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2005 CRA Initial PlanOAKLAND PARK Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan December, 2005 E D S A Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final December 2005 EDSA ILER PLANNING GROUP CARTER + BURGESS City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan i TABLE OF CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ..............................................................................................1 I. INTRODUCTION .......................................................................................................6 A. Redevelopment Planning process .................................................................................7 B. Public Participation Program ........................................................................................8 II. EXISTING CONDITIONS ........................................................................................9 A. Regional Relationships………………………………………………………………..9 B. Community Redevelopment Area…………………………………………………......9 CRA Boundary ........................................................................................................9 Private Development in the CRA ..........................................................................13 C. Land Use and Zoning ..................................................................................................15 D. Public Facilities ...........................................................................................................22 Publicly -owned Properties ....................................................................................22 Municipal Properties ............................................................................................22 Parks.....................................................................................................................22 Other Publicly-owned facilities:...........................................................................23 Infrastructure ........................................................................................................26 E. Redevelopment Needs .................................................................................................41 F. Demographic and Economic Overview .......................................................................46 Demographic and Economic Overview Summary ................................................46 Detailed Economic and Demographic Overview .................................................50 Employment...........................................................................................................53 III. PROPOSED REDEVELOPMENT PLAN ...........................................................67 A. Goals and Objectives ...................................................................................................67 B. Capital Improvements .................................................................................................72 Current City Commitment to Capital Improvements in the CRA .........................72 Proposed Capital Improvement Projects..............................................................76 C. Public/private partnerships ..........................................................................................86 D. Policies and Programs .................................................................................................88 Land Use Changes in the CRA ..............................................................................88 Specific Redevelopment Programs........................................................................91 CRA -Wide Redevelopment Programs ...................................................................92 E. Community Redevelopment Agency Administration .................................................95 F. Community Redevelopment Plan Expenditures ..........................................................95 IV. REQUIRED CRA PL AN ELEMENTS ...............................................................100 A. Neighborhood Impact and Affordable Housing........................................................100 Land and Building Acquisition ...........................................................................100 City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan ii B. Conformance with Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan and Broward County Land Use Plan..................................................................................................................................102 Broward County Land Use Plan .........................................................................102 Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan....................................................................103 V. FINANCIAL FEASIB ILITY .................................................................................107 A. Tax Collection Analysis ............................................................................................107 B. Project Financing.......................................................................................................115 Committed Funds ................................................................................................115 Optional Funding Sources ..................................................................................115 Revenue/Cost Balance .........................................................................................118 C. Project phasing ..........................................................................................................119 D. Financial Strategy......................................................................................................123 E. Conclusion and plan implementation ........................................................................127 VI. OPERATIONAL PR OCEDURES ......................................................................128 A. CRA Term.................................................................................................................128 B. Annual Reporting ......................................................................................................128 C. Plan Update and Amendments ..................................................................................129 LIST OF TABLES Table 1: Future Land Use .................................................................................................15 Table 2: Existing Zoning ...................................................................................................16 Table 3: Existing and Future Level of Service..................................................................26 Table 3: Migration Into and Out of Broward County, 2002-2003 ...................................50 Table 4: Population and Household Trends, County, City & CRA, 2000-2020 ...............52 Table 5a: Housing Resale Activity Trends (Zip Codes 33309 & 33334).........................57 Fourth Quarter 1998 and 2004.........................................................................................57 Table 5b: CRA Associated Capital Improvement Projects Funding Sources...................75 Table 6: Tax Increments with Capital Improvements.....................................................109 Table 7: Land Use Conversion Analysis: Industrial to Residential (Townhome)..........110 Table 8: Real Property Tax Assessment & Tax Collection Analysis ..............................111 Table 9: Estimate of Real Property Tax Growth (High “Probability” Development 2006 to 2015)...........................................................................................................................112 Table 10: Estimate of Real Property Tax Revenue Growth: "Long Term" (City/County Induced) Development - 2006 to 2015............................................................................113 Table 11: Estimate of Real Property Tax Revenue Growth: Existing and Projected New Development (2006 to 2015) with Capital Improvement Projects .................................114 Table 12: Total Funding Available for CRA Plan Projects............................................125 City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan iii LIST OF FIGURES Figure A: Redevelopment Concept Plan.............................................................................5 Figure 1: Regional Location Map ....................................................................................11 Figure 2: CRA Context .....................................................................................................12 Figure 3: Current Development ........................................................................................17 Figure 4: Existing Land Use Map ....................................................................................18 Figure 5: Vacant Land Map .............................................................................................19 Figure 6: Future Land Use Map ......................................................................................20 Figure 7: Zoning Map ......................................................................................................21 Figure 8: Public-owned Properties ..................................................................................24 Figure 9: Parks and Open Spaces ....................................................................................25 Figure 10: Existing Level of Service.................................................................................28 Figure 11: Future Level of Service ...................................................................................29 Figure 12: Broward County Trafficways Plan .................................................................30 Figure 13-a: Transit Development Plan- Existing Conditions (Fixed Route)..................31 Figure 13-b: Transit Development Plan- 5 Year Improvements ......................................32 Figure 13-c: Transit Development Plan- 20 Year Improvements ....................................33 Figure 14-a: Classified Roads with Missing Sidewalks ...................................................34 Figure 14-b: Cost Feasible Pedestrian Projects ..............................................................35 Figure 14-c: Cost Feasible Bicycle Projects ....................................................................36 Figure 14-d: Existing and Designed Bicycle Facilities ....................................................37 Figure 15: Drainage Deficient Areas ...............................................................................39 Figure 16: Current Capital Improvement Projects ..........................................................40 Figure 17-a: Inventory and Analysis ................................................................................42 Figure 17-b: Inventory and Analysis ................................................................................43 Figure 17-c: Inventory and Analysis ................................................................................44 Figure 17-d: Inventory and Analysis ................................................................................45 Figure 18: City of Oakland Park and Oakland Park CRA Location (TAZ) Map .............51 Figure 19-a: Total Employment, Broward County 2001-2004 ........................................53 Figure 19-b: Employment by Industry, Broward County 2001-2012 ...............................54 Figure 20: Residential Building Permits Issued in Broward County, 1980-2004 ............55 Figure 21-a: Broward County Office Market (by sub-market)........................................60 Figure 21-b: Broward County Office Market -Absorption Development Trend ...............61 Figure 21-c: Broward County Office Market – Occupancy and Rate Trend (2001-2004) ...........................................................................................................................................61 Figure 21-d: Broward County Retail Market – Lease Rate and Vacancy Trend – 2002 to 2004...................................................................................................................................63 Figure 21-e: Broward County Industrial Market Lease Rate, Development and Absorption Trend – 2002 to 2004 .....................................................................................66 Figure 22: Proposed Changes to the Future Land Use Map ..........................................89 Figure 23: Proposed Future Land Use Plan ...................................................................96 Figure 24: Proposed Changes to the Zoning Map ..........................................................97 City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan iv Figure 25: Proposed Zoning Map ...................................................................................98 Figure 26: Existing and Proposed Parks, Open Space, and Streetscape Plan ...............99 Figure B: Phase I Projects, Redevelopment Concept Plan .Error! Bookmark not defined. APPENDICES APPENDIX A. SLUM AND BLIGHT STUD Y APPENDIX B. DOWNTOWN MIXED USE DISTRICT ORDINANCE AND DESIGN GUIDELINES APPENDIX C. COMMENTS AND QUESTIONS RECEIVED AT THE TOWN HALL MEETING (SEPTEM BER 14, 2005) City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Background In 2002, the Board of County Commissioners of Broward County delegated and conferred upon the City Commission of Oakland Park the authority to create a Community Redevelopment Agency and prepare a Community Redevelopment Plan. The City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan is the result of community involvement, extensive analysis of existing conditional uses, and market trends. It is intended to guide redevelopment in Downtown Oakland Park and the whole Community Redevelopment Area which consists of approximately 1,007 acres of industrial, residential, and commercial uses. This CRA Plan was recommended by the Community Redevelopment Agency on November 9, 2005 for approval and t he City Commission approved the Plan on November 30, 2005. Subsequently, the Board of County Commissioners of Broward County approved the CRA Plan on December 13, 2005. The Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Agency was created to encourage reinvestment in the area through catalytic projects. Community Redevelopment Areas have three primary benefits in promoting redevelopment, which include: 1. Access to the Broward County Redevelopment Capital Program funding and tax increment financing for redevelopment projects; 2. Increased eligibility for federal and state grants that can be used for infrastructure improvements, business development, and property acquisition; and 3. A master planning approach and implementation strategy for the Community Redevelopment Area. Redevelopment Concept Plan The Redevelopment Concept Plan (Figure A) provides an overview of redevelopment projects within the Community Redevelopment Area. Potential redevelopment projects include: Proposed Capital Improvement Projects: Downtown Infrastructure Projects Reconstruction of the intersection of Oakland Park Boulevard and Dixie Highway Reconstruction of the intersection of NE 34th Court and Dixie Highway NE 12th Terrace Extension Reconstruction of NE 13th Avenue from NE 38th Street to NE 32nd Street Miscellaneous Downtown Mixed Use District (DMUD) drainage improvements NE 12th Avenue lift station upgrade/replacement Train Whistle Quieting City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 2 NE 34th Court Improvements Downtown Park Gateway Carter G. Woodson Park Improvements and Expansion Flo ranada Industrial District Improvements Improvements to Prospect Road Improvements to Andrews Avenue Improvements to NE 38th Street Improvements to NW/NE 41 st Street Improvements to NE 6th Avenue Improvements to NE 5th Avenue Improvements to NE 8th Avenue Wimberly Athletic Complex Parking Improvement and Expansion of Collins Community Center Commercial Boulevard and Dixie Highway Gateway Prospect Road and I-95 Gateway South Dixie Highway and Gateway Buffer Prospect Gardens Neighborhood from I-95 Improvements to Guisti Park Expansion of Public Boat Ramp/Park along Middle River Traffic Improvements to Kimberly Lake Neighborhood Oakland Park Elementary School Pedestrian Improvements Lloyd Estate Elementary School Pedestrian Improvement Major Intersectio n Improvements Minor Intersection Improvements Proposed Public/Private Partnerships: Park Place Development Dixie Mixed Use (East) Development Dixie Mixed Use (West) Development Watts Estate Housing Development Proposed Policies and Programs: East Harlem McBride Land Use Change Oakland Festival Center Land Use Change H and S Subdivision Land Use Change NE 12th Terrance Land Use Change Central Park Industrial Center Land Use Change Kmart Site Land Use Change Future Prospect Gardens Pocket Park Land Use Cha nge Waterfront Promenade along the Middle River Floranada Design District Midtown Commercial Regulations Attainable Housing Program Community Appearance Program City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 3 Condominium Conversion Program Public Art Program Historic Oakland Park Green Building Program Arts District Retail Market Analysis Commercial Façade Program Adjacent Land Use Buffer Study Community Policing Program The linchpin of the Community Redevelopment Plan is the Downtown Mixed Use District (DMUD). The DMUD is located along Dixie Highway, north of Oakland Park Boulevard. This area was designated a Local Activity Center in 2004, a land use category designation that promotes compact, mixed use development. Specific land development regulations and design guidelines were adopted by the City in 2004 for the DMUD. Capital Improvement Projects described in this plan will enhance and distinguish Downtown Oakland Park as a local destination. While Downtown Oakland Park is important to the Community Redevelopment Area, other commercial and reside ntial areas receive special attention as well. Improving neighborhoods, pedestrian circulation, green spaces and connections to downtown are key elements of the Redevelopment Plan. These basic principles form the basis for plan initiatives. For example, streetscape improvements will connect residential neighborhoods to the downtown while improving blighted conditions. Harlem McBride and other residential areas will be enhanced by decreasing incompatible industrial uses, increased park space and attainable housing. A Design District along Floranada Road will continue to attract home improvement businesses and consumers. A designated Midtown centering on Prospect Road and Andrews Avenue with unique streetscaping will enhance long-standing, favorite local businesses. An Arts District will attract artists that will call Oakland Park home and attract visitors and residents to their studios. The capital improvement projects, policies, and programs in the CRA will total approximately $92 million. Projects will include Downtown infrastructure improvements including a pedestrian bridge and public parking, facilities for the expansion of Carter G. Woodson Park, and streetscape improvements across the Community Redevelopment Area. Private/public partnerships include Park Place development (the focus point of the Downtown Mixed-use District), Dixie Mixed Use (East) Development and public parking, Dixie Mixed Use (West) demonstration block, and the Watts Estate housing development. These projects are supported by strong goals and policies to guide redevelopment in the Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area. They support Oakland Park’s vision that: City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 4 By 2008, Oakland Park will be recognized as a friendly "small town" with safe and attractive neighborhoods, quality schools, outstanding parks and exceptional recreation programs, with the social, cultural and business opportunities of a big city. The Community Redevelopment Agency is expected to generate $30 to $35 million during the first ten years assuming it receives the full amount of the tax increment financing (95%) contributed by the City and County. Tax millage rates will not increase in the CRA as a result of this plan. Projects will be funded and scheduled in two phases. Phase I projects total $38 mil lion and Phase II projects total $54 million. Principal sources of funding for projects will likely be a combination of tax increment and Broward County redevelopment funds for both phases. Given current tax rates, by 2010 it is estimated that there will be a total of approximately $2.5 million in tax increment available from the City and County. The City can issue a 30-year bond, which would net $23.75 million in capital funding. The estimated gap in financing for Phase I projects ($12.1 million) may be supported by the County’s Redevelopment Capital Program. The following table details the funding strategy: Total Funding Available for Phase I CRA Plan Projects Funding Potential 2010 Expected Increment $2,500,000 Debt Service Coverage 1.20 Bond Te rm (Years) 30 Interest Rate (Annual) 6.00% Supportable Debt $28,805,000 Fees (2%) ($576,000) Shortfall Reserve ($1,345,000) Bond Reserve Fund (1.5 years) ($3,123,000) Net Funds Available (1/1/07) $23,753,000 A financial strategy for Phase II will be determined when the CRA plan is updated in the future and the results of Phase I project implementation is reviewed. It is expected that the CRA Plan will be reviewed every five years and Phase II financing will be based upon the successful completion of the projects and the existing financial status of the Community Redevelopment Agency at that time. This Community Redevelopment Plan including the proposed capital improvement projects, public/private partnerships, programs and policies coupled with continued public involvement will ensure the success of the Community Redevelopment Area throughout its 40-year term. