III. OAKLAND PARK CRA IN RETROSPECT In 2001, the City of Oakland Park first launched its redevelopment initiative, a year later the Broward County Board of County Commissioners conferred the authority to the City to create a CRA. In 2004, the City amended its Comprehensive Plan to designate the Downtown Mixed Use District as a Local Activity Center. In 2005, the City and County approved the Oakland Park CRA Plan and in 2007 the City and the County came to an agreement that the City would participate in the County’s Redevelopment Capital Program in lieu of seeking County participation in tax increment financing. The Oakland Park CRA Plan set forth detailed redevelopment project plans that focused primarily on the downtown redevelopment, but also provided for strategic investment in neighborhoods that would improve future connectivity to the urban core. In 2011, the CRA adopted the 2012-2017 CRA Strategic Action Plan which established the Culinary Arts District brand for Downtown Oakland Park. This brand provides an outstanding opportunity for the CRA to position the downtown and leverage the success of the Funky Buddha Brewery, who opened in 2013. However, with opportunity comes challenge, and while the culinary brand is innovative and unique, the CRA had to be prepared to overcome the higher than average failure rate of new restaurants as well as the challenges that exist in converting existing retail and or industrial uses into successful restaurant space. The City’s approach to redevelopment called for a phased project plan. The phasing plan separated overall redevelopment projects into two phases. Phase I projects would be accomplished within a 5-year period and Phase II projects would have a ten-year duration. The projects within each phase were broken into three categories: Capital Improvement Projects, Public Private Partnerships, and Policies and Programs. The following section provides a detailed status update on the projects completed by category and phase. Capital Improvement Projects Despite the fact that this CRA was initiated the same year as the recession began, the CRA was able to fully complete four (4) of the ten (10) capital improvement projects originally slated for completion by 2012. In addition, the agency was able to complete a large portion of a $5.4 M Downtown Infrastructure Project, which was comprised of various roadway and drainage improvement projects. The CRA was also successful in working with Florida Department of City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Agency 2017 - 2022 Strategic Action Plan 5 | P a g e Transportation (FDOT) to leverage State funds to launch two (2) additional projects, leaving only one Phase I project not yet complete. The projects are detailed below: PHASE I- COMPLETED CRA PLAN PROJECTS Capital Improvement Projects City/CRA Funds Used NE 34th Court Improvements Y Downtown Gateway Park Y South Dixie Highway Gateway Y Carter G. Woodson Park Improvements and Expansion Y PHASE I – CRA PROJECTS PARTIALLY COMPLETE OR UNDERWAY Capital Improvement Projects City/CRA Funds Used Partially Complete Downtown Infrastructure Improvements Y Traffic Improvements to Kimberly Lakes Neighborhood Y Lloyd Estates Elementary School Pedestrian Improvements Y Underway Buffer Prospect Gardens Neighborhood from I-95 N – FDOT Oakland Park Elementary School Pedestrian Improvements FDOT/GF The Downtown Infrastructure Improvement Project was a combination of five infrastructure projects in the downtown with an estimated cost of $5.4 million four of the five projects have been completed (designated with strike through below). The one remaining project is included in the overall CRA project list but is not anticipated to begin during the 2017 – 2022 Strategic Plan years. Reconstruction of the intersection of Oakland Park Blvd Dixie Highway $1,000,000 Reconstruction of the intersection of NE 34tth Court and Dixie Highway $1,500,000 NE 12th Terrace Extension $1,750,000 Miscellaneous DMUD Drainage Improvements $1,000,000 NE 12th Avenue Lift Station Upgrade/Replacement $ 175,000 City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Agency 2017 - 2022 Strategic Action Plan 6 | P a g e PHASE I – CRA PROJECTS NOT YET COMPLETE Capital Improvement Projects City/CRA Funds Used Commercial Boulevard and Dixie Highway Gateway TBD The Commercial Boulevard and Dixie Highway Gateway Project as originally proposed was intended to improve mass transit amenities at this intersection. The project also proposed funding for intersection improvements and special paving and median improvements along Dixie Highway. Due to the fact that a new bus shelter has already been installed and the Dixie Highway improvements will be otherwise addressed through various mobility improvements, it is recommended that this project be removed from future consideration in the CRA plan. Capital Projects – Phase II The CRA worked in collaboration with the City to leverage funding during the economic decline and was successful in securing alternate funding sources for a majority of the projects listed in Phase II of the redevelopment effort. The Phase II capital improvement program included seventeen (17) projects with a budget estimate of $51.5 M. To date, the CRA has completed six (6) of the seventeen (17) projects with an additional nine (9) projects partially complete or currently underway. This leaves only two (2) incomplete projects to be included in the current Strategic Action Plan. The Phase II project status is detailed below: PHASE II – COMPLETED CRA PROJECTS Capital Improvement Projects City/CRA Funds Used Improvements to NE 38th Street Y Prospect Road and I-95 Gateway Y Improvements to Guisti Park Y Expansion of the Public Boat Ramp along the MR Y Reconstruction of NE 13 Avenue (NE 38 to St to NE 32 St) Y Train Whistle Quieting N-MPO City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Agency 2017 - 2022 Strategic Action Plan 7 | P a g e PHASE II - CRA PROJECTS PARTIALLY COMPLETE OR UNDERWAY Capital Improvement Projects City/CRA Funds Used Floranada Industrial District Improvements Y Improvements to Prospect Road N-MPO Improvements to Andrews Avenue Y Improvements to NE 6th Avenue N-FDOT Wimberly Athletic Complex Parking and Collins Park Expansion Y Major Intersection Improvements Y Minor Intersection Improvements Y * Improvements to NW/NE 41st Street Y *Improvements to NE 5th Avenue N-CDBG *SCOPE REVISED DUE TO REASSESSMENT OF IMMEDIATE NEEDS AND BUDGET AVAILABILITY PHASE II - CRA PROJECTS NOT YET COMPLETE Capital Improvement Projects City/CRA Funds Used Improvements to NE 8th Avenue TBD Improvements NE 12th Terrace South of Oakland Park TBD Public Private Partnerships In 2005, the CRA and the City Commission anticipated the potential need for “gap financing” via the Community Redevelopment Agency to ensure that the right kind of development is encouraged in the Downtown. The initial plan focused the part nership opportunities in three areas in the Downtown; more specifically defined as Park Place, Dixie Mixed Use (East) Development, and Dixie Mixed Use (West) Development. These focus areas all stressed the need for land acquisition funding to ensure the availability of developable space to construct parking, implement mobility improvements, as well as provide for the development of public gathering space and installation of public art. Furthermore, the CRA Plan called for the issuance of a Request for Proposal for the development of lots located on the west side of Dixie Highway and NE 38 Street currently held by the City. All the Public Private Partnership Projects were anticipated to be completed within Phase I of Redevelopment (i.e. first 5 years of CRA). However, due in large part to the state of the economy from 2007 – 2012 the CRA was unable to move forward with plans to develop mixed use facilities City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Agency 2017 - 2022 Strategic Action Plan 8 | P a g e or find a viable partner to have the financing to construct during the economic decline. Although the larger scale initiatives would have to wait out the economy, the CRA continued to leverage partnerships and grant opportunities to complete projects in the public realm during the downturn. This in-turn resulted in significant private investment, eliminating the need for CRA funds in several of the identified areas. As the economy began to rebound in 2012, the agency was poised to take advantage of the recovery due to the approval of the CRA 2012-2017 Strategic Action Plan in November 2011. This plan provided greater specificity for redevelopment initiatives in the downtown based on the new economic condition. The Strategic Action Plan also included redevelopment initiatives outside of the Downtown area. There have been multiple private investment projects completed on CRA target sites, most of which required very little capital outlay on the part of the City or the CRA. The largest and most prominent of those private investments completed to date are Funky Buddha Brewery (Oakland Station Warehouse) and Allied Kitchen and Bath (Sikes property). Together, these private redevelopment projects have added an additional $5.2 million in taxable value within the CRA. CRA direct incentives for the two projects totaled $34,000, resulting in a return on investment to date of 136% as measured by property tax revenue increases. There have been four (4) projects completed under the Downtown/Dixie Mixed Use (East) Initiative. These projects have laid the groundwork for the increased investment in the Downtown. The projects are detailed below: PHASE I – PUBLIC PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP STATUS Public Private Partnerships Status Dixie Mixed Use West – Downtown Oakland Park Central Downtown – Squires Property Private Investment – Complete Park Plaza. CRA gave $10,000 in façade improvement Development of West Dixie Lots - Long Term Mixed Use Not Complete Dixie Mixed Use East – Downtown Oakland Park North North End Urban Residential Private Investment – Complete Eastside Village 3700 Block Parking Lot Improvement Project City/CRA Funds – Complete Central Downtown – Sikes Property Private Investment – Complete Allied Kitchen and Bath. CRA gave $30,000 in façade improvements and City issued $2.3M in parking waivers to incentivize development. Downtown Oakland Park Project Details Jaco Pastorius Park Expansion City/CRA Funds – Complete Compatible Warehouse Aquaculture and other Culinary Uses Private Investment- Complete Funky Buddha, $4,000 in CRA Incentive City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Agency 2017 - 2022 Strategic Action Plan 9 | P a g e Open Dining to 38 St City/CRA Funds– Complete Funky Buddha, Alberte’s Restaurant Parking Events Venue Facility NE 38th St and Dixie City/CRA Funds – Complete Jaco Pastorius Park Culinary Component Not Complete Long Term Mixed Use SE Corner of 38th St and Dixie City opted to implement transitional surface parking Coastal Link Train Station Not Complete South Gateway to Downtown Scope Change / Underway Other CRA Projects Watts Estates Housing Development Broward County -Complete - Funded by