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 5 Figure A: Redevelopment Concept Plan City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 6 I. INTRODUCTION The City of Oakland Park has recognized that significant areas of Downtown Oakland Park and other sections of the city are in need of redevelopment. After a 1981 study of slum and blight conditions, the City established a CDBG target area and the Main Street Program to invest and create redevelopment and economic development programs. In 2001, the City Commission authorized the preparation of a slum and blight study to identify a specific area in need of redevelopment and to establish the existence of slum and blight. The slum and blight study is the first step in creating a Community Re development Agency to oversee redevelopment of a Community Redevelopment Area. The designation of a Community Redevelopment Area, as noted in the Florida statutes, creates a tool for local governments to initiate the process of redevelopment. In 2002 Broward County approved the Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Agency according to regulations set in Florida State Statutes Chapter 163, Part III. The City’s Vision is that, “By 2008, Oakland Park will be recognized as a friendly "small town" with safe and attractive neighborhoods, quality schools, outstanding parks and exceptional recreation programs, with the social, cultural and business opportunities of a big city.” The Community Redevelopment Plan will guide the community through the transformation to the “small town with the opportunities of a big city.” As part of the redevelopment process, both the City’s and County’s comprehensive plans were amended to designate a Local Activity Center in the Community Redevelopment Area along Dixie Highway. The Local Activity Center land use designation promotes compact, mixed-use development. The City designated this area as the Downtown Mixed Use District (DMUD) and established specific land development regulations and design guidelines for this area in 2004. The City of Oakland Park through this Community Redevelopment Plan intends to expand on the establishment of the Downtown Mixed Use District to set goals and objectives, capital improvement projects, public/private partnerships and programs that stimulate economic growth, enhance neighborhoods, and improve the overall livability of the Community Redevelopment Area. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 7 A. REDEVELOPMENT PLANNING PROCESS The Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Plan is intended to serve as a guide for effective redevelopment and enhancement of the Community Redevelopment Area. A multidisciplinary team of urban planners, urban designers and engineers worked with the City of Oakland Park staff, residents and business owners to prepare the Plan. The following planning process was utilized in the preparation of the Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area Plan: 1. Assess existing conditions in the Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area 2. Conduct public meetings and workshops to establish a community vision 3. Use public input to determine guiding principles 4. Identify problems and opportunities 5. Outline land use and zoning changes necessary to facilitate appropriate redevelopment 6. Identify public projects to help solve problems and initiate redevelopment 7. Review private redevelopment plan for consistency 8. Identify opportunities for public/private partnerships 9. Prepare a realistic Redevelopment Plan These steps allow for a logical, yet creative Community Redevelopment Plan based upon the desires of the Oakla nd Park community. Florida State statutes also regulate community redevelopment plans. Per Chapter 163.360 of the Florida statutes, Community Redevelopment Plans shall: o Conform to the comprehensive plan for the county or municipality o Indicate redevelopme nt activities such as land acquisition, demolition or removal of structures o Detail redevelopment improvements and rehabilitation in the community redevelopment area o Provide zoning and planning changes, land uses, maximum densities, and building requirements o Provide for affordable housing o Provide for community policing o Provide for a feasible method of relocation of families who will be displaced o Due consideration to provision of park and recreational areas o Afford maximum opportunity for community redevelopme nt by private enterprise. This plan meets both Florida State statutory requirements and Broward County requirements. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 8 B. PUBLIC PARTICIPAT ION PROGRAM Community involvement was a critical component in the planning process of the Community Redevelopment Plan. A design charette held in 1999 established that citizens of the City of Oakland Park desired a redeveloped Downtown Oakland Park, including design guidelines, an improved civic center, pedestrian accessibility, and more tree canopy. During the development of the Downtown Mixed Use District land development regulations and design guidelines, the design team met with the public in March and July of 2004. In May of 2004, the team specifically held an informational workshop on the CRA with resident s and business owners. Participants voiced concerns in regard to pedestrian safety, train noise, absentee landlords, height and density. They also indicated a desire for a local destination with shops and restaurants, more sidewalks, and gateway features. Comments were also received regarding future development concepts and potential capital improvement projects. Public participation and the comments received from Oakland Park residents and business owners through the planning process form the basis of this Community Redevelopment Plan. A Town Hall meeting was held on September 14, 2005 to review the CRA Conceptual Plan. Residents and business owners had the opportunity to ask questions, voice concerns and support the plan. Comments from the Town Hall meeting are included in Appendix C. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 9 II. EXISTING CONDITIONS A. REGIONAL RELATIONSHIPS The City of Oakland Park is located in east central Broward County. The City of Fort Lauderdale lies to the east of Oakland Park with Wilton Manors lying to the south and Lauderdale Lakes to the west. Interstate 95 splits the eastern and western halves of Oakland Park. It is a five -minute drive from the eastern boundary of the City to the beach and twelve miles to the Fort Lauderdale -Hollywood International Airpo rt and Port Everglades. Oakland Park is also just over thirty miles from the City of Miami, Miami International Airport and the Port of Miami. Considering the City’s proximity to these major economic centers, the City of Oakland Park is an ideal location for redevelopment and future economic success. Figure 1 shows the geographic relationship of the City of Oakland Park to Broward County. B. OAKLAND PARK COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AREA The Slum and Blight Study (Appendix A) provided demographic and econo mic analyses regarding median household income of the Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) in comparison to the City of Oakland Park and Broward County. It showed that the income of CRA households was significantly lower than the average Oakland Park household. A more detailed demographic and economic analysis is provided in Section F of this chapter. CRA Boundary Figure 2 shows the boundary. The legal description is as follows: Beginning at north side of the North Fork of the Middle River, proceed along the west side of the right -of -way of NE 6 Avenue; along the south side of the right -of -way of East Oakland Park Boulevard; along the west side of the right -of -way of North Andrews Avenue; along the south side of the right -of -way of NW 40 Street; along the west side of the right of way of Powerline Road; along the east side of the right -of -way of I-95; along the Northern City boundary; along the east side of the right -of -way of NW 3rd Avenue; along the south side of the right -of -way of NE 45th Street; along the west side of the right - of -way of NE 1st Terrace; along the north side of North Andrews Gardens 2nd Addition (31-39 B) Lot 11; along the Northern City boundary; along the Western City boundary; City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 10 along the Northern City Boundary; along the centerline of the of NE 6th Avenue; along the north side of the right -of -way of NE 46th Court; along the west side of the right -of - way of Dixie Highway; along the north side of the right -of -way of Commercial Boulevard; along the west side of the FEC Railroad to the Northern and Eastern City boundaries; along the east side of Coral Ridge Isles (45 -47B) Block 49 Lots 6 and 8; along the south side of the right -of -way of Commercial Boulevard; to the east side of the right -of -way of NE 14th Lane; along the south side of Coral Heights Section 3(47-19B) Block 26 Lot 4; along the east side of the right -of -way of NE 12th Terrace; along the south side of Coral Heights Section 2 (45-8 B) Block 29 Lots 25 through 27; along the north side of the right -of -way of NE 40th Drive; along the east side of the right of way of NE 14th Avenue; along the south side of the right -of -way of NE 40th Place; along the east side of the right -of -way of NE 13th Avenue; along the south side of the right of way of East Oakland Park Boulevard; along the east side of the right -of -way of NE 13th Avenue; along the east side of Ocean Boulevard Park (21-45 B) Block 5 Lot 3 E 15; to the north side of the North Fork of the Middle River ending at the beginning point. The Community Redevelopment Area is made up of 1,007 acres urban development, which represents slightly more than 19% of the City’s land area. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 11 Figure 1: Regional Location Map City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 12 Figure 2: CRA Context City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 13 Private Development in the CRA As of October 2005, there were 25 development projects within the CRA pending approval by the City of Oakland Park Development Review Committee. The development projects included the following: • Casanova Townhomes, 333 NW 41 Street (5 Townhouse dwelling units) • Ivan I Townhomes, 431 NW 40 Court (4 Townhouse dwelling units) • Forman Townhouses, 464 NW 41 Street (7 Townhouse dwelling units) • Watts Estates Plat, 3600 Block of NE 3 Avenue (20 Single-Family dwelling units) • Walgreens Pharmacy Store, 3100 N. Andrews Ave (14,550 square foot Retail store) • Royal Palm Oil & Gas LLC Auto Wash, 423 E.O.P.B. (6,164 square foot Multi- Purpose Car Wash Building) • Diadem Townhomes, 670 NE 43 Street (20 Townhouse dwelling units) • Parktown Villas, 701 NE 43 Street (14 Townhouse dwelling units) • Oakland Bay Warehouses, 1001 NE 46 Court (36,690 square foot of Warehouse Buildings) • Bonilla Townhomes, 800 NE 43 Street (3 Townhouse dwelling units) • Oakland Park Station, 1201 NE 38 Street (314 Townhouse/Condo dwelling units) • Recalt & Montiel Townhomes, 1047-1049 NE 37 Street (3 Townhouse dwelling units) • Luis Perez Townhomes, 1042 NE 35 Street (3 Townhouse dwelling units) • Alster Townhomes, 1265-1279 NE 35 Street (8 Townhouse dwelling units) • Villas Verona Townhomes, 1022-1028 NE 33 Street (6 Townhouse dwelling units) • The Pointe at Middle River, 2900 NE 12 Terrace (102 Townhouse/Condo dwelling units) • Color Lab Renovation, 3400 NE 11th Avenue and 3401 N. Dixie Highway (Commercial renovation) • Thomas Smith Townhomes, 495 NW 43rd Street (3 Townhouse dwelling units) • Sobel Office Building, 3301/3305 N Dixie Highway (5,373 square feet, 2-story office building) • Oakland Manors Townhomes, 3520 NE 10th Avenue (4 Townhouse dwelling units) • Guevara Townhomes, 1287/1299 NE 25th Street (4 Townhouse dwelling units) • Oceanic Townhomes, 610 NE 43rd Street (6 Townhouse dwelling units) • Prospect Plaza, 480 West Prospect Road (Commercial development) • Premier Animal Hospital, 550 East Prospect Road (Commercial development) • 496 NW 43 Street Townhouses, 496 NW 43rd Street (10 Townhouse dwelling units) City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 14 New development and redevelopment in the CRA is primarily residential with five new commercial and one new industrial development (plus one commercial renovation.) The most common type of new development seen in the Oakland Park CRA is townhome development. One hundred townhomes and 416 townhome/condo units have been proposed for development. Oakland Park Station, scattered townhome developments, and The Pointe and Middle River have a high probability of being built within two to three years and are considered in the financial analysis in Chapter IV. Of particular concern is the high number of condominium conversions in South Florida and the City of Oakland Park. Condominium conversions can potentially and harmfully reduce the supply of affordable rental housing. Regulations considering the affordability of condominium conversions, tenant relocation, and conformance with the City’s current land development regulations should be considered. An important proposed single-family development is the Watts Estate, which is an affordable housing project planned on land currently owned by the Broward County Housing Authority with the restriction that the land is to be used to assist low-income families. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 15 C. LAND USE AND ZONING Figure 4 shows existing land uses in the Communit y Redevelopment Area and Figure 5 depicts the location of the 51 acres of vacant land in the CRA. Figure 6 shows future land uses in the Community Redevelopment Area. Table 1 shows the total acreage of each land use. The predominant future land uses are Commercial (25%), Industrial (22%), Low Density Residential (18%) and Local Activity Center (15%). Downtown Oakland Park, which is also referred to as the Downtown Mixed Use District (DMUD), was given the Local Activity Center land use designation. Parks/Recreation land use makes up only 2% of the overall land uses in the Community Redevelopment Area. Table 1: Future Land Use Symbol Land Use Area (Acres) Percentage of CRA Area L5 Low Density Residential (up to 5 DU/acre) 178.07 17.68% CF Community Facilities 31.36 3.11% LM Low-Medium Density Residential (up to 10 DU/Acre) 11.26 1.12% M Medium Density Residential (up to 16 DU/Acre) 129.96 12.9 1% PR Parks/Recreation 21.26 2.11% C Commercial 251.91 25.02% MH Medium-High Density Residentia l (up to 25 DU/Acre) 3.66 0.36% U Utilities 8.66 0.86% I Industrial 222.66 22.1 1% LAC Local Activity Center 148.2 14.72% Total 1,007 100% Source: EDSA, 2005 (Table revised in December 2005.) Figure 7 shows existing zoning. Zoning w ithin the Community Redevelopment Area naturally reflects the land use composition. Predominant zoning categories include Single Family Residential (22%), Light Industrial (19%), Downtown Mixed Use District (15%), Community Business (10.5%), and Commercia l-Industrial (9%). Besides the Downtown Mixed Use District (DMUD) there are few areas that are zoned for mixed use. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 16 Table 2: Existing Zoning Symbol District Area (Acres) Percentage of CRA Area CF Community Facilities 31 3% B-1 Community Business 106 10.50% B-2 General Business 51 5% B-3 Commercial-Industrial 91 9% I-1 Light Industrial 192 19% DMUD Downtown Mixed Use District 148.2 15% OS Open Space 21 2% PCC-2 Planned Business Center 2 0.10% PU Public Utility 6 0.50% R-1 Single Family Residential 225.8 22% R-2 Two -Family Residential 31 3% RM-16 Medium Density Multi-Family Residential 51 5% RM-25 Medium-High Density Multi-Family Residential 51 5% Total 1,007 100% Source: EDSA, 2005 (Table revised in December 2005.) City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 17 Figure 3: Current Development City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 18 Figure 4: Existing Land Use Map City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 19 Figure 5: Vacant Land Map City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 20 Figure 6: Future Land Use Map City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 21 Figure 7: Zoning Map City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 22 D. PUBLIC FACILITIE S Publicly-owned Properties Oakland Park City Hall lies in the heart of the new Downtown Mixed Use District on NE 12th Avenue. The City of Oakland Park Public Library is just west of City Hall. Figure 8 shows the location of all publicly-owned properties in the Community Redevelopment Area. City-owned and other publicly-owned properties in the CRA inc lude: Municipal Properties 1) City Hall-Complex and Library- 3650 N.W. 12th Avenue 2) Public Works Administration Building-250 N.E. 33rd Street 3) Police Station and Fire Rescue #9- 301 NE 38th Street 4) Spiher Recreation Center-1246 N.E. 37 Street 5) Cit y of Oakland Park Fire Station #9-301 NE 38th Street 6) Water Treatment Plant - 5100 NE 12th Terrace 7) MCI Lot- NW Corner of NE 39th Street and NE 6th Avenue Parks The Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area does not have sufficient park area. There are 25.07 acres of park within the Community Redevelopment Area. With a population of 10,537 in the CRA, only 2.38 acres of park space are available for every 1,000 residents. (The City’s comprehensive plan requires a park level of service of 3 acres per 1,000 people.) Increasing park space is critical to community vitality in the CRA. Parks with various levels of passive and organized activities are needed. Figure 9 illustrates the location of existing parks within the CRA. Existing City parks include: 1) Collins Community Center-3900 N.E. 3rd Avenue 2) Wimberly Athletic Field-4000 N.E. 3rd Avenue 3) Dillon Tennis-4091 N.E. 4th Avenue City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 23 4) Lloyd Estates Park- 3490 N.E. 3rd Avenue 5) Oakland Park Athletic Complex East- Corner of N.E. 38th Street and N.E .6th Avenue 6) Carter G. Woodson Park- 3940 N.E. 3rd Avenue 7) Boat Ramp- N.E. 12th Terrace and N.E. 30th Court 8) Guisti Heart Parcourse-Southeast corner of N.E. 38th Street and N.E. 6th Avenue 9) Pioneer House and Museum- Corner of NE 39th Street and NE 6th Avenue 10) Future Downtown Park- NE Corner of NE 38th Street and Dixie Highway Other Publicly-owned facilities: Broward County Schools: 1) Lloyd Estates Elementary School- 750 NW 41st Street. 2) Oakland Park Elementary-936 NE 33rd Street. Broward Count y Elderly and Veterans Services Division –2995 North Dixie Highway Broward County Sheriff’s Office Oakland Park District Office (same building as City of Oakland Park Fire Station #9-301 NE 38th Street) U.S. Post Office 1)4350 N. Andrews Avenue 2) 3350 Northeast 12th Avenue U.S. Department of State Regional Service Center- 4000 N. Andrews Avenue City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 24 Figure 8: Public-owned Properties City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 25 Figure 9: Parks and Open Spaces City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 26 Infrastructure A great deal of the existing infrastructure within the CRA is relatively old and in need of rehabilitation and/or replacement. Although water, sanitary sewer, storm, roadways, and sidewalk have been periodically repaired or replaced, much of the infrastructure is inadequate to service the level of future development anticipated within the CRA boundaries. Transportation Conditions Figures 11a-14b show existing and future transportation conditions. Significant roadways in Oakland Park such as Dixie Highway, Prospect Road, N.E. 38th Street, and Oakland Park Boulevard are expected to reach a level of service “F.” Table 3: Existing and Future Level of Service Roadway Existing Level of Service (2003 Daily Conditions) Future Level of Service (2025 Daily Conditions) Dixie Highway C F N.E. 38th Street D F Oakland Park Boulevard F F N.E. 6th Avenue D F Commercial Boulevard F F Prospect Road (I-95 to Andrews Avenue) C D Prospect Road (Andrews Avenue to Dixie Highway C C Prospect Road (Dixie Highway to N.E. 10th Terrace E F Oakland Park Boulevard consistently fails to meet the adopted level of service standard and congestion is severe. The local roads within the CRA have sufficient capacity in most cases; however, many have exceeded their design life and are deteriorating. The major collector roadway, Dixie Highway, does not function in a satisfactory manner under current circumstances, a condition that will be greatly exacerbated after future development should no improvements be implemented. The roadway will require additional turn lane improvements along with some road widening. Minor right-of-way acquisition will most likely be necessary. The City is currently working with FDOT on getting dual left turn lanes installed on all four legs of the Oakland Park Boulevard/Dixie Highway intersection as a part of a year 2007 FDOT project. The City is currently designing and permitting City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 27 improvements on N.E. 12th Avenue from Oakland Park Boulevard to N.E. 38th Street. Also, the City is currently working on NE 38th Street from Federal Highway to N.E. 13th Avenue, and is in the process of designing the extension of those improvements to Dixie Highway. Looking at the public transportation system, Broward County is preparing for headway improvements to 15 minutes on Andrews Avenue and Dixie Highway (Figure 13b). Headways will improve to 10 minutes on Oakland Park Boulevard. A rapid bus line is planned for Oakland Park Boulevard by Broward County Transit within the next twenty years (Figure 13c). In addition, the Florida Department of Transportation, District IV is managing a multi- jur isdictional study examining transit alternatives along the Florida East Coast (FEC) corridor. The potential for a transit station within the Downtown Mixed Use District has been addressed as part of the district’s design Guidelines, however the City of Oakland Park should continue to position itself for a transit station by adopting policies and regulations that promote the use of transit downtown. Lack of sidewalk continuity (Figure 14a) in the Oakland Park CRA prevents easy pedestrian circulation. Flo ranada Road, Dixie Highway, and N.E. 34th Court lack continuous sidewalks. These routes provide important passageways for pedestrians to commercial areas including the future Design District, Downtown Oakland Park, and City parks. A greenway has been completed along the FEC Corridor from Oakland Park Boulevard to N.E. 38th Street. This greenway is expected to continue as bicycle and pedestrian lanes along Dixie Highway north of N.E. 38th Street. Bicycle lane projects are also planned for Prospect Road and N.E. 6th Avenue. Other improvements include a bicycle/pedestrian bridge planned at N.E. 38th Street and Andrews Avenue (Figure 14c). City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 28 Figure 10: Existing Level of Service City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 29 Figure 11: Future Level of Service City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 30 Figure 12: Broward County Trafficways Plan City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 31 Figure 13-a: Transit Development Plan - Existing Conditions (Fixed Route) City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 32 Figure 13-b: Transit Development Plan - 5 Year Improvements City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 33 Figure 13-c: Transit Development Plan- 20 Year Improvements City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 34 Figure 14-a: Classified Roads with Missing Sidewalks City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 35 Figure 14-b: Cost Feasible Pedestrian Projects City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 36 Figure 14-c: Cost Feasible Bicycle Projects City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 37 Figure 14-d: Existing and Designed Bicycle Facilities City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 38 Wastewater and Potable Water The City of Oakland Park receives wastewater treatment and potable water from the City of Fort Lauderdale. The City is currently undertaking a large watermain replacement program within the CRA, and more specifically within the Downtown Mixed Use District. Watermains in areas outside of the Downtown Mixed Use District within the CRA may need replacement due current conditions of the underground pipes and their materials. With respect to water supply, the primary needs are upsizing of the lines and installation of additional fire hydrants to achieve adequate fire flows. The existing sanitary sewer system is sufficient to serve the existing homes and businesses within the CRA. However, after redevelopment, the lift stations and forcemains may not be able to serve the higher density development. It is recommended that the City perform an analysis of the CRA sanitary sewer system for both existing and future development. In addition, based on the age and material of the piping, it would be in the best interest of the City to test the sanitary sewer system for groundwater infiltration in the CRA area. The cost of the replacement or lining of existing piping will be recaptured with the reduction in the volume of sewage treated. Drainage The City has its own stormwater utility. Figure 15 shows problem drainage areas. Storm drainage is of great concern throughout the City. The CRA has a number of areas which are in need of upgrade. Recently the City has designed and permitted two large drainage projects that will alleviate the major drainage concerns within the CRA boundaries. These two projects are the NE 6th Avenue 72” trunk line and the Kimberly Lake 72” trunk line. The NE 6th Avenue trunk line is essential to drain the central area of the CRA. This pipe will run from NE 38th Street South to the North Fork of the Middle River, which lies south of Oakland Park Boulevard. The City has many east-west feeder lines in place that will eventually tie into the new 72” pipe. However, additional lines will need to be constructed. The Kimberly Lake trunk line will greatly enhance drainage in the flood prone Kimberly Lake area at the north end of the CRA. Figure 16 shows capital improvement projects currently planned by the City in the Community Redevelopment Area as well as the whole City of Oakland Park. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 39 Figure 15: Drainage Deficient Areas City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 40 Figure 16: Current Capital Improvement Projects City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 41 E. REDEVELOPMENT NE EDS The Slum and Blight Study attached as Appendix A provides details on the slum and blight conditions found in the Community Redevelopment Area. The slum and blight conditions were found to meet statutory requirements. Figures 17a- 17d illustrates the inventory and analysis of the area completed as part of the CRA master planning process. Significant slum and blight findings in the analysis included: 1. High numb er of code enforcement violations 2. Dilapidated and abandoned structures 3. Aging infrastructure including poor drainage 4. Insufficient parking 5. Non-conforming and incompatible uses 6. Small, irregular lot sizes Figures 17a-17d illustrate an extensive inventory and analysis of the Community Redevelopment Area. This analysis finds the additional negative characteristics of the area: • Insufficient park and open space • Lack of building aesthetics • Poor pedestrian facilities • Minimal tree canopy and la ndscaping • Inadequate traffic circulation • Awkward and unsafe parking configurations • Community character and history hidden and not celebrated These conditions of slum and blight and other negative characteristics indicate opportunities for redevelopment and a need for community enhancement. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 42 Figure 17-a: Inventory and Analysis City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 43 Figure 17-b: Inventory and Analysis City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 44 Figure 17-c: Inventory and Analysis City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 45 Figure 17-d: Inventory and Analysis City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 46 F. DEMOGRAPHIC AND ECONOMIC OVERVIEW In order to understand the broader economic context of the potential redevelopment of the Oakland Park CRA, an economic and demographic overview of the CRA district, the City of Oakland Park and the surrounding metropolitan area was conducted. The analysis that follows summarizes research related to population, income, employment, and housing trends. The work completed as part of this analysis includes a comprehensive analysis of economic, demographic, and real estate market conditions that promote long- term redevelopment within the CRA. The market analysis will help to determine and/or support redevelopment opportunities within the CRA by real estate use and, furthermore, utilized to support certain funding initiatives considered herein. A summary and more detailed analysis are included in this section. Demographic and Economic Overview Summary The methodology for supporting the Oakland Park CRA’s opportunities included analyzing the current and future demand for key real estate uses including residential (for-sale and rental), office, retail, and industrial. The analysis considers regional economic and demographic trends, inherent market strengths and weakness of the CRA and surrounding areas, as well as competitive implications for commercial real estate activity in and around Oakland Park. Economic Overview The market analysis indicates that Oakland Park, and the CRA, is well situated in an area that continues to strengthen economically. Specific conclusions from economic/demographic trends include: • Although population growth in the City of Oakland Park trailed that of the County from 1990 to 2000 (1.7 percent versus 2.6 percent, respectively), future growth projections through 2020 indicate Oakland Park’s population will moderate slightly to 1.4 percent per annum, while the County growth will slow to 1.7 percent per annum. • Specific to the CRA, the Broward County Planning Department projects population growth from roughly 10,500 currently to 12,900 in 2020. Accordingly, the CRA is expected to add approximately 700 new ho useholds during this period. However, it is apparent that with recent residential planning activity, and promotion of a successful redevelopment plan, the CRA is in a position to capture considerably more growth than originally forecast. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 47 • Both short term and long-term growth and revitalization of infill areas throughout the County, namely established communities east of I-95, will be fueled in large part by diminishing land availability in the western portions of the County. • The City’s median age in 2000 was 35.8, which is lower than that of the County’s median age of 37.8. Notably, the City is well below the County in the 65+ age category, 10 percent of the population versus the County’s 16 percent. From a retail (consumption) and housing standpoint, the City’s current age classification bodes well for future growth, as the stronger purchasing power associated with households in the 35 to 65 age classification should have an impact on the redevelopment opportunities in the area. • Employment growth in Bro ward County has been strong for the past several years, led by growth in the Business and Professional Services sector. County anticipates an average 15,000+ new jobs per year through 2012. While the largest employment in the City of Oakland Park (and the CRA) is within government and retail sectors, an opportunity to capture employers (commercial space) and employees (housing) in the services sector may be enhanced through the redevelopment plan. • With strong regional employment growth, the City’s young resident profile, and a changing development environment, from an economic/demographic standpoint there is a strong opportunity for housing and commercial development within the CRA during the next several years. Real Estate Market Overview A local and regional market assessment by real estate use was completed to provide some indication of the redevelopment potential for the CRA. Key findings by real estate use include: • For-Sale Residential – There has been limited new housing development in Oakland Park during the past several years. Based upon an analysis of resale activity in the City, single family home prices increased more than 15 percent per annum from 1998 to 2004, with average sale price increasing from $101,000 to $235,000, or $69 per square foot to $166 per square foot. Accordingly, condominium resale price for the area increased an average 18 percent per year from 1998 to 2004, with average unit sale price increasing from $52,500 to $142,500, or $53 per square foot to $144 per square foot. The resale market continues to strengthen, increasing substantially in terms of volume and pricing. In terms of new development, there are more than 416 townhome/condominiums planned within Oakland Park Station and The Pointe at Middle River, with more than 70 additional units planned throughout the CRA. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 48 • Rental Residential – The broader Oakland Park rental apartment sub-market comprises more than 7,900 apartment units. The sub -market has a reported occupancy greater than 96 percent, with lease rates in the mid-$900 range. The unprecedented trend in rental conversions to condominium (both locally and regionally) will put pressure on rental apartment supply during the next few years. • Office – There has been no notable new office development in the City of Oakland Park in more than 15 years. The market comprises approximately 620,000+ square feet of space and is reporting occupancy of almost 81 percent and lease rates generally in the $12 to $16 per square foot (gross) range. Although current conditions within the Oakland Park office market do not support new large -scale office development, opportunities to incorporate office as a supporting use within a broader mixed-use development plan are plausible. • Retail – Oakland Park is situated within the East Central retail submarket, which also includes primarily Fort Lauderdale, Wilton Manors and portions of Lauderdale Lakes. There are approximately 39 centers with a total of 3,500,000 square feet in the submarket, with an average rental rate of $16.26 per square foot. Despite strong occupancy (greater than 90 percent), Oakland Park’s local competitive market is not to a large extent achieving lease rates in-line with the broader market. • Industrial – The Oakland Park industrial market comprises approximate ly 400,000 square feet of multi-tenant industrial space, most of which is warehouse space as opposed to a limited amount of flex/showroom space. The market is approximately 86 percent occupied, with lease rates generally ranging in the range of $7.50 to $8.50 per square foot (gross), and roughly $10.00 per square foot for flex build-out. Notably, there has been no new development activity in several years, as the majority of existing inventory was built more than 20 years ago. Considerable portions of the industrial properties are in fair to poor condition, yet they have exposure to abutting/nearby residential neighborhoods. These uses, which encompass relatively large land areas, may provide key opportunities to redevelopment within core areas of the CRA. Conclusions and Opportunities Oakland Park’s CRA is in a position to leverage relatively strong market dynamics and trends to capture or recapture demand for retail, office, and residential development during the next several years. A successful redevelopment plan, bolstered by the City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 49 proposed capital improvement projects, should provide the impetus for on-going private investment and redevelopment within the area. While it is difficult to assess development opportunities over an extended period of time, there is a strong opportunity for residential and mixed-use development during the next five years to ten years. This momentum alone should support continued growth over a longer-term horizon. Based upon the economic and market conclusions provided herein, the following provides a summary of the proposed development parameters for Oakland Park’s CRA: Residential: As noted above, planning projections and forecasts for the CRA indicate there will be 700 new households within the CRA during the next fift een years. However, considering the amount of recent interest in redevelopment (e.g. private development projects pending approval by the City) and presuming the redevelopment plan (and associated capital improvement) is implemented, demand for housing should be considerably higher. Presently, there are roughly 450 to 500 units in pending approval by the City within the CRA, we estimate additional demand for housing (above the planned projects) to be 900 to 1,000 units within the next ten to fifteen years. While most development currently planned is for-sale (mid to higher density product), opportunities to balance the mix with rental development should emerge within a three to five year period. Office: For this, incorporating office as a supporting use, a broader mixed-use plan may be warranted. However, from a long-term development perspective, the opportunity to develop an additional 150,000 square feet in the CRA is possible, assuming economic conditions remain stable. Retail: While retail market conditions in the broader market surrounding Oakland Park are relatively strong, the next five to ten year period is one of repositioning of the retail space in the CRA. To a large extent, this considers retail use as a core component to a mixed-use plan; particularly along the main commercial arteries. Opportunities for new retail development of critical mass would likely occur beyond the near term period (within five years), however, the opportunity to add 80,000 to 100,000 square feet of new space wit hin a ten year timeframe is considered strong. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 50 Detailed Economic and Demographic Overview Population/Households General Population Growth Trends. From 1990 to 2000, Oakland Park’s population increased steadily, growing by nearly 21 percent during the period (or 1.7 percent per annum) to reach approximately 31,000 residents (which does not include recently annexed land). In comparison, during the last decade, Broward County’s population increased at an average annual rate of 2.6 percent, surpassing 1.6 million residents in 2000. The tremendous growth in the County was particularly fueled by development in the southwestern areas of Broward in the post-Hurricane Andrew period. From a broader perspective, the County’s population growth during the past decade has been supported by strong in-migration trends. According to county-to-county migration data from the Internal Revenue Service, Broward County averaged more than 13,000 net new migration during 1990, 1995 and 2000 with an in-migration peak of over 24,000 persons from Miami-Dade County alone during 1994-1995 following Hurricane Andrew. Table 3: Migration Into and Out of Broward County, 2002-2003 Source: IRS County-to-County Migration Data, 2005 For the past ten years, the strongest inflow into the County was from Miami-Dade County, while the largest outflow went to Palm Beach County. Although regional migration is significant, the County also attracts substantial migration (particularly of retirees) from the Northeast, especially from New York and New Jersey. Although the in-migration helped fuel population growth throughout the County, communities in the southern portion of the County including Miramar, Pembroke Pines, and Weston captured a significant portion of this growth. This was largely the result of the abundance of competitively priced land and more affordable housing. Oakland Park’s supply of both had dwindled. Nonetheless, the City’s growth during the past 320418738Suffolk, NY 9,55235,93044,942Totals 277 1387 446 356 1964 507 481 15,668 13,886 Out 551 (490) 464 589 (584) 897 1,389 (8,259) 14,675 Net 828 897 910 945 1,380 1,404 1,870 7,409 28,561 In Bronx, NY Hillsborough, FL Cook, IL Nassau, NY Orange, FL Kings, NY Queens, NY Palm Beach, FL Miami -Dade, FL County 320418738Suffolk, NY 9,55235,93044,942Totals 277 1387 446 356 1964 507 481 15,668 13,886 Out 551 (490) 464 589 (584) 897 1,389 (8,259) 14,675 Net 828 897 910 945 1,380 1,404 1,870 7,409 28,561 In Bronx, NY Hillsborough, FL Cook, IL Nassau, NY Orange, FL Kings, NY Queens, NY Palm Beach, FL Miami -Dade, FL County City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 51 decade has been stable, and population forecasts indicate that Oakland Park’s population is likely to follow regional trends over the next fifteen to twenty years, increasing at an estimated 1.0% annually through 2020 1 to reach roughly 38,500 persons (not including the annexed land). Although this growth project ion is somewhat slower than that of the countywide projections, which is estimated to be 1.7 percent per year through 2020, it is in-line with the region’s moderating growth trends. Oakland Park CRA: To focus more narrowly on economic/demographic trends in the CRA district, we have identified the eight Traffic Area Zones (TAZ) for which a more comprehensive profile of demographic trends was completed (shown in the map below). Figure 18: City of Oakland Park and Oakland Park CRA Location (TAZ) Map Source: Broward County Planning Department As summarized in the table below, total population within Oakland Park’s CRA in 2000 was 10,020, increasing to an estimated 10,537 in 2005. Annual population growth rates in both the City and CRA are anticipated to trail that of the County through 2020 (1.3 percent per annum versus 1.7 percent per annum); however, the differential in the projected growth rate between the City /CRA and the County is smaller in comparison to historical growth trends. This is due, in large part, to the County approaching “buildout.” It is anticipated that during the next five years, growth will be concentrated in those areas with available developable land – tracts to the south and west of the City/CRA – and thereafter, will move east, with a marked increase in redevelopment and reuse. 1 Source: Broward County Planning Department. Projections are based upon evaluation of Traffic Analysis Zones (TAZ) - a special area delineated by state and/or local transportation officials for tabulating traffic-related data- especially journey -to -work and place-of - work statistics. A TAZ usually consists of one or more census blocks, block groups, or census tracts. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final - December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 52 Table 4: Population and Household Trends2 , County, City3 & CRA4 , 2000-2020 2000 2005 2020 2000 2005 2020 2000 2005 2020 Population 10,020 10,537 12,905 32,250 33,849 41,048 1,602,828 1,724,043 2,236,313 % Annual Growth 1.0%1.4%1.0%1.3%1.5%1.7% % Annual Growth 2000 to 2020 1.3%1.2%1.7% Households 3,862 4,022 4,695 13,143 13,594 15,317 654,345 692,387 869,617 % Annual Growth 0.8%1.0%0.7%0.8%1.1%1.5% Avg. PP/HH 2.59 2.62 2.75 2.45 2.49 2.68 2.45 2.49 2.57 % Annual Growth 2000 to 2020 1.0%0.8%1.4% Housing Units 4,038 4,147 4,847 13,869 14,094 15,877 740,879 796,046 940,945 % Annual Growth 0.5%1.0%0.3%0.8%1.4%1.6% % Annual Growth 2000 to 2020 0.9%0.7%1.2% Median Age N/A 35.8 37.8 % 5 years and under 6.7%6.3% % 18 years and over 79.1%76.4% % 65 years and over 10.2%16.1% Meidan HH Income $29,695 $35,493 $41,691 Origin (one race) - %N/A 95.4%96.6% White 66.0%70.6% Black (or African American)22.6%20.5% Other 6.8%5.5% (Latino, Hispanic of any race)17.9%16.7% City of Oakland Park - CRA City of Oakland Park Broward County Source: US Census; Broward County Planning Services; Lambert Advisory Current US Census projections show 4,700 households in the CRA by 2020 – an increase of 700 households (and housing units) during the next fifteen years. This projection assumes “natural” growth with no CRA plan. It obviously does not consider current residential real estate demand or CRA plan implementation. Therefore, with a successful CRA plan, the demand for housing units will most likely increase over this level (discussed further herein). Cultural Trends. Overall population in Broward County is diversifying; a study released by the Center of Immigr ation Studies in October 2001 indicated that there were 60,627 legal immigrants who settled in Broward County between 1991 and 1998. However this figure does not include legal immigrants through the 1986 amnesty for illegal aliens; with these people includ ed, the figure rises to 812,157. Of the 812,157 immigrants 36 percent were originally from Haiti and Jamaica. Other countries of origin were Colombia, 2 Population and Household estimates and forecast for the City of Oakland Park (and the CRA) and Broward County represents a compilation of data by TAZ as per the Broward County Planning Department. There may be a marginal disparity between TAZ estimates and those indicated within the US Census at the City and CRA level, as the TAZ’s do not exactly match the respective boundaries (for which differential in population is less than 5 percent). 