Broward County Housing Authority Middle River Site Private Investment -Complete Point of Middle River Development Kmart Site on Oakland Park Private Investment – Complete Walmart Development Site Festival Market Shopping Center Rehab Private Investment – Complete completed full façade improvement Rehab Shopping Centers - Prospect Road City CRA - Underway - $176,921 in Façade Grants given to date, $1.1 M for Prospect Road Parking Lot The 2012 Strategic Action Plan established a redevelopment plan for the area referred to as the South Gateway, generally located at the corner of Oakland Park Boulevard and NE 12 th Avenue. The 2012 Plan called for a public private partnership to create a high-profile restaurant/urban hotel or mixed use building. Since the adoption of this plan, the City has made investments in the south gateway through the construction of the arch, as well as plans for the construction of the South Gateway Fountain and Public Plaza. Moving forward, the recommendation is to remove from consideration the development of a restaurant and urban hotel at this location, instead opting for a substantial entrance feature, cultural facility, and public gathering space. The development of a City iconic entrance and gathering space will serve as the linchpin for redevelopment to the downtown. The CRA and the City have been successful in obtaining a Cultural Facilities Grant to support the development of the South Gateway Plaza and will continue to seek partnerships with adjacent property owners to redevelop this prominent downtown location. Policies and Programs The Plan detailed the need for certain Policies and Programs to be implemented in Phase I of the redevelopment efforts. These policies were primarily centered around land use changes and the implementation of quality of life programs that focused on community appearance, public art, and affordable housing. Based on the housing market decline, the CRA made the conscious decision to place a hold on programs aimed at affordable housing and instead focused its efforts on community appearance and public art programs. The CRA also postponed the implementation of various land use City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Agency 2017 - 2022 Strategic Action Plan 10 | P a g e changes that could have ultimately been proven ineffective in light of the changing real estate market conditions. The policies and programs are detailed below: PHASE I – POLICIES AND PROGRAM STATUS Policies and Programs Status Oakland Festival Center Land Use Change Land Use Change Not Pursued due to private Investment Kmart Site Land Use Change Land Use Change Not Pursued due to private Investment - Walmart Community Appearance Program On-Going the City currently has implemented Beautification programs, code sweeps, and made changes to code to improve quality of life issues Public Art Program On Going Commercial Facade Program On Going Relocation Assistance On Going Strategic Investment Program On Going Marketing/ Branding Campaign On Going East Harlem McBride Land Use Change On Hold – Implementation postponed due to real estate market instability. H and S Subdivision Land Use Change On Hold - Implementation postponed due to real estate market instability. NE 12th Terrace Land Use Change On Hold - Implementation postponed due to real estate market instability. Central Park Industrial Center Land Use Change On Hold - Implementation postponed due to real estate market instability. Future Prospect Gardens Pocket Park Land Use Change On Hold - Implementation postponed due to real estate market instability. Attainable Housing TBD Based on Housing Study Outcome Condominium Conversion Program Not Complete –NA *Recommend Removal from Plan As noted above, there is one project recommended for removal from the Plan. The Condominium Conversion Program is recommended for removal because it is no longer relevant to the 2017 condition. In 2005, housing prices were skyrocketing and low quality condominium conversions were prevalent, at the time the CRA planned to set aside funds through a Condominium Conversion Program to ensure the quality of condominium conversion and availability of affordable housing. Since the downturn in the real estate market, condominium conversion market has flattened, therefore it is recommended that this project be removed from consideration. It should be noted that the Attainable Housing Program will be under review in the upcoming months, pending the outcome of the City’s Affordable Housing Study. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Agency 2017 - 2022 Strategic Action Plan 11 | P a g e PHASE II – POLICIES AND PROGRAMS STATUS Policies and Programs Status Retail Market Analysis Complete Waterfront Promenade along the Middle River *Reserved for future feasibility Floranada Design District Not Complete Midtown Commercial Regulations Not Complete Historic Oakland Park- Harlem McBride Planning underway Green Building Program Underway as a part of City ESCO and PACE program participation Arts District Underway will be part of NE 12 Terrace Planning and Design Adjacent Land Use/Buffer Study Underway part of 2017 LUPA RFP Community Policing Program *Reserved if needed The City of Oakland Park CRA as detailed above has experienced significant private investment that occurred before the implementation of new land use regulations. Two such projects of note occurred along the Middle River. These new developments combined with existing residential communities along the waterway delayed plans for a waterfront promenade . As such, it is recommended that the project be placed in a reserved status, until future changes in the land use present an opportunity to complete all or a portion of the prome nade. The second project, being placed in reserved status is the Community Policing Program. Chapter 163.358 FS, provides that municipalities may approve the development of community policing innovations, if detailed in the CRA Plan. Over the years, the Oakland Park CRA has not needed to use funds towards policing efforts in these areas. It is anticipated however, that when the downtown development takes root, there may be a need for community policing programs. As such, the CRA is reserving the possibility of a need for the community policing programs to be a part of their efforts in future years. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Agency 2017 - 2022 Strategic Action Plan 12 | P a g e IV. OAKLAND PARK CRA THE FUTURE: 2017-2022 Goals The City of Oakland Park CRA Plan set forth goals for the long-term development of the CRA. The Goals were developed in light of the local and national market conditions that existed at its inception in 2005 and took into account solid smart growth principles that could guide the agency throughout the term of its existence. They are as follows: ❖ Redevelopment of the Downtown ❖ Connections to Downtown ❖ Strengthen Neighborhoods ❖ Increase Green Space ❖ Increase Attainable Housing Options While the change in the real estate market impacted the course of action needed to accomplish these goals, it did not substantially impact the relevance of the 2005 goal statements. The word substantially is operatively used due to the significant change in real estate market since 2007 and its impact on how municipal governments must operate . Before the economic crisis in South Florida, municipal governments became used to double digit growth in advalorem tax base year over year, which provided the ability to tolerate slightly greater risk profiles when it came to redevelopment. Post crisis, municipalities and CRA’s were forced to re-tool the way in which they project growth in tax base, evaluate the risk profile for redevelopment projects, and become more conservative about the general cost of construction in the current market. In light of this shift, the 2017 - 2022 Strategic Action Plan calls for two minor clarifications to the CRA Goal statements regarding green space and housing: ✓ No Revision Recommended - Redevelopment of Downtown ✓ No Revision Recommended - Connections to Downtown ✓ No Revision Recommended - Strengthen neighborhoods ❖ Revision Recommended - Increase Increasing and Replenishing Green Space ❖ Revision Recommended - Increase attainable Availability of well-planned housing options These revisions are being recommended because when they were adopted in 2005, the market condition and or prevailing best practices in these areas were different. More specifically, the housing goal statement was meant to address the drastic annual rise in housing costs nationwide. This housing boom created a valid concern about the long-term affordability of quality housing in the Oakland Park CRA. However, post the 2007 housing market decline, City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Agency 2017 - 2022 Strategic Action Plan 13 | P a g e property values in Oakland Park indicate that the City has greater than its proportionate share of affordable housing as compared to the rest of Broward County. Therefore, the issue which must be addressed in 2017, is the need for higher quality housing stock throughout the CRA and specifically the need for well-planned housing opportunities to support the Downtown and CRA businesses. This minor clarification aligns the CRA goals with the market conditions that exist today. In addition, the green space goal needed a minor clarification to align it with the efforts of the City to improve quality of life and focus on the need to increase and replenish green spaces. “Green spaces” in the current context is meant to include parks, greenways, streetscapes, landscaping and beautification. This small tweak makes the approach more comprehensive and is aimed at improving quality of life and access to green space for a greater number of residents. The remaining CRA goals are still in line with the current economic condition and maintain a clear vision that the Oakland Park CRA is still committed to the goal of developing a sound Community Redevelopment Plan with a focus on catalytic investment and/or projects for the Community Redevelopment Area. Guiding Principles for CRA Strategy 2017-2022 As a requirement of the Oakland Park CRA Plan, the CRA Board must update and amend the Plan every five years to reflect changing conditions. The standard updating process should involve the following: 1. Updated data and analysis; 2. Revised capital improvements program and other redevelopment strategy recommendations; 3. Review by Local Planning Agency; and 4. Consideration by CRA Board and City Commission. In an effort to address the CRA update requirements and adopt the most effective Strategic Plan for the future, the City Administration built a strong team of professionals to lead the redevelopment planning effort. This team of professionals, made up of both CRA and City Staff, consultants, stakeholders, and various industry thought leaders was assembled by City Administration in January of 2016. This planning team was tasked with analyzing municipal demographics, evaluating market conditions, reviewing planning and zoning regulations, contemplating facilities utilization, evaluating transportation planning opportunities, revi ewing economic development best practices, and studying real estate market opportunities. Having clear goals and guiding principles with which to implement these goals is the key to the effective implementation of any large-scale initiative. The redevelopment of the CRA district is certainly a large-scale and aspirational initiative which has been thoughtfully contemplated by the Oakland Park City Commission and the CRA Board of Directors. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Agency 2017 - 2022 Strategic Action Plan 14 | P a g e As such, City Administration took into consideration the goals of these bodies and embraced six guiding principles established in a January 2016 publication by the United States Environmental Protections Agency’s, Office of Sustainable Communities, Smart Growth Program entitled “Framework for Creating a Smart Growth Economic Development Strategy: A Tool for Small Cities and Towns”. These Guiding Principles are as follows: ❖ Make the distinction between “growth” and “investment.” ❖ Be tactical and strategic ❖ Be focused ❖ Start where there is already momentum ❖ Find the right partners for specific goals ❖ Communicate and coordinate The following sections detail the plans, initiatives, and activities that shaped the 2017-2022 CRA Strategic Action Plan. These actions are presented according to the guiding principle that informed staff’s view of the task. The information is being presented in this fashion to highlight the importance of aligning goals and principles to the activities of the CRA , as well as ensuring that the redevelopment strategy behind the initiatives are clearly communicated to the governing body and the community. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Agency 2017 - 2022 Strategic Action Plan 15 | P a g e Guiding Principle One: Growth vs. Investment It was important that the City and the CRA implement initiatives to ensure that the CRA continues to effectively eradicate slum and blight while supporting the growth and expansion of existing businesses. As such, the planning team recommended several programs which were adopted by the City Commission and CRA Board that support and improve the financial stability of long standing business owners and residents, thereby building on their ongoing private investment. Through these initiatives, the City and the CRA invested in strengthening codes, improving code compliance, and enhancing landscape beautification, installing new banners, implementing a robust wayfinding program, and encouraging safe street amenities throughout the City and the CRA in particular. These efforts include : Adoption of Uniform Landscape Streetscape Design Guidelines & Standards The Uniform Landscape and Streetscape Design Standards establishes a brand of landscaping and streetscaping citywide. It provides landscape uniformity on both public and private lands; modernizes and adds flexibility by allowing alternative/sustainable designs to the existing landscape requirements; encourages Native/Florida Friendly plant lists; encouraged Hardy/low maintenance plant lists; creates a Homeowner’s Guide for quick reference. Community Enhancement Lien Compliance Initiative The City identified and prioritized over 300 high impact commercial properties that are currently not compliant with the landscape code or have other accumulating fines. Community Enhancement staff increased communication with these owners and in a one year period has been able to work cooperatively with a total of 38 businesses/properties to gain compliance. All property owners, who as a result of this initiative have brought their properties into voluntary compliance, have been invited to attend a Commission meeting to be recognized for their efforts. In order to continue the momentum with this list of businesses, Make the distinction between “growth” and “investment.” “Not all communities are necessarily growing. However, in most cases, businesses, individuals, and/or public agencies continue to make investments in the community even during periods of decline. Building on ongoing investment(s), rather than “growth” as defined by increasing employment, population, or tax base, is essential to redevelopment.” EPA, 2016, Framework for Creating a Smart Growth Economic Development Strategy: A Tool for Small Cities and Towns. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Agency 2017 - 2022 Strategic Action Plan 16 | P a g e the City hired a third party under a pilot program to consistently increases the level of communication with the remaining noncompliant businesses with the goal of gaining greater compliance. Enhanced Maintenance of the City’s Landscaping More funding has been budgeted to increase the level of service for landscape maintenance contracts, throughout the City and in the CRA in particular. New Policies Implemented to Require Beautification Components in all Infrastructure Capital Improvement Projects (CIP) Prior to the Landscape Beautification Initiative, it was not a standard for all CIP projects to include funding for landscaping and beautification in the immediate area. It is now mandatory that all CIP projects, regardless of whether the improvement is above or below ground, include a beautification component. Proud Oakland Park (POP) Star Program Award for Enhanced Landscaping Improvements In an effort to communicate the importance of beautification, the City implemented a monthly recognition program that highlights businesses that have implemented enhanced landscaping. These businesses will be the POP Stars of the Month and are presented an award at a City Commission Meeting. Winners are promoted on the City’s website, social media sites and through a citywide email blast. CRA Landscaping Incentive City Matching Grant Program To incentivize the beautification effort in the CRA district, the CRA expanded the Façade program to include landscaping improvements as a part of its matching grant program. This program is available to any business within the CRA District. Expand the CRA Façade Incentive City Matching Grant Program Prior to the implementation of the Landscape Beautification Program, t he Façade program was only available to businesses in the Downtown area. The CRA expanded the matching grant program to make it available districtwide. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Agency 2017 - 2022 Strategic Action Plan 17 | P a g e Guiding Principle Two – Tactics and Strategy In line with the principle of being tactical and strategic, the planning team worked to evaluate the Oakland Park CRA’s current position in the broader South Florida market . More specifically, the team focused on understanding how best to invest time and resources in the public and private realm. In the private realm, the team focuses specifically on identifying Oakland Park’s target market retailers and understanding the buying power of the Oakland Park consumer. In the public realm, the team evaluated the condition of City assets and how best to utilize them to provide better municipal services and while catalyzing development. This was accomplished through : Retail/ Target Market Study: In 2015, the CRA engaged the services of The Retail Coach, to conduct a retail market analysis in the CRA. The purpose of this analysis was to study the retail base in the City, understand the consumer demographics and geography that drives commerce to prepare a comprehensive strategy for retail recruitment. The Retail Coach market analysis found that the City of Oakland Park enjoys a diverse population of 41,831 residents, with 59% classifying themselves as White, 27.9% African American or Black, and 13% Other. 29% of the population is Hispanic/Latino. The City Be tactical and strategic “A smart growth economic development plan should include broad, long-term strategies that set overall direction and objectives for any economic development- related activities and investments. The plan should also identify short-term, tactical actions that address specific barriers or challenges to attaining the longer-term vision. While the long-term strategies might not change for several years, tactics should be updated on a regular basis to reflect changing conditions and opportunities.” EPA, 2016, Framework for Creating a Smart Growth Economic Development Strategy: A Tool for Small Cities and Towns. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Agency 2017 - 2022 Strategic Action Plan 18 | P a g e is a stable community with 58% of the residences being owner occupied with 42 % being renter occupied. With respect to geographic impacts on the retail market, the consultant noted that due to the compact nature of South Florida communities, the City should expand its trade area to include parts of neighboring communities. The study outlined the demographics of the potential customer base living outside the City that were likely to support Oakland Park retail markets, and introduced the concept of defining the City’s greater Retail Trade Area. The Oakland Park Retail Trade Area as defined by this study, expands the potential consumer base City of Oakland Park businesses to a population of 208,023 people, with 44 % classifying themselves as White, 49% as African American or Black, and 7 % Other. 16% of identify as Hispanic or Latino. The retail trade area customers were then broken into five Psychographic Lifestyle Segments, which will be used to communicate the Oakland Park consumers’, demographic characteristics, attitudes, lifestyles, purchase behaviors, and work patterns to potential investors in the CRA district. Finally, the data from this study armed the City and the CRA with valuable statistics on the retail opportunity that exits, finding most notably that that Oakland Park could capture over $2 Billion of retail sales that are currently occurring outside of the City but within the Retail Trade Area . This information coupled with the demographic and psychographic information will be key as the City continues to actively recruit target retailers to fill the downtown mixed-use developments. Facilities Study Update: Consistent with the 2010 Facilities Study, the 2017 Facility Study affirmed the need to assess the viability and best use of City Facilities. In 2010, the City Commissioned a Facilities Study to evaluate the condition of City facilities and projected future needs for space. The 2010 study noted that most of the existing buildings were originally constructed 20-40 years ago, often for entirely different functional purposes, and subsequently have undergone a series of modifications and “piece -meal” additions that have tended to compromise their functionality. The 2010 study also noted significant issues regarding compliance with current building and fire codes as well as accessibility and overcrowding issues. The 2010 study made four key recommendations on how to address the issues found; 1.) consolidate personnel and services at appropriate facilities to reduce the citywide facility area 2.) vacate and cease maintenance of under-utilized and defunct facilities which have exceeded their useful life 3.) sell or lease viable properties, and/or maintain properties at nominal operational expense to hold for future development; City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Agency 2017 - 2022 Strategic Action Plan 19 | P a g e 4)upgrade and repair facilities which will be utilized into the foreseeable future to reduce annual maintenance expenditure and operational costs. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Agency 2017 - 2022 Strategic Action Plan 20 | P a g e Guiding Principles Three and Four – Focus and Momentum In 2017, the planning team worked with an outside consultant to update the 2010 Study and reevaluate the findings. While minor repairs to facilities have been made to address life safety and access issues since 2010, the findings of the first phase of the 2017 Facility Study update generally found the same condition. As such, if the City determines that addressing the viability and useful life of the City facilities will be a priority, the CRA should be prepared financially to capitalize on the catalytic opportunity that the potential relocation of City hall would have on the redevelopment of downtown. In any event, the CRA should engage in land acquisition opportunities in an around the downtown in order to position itself to aggregate and control properties for future redevelopment opportunities in and around City Hall. The CRA district encompasses 1,007 acres within the City of Oakland Park and of that the Downtown Mixed Use District represents approximately 150 acres of the CRA. Redevelopment of the downtown has always been an important focus of the CRA Planning activities. In line with the principles of being focused and starting where there is already momentum, the 2017-2022 Strategic Action Plan maintains a continuing focus on the downtown. The planning team worked on planning initiatives that will set the stage for smart growth that encourages the right mix of uses and a sense of place that is uniquely Oakland Park. They are as follows: Downtown Mobility Plan: With interest in the Downtown District increasing, the need to comprehensively plan for the anticipated development is paramount to the City and the CRA. The improvement in the economy has brought exciting new investment in blighted industrial properties, adaptive re-use, and new restaurant, office, and retail space. The one common theme among businesses and prospective developments in the downtown is the concern over long term solutions for parking and traffic circulation. The planning team saw the need to holistically address all modes of transportation and to create a well-planned system overall in the downtown district. This “mobility “plan would have an end goal of Be focused “Investments of time, money, and other community resources are most effective when targeted to an area that is both big enough to offer opportunities for change and small enough to make tangible, visible improvements that will spur investment. Over time, small focus areas can be expanded to build on successes.” Start where there is already momentum “Economic development efforts are most effective in places where there is already some private-sector activity so that public investments can reinforce and support investment by individual homeowners, business owners, commercial property owners, and/or banks and other financial institutions. Once these initial investments start to show success, it will be easier to attract additional investment to nearby locations, thus spreading the momentum incrementally over time.” EPA, 2016, Framework for Creating a Smart Growth Economic Development Strategy: A Tool for Small Cities and Towns. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Agency 2017 - 2022 Strategic Action Plan 21 | P a g e encouraging well planned movement of all modes of transportation to promote economic development. Therefore, in 2016, the City and the CRA engaged The Corradino Group to complete a Mobility Study for the Downtown District. The goal of the Mobility Plan was to: •Get people to the District in an easy manner •Reduce reliance on personal automobiles •Provide infrastructure to support alternat ive modes of transportation •Encourage foot traffic once within the district to promote economic development The Downtown Mobility Plan established strategies to improve the downtown in six categories: •Parking •Vehicular Circulation •Pedestrian Connectivity •Bicycle Connectivity •Transit – Rail •Transit- Local Parking Strategies •Abandon the practice of issuing parking impact fee waivers •Establish a new parking impact fee calculation that increases the cost per spa ce to be in line with current cost of constructing structured parking •Structure new impact fee requirements to give exemptions or lesser parking impact fee requirements for businesses that embrace multi-modal services •Acquire land to develop surface lots at the edge of the district to encourage foot traffic into the core •Revise current suburban parking codes to be in line with the urban condition of the downtown •Encourage new structured parking facilities to be mixed use Vehicular Circulation Improvement Strategies •Implement roadway improvements along NE 12th Avenue to facilitate 2 -way traffic from Oakland Park Boulevard North to NE 38th Street in the Short Term •Reduce traffic into the district by reducing access to on-street parking •Set specific times for loading zones/freight to businesses •As the district matures, implement partial closures along NE 12 Avenue to promote long term goal of full closure •Repurpose NE 12 Avenue as a pedestrian Mall City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Agency 2017 - 2022 Strategic Action Plan 22 | P a g e Pedestrian Improvement Strategies •Acquire land to complete the sidewalk network and improve amenities that create a walkable district (shade, lighting, seating, improved wayfinding) •Once land has been acquired, implement greenways over time to connect district edge parking to the core of the district •Once land has been acquired, construct mixed use paths, greenways, and enhanced crossings to ensure connectivity of the east and west side of the district Bicycle Connectivity Improvement Strategies •Include Bicycle facility improvements on future main roadway improvements throughout the district •Install more bicycle racks and Bikeshare stations Transit Rail •Continue talks with FEC to plan for proper placement in the Downtown and planning for parking near the platform Transit Local Shuttle •Establish micro-transit shuttles in the downtown Updated Downtown Mixed-Use District Land Use and Zoning: The City of Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District (DMUD) is a Local Activity Center spanning approximately 1 square mile centered by Dixie Highway and the Florida East Coast Railway (FEC). In 2004, the City of Oakland Park amended its Land Development Code to establish the DMUD and adopted the accompanying Oakland Park Mixed Use District Design Guidelines. The DMUD process and resulting legislation embodied the best practices as it relates to fostering smart growth, economic development, and created locations for public events and activities. However, subsequent to the adoption of this thoughtful policy and the creation of the C RA, the economic downturn occurred which limited the City’s ability to test the effectiveness of this legislation, due to the lack of development. The City Commission and the CRA Board of Directors expressed concern that the 2004 DMUD codes may need to be reevaluated to assess current relevance. In an effort to address these concerns the redevelopment working group gathered concerns, ideas, and best practices from local businesses, residents, economic development, and culinary industry professionals to identify potential gaps in the DMUD that need to be addressed to move the downtown into the future. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Agency 2017 - 2022 Strategic Action Plan 23 | P a g e This collaborative process showed that a great majority of the 2004 legislation was still sound however a few revisions would better ensure smart growth in the downtown. The revisions centered around concerns regarding the proliferation of adaptive reuse versus full scale redevelopment, parking code inadequacies, ineffective minimum lot assembly requirements for residential and commercial development, the need for improved development standards for multi-family developments. In addition, the recommendation was made to begin planning for longer term Land Use Plan Amendments to address the need for additional housing units and commercial square footage in the downtown, as well as the desire to combine some of the existing DMUD sub-areas to promote more mixed-use development in the downtown. The City and the CRA will issue a Request for Proposal (RFP) for a qualified Planning Firm to prepare the short term and long term land use plan amendments detailed above. The RFP should also address the remaining land use changes proposed in the CRA Plan but not yet adopted. Architectural Guideline Development for Downtown: The final plan is the Architectural Guidelines for Downtown Development. The City Commission and the CRA Board of Directors have been very clear about their desire to keep Downtown Oakland Park unique but complementary to community characteristics. In expressing that vision, the City will promote low to midrise development with well-planned streets that retain connectivity to the community and an eclectic mix of design and architectural elements that will work together to create an urban form that is distinctively Oakland Park. Currently, the void in the code is that it does not define that “distinctive Oakland Park” aesthetic. The need for that definition is the driving force behind the creation of an Architectural Guideline for Downtown Development. The purpose of the guidelines will be to achieve a bet ter urban environment through attention to fundamental design principles. The Design Guideline is meant to offer a flexible tool as an alternative to prescriptive zoning requirements, which will allow new development to complement the distinctive character of Oakland Park. The Request for Proposals (RFP) will incorporate the task to establish an illustrative Architectural Design Guideline and Design Review tool that creates the “distinctive Oakland Park” aesthetic for the downtown. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Agency 2017 - 2022 Strategic Action Plan 24 | P a g e Guiding Principle Five- The Right Partners The Oakland Park CRA Plan has always incorporated public private partnerships as a tool for achieving large scale mixed redevelopment of key sites in the downtown area. The 2017-2022 Strategic Action Plan continues to focus on the downtown as an essential part of the overall success of the larger CRA redevelopment effort. Furthermore, these public private partnership projects are necessary to ensure that there is a sufficient customer base in the downtown to support the new businesses. Developing a strategy to address the residential void, will mitigate the fact that the downtown has not yet become a “destination”, it will provide the foot traffic metrics that will be a part of a retailers analysis when deciding to invest in the downtown. The CRA’s ability to make strides towards the development of these lots would allow the CRA to capitalize on the current demand from both millennials and empty nesters for mixed-use residential products. The planning team has identified several opportunities that establish an exciting path of potential successful development in the Downtown. They are depicted in the image above. As noted in the guiding principles, these public private partnerships may require working across public agencies in addition to the private partners to secure the funding needed for implementation. Find the right partners for specific goals “Successful economic development efforts rely on partnerships across public agencies, especially when different types of funding are involved. Engaging these partners for specific and mission-appropriate goals is more effective than trying to seek support for broad or poorly defined initiatives. Communities might also set goals to align with specific funding sources to improve the odds of securing money for implementation.” EPA, 2016, Framework for Creating a Smart Growth Economic Development Strategy: A Tool for Small Cities and Towns. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Agency 2017 - 2022 Strategic Action Plan 25 | P a g e Request for Proposals for West Dixie Lots The City of Oakland Park currently holds two vacant parcels located on the northwest and southwest corner of Dixie Highway and NE 38 Street. The combined acreage for both lots total 2.07 acres. Situated within the Oakland Park Downtown, Culinary Arts District, the sites are zoned Downtown Mixed Use - Dixie Mixed Use. This zoning permits mixed uses including commercial and multi-family residential at a density of up to 45 units per acre. In line with the CRA Plan, the City and the CRA desire to redevelop the two parcels through the issuance of a Request for Proposals (RFP) for a public private partnership development agreement. This RFP process would secure a qualified private partner to develop a high-quality mixed use project that includes residential, retail, public art and or gathering spaces, and public parking. This project is across the street from Funky Buddha Brewery and is meant to be the embodiment of the desired future development aesthetic for the surrounding area. In order to increase the potential for the CRA and City to attract the right developm ent team, the CRA should select consultants (planner, architect, real estate) to conduct a massing analysis of the lots to create viable building block scenarios, with consideration given to the City’s desires for mixed use, optimal height, and character of the building. The consultant s should also create renderings of the building to express look, feel, and caliber of development. These renderings would be included with the Request for Proposal. The CRA Plan called for $1M in gap financing in 2005, to incentivize development. Using the massing analysis, provided by the consultant, the CRA would have the ability to more realistically establish pro-forma(s) for the project and estimate the necessary funding gap. In addition, the CRA should assemble a team of professionals to assist the City and CRA staff in writing, communicating, and evaluating the public private partnership proposals submitted for this project. Finally, the City and the CRA should explore the possible advantages of a transferring the ownership of the westside lots to the CRA. The City may benefit from the flexibility of the provisions for the disposition of property under Community Redevelopment statute provisions (Chapter 163.380, F.S.). City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Agency 2017 - 2022 Strategic Action Plan 26 | P a g e Redevelopment of L Shaped Building The City currently owns a 16,098 sf two story building on the northeast corner of Jaco Pastorious Park. A 5000sf section of the building is currently occupied by the Urban Farming Institute under a contractual agreement to provide community garden and other agricultural services to the City. In the 2012 CRA Strategic Update, the CRA adopted the concept of creating a culinary market in the downtown to support the Culinary Arts District brand. Since that time, the Planning team has worked with culinary industry professionals to develop the concept of a Culinary Artisanal Marketplace in the “L-Shaped Building”. The location of the facility leverages the investments already made by the City and the CRA to expand Jaco Pastorius Park, and to connect the Park to the downtown through the construction of the Grand Plaza featuring an archway and dancing fountain. The Culinary Artisanal Marketplace is envisioned to be a local gathering place for great food with a diverse tenant mixture of local food vendors, artisan cafes, and organic or “Fresh from Florida” produce. As delineated in the original plan, the market place would be a community asset that would improve the food culture in the City through education, community outreach and support for local businesses. In order to fully evaluate the feasibility of a culinary marketplace in the “L-shaped building” the CRA should engage a professional consulting team that has experience developing and or leasing these kind of specialty marketplaces to assist in successfully redeveloping and marketing, and operating the site. The CRA should establish strategic partnerships with culinary industry leaders in the areas of culinary education, hospitality marketing, sustainable food vendors, organic purveyors, and local farmers to secure strong long term partnerships for the building . If the Culinary Marketplace is found to be feasible and the City and the CRA have forged the right partnerships to ensure the viability of the market, the City may them move forward with plans to redevelop and market the facility. The City and the CRA should consider a public private partnership to redevelop and operate the market long term. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Agency 2017 - 2022 Strategic Action Plan 27 | P a g e Potential Redevelopment of City Owned Properties in the Downtown The City of Oakland Park City Hall Complex and adjacent publicly owned lands equals four (4) acres of prime real estate at the center of the Culinary Arts District and is in close proximity to one of the main economic drivers for the downtown, Funky Buddha Brewery. In light of the findings in the 2010 Facility Study and concurrence of the 2017 Fa cilities Siting Update which noted that the City Hall building has functionally reached the end of its life expectancy. The City of Oakland Park should consider the relocation of City Hall and the associated amenities to an alternate location (s) within the downtown and determine what the highest and best use for the current City owned properties. The location of the current municipal properties, would add greater value as a well-planned mixed use facility in the center of the Culinary Arts District. With its location across the tracks from the West Dixie Lots and adjacent to the Funky Buddha, the CRA would be poised to have impactful redevelopment on all four corners in the center of the Culinary arts District. The impact of the full redevelopment of the “center of the downtown” will exponentially increase the probability of quality investment in the surrounding area. In addition, the City and the CRA would be the driving force behind the projects and will have greater control over the density, aesthetic, and sense of place created for future developments to model. The City and the CRA should evaluate other opportunities to relocate City Hall within the urban core and acquire land adjacent to City Hall to increase the potential for an impactful, high quality, low rise, mixed use development. Redevelopment of the 1299 E. Oakland Park Blvd. Building The 2012 CRA Strategic Plan adopted by the CRA, included the potential redevelopment of the 1299 Building as a part of the South Gateway Redevelopment, which proposed a high -end restaurant and urban hotel adjacent to “new private investment” in the 1299 Building. Since that time, the City and the CRA have plans to create a sense of place though the installation of an iconic downtown entryway feature and a proposed new south gateway plaza and fountain. The development of a City iconic entrance and gathering space will serve as the linchpin for redevelopment to the downtown. This new public gathering space will also be a cultural facility for Oakland Park. The south gateway project has been funded by the Florida Division of Cultural City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Agency 2017 - 2022 Strategic Action Plan 28 | P a g e Affairs, Cultural Facilities Grant making the Grand Plaza to the upcoming South Gateway Plaza a new City’s Cultural Facility. This is unique because this will be one of the first outdoor roadways to be designated as such in the state. In order to capitalize on the municipal improvements adjacent to this building, the CRA should establish a partnership with the owners of the 1299 Building to redevelop this location and change the façade to complement the south gateway improveme nts adjacent to the development. Land Acquisition Like most eastern cities in South Florida, land in Oakland Park is at a premium. Due to the historic development patterns, lot sizes are small which presents a challenge to redevelopment. The opportunity amidst this challenge in Oakland Park is that land is still affordable, however, year over year the cost of land increases. It is therefore, essential to the success of the strategies for redevelopment, mobility, and beautification for the CRA to engage in targeted strategic land acquisition throughout the CRA and especially in the Downtown. The acquisition of these properties is key to being able to provide well planned parking on the edge of the di strict, to providing greenspace, to creating a walkable community, and to aggregating proprieties for viable development. Redevelopment of the Post Office Building Another partnership opportunity that will be valuable to the redevelopment of the downtown is the redevelopment of the post office property. The current site of the post office is located in a prime mixed use location, which is underutilized based on the post offices current operations. The post office retail site gets limited use and does not drive traffic to the Culinary Arts District. The CRA should work to develop a partnership with the post office, and a private developer to retain a smaller post office facility and redevelop the site into a vibrant mixed use facility in the downtown. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Agency 2017 - 2022 Strategic Action Plan 29 | P a g e Redevelopment Capital Program Financing In June of 2007, the City and the County established a funding agreement that released the County from its obligation to provide tax increment financing to the City’s CRA Trust Fund, instead opting for the payment of $13 M in dedicated Redevelopment Capital Program (RCP) funds over a period of five years. RCP established a loan to grant f unding model through which the County would reimburse the City for an approved list of projects. The repayment am ount would be mitigated by the taxable value increase associated with the project. Unfortunately, the very year the CRA funding agreement with the County was approved marked the beginning of the worst economic recession in the United States since the Grea t Depression. Despite the financial challenges that existed for all municipal organizations from 2007 – 2012, the Oakland Park CRA was able to complete $4.9 M in Redevelopment Capital Program Projects. The CRA managed its responsibility to the County through a series of contract revisions meant to responsibly balance its capital commitments in the midst of the worldwide financial crisis. These contract revisions meant that the Oakland Park CRA was forced to leave RCP funding on the table. Now that the economy has recovered and the City is able to responsibly demonstrate that the redevelopment projects within the downtown will result in increased tax base, the CRA should continue to negotiate with the County to recover the funds they were forced to abandon during the recession. Broward County will be a key partner to development, as the CRA and the County share common goals for redevelopment, economic development, and commitment to quality housing stock. Alternate Financing Options The estimated cost for the projects included in the 2017 – 2022 Strategic Action Plan are detailed in CRA 2017 -2022 Project List section of the report. Overall it is estimated that the CRA may need $22 million in revenue to finance all the initiatives herein. With an annual budget of $1.4 M the CRA will need to employ alternate financing options to be able to complete the proposed projects. Over the next five years the redevelopment initiatives discussed herein can be financed through several funding streams. The City in conjunction with the CRA may leverage grant funding to complete projects. In light of the mobility plan, CRA Strategic Action Plan, and the City’s five year CIP, the CRA can show a well-planned program for development, which is looked upon favorably by most grantors. The CRA in partnership with the City is well positioned to successfully obtain grant funding at the federal, state, and local levels for many of the capital projects and public private partnership opportunities contemplated in this plan. The CRA and the City could also explore the cost benefit of issuing bank notes and or bonds to advance the projects throughout the CRA, depending on the interest rate environment. The benefit of this funding strategy is that the CRA would have the ability to advance the downtown development and take advantage of the current positive real estate market conditions. The CRA City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Agency 2017 - 2022 Strategic Action Plan 30 | P a g e and the City would need to package these issuances strategically to ensure that there is sufficient revenue to support the debt service and the day-to-day operations of the CRA. In addition to grants and debt issuance, the CRA is also well positioned to leverage the current interest in developing the downtown to its advantage. The CRA could partner with private developers who are constructing projects adjacent to key capital improvement locations to construct or provide funding for the completion of downtown mobility improvements. These partnerships could be viable because the development community understands that if the quality of life surrounding their development is improved so too is their property value. Furthermore, the CRA plan provides for $8.7 million in potential public private partnership project dollars. Depending on the structure of the redevelopment project, the CRA may not have to outlay dollars, these partnerships may come in the form of impact or permit fee waivers, tax increment rebates, or grant partnership agreements. Finally, should the City choose to move forward with the consolidation of City administrative services to a single site and in turn relocate the City facilities, there is substantial revenue that could be generated. Due to the fact that there is great land value for the City properties in the downtown as well as exceptional value in the “opportunity” to place a development in the center of the Culinary Arts District, the City is well positioned to leverage this site. The City could utilize the proceeds of the sale to mitigate the cost of land acquisition , consolidation of operations, and the construction of a new City Hall facility. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Agency 2017 - 2022 Strategic Action Plan 31 | P a g e Guiding Principle Six – Communicate and Coordinate City Administration saw the potential pitfalls associated with having the many plans and programs addressed herein being implemented simultaneously. As such, the planning team met regularly to share ideas, information, plans, and concepts so that the various departments considered the impacts across the agency as well as with the private stakeholders. This planning team model worked to ensure that interagency communication was effective. However, the planning team also noted the need for the CRA to continue to communicate its successes and market itself to the external audience. The marking and branding effort for the CRA has many layers, the most notable being the branding of the Downtown Culinary Arts District. The CRA must communicate the availability of its programs and incentives to the business community to advance its mission of development for our existing business community. Branding and Marketing Plan The branding recommendations for the CRA were initiated in 2012, with focus given to the Downtown District. In 2015, the City advanced the branding initiative by hiring a marketing and advertising firm and an event planning professional to assist staff with implementing the CRA branding and marketing strategies. The CRA branding initiatives are framed around five major opportunities that the CRA needed to focus on to improve the viability of the downtown: •Establish an identity and brand for the Downtown District •Focus on business attraction/retention and communications •Create opportunities or the cross promotion of businesses and install directional/wayfinding signs •Create merchandising, operational and business support to facilitate business growth •Expand customer base through advertising and events In the years since these initiatives have been identified, staff has successfully completed or is currently implementing, as an ongoing responsibility, all the strategies outlined in this study. It is to be noted that the task of keeping the district “top of mind” for prospect ive investors and businesses owners. Communicate and coordinate “Good communication and coordination among groups and agencies can help ensure that all available resources support the community’s vision. For small cities with limited resources, this coordination can help achieve goals at minimal cost by avoiding redundancy, conflicting efforts, and/or spreading resources too thin for meaningful improvement.” EPA, 2016, Framework for Creating a Smart Growth Economic Development Strategy: A Tool for Small Cities and Towns. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Agency 2017 - 2022 Strategic Action Plan 32 | P a g e In an effort to raise awareness about the downtown and drive traffic to the Culinary Arts District, the CRA launched over one hundred annual events and activities throughout the year. Monthly events like Music on Main, seasonal events like the Culinary Arts Showcase, and annual events like Taste of Oakland Park, Holiday Village, and Oktoberfest have been successful in increasing awareness about the downtown experience. The CRA has also successfully marketed the downtown through its banner program and improved wayfinding initiatives. In addition, the CRA has implemented an aggressive social media program. The City has produced two videos that feature the City and the CRA, and plans to continue that effort. The planning team has also utilized unconventional approaches to develop effective marketing strategies for the downtown through the creation of a “Culinary Think Tank” group. The Culinary Think Tank meets periodically to advance the Culinary Arts District in Oakland Park. The members of the Think tank represent local universities, banking institutions, urban planners, and vario us culinary industry representatives. The purpose of this group is to potentially leverage the resources that each organization may have to participate in the downtown initiatives as well as learn about the emerging trends and challenges for the culinary community. This group will be beneficial in informing the CRA about the challenges that a culinary startup will face, and may provide key partnerships to assist the CRA in providing much needed training and business incubation for culinary startups. The future of branding the downtown will be improving upon the investments that have been made: 1)Expanding the wayfinding and directional sign efforts; 2) Growing the customer base for events in the downtown area; 3) Expanding our reach regarding the existence of the downtown through a focused marketing and advertising strategy; 4) Establishing a long-term training and business development assistance to ensure that the City retain existing business and provide the support for them to grow in the district. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Agency 2017 - 2022 Strategic Action Plan 33 | P a g e V.CONCLUSION The Oakland Park CRA has an exciting opportunity to continue to redevelop the CRA district. This exciting opportunity began in 2005, stalled for a short time during the recession, and is once again gaining momentum. The foundational work completed in the downtown by the City and the CRA in 2007 – 2017 with the completion of multiple capital improvement projects, the implementation of quality of life programs, investment in landscape beautification, and implementation and expansion of business incentive programs is now bearing fruit. It is for these reasons that the CRA must continue to focus its efforts in the downtown area to capitalize on the momentum that is building for the Culinary Arts District brand, while also systematically laying the foundation for other CRA focus areas in preparation for the future. As discussed above, it will be essential to the future development and sustainability of the Culinary Arts District to increase the number of residential units in the downtown area. The best way deliver those units is through the well-planned redevelopment of select sites in the downtown to mixed use, low rise, aesthetically impactful developments. These developments will not only work to secure the financial viability of the downt own, they will provide gathering spaces, parking, and employment opportunities. The public private partnerships, land acquisition, capital projects, along with the implementation of the new policies and programs herein will work together to advance the vision. The viability and growth of the downtown will positively impact the surrounding communities and spur private investment in the greater CRA district. It must be noted that as the maturation of the downtown is occurring, the CRA also has plans to invest in the infrastructure of other areas throughout the CRA. Similar to what was done in the downtown for the last ten (10) years, the CRA will lay the foundation in other strategic locations in the district through investment in streetscape improvements, drainage improvements, code compliance, and business incentive programs. This foundational work will strategically prepare these emerging areas for the next step in the maturation of their redevelopment and ensure that the City and the CRA are well positioned to leverage opportunities for redevelopment in the emerging areas as it has in the downtown Culinary Arts District. The CRA is full of opportunity, promise, and potential. The Downtown Culinary Arts District concept in unique and has the potential to be an amazing small town downtown destination and economic driver for the community. If implemented the 2017 - 2022 Strategic Action Plan provides the roadmap for this development. This plan along with the “foundational work” that has begun throughout the CRA will work together to advance redevelopment district wide and achieve the goals originally set for the CRA in 2005. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Agency 2017 - 2022 Strategic Action Plan 34 | P a g e VI.CRA PROJECT LIST The following charts provide a full list of all projects currently contemplated within the CRA district. They are separated into four (4) categories; Capital Projects; Public Private Partnerships, Land Acquisition, and Policies and Programs. It is estimated that in order to complete all of the projects contemplated within the CRA district will require a financial investment of $48 million dollars. Capital Projects Project Title Estimate Downtown Infrastructure Improvements: Reconstruction of intersection of OPB and Dixie Highway NE 12th Terrace Extension (North of Park Lane) $ 2,750,000 Traffic Improvements to Kimberly Lakes Neighborhood - Planning and Design $ 100,000 Improvements to NE 8th Avenue - Planning and Design $ 100,000 Improvements to NE 12 Terrace (South of OPB) - Planning and Design $ 100,000 Mobility - Development of Surface lots $ 1,800,000 Mobility- Parking Management System $ 50,000 Mobility - Vehicular Circulation changes NE 12 Ave $ 180,000 Mobility- Pedestrian Improvements throughout Downtown $ 8,200,000 Mobility - Streetscape Improvements throughout Downtown $ 250,000 Mobility - Expanded Bike Share and Station Installation plus annual maintenance $ 1,335,000 Mobility - Micro Transit Downtown Circular Plan $ 80,000 Total Capital Projects $ 14,945,000 Public Private Partnerships Project Title Estimate Development of West Dixie Lots - Long Term Mixed Use $ 2,500,000 Jaco Pastorius Park Culinary Marketplace Construction $ 3,269,000 Long Term Mixed Use SE Corner of 38th Street and Main Street $ 1,500,000 Coastal Link Train Station TBD South Gateway Fountain and Plaza $ 1,481,200 Redevelopment of Post Office Site $ 10,000,000 Total Public Private Partnerships $ 18,750,200 City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Agency 2017 - 2022 Strategic Action Plan 35 | P a g e Land Acquisition Project Title Estimate Land Acquisition – Downtown Property aggregation for mixed Use development $ 5,422,700 Land Acquisition – Parking and west side development $ 2,500,000 Land Acquisition – Jaco Park Culinary Marketplace $ 1,500,000 Total Land Acquisition $ 9,422,700 Policies and Programs Project Title Estimate Land Use East Harlem McBride Land Use Change H and S Subdivision Land Use Change NE 12th Terrace Land Use Change Art District Feasibility Study Central Park Industrial Center Land Use Change Floranada Design District Midtown Commercial Regulations Future Prospect Gardens Pocket Park Land Use Change Incentive Programs Commercial Façade $ 840,000 Public Art Program $ 700,000 Relocation Assistance $ 980,000 Strategic Investment Program $ 980,000 Attainable Housing TBD Marketing/ Branding Campaign $ 1,036,000 New Business Development Assistance and Training Program $ 280,000 New Oakland Park Downtown Development District Feasibility Study $ 50,000 Total Policies and Programs $ 4,866,000 Total Remaining CRA Project Cost Estimate Project Category Estimate Total Capital Projects $ 14,945,000 Total Public Private Partnerships $ 18,750,200 Total Land Acquisition $ 9,422,700 Total Policies and Programs $ 4,866,000 Grand Total $ 47,983,900 No Cost City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Agency 2017 - 2022 Strategic Action Plan 36 | P a g e VII.2017 – 2022 ACTION PLAN The projects listed below are priority for the Oakland Park CRA, and are projected to be undertaken on or before Fiscal year 2022. Capital Improvement Projects Project Title Estimate Phase I Planning and Design for Improvements to NE 12 Terrace (South of OPB) -including Arts District Feasibility Plan $ 100,000 Mobility - Development of Surface lots $ 1,800,000 Mobility- Parking Management System Design $ 10,000 Mobility – Phase I Planning and Design for of Vehicular Circulation Improvements NE 12 Ave $ 30,000 Mobility- Phase I Planning and Design for Pedestrian Improvements throughout Downtown $ 984,000 Mobility – Phase I Planning and Design Streetscape Improvements throughout Downtown $ 30,000 Mobility - Expanded Bike Share Partnerships and Station Installation $ 215,000 Mobility - Micro Transit Downtown Circular Plan $ 80,000 Total Capital Projects $ 2,894,000 Public Private Partnerships Project Title Estimate Development of West Dixie Lots Gap Funding $ 2,500,000 Jaco Pastorius Park Culinary Marketplace Construction $ 3,269,000 Long Term Mixed Use SE Corner of 38th Street and Main Street – Gap Funding $ 1,500,000 South Gateway Fountain and Plaza ($500,000 in Cultural Facility Grant funding secured) $ 1,481,200 Total Public Private Partnership $ 8,750,200 Land Acquisition Project Title Estimate Land Acquisition – Downtown property aggregation for mixed use development $ 6,800,000 Land Acquisition – Parking $ 2,500,000 Land Acquisition – Jaco Park Culinary Marketplace $ 1,500,000 Total Land Acquisition $ 10,800,000 City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Agency 2017 - 2022 Strategic Action Plan 37 | P a g e Policies and Programs Project Title Estimate Land Use East Harlem McBride Land Use Change H and S Subdivision Land Use Change NE 12th Terrace Land Use Change Central Park Industrial Center Land Use Change Floranada Design District Midtown Commercial Regulations Future Prospect Gardens Pocket Park Land Use Change Incentive Programs Commercial Façade $ 150,000 Public Art Program $ 125,000 Relocation Assistance $ 175,000 Strategic Investment Program $ 175,000 Attainable Housing TBD Marketing/ Branding Campaign $ 185,000 New Business Development Assistance and Training Program $ 50,000 New Oakland Park Downtown Development District Feasibility Study $ 50,000 Total Policies and Programs $ 910,000 Total 2017 – 2022 CRA Project Cost Estimate Project Category Estimate Total Capital Projects $ 2,894,000 Total Public Private Partnerships $ 8,750,200 Total Land Acquisition $ 9,422,700 Total Policies and Programs $ 910,000 Grand Total $ 21,976,900 No Cost City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Agency 2017 - 2022 Strategic Action Plan 38 | P a g e APPENDIX TRANSPORTATION MOBILITY PLAN CITY OF OAKLAND PARK Culinar y Arts District February 2017 1 Today’s Agenda •Vision •What is Mobility? •Observations and Recommendations •Parking •Vehicular Circulation •Pedestrian •Bicycling •Transit Vision •Enhancing Mobility to Guide Economic Development •Fostering connections between the district and the surrounding neighborhoods •Connectivity between East and West sides of the Rail •Getting people out of the car to walk •Successful Integration of a new transit station Train Station Greenway Connections Open Space Potential Parking Areas Enhanced Bike/Ped Crossings Major Vehicular Paths 3 4 Las Ramblas, BarcelonaCity Hall, City of Oakland Park, FL Oakland Park Future at a Glance Multimodal Transportation 5 •What is Mobility? •Providing the ability to move in all modes, (Car, walk, bike or transit) •Mobility Plan Goals •Get people to the District in an easy manner •Reduce reliance on personal automobile •Provide Infrastructure to support alternative modes •Encourage foot traffic once within the District to promote economic development N DixieHighwayOakland Park Boulevard NE 38th Street District Challenges and Opportunities 6 •East-West Divide –FEC Line •District Qualities •Compact •Only 3 crossings •Roadways operating within acceptable Level of Service •Zoning and future land use aligned for TOD development •Good local support •Existing Infrastructure positives •Landscaping •Seating N DixieHighwayFEC RailOakland Park Boulevard NE 38th Street Parking Needs 7 •Expected Needs •Divided Analysis by East and West side of US-1 •Based on expected buildable space •Existing Parking (Public, Private): 1853 •LAC (2009): 2430 •Adjustments: •If you use space for parking, you’re not using it for retail, etc. •FEC Tri-Rail Station planning accounts for 216 spaces additional spaces needed. •Less parking is ok within the district, for alternative mode purposes. •But this doesn’t mean no parking. May Want To Consider A Shift To A More Urban Code The Current Code Allows: East Total 3 Stories Commercial Retail/Office with Residential 3,640 Commercial Rest/Bar with Residential 12,353 East Total 6 Stories Commercial Retail/Office with Residential 7,628 Commercial Rest/Bar with Residential 20,824 West Total 3 Stories Commercial Retail/Office with Residential 4,916 Commercial Rest/Bar with Residential 13,457 West Total 6 Stories Commercial Retail/Office with Residential 9,251 Commercial Rest/Bar with Residential 28,924 Parking Needs 8 What is the recommended parking at 3 and 6 story buildout. Assumptions: 1. Mixed-Use 2. Improved Transit options (BCT and Coastal Link) 3. Current 1.56 autos/HH 4. Mix of usage = mix of times for peak parking 5. TDM and Rideshare programs available 6. Assumes additional space is for increased Commercial SF Potential Needs (Conservative estimate, move away from suburban style code for a Transit Oriented Development/Downtown area) East Total 3 Stories Commercial Retail/Office with Residential 2,726 Commercial Rest/Bar with Residential 3,610 East Total 6 Stories Commercial Retail/Office with Residential 5,948 Commercial Rest/Bar with Residential 8,246 West Total 3 Stories Commercial Retail/Office with Residential 3,598 Commercial Rest/Bar with Residential 4,212 West Total 6 Stories Commercial Retail/Office with Residential 7,101 Commercial Rest/Bar with Residential 8,189 Parking Internal Connections 9 •District-edge capture •Where can we put parking? •How much is needed? •How do we phase it in? •How will it work for pricing? •How much traffic flows through the district? When? •Loading times should be set outside of normal business hours •Other