3 Estimate of Households for Year 2005 (City and CRA) represent an approximation by Lambert Advisory utilizing historic and projected growth population and household growth trends. All other current and fut ure estimates of population and household trends provided by Broward County Planning Services and/or US Census. 4 Broward County Planning Department TAZ. Household Income for the Oakland Park CRA represents US Census 2000 data for census tracts 57.01 and 57.02 (primary boundaries of the CRA). City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 54 Figure 19-b: Employment by Industry, Broward County 2001-2012 - 100,000 200,000 300,000 400,000 500,000 600,000 700,000 800,000 900,000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2010 2012 Information Manufacturing Other Services (Except Government) Government Construction Financial Activities Leisure and Hospitality Professional and Business Services Education and Health Services Trade, Transportation, and Utilities Source: Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation, 2005 The services sector is particularly strong, representing nearly 90% of total employment since 2000 and adding nearly 30,000 jobs over the same period. The services sector benefits from the County’s tourism; however, small business expansion also helps to fuel the growth. Within Services, Financial Activities (which includes finance, insurance, and real estate rental and leasing) has shown the strongest growth since 2000, at 4 percent annually. The three largest sectors are Trade, Transportation, and Utilities (includes wholesale and retail trade, transportation, warehousing, and utilities, and represented nearly a quarter of total employment in 2004), Education and Health Services (19% of total employment in 2004), and Professional and Business Services (15% of total employment in 2004). These same three sectors are also projected to grow at the highest rates through 2012. The strength of the Professional and Business Services sector is notable, in particular, as it is a key driver of demand for office space. According to US Census 2002 (Selected Statistics), The City of Oakland Park has approximately 13,770 total jobs, among a total of 1,186 establishments (or an average of 12+ persons per place of work). The largest employment sector is within Administrative and Support (waste management, remediation services) with 4,122 employees, followed by Retail Trade with 2,601 employees. Specific to the CRA and immediate surroundings, the largest employers are government with the City employing 277 employees and the United Postal Service reporting 125 total employees. The other large employees in the City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 56 During the past few years, however, the diversity in Broward County’s housing type is beginning to change again, as land availability to the west diminishes and a renewed housing market emerges to the east (largely driven by development in downtown Ft. Lauderdale and along the coast). This trend is expected to continue and will be detailed further in following sections. Income: Based upon 2000 US Census data, the City of Oakland Park median household income is $35,500, which is 15 percent lower than the County median of $41,700. Accordingly, on a per capita income basis, Oakland Park’s per capita income in 2000 was $18,900, compared to $23,200 for the County. Specific to the Oakland Park CRA, median household income (based upon US Census 2000 data for census tracts 57.01 and 57.02) is estimated to be $29,695, with per capita income estimated at $13,079. Based upon per capita (personal income) growth data provided by the Bureau of Economic Analysis, Lambert Advisory has estimated current average household incomes, which may be used to support retail demand forecasts that may be considered in later phases of the analysis. Those estimates are as follows: Broward County: $59,700; City of Oakland Park: $49,600; and, Oakland Park CRA: $41,530. Summary. Following decades of existence as a “tropical paradise” for retirees and tourists, Broward County has been transformed by a dramatic socio-economic change. Strong economic and business growth, combined with positive cultural diversity has led to significant reinvestment in Broward in both business and home ownership. It has also created a multi-lingual culture characteristic of an international business center that now rivals the Counties to the north and south for corporate regional and international headquarters. Geographically, the City of Oakland Park is within the central portion of the County and proximate to the Fort Lauderdale/Hollywood International Airport and Port Everglades; furthermore, the City has good accessibility to major transportation arteries and area resources. Strategically located within the eastern quadrant of the City, the CRA district is positioned to capitalize on certain economic/demographic factors, which will support both short- and long-term plans to revitalize the area. Housing Market Overview For-Sale Market. In an effort to understand general housing trends in the City of Oakland Park and surrounding areas, and in the absence of new housing development in this area, a “snapshot” profile of single family and condominium resale activity was completed. This process entails an analysis of resale activity for the 4th quarter of 1998 and 2004 to identify sales activity trends among single- and multi-family units within two Zip Codes (33309 and 33334). These two Zip Codes largely encompass the City of Oakland Park (as well as nominal portions of neighboring City of Fort Lauderdale, and Wilton Manors) and, in particular, Zip Code 33334 overlays a significant portion of the CRA. Therefore, this data is telling as to the type of housing (condominium versus single family), sales volume and pricing trends that exist for the CRA and its surrounding area. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 57 Table 5a: Housing Resale Activity Trends (Zip Codes 33309 & 33334) Fourth Quarter 1998 and 2004 1998 2004 %CAGR 1998 2004 %CAGR 1998 2004 %CAGR Condominium Number of Sales (4th Q) 25 101 12 25 37 126 Average Sale Price $50,703 $146,518 19.3%$56,725 $126,208 14.3%$52,656 $142,488 18.0% Average Price/Sq.Ft. $51.81 $142.24 18.3%$55.86 $156.61 18.7%$53.20 $144.76 18.2% Single Family Number of Sales (4th Q)60 169 38 129 98 298 Average Sale Price $96,471 $209,011 13.8%$110,732 $270,309 16.0%$101,586 $235,458 15.0% Average Price/Sq.Ft. $63.74 $144.15 14.6%$78.14 $195.59 16.5%$69.04 $165.74 15.7% 33309 33334 Total Source/Notes: DataQuick; Lambert Advisory; CAGR represents Compound Annual Growth Rate. As illustrated in the table above, the most notable trends in the for-sale housing market in the Oakland Park area include: -Although sales activity represents one quarter of each year (1998 and 2004) sales activity increased nearly three-fold in the total area, from 98 sales to nearly 300 sales; -Of the total re-sale units in the area, roughly one-third of the mix is condominium and two-thirds single family; -Condominium resale price for the aggregate area increased an average 18 percent per year from 1998 to 2004, with average unit sale price increasing from $52,500 to $142,500, or $53 per square foot to $144 per square foot; -Single family home prices increased more than 15 percent per annum from 1998 to 2004, with average sale price increasing from $101,000 to $235,000, or $69 per square foot to $166 per square foot. -Specific to the single family housing market, home sales east of I-95 (identified as Zip Code 33334 and for which a large portion of the CRA exists) reported average home re-sales in 2004 of $270,000 compared to $210,000 for homes west of I-95. -Although Broward County has yet to publish official single-family home resale values for 2004, it is estimated that at that point in time, the average existing single family home sold for approximately $275,000. With an average sale single-family resale price in the $240,000 range, the Oakland Park area (including both Zip Codes) is slightly lower than that of the County. However, homes within the eastern quadrant of the City are more closely aligned with the County average. In terms of new housing development, there has been limited single family housing product introduced to central Broward County (east of US 441). To this extent, new City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 58 product is primarily condominium development, most of which is situated along the eastern fringes of the County (including downtown Fort Lauderdale and the beaches), with increasing development activity occurring west of I-95, including Plantation and Sunrise. While the City of Oakland Park has a number of residential developments planned, notably Oakland Park Station (314 townhome/condominium units) and The Pointe at Middle River (102 townhome/condominium units), they are mostly in the planning stages with approvals pending. Nonetheless, based upon an analysis of new condominium development within the surrounding market, the following provides a general profile of market characteristics: •Most new condominium development outside of downtown Fort Lauderdale is a mix of townhome and mid-rise (4 to 10 story) condominium generally accommodating 30 to 40 units per acre; •One bedroom units average 800+ square feet at an average price of $285,000+, or $330 per square foot; •Two bedroom units average 1,275+ square feet at an average price of $350,000+, or $300 per square foot; •Three bedroom units average 1,500+ square feet at an average price of $430,000+, or $290 per square foot; •Most projects provide common areas including clubhouse, fitness center, and/or business center. The properties west of I-95 are more expansive in terms of property amenities (such as lake views, walking paths), while the properties east of I-95 promote more of an urban life-style (with limited amenities); •Although some projects are still in the reservation (pre-planning) stage, it appears that most development in the “sales” stages are reporting an average sales absorption between 20 to 30 units per month; and, •Sales representatives indicate that the buyer profile for several developments is a mixed group, comprising retirees, second home buyers, young primary individuals and couples, and investors. It is estimated that more than 75 percent of these buyer segments is local (South Florida) demand, with the balance representing buyers from the northeast US, and marginal demand from South America. Accordingly, most projects indicate that in the range of 25 percent of buyers are investors, or purchasing for speculation with the goal to sell (or “flip”) their contract prior closing. However, with further conversations with developer contacts, and industry experts not affiliated with the developments interviewed herein, the investor market appears to be significantly larger than sales representatives are reporting. To this extent, there have been estimates made in public documents that indicate investors represent at least 50 percent and as much City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 59 as 75 percent of the current buyers. Although it is very difficult to verify due to the fact that the current wave of sales activity will not move to closing for another six to twenty four months, accounts of this investor volume cannot be ignored. Rental Market. The Broward County rental market comprises more than 130,000 apartment units, spread among more than 10 major sub-markets. Apartment development in Broward County has been strong during the past several years, with the addition of more than 1,500 units per year since the late 1990’s. With Broward County nearly 97 percent built out, apartment developers have been forced to focus on redevelopment areas. More than 58 percent of the 4,719 units delivered in 2004 and expected to be delivered in 2005 are in Fort Lauderdale and Coral Springs. As evidence of the development shift to infill areas, 40 percent of 2004 and 2005’s deliveries are mid- and high-rise communities versus only 13 percent for the previous 4 years. Accordingly, there are more than ten major projects (estimated to represent more than 2,500 units) recently completed, or in the construction/planning process within the County, the majority of which are situated in the northwest and southwest sectors of the County and Downtown Fort Lauderdale 5. Although there has been a steady flow of apartment development within the region, there has been a significant push in apartment conversions (to condominiums), which impact the market. Apartment communities in areas where there have been substantial conversion activity, such as Coral Springs, are benefiting from decreased competition. Coral Springs apartment communities are being positively affected by four recent condominium conversions, reducing the supply of apartments by 1,235 units. Broward County’s apartment performance should continue to improve in 2005 as the employment market expands and the supply is reduced through condominium conversions. Overall, occupancy remains very strong at approximately 96 percent. Of the apartment stock in major apartment projects, roughly 34 percent of the units are one bedroom, 52 percent are two bedroom and 14 percent are three-plus bedroom. The average rental rate among all unit types is approximately $925 per month. The Fort Lauderdale/Oakland Park rental apartment sub-market (defined by RPW, Inc.) comprises more than 7,900 apartment units. The Oakland Park sub-market has a reported occupancy greater than 96 percent and average rental rates in the mid-$900 per month range, which is consistent with most sub-markets in Broward County. Office Market Overview From a regional perspective, the Broward County office market is comprised of roughly 50 million square feet of space. The office development is scattered among more than ten sub-markets. 5 Southeast Real Estate Business – February 2005 City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 60 Figure 21-a: Broward County Office Market (by sub-market) Source: CoStar; Lambert Advisory During the past four years, there was approximately 5.5 million square feet of office space built in Broward County, or 1.2 million square feet per year. Although development slowed to less than 800,000 square feet in 2003, due in large part to the global economic downturn and 9/11, construction activity increased in 2004 to more than 850,000 square feet, and there was roughly 500,000 square feet under-construction in the County during the first quarter of 2005. Overall, the County is experiencing 87.9+ percent occupancy, which is an improvement over the decade low of 84 percent (2002). Accordingly, lease rates are averaging $22.20 per square foot, an increase of more than 4 percent per year from 2001. Pompano Beach Sub-Market 4.9M square feet FT. Lauderdale Sub-Market 6.2M square feet Downtown CBD Sub-Market 7.5M square feet Hollywood Sub-Market 4.4M square feet SW Broward Sub-Market 4.4M square feet Cypress Creek Sub-Market 6.8M square feet Sawgrass Sub-Market 2.6M square feet Plantation Sub-Market 6.8M square feet NW Broward Sub-Market 4.0M square feet City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 61 Figure 21-b: Broward County Office Market-Absorption Development Trend Source: CoStar; Lambert Advisory Figure 21-c: Broward County Office Market – Occupancy and Rate Trend (2001-2004) Source: CoStar; Lambert Advisory Oakland Park (and primarily the commercial district) is situated within the Fort Lauderdale office submarket and is comprised of a total 6.2 million square feet of office space. This submarket encompasses a large sector of the eastern portion of the County (as far south as Dania and as far north as Pompano Beach, but not including Downtown Fort Lauderdale). However, Oakland Park is bounded to the north by one of the County’s strongest office submarkets, which is Cypress Creek (6.8 million square feet). $20.40 $20.60 $20.80 $21.00 $21.20 $21.40 $21.60 $21.80 $22.00 $22.20 $22.40 2001 2002 2003 2004 83.5% 84.0% 84.5% 85.0% 85.5% 86.0% 86.5% 87.0% 87.5% 88.0% 88.5% Quoted Rate Occupancy 0 500,000 1,000,000 1,500,000 2,000,000 2,500,000 3,000,000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Net Absorb.Delivered City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 62 According to the Broward County Property Appraiser, Oakland Park comprises 275,000 square feet of office space; however, as reported by Black’s office guide, there are approximately 620,000 square feet of office space within roughly 17 buildings 6 - the majority of which are situated along Oakland Park Boulevard. The discrepancy is assumed to be partially attributed to the fact that certain buildings that are effectively leasing office space may be identified as industrial or other land use code. Nonetheless, there is in the range of 118,000 square feet of available office space, or a market vacancy of 19 percent. Accordingly, lease rates range from a low of $9.00 per square foot (gross) to a high of nearly $19.00 per square foot (gross). Notably, this level of rent does not support new development, which would generally be defined within the low- to mid- $20.00 per square foot range. Nearly 50 percent of the buildings in the Oakland Park office market are larger than 30,000 square feet; Oakland Commerce Center represents the largest office facility, totaling 155,000 square feet among 12 buildings built in 1983 and renovated in 2003. Although several buildings have undergone considerable renovation during the past several years, there has been no new office inventory built since 1989. Based upon current conditions within the Oakland Park office market, the level of rent does not support new development. Although there is no new office product available in the market to achieve premium rent levels, the market is well below the level to support new development (generally defined to be at least in the low- to mid- $20.00 per square foot range). This is not to say that there may not be an opportunity to integrate a limited amount of office within a broader mixed-use plan for which a small segment of demand will support this use. Retail Market Overview There is more than 33 million square feet of retail space in Broward County7. As land becomes increasingly scarce, redevelopment is on the rise and a trend towards vertical development is moving north from Dade County. In particular, the repositioning of older centers in prime locations has been the trend for the past few years and is expected to continue during the near term. Accordingly, these older centers are being replaced with newer development formats such as the “power strip centers,” typically having big-box anchors alongside a significant amount of other retail. Furthermore, there has been a strong movement toward mixed-use development, whereby many large-scale residential projects incorporate ground floor retail as a critical component of the overall plan, particularly in urban infill redevelopment areas. 6 Black’s Guide 2005 (on-line) 7 CB Richard Ellis – Broward County Retail MarketView City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 63 Figure 21-d: Broward County Retail Market – Lease Rate and Vacancy Trend – 2002 to 2004 Source: CB Richard Ellis; Lambert Advisory As a result of increasing redevelopment, the market continues to strengthen, with lease rates increasing more than 15 percent from 2002 to 2004, while vacancy declined from over 7.0 percent to nearly 5.5 percent during the period. As of late 2004/early 2005, there was nearly 1.2 million square feet of new retail space under construction in Broward County, most of which was located in the County’s southwest and northwest quadrants. According to the Broward County Property Appraiser, Oakland Park CRA comprises approximately 1.1 million square feet of retail. As defined by CB Richard Ellis, Oakland Park is situated within the Ea st Central submarket, which also includes primarily Fort Lauderdale, Wilton Manors and portions of Lauderdale Lakes. There are approximately 39 centers having a total of 3,500,000 square feet in the submarket, with an average rental rate of $16.26 per square foot. Harbor Shops, located on Cordova Road in Fort Lauderdale, represents the newest development in this submarket. It includes a 200,000 square foot Publix-anchored center near completion/lease-up. Inverrary Falls, located on West Oakland Park Boulevard, is a 90,000 square foot Publix-anchored development currently under construction, and is reportedly 94 percent occupied with lease rates in the low to mid $20.00 per square foot range. Victoria Park Shoppes, which is located on Federal Highway, is a 65,000 square foot strip center anchored by Winn Dixie completed in 2004. Perhaps the two most notable shopping centers in the immediate Oakland Park market area are the Northridge Shopping Center and Oakland Park Festival Center. Based upon information provided by National Research Bureau Shopping Center Database (2005), two facilities are noted: $12.50 $13.00 $13.50 $14.00 $14.50 $15.00 $15.50 $16.00 $16.50 $17.00 2002 2003 2004 0.0% 1.0% 2.0% 3.0% 4.0% 5.0% 6.0% 7.0% 8.0% Rate Vacancy City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 64 Northridge Shopping Center : Located at the intersection of Old Dixie Highway and Commercial Boulevard, the property is comprised of a total 235,000 square feet of space. The property was built in 1972 with recent renovations completed in 1999. The property is anchored by Publix, Bally Fitness, and Ross. Additional in-line stores and/or outparcels include Denny’s, Jo-Ann Fabrics, and Payless Shoes. The center is reportedly 93 percent occupied, with in-line lease rate generally ranging from $9.00 to $12.00 per square foot, net. Oakland Park Festival Center: The property, which comprises a total 132,000 square feet, was built in 1965 and renovated in 1994. Winn-Dixie anchors the center, with in-line space including Auto Zone. The property is reportedly 89 percent occupied, with lease rates ranging from $10 to 12 per square foot (net.) The center is located at 3500 North Andrews Avenue. Overall, the regional retail market is relatively stable. However, despite strong occupancy, the Oakland Park’s local competitive market is not to a large extent achieving lease rates in-line with the broader market. In an effort to identify opportunities that may help better understand the retail market affecting the Oakland Park CRA, it is necessary to analyze current and future retail demand by segmentation. This is accomplished through conventional forecast methodologies based upon the economic composition of the retail trade area, as well as feedback from the community. While we subscribe to the importance of utilizing this standardized retail demand analysis to quantify the opportunities, we feel that this method alone will not answer a critical question: how do we position the property to increase retail demand for existing businesses, as well as attract new complementary retail providers? This may be the strategy in the following phases of work to be competed as part of the Oakland Park CRA redevelopment plan. Industrial Market Overview Broward County is among the largest industrial markets in the US, with more than 85 million square feet of space 8 . Following several years of growth and absorption, the regional industrial market has been experiencing cycles during recent quarters. However, the Broward County industrial leasing market posted a decrease in overall vacancy by 20 basis points dipping to 7 percent by the close of first quarter 2005, representing the lowest vacancy level recorded in the past several years 9. Although strong growth numbers over the past 12 months have been responsible for the recent decline in vacancy, a few sub-markets within the county have been experiencing higher vacancy levels. For instance, in the Southwest Broward submarket, which has emerged as one of the most active markets during the past few years, warehouse/distribution product currently measures vacancy at 32.6 percent, and is 8 Fort Lauderdale Downtown Development Authority 9 Colliers International – Industrial 2004 Year End City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 65 responsible for driving overall vacancy up to 14.2 percent within that submarket. In contrast, two major submarkets, Pompano Beach and Southeast Broward, both have a vacancy of less than 4.0 percent. The County’s industrial market is driven by a broad range of tenant activity, as tenants whose aim is to be within close proximity to Port Everglades choose Southeast Broward, while other tenants seeking a mid-point between Miami-Dade and Palm Beach County have easy access to major highways in Pompano Beach. As large blocks of space are nearly non-existent, FedEx Ground recently announced plans for a 215,000 square foot facility in Pompano Beach that will employ more than 350 workers when it opens in 2006. As the market absorption experienced recent strengthening trends, rents reported a slight decrease of $0.11 per square foot per year to $7.59 per square foot per year. Nevertheless, the general outlook is bright for continued growth and measured expansion within a few remaining parcels of developable land. Particularly, R&D/flex product is expected to make gains, as the area is fast becoming a biotechnology hub. According to the Broward County Property Appraiser, the Oakland Park CRA has a total of more than 4 million square feet of industrial space; however, this is presumed to include public buildings (maintenance), utility buildings and/or single tenant building, as well as some quasi-industrial space that may be used as office, other use. In terms of the multi-tenant industrial market, Black’s Guide indicates the Oakland Park industrial market comprises approximately 400,000 square feet of industrial space, most of which is warehouse space as opposed to a limited amount of flex space. The market is approximately 86 percent occupied, with lease rates generally ranging in the range of $7.50 to $8.50 per square foot (gross), and roughly $10.00 per square foot for flex build- out. Notably, there has been no new development activity in several years, as the majority of existing inventory was built more than 20 years ago. In all, the redevelopment of Oakland Park’s CRA will not be supported by large-scale industrial development. As a matter of fact, there has been consideration to allow for the conversion of land use from industrial to residential or mixed-use with commercial, which would most likely have a positive impact on the redevelopment process. However, for certain areas of the district (and surrounding community), the opportunity to provide limited supporting use through warehouse and flex space may be considered. With strong industrial development activity in surrounding municipalities such as Pompano Beach and Deerfield Beach, Oakland Park may serve to provide newer, functional industrial type-space (including flex) to certain tenants being priced out of these more established markets. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 66 Figure 21-e: Broward County Industrial Market Lease Rate, Development and Absorption Trend – 2002 to 2004 Source: Colliers International; Lambert Advisory 0 500,000 1,000,000 1,500,000 2,000,000 2,500,000 3,000,000 2001 2002 2003 2004 0.0% 1.0% 2.0% 3.0% 4.0% 5.0% 6.0% 7.0% 8.0% 9.0% 10.0% Absorption New Construction Vacancy City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 67 III. PROPOSED REDEVELOPMENT PLAN The City of Oakland Park is dedicated to creating a “small town with big city opportunities.” This Community Redevelopment Plan establishes the existing conditions, reiterates conditions of slum and blight, and sets the stage for transformation of the Community Redevelopment Area. Projects and programs that will increase community appearance and vitality, create a local destination, strengthen neighborhoods and promote economic activity are outlined in detail in this Chapter. The Redevelopment Concept Plan presented in the Executive Summary combines a number of strategies for the CRA. The strategies can be separated into the following categories: A. Goals and Objectives B. Capital Improvement Program C. Public Private Partnerships D. Programs and Policies E. Community Redevelopment Agency Administration A. GOALS AND OBJECTIVES By definition, the Plan, its goals and objectives and the catalytic projects and programs will promote further investment and momentum toward achieving the City’s vision. The City of Oakland Park’s vision is as follows: By 2008, Oakland Park will be recognized as a friendly "small town" with safe and attractive neighborhoods, quality schools, outstanding parks and exceptional recreation programs, with the social, cultural and business opportunities of a big city. Likewise, the Community Redevelopment Plan reflects Broward County’s goals and principles for redevelopment: 1- Sustainable transportation choices 2- Civic beauty 3- Accommodation for a diverse population 4-Economic vitality and sustainability 5- Sense of place The goals and objectives are aimed at developing a sound Community Redevelopment Plan with a focus on catalytic investment and/or projects for the Community Redevelopment Area. The goals and objectives summarize five main aspirations of the Community Redevelopment Agency. Redevelopment of Downtown Connections to Downtown Strengthen neighborhoods City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 68 Increase green space Increase attainable housing options. The Goals and Objectives of the Community Redevelopment Area in detail are as follows: Goal 1 – Promote Community Involvement and Citizen Participation Objectives: • Maintain and enhance community website and newsletters • Well advertised public meetings and workshops • Encourage home owner associations, non-for-profit and economic agency participation Goal 2 - Build a positive community image and identity Objectives: • Increase regional public awareness and identity through public relations and advertising • Eliminate land use incompatibilities where feasible • Improve visual quality of public roadway corridors and streets • Develop perimeter gateway improvements • Improve building facades • Develop “Clean-up Fix-up” program through consistent code enforcement • Enhance and maintain existing parks and build new parks and open spaces for public recreation and community wellness in existing neighborhoods • Create opportunities for cultural activities and advanced educational facilities • Provide opportunities for public art • Promote sound urban design principles and smart growth concepts Goal 3 – Create a Community Redevelopment Plan consistent with City’s Comprehensive Plan and long-term vision. Objectives: • Incorporate recommendations from the Community Redevelopment Plan into City’s Comprehensive Plan • Replicate successful Community Redevelopment Plans and Programs to other areas in the City Goal 4 – Establish improved quality and safety of housing, neighborhoods, and districts. Objectives: • Encourage a diversity of housing types (products) structured around parks and open spaces where feasible City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 69 • Enhance and maintain existing parks and build new parks and open spaces for public recreation and community wellness in existing neighborhoods • Provide for safe and convenient access to community amenities (parks, downtown, public facilities, schools, etc.) • Initiate improved streetscape lighting program • Encourage innovative community policing programs • Promote consistent code enforcement • Address excessive train noise along the FEC Corridor Goal 5 – Build upon the planned Park Place downtown destination by concentrating higher intensity and density with mixed-use development that provides for social, cultural and economic opportunities. Objectives: • Provide for downtown parking • Provide for an effective and safe connection to both sides of Dixie Highway through a architecturally significant statement • Consistently and rigorously administer the Downtown Mixed Use District Ordinance and Design Guidelines adopted by the City. • Provide for announcement of downtown through signage, hardscape, architectural statement and landscape improvements • Prioritize improvement project(s) or demonstration project in the Downtown • Provide for pedestrian connectivity to the Downtown Goal 6 - Improve mobility, parking, circulation, and safety and plan for multi- modal transportation and transit Objectives: • Create open space connections through community redevelopment area • Initiate a sidewalk program throughout the redevelopment area, including Safe Routes to schools • Enhance and improve bike mobility • Provide access to waterways • Provide and enhance bus transit stops • Plan for downtown transit station along the FEC • Address mobility issues through traffic calming and access management • Provide for structured parking in the Downtown • Improve pedestrian and vehicular safety through intersection improvements • Improve and enhance connectivity of existing local transportation system Goal 7 - Create plan and incentives for positive land use changes that contribute to a higher quality of life for the community. Objectives: • Eliminate land use incompatibilities • Investigate inclusionary requirement for attainable housing City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 70 • Improve neighborhood compatibility and buffering from industrial and commercial activities • Encourage compatible in-fill residential development • Improve enforcement and policing of hazardous and toxic materials in industrial areas Goal 8 - Encourage local and regional economic growth by leveraging capital sources for funding. Objectives: • Promote inter-jurisdictional partnerships and leverage private funding resources and/or investment • Promote public/private partnerships for redevelopment projects • Broaden tax base • Educate city staff to evaluate Community Redevelopment Area projects and opportunities • Provide incentives and encourage entrepreneurship for small business • Support and expand and improve existing businesses • Investigate Business Improvement District (BID) to promote economic development • Improve technology to promote economic development Goal 9 - Improve and enhance existing infrastructure. Objectives: • Improve storm drainage capacity and conveyance • Improve level of service for water and sewer • Initiate improved streetscape lighting program • Recognize fiber optics, wireless internet and communications as a vital City feature Goal 10 - Create opportunities for Attainable Housing Objectives: • Encourage diversity of housing options (products) • Investigate inclusionary requirements and density bonuses for attainable housing • Provide relief for all existing residents potentially impacted by Community Redevelopment Area activities • Initiate housing rehabilitation program • Investigate opportunities to assist senior resident housing • Encourage compatible in-fill residential • Consider a tax credit for existing attainable rental projects Goal 11 – Encourage development and redevelopment that fosters environmental sustainability through creative and practical solutions City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 71 Objectives: • Provide incentives to development and redevelopment utilizing recognized principles of “Green Building” • Establish programs and educational outreach to promote reduction in resource consumption • Enhance and improve existing recycling program • Improve water quality through infrastructure improvements City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 72 B. CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS Current City Commitment to Capital Improvements in the CRA As previously noted, the Community Redevelopment Area including the Downtown Mixed Use District needs significant capital improvements to catalyze and support redevelopment. The City is already committed to a number of infrastructure improvements including streetscaping and beautification, stormwater, park, and pedestrian crossings. The following is a list of capital improvements that the City has recently completed, has in process, or has committed funding for: Powerline Road Beautification Median beautification of Powerline Road including installation of trees and other landscaping material between Oakland Park Boulevard and Prospect Road will improve the aesthetics in that area. Committed funding- $100,000. NE 6th Avenue Trunkline Average rain events force the closing of this county collector roadway thus damaging nearby residents and businesses. The City was awarded a FEMA pre-disaster mitigation grant for $2,433,750 for this project. The project is located on the NE 6th Avenue corridor from just north of Prospect Road at NE 47th Street south to Oakland Park Boulevard. Committed funding- $4,000,000. Downtown Park Development This 3.48 acre site is located on Dixie Highway immediately north of NE 38th Street and west of the Florida East Coast Railroad. The development of this site would allow for greater pedestrian access to open space in the Downtown. Committed funding- $1,200,000. Kimberly Lake Drainage Identified in 2002 as the #1 problem stormwater area, moderate storms create undesirable flood levels, while severe storms create FEMA documented floods. The City was awarded FEMA pre-disaster mitigation grant for $2,625,075 for this project. This project is located on the eastern boundary of the CRA bordered by NE 38th Street on the south, Floranada Boulevard on the north, the FEC Railway to the west and NE 16th Avenue to the east. Committed funding- $4,500,000. NE 12th Avenue Reconstruction This project includes design and construction of improved drainage and beautification of the downtown area. The completed project will incorporate decorative lighting, City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 73 landscape enhancements, sidewalks, and several plazas to encourage the revitalization of the downtown area. Committed funding- $3.4 million. FEC ROW Beautification Beautification of the Florida East Coast Railroad right-of-way includes landscaping enhancements, decorative fencing, and lighting. This project improves the aesthetics while increasing pedestrian safety along the FEC corridor. Committed funding- $850,000. Downtown Waterline Improvements Public improvements in the downtown area to replace and upgrade waterlines to address deficiencies and increase capacity in anticipation of redevelopment and accommodate increased activity in the downtown area are planned. Committed funding- $1,800,000. Central Prospect Business District Drainage Project This drainage project is designed to relieve flooding along NE 5th Terrace from NE 43rd Street to NE 46th Street and NE 8th Avenue to NE 46th Street. The project consists of replacement of the existing drainage system with new and larger drainage pipes and exfiltration trenches. Pavement, swale, and sidewalk restoration is also included. Committed funding- $646,000. Dixie Highway Slip Ramp / NE 38th Street Realignment The slip ramp off Dixie Highway to NE 38th Street has become the FLC Dixie Highway Project; it will relieve congestion on Dixie at NE 38th Street and preserve neighborhoods by eliminating a left turn lane onto NE 38th Street from southbound Dixie Highway. Committed funding- $1,200,000. Carter G. Woodson Park Acquisition This is a small (0.85 acres) irregularly shaped park in an older neighborhood, which does not allow space for organized sports. It was awarded a $200,000 Florida Recreation Development Assistance Program Grant. Committed funding- $400,000. Prospect Road and NE 6th Terrace Drainage Identified in 2002 as a priority project, this project includes the construction of improved drainage infrastructure to alleviate flooding problems in the Prospect Road and NE 6th Terrace area. Committed funding- $733,000. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 74 Dixie Highway Enhancement The project consists of the construction of sidewalks on the east side of Dixie Highway, south of Oakland Park Boulevard. It includes landscaping enhancements, and decorative street lighting. Committed funding- $115,000. Pedestrian Crossing Arms The installation of pedestrian crossing arms along the FEC Corridor between Dixie Highway and NE 12th Avenue between NE 32nd Street and NE 38th Street will increase pedestrian safety in the downtown area. Committed funding- $334,000. The following table outlines the City’s capital improvement projects in the CRA by funding source. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 Community Redevelopment Plan 75 Table 5b: CRA Associated Capital Improvement Projects Funding Sources PROJECT STATUS EST COST CITY COUNTY FDOT FEMA EPA CDBG FRDAP Powerline Road Beautification - OP Blvd - Commercial Blvd - Landscape medians Awaiting Grant Award. Design 100% Complete. 100,000 50,000 50,000 NE 6th Avenue Trunkline - Waterline replacement - NE 38th to OP Blvd Design/Permitting Stage. FDOT permit required before FEMA contract execution. 3,800,000 1,100,000 300,000 2,400,000 Downtown Park - North of NE 38th St & Dixie Hwy - Acquisition and development Conceptual Stage. 4,000,000 2,000,000 2,000,000 Kimberly Lake Drainage & waterline replacement - 71 acre basin - drainage project NE 13th Ave to C-13 Canal Bid document preparation stage. Expect to go out to bid in 12/05. 5,200,000 2,215,000 2,600,000 385,000 NE 12th Ave Reconstruction - NE 38th St to OP Blvd - Drainage, lighting, sidewalks, streetscape Design 95% complete. Bid documents prepared. 4,000,000 4,000,000 FEC ROW beautification - OP Blvd to NE 38th St - Fencing, landscaping Completed in 06/04. 850,000 295,000 555,000 Downtown Waterline Improvements - Waterline upgrade in downtown district Construction closeout. As builts being reviewed for certification. 1,800,000 1,500,000 300,000 Central Prospect Business Drainage Project - NE 5th Terrace - NE 8th Ave - Drainage Construction 100% complete. Change order for additional work being processed.) 646,000 368,000 278,000 Dixie Hwy Slip Ramp / NE 38th St realignment Conceptual stage. 1,000,000 500,000 500,000 Carter Woodson Park Acquisition - Expansion of Park Conceptual stage. 400,000 200,000 200,000 Prospect Rd & 6th Terrace (NE 45th St from Dixie Hwy to Prospect) - Drainage Design at 30%. 650,000 360,000 290,000 Dixie Hwy Enhancement (OP Blvd - South to City Limits) - Landscaping, fencing Design at 60%. 115,000 115,000 Pedestrian Crossing Arms - NE 34 CT to NE 38th St Construction at 50%. Work is being done by the FEC and costs are billed to the City. 334,000 50,000 284,000 TOTAL $22,895,000 $12,638,000 $2,300,000 $949,000 $5,000,000 $385,000 $1,423,000 $200,000 City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 76 Proposed Capital Improvement Projects In order to attract redevelopment and assure appropriate infrastructure, a number of additional Capital Improvement Projects are needed in the Community Redevelopment Area. Particular attention has been paid to improvements that will support the redevelopment of the Downtown area while supporting, enhancing, and beautifying other areas of the CRA. These Capital Improvement Projects have been developed to meet three main objectives: traffic, drainage and place-making. TRAFFIC A number of the recommendations in the Post Buckley Traffic Study (2004) are intended to be implemented in the CRA Plan. The major difference will occur at Dixie and NE 38th Street. The City constructed a new section of NE 38th Street from Federal Highway to NE 13th Avenue. The developed cross-section was designed to slow traffic and deter “cut through” traffic. Based on the Post Buckley report, two southbound left-turn lanes were to be constructed on Dixie Highway at NE 38th Street which would encourage high volumes of thru traffic. As a compromise alternative, we have recommended no southbound left-turn lanes on Dixie Highway at NE 38th Street; however, we have introduced a slip ramp off of Dixie onto 38th West of Dixie Highway. The traffic going east can then make a left turn and cross the intersection of NE 38th Street and Dixie Highway from the west leg of the intersection. While not optimizing the traffic flow as the Post Buckley report had suggested, the conflicting movement of the southbound thru left-turn lane is removed and the performance of the intersection will be improved. The level of service change could be determined in a future study. In addition, since the Post Buckley report was finalized, a new traffic pattern was developed for the DMUD. The main change is the one-way couplet on NE 12th Avenue and NE 12th Terrace. This will not have a major impact on Dixie Highway. The improvements proposed at NE 34th Street and Dixie Highway will be implemented with the possible exception of the three westbound lanes on NE 34th Court. The intersection of Oakland Park Boulevard and Dixie Highway is intended to be constructed as indicated in the Post Buckley report, by the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT). This is the most critical intersection with the worst level of service. In conclusion, it is recommended that a new study be performed to reflect developments since the original traffic report. DRAINAGE The City is currently preparing to construct two major drainage improvement projects within the CRA. These are the Kimberly Lake Drainage improvement project and the NE 6th Avenue trunk line. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 77 The Kimberly Lake project will address a major drainage problem in the far eastern section of the CRA. The NE 6th Avenue trunk line will tie together the existing piping in the western central CRA area and provide a positive outfall to the C -13 canal. The major remaining area for drainage improvement is the DMUD while drainage improvements are currently being designed for NE 12th Avenue. The remainder of Downtown will require more detailed study, and further improvements will need to be implemented. PLACE-MAKING The City of Oakland Park is planning for a series of improvements, as part of this redevelopment plan, that will not only resolve a number of infrastructure issues, but will also contribute to an enhanced quality of life in Oakland Park, and Broward County as a whole. The CRA Plan calls for a number of improvements to corridors, schools, parks and open spaces, gateways and neighborhoods that are aimed at improving the livability of residents and the success of businesses. Simply, the plan recommends five main points; strengthening the downtown; strengthening and revitalizing neighborhoods; providing strong pedestrian connections to the downtown; increasing parks and green space; and increasing attainable housing options within the CRA. These five points contribute to place-making within the downtown district and surrounding neighborhoods in the CRA. The impact of place-making will reach beyond the borders of the CRA and will have a positive impact on all the residents of Oakland Park and nearby cities. These projects are vital steps in transforming Oakland Park into the City’s vision, as well as meeting the goals and objectives outlined in this plan. These projects are graphically depicted in Figure A, Redevelopment Concept Plan. The following list provides descriptions of proposed capital improvement projects related to the Redevelopment Concept Plan and approximate constructions costs. 1. Downtown Infrastructure Improvements There are several vital downtown infrastructure improvements that are necessary to the future growth of the downtown area. They are geared at resolving traffic, drainage, noise and utility improvements. These infrastructure improvements will set the foundation for upcoming public and private investment in the downtown district (DMUD). The below projects estimated have an estimated construction cost of $12,425,000. The breakdown of these costs is described below. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 78 a. Reconstruction of the intersection of Oakland Park Boulevard and Dixie Highway The State is currently funding the design and reconstruction of the intersection of Oakland Park Boulevard and Dixie Highway. However, the state will not fund any right-of-way acquisition, and therefore, the City must plan for a cost for additional right-of-way acquisition as necessary. Estimated construction cost - $1,000,000. b. Reconstruction of the intersection of NE 34th Court and Dixie Highway There are no designated left only turn lanes going north or south on Dixie Highway. As is the case at NE 38th Street, this creates a great deal of conflict with thru lane traffic and greatly reduces capacity. We will seek to add left turn only lanes on the north, south, and west legs of the intersection. This will require some additional right-of-way not currently owned by the city. Miscellaneous drainage and other utility relocation and adjustment will also be necessary. Estimated construction cost - $1,500,000. c. NE 12th Terrace Extension As part of the Downtown Mixed Use District (DMUD), an extension of NE 12th Terrace is a necessary for the redevelopment of the Park Place sub-area. This north street extension will improve vehicular and pedestrian circulation in the Downtown. Estimated construction cost: $1,750,000 (Includes estimated street ROW acquisition). d. Miscellaneous DMUD drainage improvements There are numerous areas within the DMUD that are isolated, low areas and have no means of draining other than eventual seepage into underlying soils. Therefore it will be necessary to construct infiltration trenches, drainage wells, and positive outfall connections wherever possible in those areas. Estimated construction cost - $1,000,000. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 79 e. NE 12th Avenue lift station upgrade/replacement The existing station should be monitored closely. It is anticipated that as the DMUD develops, a larger, more efficient station will be necessary. Estimated construction cost - $175,000. 2. NE 34th Court Improvements NE 34th Court is the central east-west road in the DMUD. Improvements of NE 34th Court will extend from NE 13th Avenue to the east, to Andrews Avenue to the west (dependent on the Oakland Festival Center land use change and redevelopment.) If the Oakland Festival Center parcel does not redevelop, then improvements to NE 34th Court will extend to NE 2nd Avenue to the west. Improvements to this corridor will also act as the linkage to the central section of the CRA. As NE 34th Court will become a high profile road, it is our intent to create a prominent boulevard along this roadway. This will include more hardscape and landscape than on a typical local road in order to create a high quality and aesthetically pleasing streetscape. There is an opportunity, as part of the streetscape improvements of the CRA, to relocate the existing utilities underground. Other items to be constructed will be sidewalks, bike lanes and drainage improvements. Estimated construction cost - $6,400,000. 3. Downtown Park Gateway Oakland Park’s Downtown Mixed Use District (DMUD) is in need of a gateway into downtown and a central green space. The northern area of the Downtown Mixed Use District (north of NE 38th Street and Dixie Highway) is a prime lo cation for such use, as the City owns approximately 3 acres of green space. This park and gateway will help beautify the once industrial area and add a recreational and aesthetic value to the downtown. The City owns two parcels of land, on the east and west sides of Dixie Highway, north of NE 38th Street, that serve as an ideal location for a Downtown park gateway. Its location makes it a visible element when traveling north or south along Dixie Highway. The Downtown Park Gateway will require demolition of existing asphalt, rehabilitation of an existing building to be used for community gatherings, high quality hardscape, landscape, signage and environmental graphics. Architectural gateway, lighting improvements, upgrade of utilities City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 80 and site furnishings to create space and identity for the park and gateway to downtown are included. The estimated construction cost supplements the investment already allocated by the City of Oakland Park. Estimated construction cost - $3,238,000. . 4. Carter G. Woodson Park Improvements and Expansion The Harlem McBride Neighborhood is presently surrounded by a number of industrial parcels. Carter G. Woodson Park is located within the center of the neighborhood, but is in need of improvements that would help enhance the surrounding neighborhood, as well as the quality of the park. Needed improvements consist of expansion of existing facilities, new play equipment, landscape improvements, and upgrading utilities and sidewalks. The City has allocated $400,000 toward acquisition. Those funds are not included in the estimated construction cost, but will supplement the City’s investment. Estimated construction costs - $590,000. (Construction estimate does not include potential parcel acquisitions). 5. Commercial Boulevard and Dixie Highway Gateway At the intersection of Commercial Boulevard and Dixie Highway, there is an opportunity to announce arrival into Oakland Park and the CRA. This can be accomplished by implementing a gateway statement at or near the intersection. The proposed gateway may include new bus stations to improve the mass transit experience, intersection improvements that will include special paving and median improvements along Dixie Highway leading up to the intersections, signage, landscaping that add to the identity of the gateway. Shade, lighting, signal improvements, and site furnishings that will also improve and announce the area. Estimated construction costs - $957,000. 6. South Dixie Highway Gateway At the southern entrance into the CRA, there is another opportunity to announce arrival into Oakland Park and the Downtown through gateway improvements. The proposed gateway would be located at the Middle River bridge and approaches located south of Oakland Park Boulevard. Proposed improvements would include improvements to the bridge, lighting, landscape, hardscape, signage, site furnishings, and utility upgrades. Estimated construction costs - $1,453,000. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 81 7. Buffer Prospect Gardens Neighborhood from I-95 The I-95 corridor is located adjacent to the Prospect Gardens neighborhood and is an eyesore, as well as a source of noise pollution for the residents. There is an opportunity to screen and buffer the neighborhood from the highway with a combination of a sound wall and landscaping. The landscaping would soften the appearance of the sound wall, while adding aesthetic value to the residential area. Estimated construction costs - $2,650,000. 8. Traffic Improvements to Kimberly Lake Neighborhood The Kimberly Lake neighborhood currently experiences unsafe speeding within the core of the neighborhood, which creates a great deal of conflict in the neighborhood. These conflicts can be reduced through the implementation of traffic calming measures and streetscape improvements. These improvements include landscape, roadway improvements such as curb and gutter, sidewalks, lighting, and where necessary, utility improvements. Estimated construction costs - $100,000. 9. Oakland Park Elementary School Pedestrian Improvements The Oakland Park Elementary School is located west of the Downtown Mixed Use District (DMUD) and is an asset for the neighborhood. The school is in need of a series of upgrades that will not only improve the visual quality of the school, but also improve the pedestrian environment of walking to, from and within the property. Improvements include hardscape, landscape, lighting and site furnishings that will enhance the school environment. The Community Redevelopment Agency will coordinate these improvements with the Broward County School Board. Estimated construction costs - $665,000. 10. Lloyd Estates Elementary School Pedestrian Improvements The Lloyd Estate Elementary School is located within the Prospect Gardens neighborhood and is an asset for the neighborhood. The school is in need of a series of upgrades that will not only improve the visual quality of the school, but also improve the pedestrian environment of walking to, from and within the property. Improvements include hardscape, landscape, lighting and site furnishings that will enhance the school environment. The Community Redevelopment Agency will coordinate these improvements with the Broward County School Board. Estimated construction costs - $769,000. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 82 11. Floranada Industrial District Improvements North of the Downtown Mixed-Use District (DMUD) is an industrial area that is composed of a number of commercial and light industrial business that are divided from the downtown district and Dixie Highway frontage. The intent of the capital improvements to the Floranada Industrial Area is to assist in the physical creation of a district. Improvements to this area would include primarily perimeter treatments and streetscape improvements including street trees, lighting, site furniture, signage and roadway and utility improvements. All improvements would be in an effort to market the district as a Design District within the community. Estimated construction costs - $1,484,000. 12. Improvements to Prospect Road Prospect Road is in need of improvements to the corridor. The corridor connects many residential neighborhoods and businesses to the Downtown area and other areas of the City. Improvements to the corridor include hardscape, crosswalk improvements, landscape, lighting and site furnishings. Estimated construction costs - $4,024,000. 13. Improvements to Andrews Avenue Andrews Avenue is in need of improvements to the corridor. The corridor connects many residential neighborhoods and businesses to the Downtown area and other areas of the City. Improvements to the corridor include hardscape, crosswalk improvements, landscape, lighting and site furnishings. Estimated construction costs - $4,408,000. 14. Improvements to NE 38th Street NE 38th Street is in need of improvements to the corridor. The corridor connects many residential neighborhoods and businesses to the Downtown area and other areas of the City. There is an opportunity, as part of the streetscape improvements of the CRA, to relocate the existing utilities underground. This would greatly enhance the visual quality of the corridor and the image of the neighborhood. Improvements to the corridor include hardscape, crosswalk improvements, landscape, lighting and site furnishings. Estimated construction costs - $5,539,000. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 83 15. Improvements to NW/NE 41st Street NW/NE 41st Street is in need of improvements to the corridor. The corridor connects many residential neighborhoods and businesses to the Downtown area and other areas of the City. Improvements to the corridor include hardscape, crosswalk improvements, landscape, lighting and site furnishings. Estimated construction costs - $2,459,000. 16. Improvements to NE 6th Avenue NE 6th Avenue is in need of improvements to the corridor. The corridor connects many residential neighborhoods and businesses to the Downtown area and other areas of the City along the north south corridor. Improvements to the corridor include hardscape, crosswalk improvements, landscape, lighting and site furnishings. Estimated construction costs - $4,192,000. 17. Improvements to NE 5th Avenue NE 5th Avenue is in need of improvements to the corridor. The corridor connects many residential neighborhoods and businesses to the Downtown area and other areas of the City. Improvements to the corridor include hardscape, crosswalk improvements, landscape, lighting and site furnishings. Estimated construction costs - $3,414,000. 18. Improvements to NE 8th Avenue NE 8th Avenue is in need of improvements to the corridor. The corridor connects many residential neighborhoods and businesses to the Downtown area and other areas of the City. Improvements to the corridor include hardscape, crosswalk improvements, landscape, lighting and site furnishings. Estimated construction costs - $1,775,000. 19. Wimberly Athletic Complex Parking Improvements and Expansion of Collins Community Center The Wimberly Athletic Complex and the Collins Community Center are located in the heart of the Community Redevelopment Area. It is an active recreation complex used by citizens for tennis, baseball, softball, roller hockey, basketball, community gatherings and passive recreational spaces. Currently, the area is short on on-site parking. Street parking is difficult City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 84 because the area is surrounded by many light industrial and commercial businesses that have back-out parking on the majority of the streets. On-site parking would enhance this community resource and improve accessibility to the residents of the City. There is also a need for a Parks Needs Assessment and Master Plan created for the City to determine future Capital Improvement Projects for parks and recreation centered around the Wimberly Athletic Complex. This study should also take into account the future growth of the City, as redevelopment occurs. In addition, the Collins Community Center should be enhanced and enlarged so that it can host more community-based activities. Estimated construction costs - $6,659,000. 20. Prospect Road and I-95 Gateway As part of the overall gateway improvements, the intersection of Prospect and I-95 presents another opportunity to better announce arrival into the CRA. The area is currently composed of a number of dilapidated properties that do not properly announce the area. There is an opportunity to implement a gateway feature that will enhance the aesthetic quality of the area. Gateway improvements may include removal of asphalt, special paving, signage, signal improvements, landscape improvements and bus shelters. Estimated construction costs - $843,000. 21. Improvements to Guisti Park Guisti Park is a very popular fitness course located in the heart of the City. The course serves hundreds of Oakland Park and Broward County residents that can be found throughout the day running, walking and recreating on the mile long path. The fitness course experienced some damage following the hurricane of 2004 and is in need of upgrades that would improve the functionality of the park and the overall aesthetics of the recreation center. Proposed improvements include a new crushed lime rock pathway, new exercise stations located along the path, and upgrades to the landscaping lighting and site furnishings. This includes a revitalization of the entire park area in addition to recent City improvements. Estimated construction costs - $443,000. (Construction estimate does not include potential parcel acquisition to secure the park’s future and protect it from potential Florida Power & Light (FP&L) expansion of the substation immediately adjacent to the park). City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 85 22. Expansion of Public Boat Ramp along the Middle River The City currently has an existing public boat dock that is in need of expansion (south of the Downtown Mixed Use District (DMUD) on NE 12th Terrace.) Local residents use this boat dock as an access point to the Middle River, as well as a small pocket park. Consistent with the Treasure Coast Design Charrette 1999 report, this is an opportunity to expand public access to the waterfront. Proposed improvements would include an addition of a small shelter, landscape improvements, upgrade of utilities as well as seawall improvements, boat ramp improvements, lighting, utilities upgrade, signage and site furniture. Estimated construction costs - $559,000. 23. Reconstruction of NE 13th Avenue from NE 38th Street to NE 32nd Street There is an active watermain replacement project along NE 13th Avenue and the planned Kimberly Lake trunk line along the length of this road segment. At the close of these projects, the roadway will be a patchwork of asphalt. Therefore, it benefits redevelopment of the DMUD to reconstruct the entire roadway. This would include exfiltration trench and possibly two to three drainage wells. Estimated construction cost - $3,000,000. 24. Train Whistle Quieting In order for limitations to be placed on the blowing of the train whistle during nighttime hours, a number of modifications must be made to the rail crossings. Modifications include the following: installation of an advanced detector system prior to the crossing; gates on both sides of each lane to prevent cars from bypassing the gate; a barrier median at the approach to the tracks; and overhead flashing trusses at each crossing. Four crossing would be improved. Estimated construction cost- $4,000,000. 25. Major Intersection Improvements There are a variety of major intersections within the CRA that are in need of improvement. There is an opportunity, while upgrading the functionality of the intersections, to implement aesthetic improvements to enhance the visual quality of the corridors. These improvements would include traffic signal improvements, special paving, utility upgrades, crosswalks and landscape where allowable. The major intersections include: Prospect Road and Andrews Avenue Prospect Road and Dixie Highway City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 86 Oakland Park Boulevard and Andrews Oakland Park Boulevard and NE 6th Avenue NE 38th Street and Andrews Avenue Dixie Highway and Floranada Boulevard Andrews Avenue and NE/NW 41st Street These improvements are depicted within the corridor improvements in Figure A: Redevelopment Concept Plan. Estimated construction costs - $6,562,500. 26. Minor Intersection Improvements There are a variety of minor intersections within the CRA that are in need of improvement. There is an opportunity, while upgrading the functionality of the intersections, to implement aesthetic improvements to enhance the visual quality of the neighborhoods. These improvements would include traffic signal improvements, special paving, utility upgrades, crosswalks and landscape where allowable. The minor intersections include: NE 6th Avenue and NE 38th Street NE 38th Street and NE 8th Avenue NE 34th Court and NE 8th Avenue NE 41st Street and NE 5th Avenue NW 41st Street and NW 5th Avenue These improvements are depicted within the corridor improvements in Figure A: Redevelopment Concept Plan. Estimated construction costs - $2,187,500. Total estimated cost of Capital Improvement Projects: $73,796,000. C. PUBLIC/PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS Four public/private partnerships are proposed as part of this Plan. For the following projects, the budgeted “gap” funding will be analyzed and reviewed on a project-by- project basis prior to determine the actual amount of the gap to be proposed for funding. Gap funding commitments will be at the discretion of the Board of Directors of the Community Redevelopment Agency. I. Park Place Development. Park Place is the focal point of the Downtown Mixed Use District. In order for Park Place to develop as outlined in the DMUD regulations and design guidelines, properties need to be aggregated to develop viable mixed-use buildings with plazas. Land acquisition to ensure the appropriate amount of developable space may be needed to encourage Park Place development. Further acquisition would be necessary to extend NE 12th Terrace to NE 36th Street. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 87 A pedestrian bridge crossing the FEC Corridor will ensure that pedestrians will be able to take advantage of both sides of Park Place and cross the FEC and traffic lanes safely. The pedestrian bridge would also augment a potential rail station here. The pedestrian bridge should be constructed with unique and eye-catching architecture to make it Park Place’s landmark. New structured parking facilities on both sides of Dixie Highway are essential for the successful development of the Downtown Mixed Use District, not only for future residents and visitors, but also for a future passenger rail station. Public art would be placed in plazas as required by the Downtown Mixed Use District Design Guidelines. Other improvements in Park Placed include creating a one-way pair using NE 12th Avenue and the extended NE 12th Terrace to improve traffic circulation. The Community Redevelopment Agency would provide some funding to a qualified developer to cover the needed amenities for Park Place. Estimated cost- $6,000,000 for “gap” funding. II. Dixie Mixed Use (East) Development. Existing and future businesses need parking to attract customers in Downtown Oakland Park. A public parking facility in this area east of Dixie Highway and south the NE 38th Street would provide needed parking in this area. The CRA might acquire land for parking. Through a public/private joint venture, a developer would construct the parking as a public amenity under the DMUD regulations. The Community Redevelopment Agency would provide some funding to a qualified developer to cover the parking facility in Dixie Mixed Use (East). Estimated cost- $3,000,000 for “gap” funding. III. Dixie Mixed Use (West) Development. A Request for Proposals should be issued to find an appropriate developer that can create an exciting mixed-use demonstration development including retail shops and public art displays. The Community Redevelopment Agency would provide seed money for this important project. The City owns the triangle-shaped lot north of NE 38th Street west of Dixie Highway within this DMUD sub-area, which may accommodate green space, parking, or traffic improvements. Estimated cost- $1,000,000 for “gap” funding. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 88 IV. Watts Estate Housing Development. This land owned by the Broward County Housing Authority is expected to provide 20 single-family residences for low-income families. Two roadway segments are needed to connect this site to NE 38th Street (an extension of NE 2nd Avenue and a one way road from the northeast corner of the site.) The new homes will enhance the existing Harlem McBride neighborhood. Non-profit housing development firms or developers wishing to fulfill attainable housing requirements suggested in this Plan could develop these residences. Estimated cost- $1,620,000 for land purchase from Broward County, site infrastructure, and administration. Total estimated cost for Public/Private Partnerships- $11,620,000 D. POLICIES AND PROGRAMS Land Use Changes in the CRA The Downtown Mixed Use District has already undergone regulatory changes in order to catalyze redevelopment (the Local Activity Center land use designation and Downtown Mixed Use District regulations). A number of other regulatory changes in land use and zoning will be necessary to increase neighborhood compatibility, economic development, throughout the CRA. Proposed land use changes are shown on Figure 22. Each land use change and the intent is described following the figure. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 89 Figure 22: Proposed Changes to the Future Land Use Map City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 90 A. East Harlem McBride Land Use Change. (Industrial Area east of the Harlem McBride area that stretches along NE 5th Avenue from NE 32nd to Carter G. Woodson Park.) The industrial area between Andrews Avenue and NE 6th Avenue in the central part of the Community Redevelopment Area lies close to many single-family homes. This industrial area lies within a residential area with no buffering and was formerly the City outskirts before Harlem McBride was annexed. The City should consider changing the land use to residential uses will enhance the surrounding neighborhoods. It is recommended that the land use be changed to Medium Density Residential (up to 16 dwelling units per acre) to allow townhome development. B. Oakland Festival Center Land Use Change. This area along Andrews Avenue currently encompasses primarily commercial uses. The City should consider changing the land use designation from commercial to a new Mixed Use land use designation to enhance Andrews Avenue commercial activity. A mixed-use development combining residential and commercial uses would bring more commercial business customers to all of Andrews Avenue businesses. The new Mixed Use land use designation would allow a mix of uses and up to 30 dwelling units per acre. This area could be developed under the Mixed Use Land Development Code. C. H and S Subdivision Land Use Change. The existing industrial area east of NE 2nd Avenue between NE 33rd Street and NE 34th Court is incompatible with surrounding commercial and residential uses. It is recommended that the City consider changing the area to Medium-Density Residential (up to 16 dwelling units per acre) to allow townhome development. Changing this area to residential would support businesses along Andrews Avenue and enhance neighborhoods in the Harlem McBride area. D. NE 12th Terrace Land Use Change. (Industrial Area on NE 12th Terrace.) The City should consider changing the land use in this area of NE 12th Terrace from its current Industrial designation to a mixed-use designation. A mix of uses will complement redevelopment within the area. A pedestrian right-of- way along the Middle River should be included with policy changes. The area along NE 12th Terrace south of Oakland Park Boulevard has potential for Arts District development and should be studied for this purpose. The land use should be changed from Industrial to a new Mixed Use land use designation that would allow a mix of uses and up to 30 dwelling units per acre. This area could be developed under the Mixed Use Land Development Code. E. Central Park Industrial Center Land Use Change. To enhance existing surrounding residential areas, changing a section of the industrial area north of Stevens Field between NE 5th Avenue and NE 6th Avenue in the central part of the Community Redevelopment Area to residential use should be considered. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 91 The City should consider changing the land use to Medium Density Residential (up to 16 dwelling units per acre) to allow townhome development. F. Kmart Site Land Use Change. To increase neighborhood compatibility, the City should consider changing the Commercial land use of properties in this neighborhood to a new Mixed Use land use (up to 30 dwelling units per acre). A policy providing pedestrian right-of-way along the Middle River should considered to allow for a Waterfront Promenade Park. G. Future Prospect Gardens Pocket Park Land Use Change. The Prospect Gardens neighborhood does not have direct access to an open space within the neighborhood. The City should pursue the acquisition of a site for a pocket park within the neighborhood. The land use of the area is primarily designated as Medium Density Residential, mixed with some Single Family residences. The City should consider changing an appropriate parcel from residential to Parks/Recreation to accommodate a pocket park for the neighbors. Specific Redevelopment Programs To implement the goals and objective of the Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area, a number of specific redevelopment programs are proposed. These include a variety of regulatory measures to transform the Community Redevelopment Area, while protecting existing residents and neighborhoods. These programs are depicted in Figure A: Redevelopment Concept Plan. H. Waterfront Promenade along the Middle River. The North Fork of the Middle River is located to the south of Downtown and it flows adjacent to a number of underutilized properties within the CRA. Public access to the waterways was originally discussed during the Treasure Coast Design Charrette in August of 1999, specifically along the Middle River. In addition to their original concept, there is an opportunity to enhance the entire waterfront to include a public walkway and respite areas to bring people to the water and provide public access to the waterfront. The walkway has the opportunity to stretch from the bridge at NE 6th Avenue to Dixie Highway. The improvements may include the introduction of shelters, boardwalk/ promenade, site furnishings, landscape and lighting improvements along the waterfront. This would be a much needed addition to the area and an effort to revitalize the areas overlooked waterways and waterway properties. This could be achieved through redevelopment incentives. The specifics of this program and the planning, design and implementation of this program should be developed in more detail for the City as part of a study. Estimated cost for study: $250,000 City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 92 I. Floranada Design District. Floranada Road is the home to interior design, architecture, and home furnishing businesses. A natural progression toward evolving into a Design District can be enhanced by creating Design District zoning regulations that attract businesses specializing in interior design, architecture, furniture design and sales, art studios and galleries, supporting businesses, and related retail. A marketing program for the Floranada Design District would attract regional attention to these home design businesses. Estimated cost-$107,000 for regulations, $12,000 per year for marketing. J. Midtown Commercial Regulations. Prospect Road and Andrews Avenue constitute Oakland Park’s Oakland Park’s “Midtown,” an area of secondary commercial activity. In addition to previously stated capital improvements, there is a need to generate aesthetic regulations that improve the appearance of commercial businesses without affecting the neighborhood character of favorite establishments. As noted in the 2005 Design Institute Report, this node may be a candidate for transit-oriented (TOD) style development. A study should be conducted to investigate how the community shuttle integrates with Broward County Transit and appropriate TOD-style development regulations. Other considerations from the report include a plaza in the vicinity of Andrews Avenue and Prospect Road to create opportunities for a farmer’s market or other community gatherings. Estimated cost- $43,000 for study, $118,000 for regulations. CRA-Wide Redevelopment Programs To implement the goals and objective of the Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area, a number of CRA-wide redevelopment programs are proposed. These include marketing and regulatory measures to transform the Community Redevelopment Area while protecting existing residents and neighborhoods. 1. Attainable Housing. Rising home prices in South Florida prohibit a large number of young professionals and working families from owning homes. New development and redevelopment projects should offer a percentage of new units at attainable prices. A density bonus can be offered as an incentive for developers to provide attainable housing and should be available throughout the Community Redevelopment Area. Developers may opt out of the density bonus by contributing to a land trust. The land trust would provide the Community Redevelopment Agency with funds for purchasing land for future attainable housing projects. Estimated cost- $63,000 for regulations. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 93 2. Community Appearance Program. A Community Appearance Program enforces appropriate standards for the maintenance, appearance, and occupancy of residential and non-residential areas. Additionally, “Clean up Fix Up” Programs can coordinate volunteers to give elderly or disabled homeowners assistance in their property improvement and maintenance, keeping vacant lots and unoccupied areas mowed and kept free of litter, removing or improving dilapidated houses, and create a community free of old car bodies.Funding for these programs can be coordinated with future neighborhood planning programs. Estimated cost- $57,000 per year for administration. 3. Condominium Conversion Program. Apartment buildings in the CRA that will be converted to condominiums should be required to meet all current zoning regulations including the DMUD regulations and conform to the CRA Plan. Conformity to the CRA Plan includes retaining the CRA’s affordable housing opportunities. Any conversion should provide existing residents a right of first refusal and an opportunity to purchase with mortgage payments similar to their former rent payment. A Condominium Conversion Program adopted into the land development regulations can require property owners to apply to the City for permission to convert rental apartments to condominiums. Such regulations have been adopted by other cities in the U.S. and it has been found that cities can regulate condominium conversions in Florida as long as there is no conflict with state law. The program would require apartment owners to provide the City with details on tenant purchases, tenant relocation, plat changes, and site plans. Any conversion would need approval by the Planning Board to ensure conformance with land development regulations. If regulatory action does provide enough protection of affordable housing, the Community Redevelopment Agency can consider acquisition of potential conversions. Estimated cost- $88,000 for regulations. 4. Public Art Program. Distinctive public artworks in Oakland Park will create local landmarks, rendezvous spots, and add to the aesthetic and creative atmosphere of the City. A Public Art Program guided by a Public Art Master Plan would ensure proper placement and coordination of public art installations. The Master Plan process should be guided by a public art committee made up of artists, landscape architects, urban planners, and community leaders. Estimated cost-$56,000 per year for administration, $34,000 for a Pub lic Art Master Plan 5. Historic Oakland Park. Incorporated in 1929, Oakland Park has a long history that should be highlighted. Harlem McBride, a historic black City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 94 neighborhood, was forged by sharecroppers from Georgia, Louisiana and South Carolina in the 1930s. Harlem McBride’s history and other unique Oakland Park historic features should be celebrated through artistic and interpretive facilities. Emphasizing local history increases a sense of place and community cohesiveness. Estimated cost- $44,000 per year for administration. . 6. Green Building Program. New development and redevelopment should receive incentives for green building design and meet standards from the LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Green Building Rating system. The LEED Green Building Rating System is a national green building standard developed by the U.S. Green Building Council. Green buildings not only decrease negative effects on the environment; they also generate substantial cost savings for building owners and tenants, reduce dependency on imported energy, and enhance resident and worker health and productivity. Estimated cost $126,000 for regulations. 7. Arts District. An arts district can take various forms. One model allows financial incentives to encourage artists to purchase homes in a designated area (Village of the Arts, Bradenton, Florida). Zoning regulations that would allow artists to sell work from their homes and streetscaping would enhance the development of an Arts District. Placing the arts district adjacent to the Downtown Mixed Use District or on NE 12th Terrace south of Oakland Park Boulevard would add to local destination being created here. A study should be conducted for the most potentially successful location. Estimated cost- $54,000 for study. 8. Retail Market Analysis. In order to determine how to increase retail demand for existing businesses and attract new retail complementary providers, a retail market analysis to determine demand by type of good should be conducted. The study should include a detailed merchandising analysis that would identify prospective tenants as well. Estimated cost- $50,000 for study. 9. Commercial Façade Program. A number of businesses along Floranada Road, Prospect Road, Andrews Avenue and Oakland Park Boulevard would benefit for grants that support façade improvements. Additional support to businesses can come in the form of grants for tenant improvements and small business loans. Estimated cost of program- $250,000 per year. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 95 10. Adjacent Land Use/Buffer Study. There are a number of areas within the CRA where there are incompatible land uses and a need for buffering. A study should be conducted to study rear setbacks along the boundary lines of different zoning districts. Existing regulations regarding setbacks and buffering should be considered. Estimated cost for study- $24,000. 11. Community Policing Program. Community policing is a public safety strategy used to increase the quality of life for low and middle-income residents. Community policing or community-oriented policing usually includes programs with the following components: shared responsibility and communication (officers attending community meetings, foot patrol, and assigned beats), prevention, and increased officer discretion. These components, plus adequate facilities and public accessibility to police officers through neighborhood substations, can facilitate community policing procedures. This program will be coordinated with the Broward County Sheriff's Office. Estimated cost- To be determined. E. COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY ADMINISTRATION The Community Redevelopment Agency will need funding for staff, marketing, and administration of the Community Redevelopment Plan. It is estimated that the costs will be approximately $300,000 in Years 1-2 and $350,000 in Year 3-5 and $400,000 in Year 6. F. COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN EXPENDITURES The following provides an estimate of expenditures based upon this Community Redevelopment Plan. Capital Improvement Projects $73,796,000 Public/Private Partnerships $11,620,000 Programs $4,582,000 Administration (first phase of administrative costs only) $2,050,000 It is anticipated that the plan will be updated every five years at a minimum. In FY 2015, the CRA Board will update this Plan and implement a second phase of CRA projects, partnerships, and programs for the 2016-2025 period. The update should include updating the comprehensive plan, land development regulations, and design guidelines as needed. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 96 Figure 23: Proposed Future Land Use Plan City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 97 Figure 24: Proposed Changes to the Zoning Map City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 98 Figure 25: Proposed Zoning Map City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 99 Figure 26: Existing and Proposed Parks, Open Space, and Streetscape Plan City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 100 IV. REQUIRED CRA PLAN ELEMENTS A. NEIGHBORHOOD IMPACT AND AFFORDABLE HOUSING Land and Building Acquisition The proposed CRA Plan may necessitate land acquisition and building demolition. It is intended that private market land and building transactions be used to the maximum extent possible in the implementation of this Plan. The City already owns several key properties in the Community Redevelopment Area. Eminent domain will only be utilized for the most critical redevelopment projects and when all concerted efforts to acquire key properties and/or buildings through private transactions have failed. Several proposed projects - notably a demonstration project and public parking in the Downtown Mixed Use District- may use properties already owned by the City. City– owned properties should have their ownership transferred to the Community Redevelopment Agency for development or redevelopment as specified in this Plan. Affordable and Replacement Housing. The Community Redevelopment Plan is not expected to significantly impact households in the low and moderate-income range. The implementation of the Plan is expected to create a greater diversity of housing and job opportunities for current CRA Area residents and persons relocating to the Area. The Plan does not propose acquisitions of any low or moderate-income housing units, or any housing units. The City shall prepare a relocation assistance plan should any future redevelopment require displacing existing residents. The Plan does propose increasing residential uses in the CRA. Already the Downtown Mixed Use District land development regulations expanded residential use by rezoning some areas from industrial to mixed-used designations. Inclusionary housing programs are suggested so that developers are required to include attainable housing development as part of their development. The Plan also intends to expand the variety of housing opportunities. Also, the CRA Proposed Conceptual Plan suggests land use changes from Industrial to Residential of some existing industrial areas and junkyards to increase neighborhood compatibility. A significant CRA affordable housing project will take place on the Watts Estate. This land owned by the Broward County Housing Authority is expected to provide 20 single- family residences to assist low-income families. A condominium conversion program will protect tenants in affordable rentals. Traffic Circulation. A major component of the Plan focuses on improving traffic circulation patterns along Dixie Highway and vehicular and pedestrian crossings of the FEC Railroad. A Circulation Plan included with the Oakland Park Downtown Mixed City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 101 Use District Design Guidelines in Appendix B also shows traffic improvements including the following: •Improve alignment of NE 38th Street •Improve left turn onto NE 38th Street for southbound traffic on Dixie Highway •Improved circulation east of Dixie Highway including a one-way pair with traffic flowing southbound on NW 12th Avenue and northbound