vehicular traffic is really dependent on parking locations N DixieHighwayOakland Park Boulevard NE 38th Street NE 34th Court NE 10thAvenueNE 13thAvenueFEC Rail Parking Event Traffic 10 •Parking Management •Appears to function well •Golf Cart Shuttles •Took an hour to begin to fill. Peaking at about 85% capacity during June 2016 Funky Buddha event •No issues during Octoberfest •Used NE 12th Street and S. Dixie spots, lot parking •May become an issue with increased regular activity •Current parking for events overlaps with potential train station parking expectations; will have to adjust in the future Parking Needs and Recommendations 11 Guest Parking Standards -Consider amending parking ratio for guests to 1 space for each 5 units (Currently 1 space for each unit) Parking In-Lieu Fee –Gradually raise to account for new parking structure needs -$24,000 (Currently $15,000) Reduce Parking Required When: Exemptions for developments/businesses less than 2,500 SF Car Share on reserved spaces Development includes at least 3 additional multi-modal options, which could include a “ride-share” designated curb front pick-up area (similar to the airport) A 25% reduction for development located within .5 mile of future Tri-Rail station Developers commitment to maintain a Transportation Management Plan that indicates certain activities and measures (approved by the City) Short to Mid Term -Reduce On-Street Parking (Short) No Off-Street Parking Between the Front of Buildings and the Street Prohibit parking between the street front and the building Businesses are accustomed to this and if it is not specifically prohibited, it will still occur (Mid) Encourage Off-Street Parking by Price Control Charge less for off-street parking in a garage, people give up the convenience to save money Parking Needs 12 •Future Demand Management •Pay by Phone •Restaurant District •Need tracking •Ensure available parking and prevent circling •Should set a limit parking based on data to be collected •Have to balance between retail and residential needs •Carshare parking •Signage Parking 13 Oakland Park Boulevard NE 38th Street NE 34th Court N DixieHighwayShort Term Surface Lots. Land Acquisition. On-Street Parking Mid Term New Structures. Begin Shifting on street parking to decks. Long Term Ensure appropriate amounts of parking. Account for increase need due to Development of Mixed-Use Structures. Train Station Major Vehicular Paths Road Closures Potential Parking Locations Vehicular Circulation External Connections 14 •Only three main roads matter to the district externally: •N Dixie Highway •Oakland Park Boulevard •NE 38th Street •Compact: District is small enough that internal circulation is not essential for general population to shop/partake in business in the District.N DixieHighwayOakland Park Boulevard NE 38th Street 15 •District-edge capture works here because of the size of the district •Small •Narrow •Available locations for relocation of parking •Existing alleys can be retained for loading zone purposes •Will reduce district vehicular/ped/bike conflicts •Can retain some on street parking on designated streets, but charge at a premium. •Encourages foot traffic.N DixieHighwayOakland Park Boulevard NE 38th Street NE 34th Court NE 10thAvenueNE 13thAvenueFEC RailVehicular Circulation Internal Connections Vehicular Circulation Roadways –NE 12th/NE 40th 16 N DixieHighwayOakland Park Boulevard NE 38th Street NE 34th Court NE 10thAvenueNE 13thAvenueClosure of RR crossing at NE 36th Street to vehicular traffic •Minimal Impact •Recommend closing to vehicular traffic, keeping open for Pedestrian, Bicycle traffic with a midblock crossing. •Midblock crossing options: •Signalization •Mid-block Crosswalk Vehicular Circulation Vehicles NE 12th Ave 17 Phase II (Mid Term): Partial Closure •Signage additions, removals N DixieHighwayOakland Park Boulevard NE 38th Street NE 34th Court NE 10thAvenueNE 13thAvenuePhase I (Short-term): 2-way •Current lane appx 16 ft. •Need 10’ feet for lane for each lane •Remove 19 parking spaces •Remove intersection island at NE 12th Avenue/NE 34th Street •Road can curve around fountain at 34th Phase III (Long Term): Full closure •Minimal impact on traffic •Repurpose area as pedestrian mall, with programmatic space Vehicular Circulation Station Access 18 West Palm Beach Tri-Rail Station, WPB, FL South Pasadena Gold Line Station, South Pasadena, CA 19 South Pasadena Farmers Market, Thursdays, 4 to 8 pm 3rd Street Promenade, Santa Monica, CA 1 block from Santa Monica Light Rail Station Vehicular Circulation Station Access Vehicular Circulation N DixieHighwayOakland Park Boulevard NE 38th Street Short Term Close 36th Street Crossing 2-way Main Street Mid Term Align Roadways to Parking/Traffic Calming as traffic increases Shift more parking off the streets Long Term Conversion of roads to Pedestrian Malls Pedestrian Internal Circulation 21 •Average person will walk 0.25 miles, upwards of 0.5 miles in optimal conditions •Barrier between subdistricts •All streets in District should have either a sidewalk or shared use path •Minor side streets should have minimum of 6’of sidewalk •For standards: Consider main street for shops, offices should have minimum 8’, upwards of 10’ for seating for restaurants, etc. 0.25 Miles 0.25 Miles 0.17 Miles 0.10 Miles 0.30 Miles 0.40 Miles Pedestrian Amenities 22 •Complete Network •Shade:Was lacking during field study, Additional shade via structures or plants necessary. Some areas are very well done. Other areas need improvement. •Lighting:As a culinary arts district, expect more foot traffic at night. Need more lighting throughout, as well as considering crosswalk flashers on N Dixie Highway and Oakland Park Blvd. •Seating:Seating along NE 12th Avenue is well done. However, the rest of the DMUD will also need seating as it develops. •Wayfinding:Wayfinding may increase effectiveness of district branding as well as enhance the pedestrian realm. Pedestrian Amenities 23 •Pavement: Markings and materials to reduce speed within district. You already see these at some intersections. •Speed: Reduce local district speed to 15 mph or less. Pedestrian Internal Connections 24 Pedestrian N DixieHighwayOakland Park Boulevard NE 38th Street Short Term Land Acquisition Complete Sidewalk Network Mid Term Mixed-Use Paths Greenways Enhanced Crossings Long Term Pedestrian Malls Greenways provide safe routes and programming space connecting the neighborhood Train Station Sidewalks/Mixed-Use Paths Open Space/Parks Enhanced Bike/Ped Crossings Pedestrian Mall 26Bicycle Internal/External Connections N DixieHighwayOakland Park Boulevard NE 38th Street NE 34th Court NE 10thAvenueNE 13thAvenueVital Connections To and from the region To integrate the district and the neighborhoods To better connect east and west To create ease in internal mobility Bicycle External Connections 27 •Bikeshare –B-cycle •Closest Station to east is Appx. 2 miles •Closest Station to south is appx. 2 miles •Threshold: 30 minute ride/5 miles •Inter-local cooperation will help provide intermediate stations •Enhanced crossing at NE 16th Avenue and Oakland Park Blvd will facilitate connection to Culinary Arts (DMUD) district 1.8 Miles NE 13thAvenueNE 10thAvenueNE 38th Street NE 34th Court NE 33rd Street Bicycling 28 N DixieHighwayOakland Park Boulevard NE 38th Street NE 34th Court NE 10thAvenueNE 13thAvenueShort Term Bicycle Facilities on main roadways More Bicycle Racks Mid Term Break up larger blocks Bikeshare stations Begin Internal Greenways Long Term Complete Network More bikeshare and bike racks as needed Transit 29 Moving People Transit External Connections –BCT Buses 30 •Buses •Broward County Transit Routes 50 and 72 •Existing pull- outs on N Dixie Highway •Consider setting aside space for a pull- out on Oakland Park Boulevard for future \ Gateway and Plaza Area Bus StopBus StopFuture Main Street Mixed Use Transit External Connections -Rail 31 •Tri-Rail Coastal Link •Considerations for development •Access •Walking •Bicycling •Vehicular •Parking •Transit Demand Management •Feeder Route Systems •2 Options for location N DixieHighwayFEC RailOakland Park Boulevard NE 38th Street NE 34th Court Transit External Connections -Rail 32 Potential Needs: 2 ac. to 5 ac. (depending on various factors, but will be on lower end; this also includes the parking and buildings) Appx. 0.15 mi to 0.20 mi platform length Will not affect E-W roads with proper siting. Station Area Platforms: Parking Needs: How many spaces? Preliminary plans put at 215 Further Study needed Other Tri-Rail Stations? Range: 200 –600 Occupancy generally 50-80% Where? Within an 1/8 mile.N DixieHighwayFEC RailOakland Park Boulevard NE 38th Street NE 34th Court Transit External Connections -Rail 33 •Tri-Rail Coastal Link •NE 34th Street •Requires further discussion with FEC. •Parking spots removed: Appx. 50 •At grade pedestrian crossing at station/NE 33rd Street to facilitate shorter block to crossing for Pedestrians, Bicyclists (Also provides a safer, more direct path to walk to Oakland Park Elementary School.) •Closer to BCT Route 72 (Oakland Park Boulevard); easier E-W transfer •Parking in Vicinity •Recommended Location N DixieHighwayFEC RailOakland Park Boulevard NE 38th Street NE 34th Court Transit Internal Connections 34 N DixieHighwayOakland Park Boulevard NE 38th Street NE 34th Court FEC RailNE 10thAvenueNE 13thAvenue3 Alternatives evaluated: Trolley (Rail), Local Shuttle, Microtransit Recommended Alternative 3: Microtransit •First/Last-Mile Program •Regular or Antique-ish refurbished vehicles •O and M affected by insurance given vehicular value •Highly scalable •Examples include the Downtowner Summary of Recommendations 35 •Parking •Revise Current Code •Put in/retain exemption clauses •Acquire land and designate future parking locations •All Parking Structures should be mixed-use •Parking should be shifted from road to in the long term •Vehicular •No immediate need for NE 12th/NE 40th •Close RR crossing at 36th •Align district destination travel to NE 13th Ave, NE 10th Ave (collectors) •Reduce traffic into district •Reduce on-street parking within district •Concentrate parking on district edge •Roadway and block realignment for vehicular travel •Increase parking in-lieu fees to standards •Set specific times for loading zones/freight to businesses Summary of Recommendations 36 •Pedestrian •All roadways within district require sidewalks or mixed -use paths •Shade elements and lighting improvements necessary •Increased amount of seating •Pedestrian Bridge at 33rd Street/FEC-N Dixie with Station to increase cross district access •36th Street –Mid-block Crossing at N Dixie Highway •Pedestrianize NE 12th Avenue •Consider pedestrian pocket and greenways system •Institute Enhanced Wayfinding system •Bicycling •Bikeshare •Bike racks •Routes •Based on critical paths •Local roadways -Sharrows, reduce speed to 15 MPH or less. •Many of the recommendations follow pedestrian ones (Bridge at 33 rd, greenways, etc.) •Transit •External -Focus on Tri-Rail Station for 34th Street •Internal circulation –focus on smaller vehicle (cars) on set route Thank you The CORRADINO Group 37