traffic flowing northbound on N. 12 Terrace •Improved pedestrian facilities on NE 34th Court Transit. The Redevelopment Plan accommodates a potential rail transit stop within the CRA. The potential for a transit station within the Downtown Mixed Use District has been addressed as part of the District’s Design Guidelines, however the City of Oakland Park should continue to position itself for a transit station by adopting policies and regulations that promote the use of transit downtown. Environmental Quality. The Redevelopment Plan should have a positive impact on environmental quality in the residential neighborhoods within the CRA Area through streetscape improvements including landscaping, bicycle and pedestrian improvements, and burying electric lines. Green building practices in new development and redevelopment will be implemented as well contributing to a decrease in energy usage and pollution. Availability of Community Facilities and Services. Improvements have been suggested in this Plan that will enhance the availability of facilities and services with the CRA Area. Pedestrian and bicycle access improvements area proposed, as well as traffic circulation improvements that will improve access to Downtown Oakland Park including public buildings, facilities, and public parks. Further, this Plan supports and recommends public parking facilities in the Downtown Mixed Use District. Parks and Recreation. The Plan calls for the development of additional parks and open space in the Community Redevelopment Area. The City has already committed new park space in the northern section of the Downtown Mixed Use District. Effect on School Concurrency. Any residential development that takes place within the CRA will be subject to school concurrency review in the development review process. This plan proposes a net increase of 56.16 acres of residential (16 dwelling units per acre to allow townhome development) and 32.1 acres of mixed-use property (30 dwelling units per acre). According to the Broward County School Board, townhomes generally City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 102 generate 0.171 students per dwelling. Therefore, new townhome development catalyzed by the land uses in this plan will generate 154 new students. Residential development that is 4 stories or greater such as the future mixed use land use designation proposed in this plan is considered “high-rise apartments” by Broward County and the Broward County School Board (30 dwelling units per acre.) Each high- rise apartment generates 0.047 students according the Broward County School Board. The properties designated to change to a new Mixed Use land use designation will generate 45 new students. The Watts Estate affordable housing project will result in 20 new single-family homes resulting in 7 new school students. Overall, this plan will generate 219 students. In early 2006, the Broward County School Board will release a student generation rate for “mid-rise” apartments. The new mid-rise generation rate should be considered, when available, to determine school concurrency for new developments. Other Matters Affecting the Physical and Social Quality of the Neighborhood. The Plan proposes improvements that will have a positive impact on the quality of life in existing residential neighborhoods by providing new park land, landscaping, improved drainage, burying electrical lines, and traffic circulation improvements. Over time, these improvements will increase property values in the Community Redevelopment Area, and the City of Oakland Park overall, and provide a local destination for residents in the Downtown District. B. CONFORMANCE WITH OAKLAND PARK COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AND BROWARD COUNTY LAND USE PLAN Broward County Land Use Plan The proposed Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Plan has been developed in a manner consistent with the Broward Count Land Use Plan (LUP) and Plan Map. The Local Activity Center (LAC) has already been adopted by the County and this area has been rezoned to adapt to the LAC designation. The most significant land uses changes in this Plan are the suggested changes in industrial land use to residential land use for increase neighborhood compatibility in the central CRA and to a land use designation that allows for an Arts District south of Oakland Park Boulevard. The Oakland Park Redevelopment Plan furthers several important goals, objectives, and policies in the Broward County Land Use plan as follows: City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 103 OBJECTIVE 10.03.00 LOCAL ACTIVITY CENTER Encourage compact development reflecting characteristics which include a mixture of community serving uses such as commercial, office, employment, civic and institutional, recreation and open space and residential, characterized by an efficient infrastructure, close-knit neighborhoods and sense of community, preservation of natural systems, promotion of pedestrian circulation and convenient access to mass transit facilities through the establishment of a Local Activity Center land use category within the Broward County Land Use Plan. (See also Policies 10.03.01-10.03.10) OBJECTIVE 14.01.00 REDEVELOPMENT OF BLIGHTED AND DETERIORATING AREAS Develop and implement land use programs to encourage redevelopment activities within identified blighted and deteriorating areas. (See also Policies 14.01.01-14.01.04) OBJECTIVE 14.02.00 ENCOURAGE ELIMINATION OR REDUCTION OF INCOMPATIBLE OR INCONSISTENT LAND USES Develop and implement land use programs to encourage the elimination or reduction of existing incompatible land uses and prevent future incompatible land uses. (See Policies 14.02.01-14.02.04.) OBJECTIVE 17.02.00 LAND USE, PUBLIC FACILITIES AND SERVICES AND EMPLOYMENT INTENSITIES Establish criteria, which encourage development of urban infill, urban redevelopment and downtown revitalization area(s) to promote economic development, increase housing opportunities, and maximize use of existing public facilities and services. (See Policies 17.02.01-17.03.07) These objectives and policies from the Broward County Land Use Plan (LUP) support the preparation and implementation of Community Redevelopment Plans such as the Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Plan. The Broward County Land Use Plan also favors the use of innovative planning techniques such as mixed-use, inclusionary housing, reduction of incompatible uses, community design, infill development and redevelopment. The proposed City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Plan is in conformance with, and furthers a number of these objectives and policies adopted in the Broward County LUP. In addition, no inconsistencies with the County’s Land Use Plan were found in this review. Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan The Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan furthers several important goals, objectives, and policies in the Future Land Use Element (FLUE) of the Comprehensive Plan as follows: GOAL 1. Protect and enhance the single-family residential, multiple-family residential, non-residential and natural resource areas of Oakland Park. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 104 POLICY 1.2 Develop traffic control strategies to minimize through-traffic on residential streets. OBJECTIVE 1.2 By 2000, detail a revised redevelopment strategy for 3 three redevelopment areas cited in this plan. POLICY 1.2.1 Prepare an urban design and parking plan for Dixie Highway redevelopment area. OBJECTIVE 1.3 By 2010, eliminate uses incompatible with this land use plan in all areas shown on Figure 2.15 Support Document. POLICY 1.4.2 Bi-annually review sign and landscaping codes to determine refinements needed to upgrade character and image. POLICY 1.4.2.1 By 1999, develop a mixed use zoning district for the Dixie Highway Corridor. POLICY 1.4.6 Minimize the impacts of incompatible land uses through the Land Development and Zoning Codes. POLICY 1.12.5 Direct new development into areas where necessary regional and community facilities and services exist. POLICY 1.12.6 Except for schools, regional and community facilities shall be located close to major traffic corridors and mass transit routes adequate to carry the volume of traffic generated by such facilities. OBJECTIVE 1.13 The City shall continue to implement subdivision and other regulations promoting well planned, orderly, and attractive development which is consistent with locally adopted Capital Improvement elements and the Goals, Objectives, and Policies of the Broward Land Use Plan. POLICY 1.13.1 The City shall continue to regulate the land use categories as depicted on the future land use map according to the Land Use implementation section of this Comprehensive Plan. OBJECTIVE 1.15 Ensure through the City’s future land use process that public elementary and secondary education facilities will be available to meet the current and future needs of Broward County’s school population. OBJECTIVE 1.16 The City shall encourage compact development reflecting characteristics which include a mixture of community service uses such as commercial, City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 105 office, employment, civic and institutional, recreation and open space and residential, characterized by an efficient infrastructure, close-knit neighborhoods and sense of community, preservation of natural systems, promotion of pedestrian circulation and convenient access to mass transit facilities with a Local Activity Center Land Use category. POLICY1.16.1 The City will support the location of uses in a manner oriented around a five-minute (i.e., quarter-mile) walk within any proposed Local Activity Center. Multiple nodes of activity oriented around the five-minute (i.e., quarter-mile) walk will be included within a Local Activity Center. A Local Activity Center will support the location of uses and internal circulation such that pedestrian mobility is a priority. All land uses in a Local Activity Center shall be directly accessed via pedestrian ways, and accessible to existing or future alternate public transportation modes, including bicycle and transit. POLICY 1.16.2 The City include park and/or open space that is accessible to the public as a functional component within a proposed Local Activity Center. POLICY 1.16.3 The City will include housing opportunities as a functional component within a proposed Local Activity Center. POLICY 1.16.4 The City shall consider community needs for affordable housing when proposing a Local Activity Center. The City encourages affordable housing opportunities, through various mechanisms such as the utilization of “affordable housing units,” the direction of public housing program funds into the Local Activity Center, reduced lot size for dwelling units, construction of zero lot line and cluster housing, vertical integration of residential units with nonresidential uses, the allowance of accessory dwelling units, or through other mechanisms proven effective in increasing the affordable housing stock. To promote Local Activity Centers which propose to include “low income” housing as a viable component, the Broward County Land Use Plan currently supports all reasonable means and methods to mitigate potential negative impacts to public facilities and services which may result from the amendment. POLICY 1.16.6 The City shall require design guidelines that incorporates pedestrian and bicycle paths and greenways to accomplish full-connected routes to all destinations with in the Local Activity Center. The paths should be spatially defined by buildings, trees, and lighting, and should incorporate designs which discourage high speed traffic. POLICY 1.16.7 The City shall ensure convenient access to mass transit or multi-modal facilities within a propose Local Activity Center to ensure the reduction of reliance on automobile travel. POLICY 1.16.9 The development of key intersections or major transit stops to create nodes of development should be promoted within a proposed Local Activity Center. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 106 POLICY 1.16.10 Require pedestrian and bicycle facilities for all new development or redevelopment projects within the Local Activity Center or in related to any other highway improvement projects. POLICY 1.16.11 Require pedestrian sidewalk connections to all building entrances, transit stops, and to multiple building sites for all new development or redevelopment projects in the Local Activity Center. POLICY 1.16.12 Incorporate into the proposed Downtown Local Activity Center Zoning District regulations that require pedestrian sidewalk and bicycle facilities for all new development or redevelopment projects with appropriate connections being made to other facilities and any transit stops. These selected objectives and policies from the adopted City of Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan all emphasize the need for the City to redevelop, eliminate incompatible uses, increase mobility, and improve community identity and aesthetics. The proposed Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Plan is in conformance with and furthers a number of these objectives and policies adopted in the City’s Comprehensive Plan. In addition, no inconsistencies with the Oakland Park Comprehensive Plan were found in this review. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 107 V. FINANCIAL FEASIBILITY A significant benefit of any Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) is the ability to manage future incremental ad valorem tax revenues within the CRA Area from both county and city sources. Following the first year of the CRA Area (base year), ninety- five percent of ad valorem taxes collected annually on the incremental growth in property values since the base year are returned to the CRA Area by eligible authorities including, but not limited to, Broward County and City of Oakland Park for use in implementing the approved Community Redevelopment Plan. These tax revenues can be combined with other funding sources such as grants and impact fees to help finance initial projects prioritized by the Redevelopment Plan. After three to four years of positive tax base growth, the incremental tax revenues of the CRA Area should also be “bondable”. This enables the Agency to receive a large up-front infusion of funds to implement public and public/private projects designed to “grow” the tax base and repay the bonds with future tax revenues. This section will provide estimated projections of incremental tax base growth in the Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area and resulting tax revenues, which may be expected to be received by the Agency. Other potential revenue sources will also be discussed to complete the ten-year CRA Area revenue picture. Fulfilling the vision of the Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Plan is contingent upon the ability to obtain funds to finance the public improvements and revitalization program. One goal of the Community Rede velopment plan is to provide capital improvement projects, which will encourage and foster private sector redevelopment within CRA. Establishment of the Redevelopment Trust Fund. Subsequent to approval of the Redevelopment Plan, the Oakland Park City Commission must then establish and approve the fund by ordinance in order to allocate future tax increments to the fund. Upon establishment of the trust fund, the Agency must also obtain approval for the issuance of tax increment revenue bonds to finance redevelopment programs when such a program is proposed. A. TAX COLLECTION ANALYSIS The tax collection analysis completed as part of the “draft” CRA Plan provides an analysis of real property tax assessment and tax collection estimates through 2015. The analysis herein contemplates a base set of assumptions (or inputs) utilized to generate estimates of future ad valorem tax assessments and tax collections. The primary set of assumptions for this tax collection analysis includes: City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 108 1.)Projected Tax Assessment on Existing Properties: In an effort to derive annual growth in ad valorem tax assessments for existing properties within the CRA through 2015, an analysis of historical ad valorem tax assessments was completed to derive an estimated long-term growth factor. Table 8 provides a summary of total tax assessment within the CRA for each year between 2000 and 2004 by major land use category. Accordingly, from 2000 to 2004, the CRA tax assessment basis increased from $357.9 million to $545.2 million, or an average annual increase of 9.9 percent during the period. However, it should be noted that while five years of tax assessment history provides relevant insight into assessment trends, a longer-term history may be warranted as Broward County’s real estate market has reached nearly unprecedented growth levels during the past few years. Typically, an analysis of tax assessment trends for the Broward County CRAs, that longer-term growth would likely be in the 6 percent to 8 percent range. Therefore, for this analysis for the Oakland Park CRA, we assume an annual growth rate for the CRA tax assessment on existing properties to be 8.0 percent per annum during the analysis period. In addition to the annual growth in property tax assessment, an additional one- time (static) increase in property assessments for the CRA upon completion of the capital improvement projects is assumed. Based upon research conducted by the Trust for Public Land, the immediate impact on property values from roadway/streetscape and green-space improvements generally range from 6 to 10 percent. Therefore, for this analysis, a one-time increase to the CRA property assessment of 9 percent in 2009 was assumed. 2.)High Probability Development: There have been three major developments proposed (and currently in the City’s development review process) within the CRA, and referred to as: Oakland Park Station, New Scattered Town Home Development, and The Pointe at Middle River as previously mentioned in Chapter II. In aggregate, these projects total 492 residential townhome/condominium units. (proposed in the CRA as of June 2005). While there are several other developments currently in planning within the district, these represent the largest projects with the highest probability of being completed within the next two to three years. Table 9 provides a summary of development assumptions, including development/delivery timeline and estimated pricing utilized to determine tax assessment and tax collection through 2015. 3.) Long Term Development: The long term development considers “other” projects referred to above, which includes a combination of residential and commercial development that may be realized during the next ten years. For this analysis, it was assumed that long-term development represents 950 residential units (in addition to the high probability development), 150,000 square feet of office, and 85,000 square feet of retail. Table 10 provides a summary of City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 109 development/delivery timeline and pricing estimates for the long-term development projects. 4.) Millage Rate: The millage rate utilized to calculate tax collection to Broward County and the City of Oakland Park is based upon Broward County’s 2004 Millage Rates. See Table 11. As summarized in the table below, the total incremental real property tax (over estimated 2005) from existing and new development (high probability and long term) to the CRA from 2006 to 2015 is estimated to be $31.5 million. As detailed further in Table 11 herein, the incremental tax increases steadily on an annual basis from $405,445 in 2006 to $6.1 million in 2015. Table 6: Tax Increments with Capital Improvements Source Tax Increment with Capital Improvements Broward County $17,113,000 City of Oakland Park $14,344,470 Total $31,457,539 Industrial Land Conversion Analysis The City of Oakland Park is considering converting industrial land (use) to residential land (use) as part of the CRA redevelopment plan. In order to understand the difference in tax assessment value that may be created by this land use conversion, an order-of- magnitude analysis has been completed, with the following underlying assumptions: -there are no regulatory issues associated with the conversion analysis; -the conversion is based upon a one acre site that allows for industrial building site coverage of 50 percent, and a residential (townhome) development of 16 units; and, -property assessment value is based upon a general market evaluation (including land and improvements) for new development of the two property types. Considering the assumptions noted above, the following table provides a summary of the variance in property value between industrial and residential uses: City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 110 Table 7: Land Use Conversion Analysis: Industrial to Residential (Townhome) Industrial Residential Site Size (acres)1.0 1.0 Site Size (Sq.Ft.)43,560 43,560 Coverage 50% of area sq.ft.16 units/acre Building Sq.Ft./Units 21,780 sq.ft.16 units Property Value per Unit/Sq.ft.$95.00 /sq.ft.$275,000 /unit Total Property Value $2,069,100 $4,400,000 City of Oakland Park Land Use Conversion Analysis Industrial to Residential (Townhome)        %$*'%$*'%$*'%$*'%$*' (!'*+)/"'"(-,")-&0&"&." &*$(")&(2                          0(/&)&(2                    /%"-                          ($'!& #' !                       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'" #  !#"" '" "'     %  #"' ))+$)(&+ !#/ &%-()"%*"#,#&'$%*")&()#% ")(%*#  ##+((%* ))))$%*)&(.")*"% #% "$'(&,$%*"))*"$* (16-% )* ,# /) -,&$/+(16-2,16,#2"$#$3$*-.+$,1 1-   !*$ 01(+ 1$-%$ */-.$/16 5/-41' (16-% )* ,# /) 31192.8=!*)*:*0341*286*&! 0&2 .2&0*(*1'*6         7,:.6.7<*5".*5!:89.:<A$*@".>.7=.:8?<1/:86@2;<270%;.; $2$ +0./$027 611$11,$-2.-6(12(-&$4$+./,$-2                                           "! #"  0.5 0#.3-27 2                                 (27.% *+ -# 0* 2                            2'$0             .2 + 6.++$"2$#                                  77=*5*<=:*5$*@7,:.6.7<"                                      7,:.6.7<*5"!$*@".>.7=.:8?<1:86201!:8+*+252<A.> $2$ +0./$027 611$11,$-2.-$5$4$+./,$-2                             "! #"  0.5 0#.3-27 2                      (27.% *+ -# 0* 2                      2'$0             $8<*5$*@7,:.6.7<8>.:                                7,:.6.7<*5"!$*@".>.7=.:8?<1:86870$.:6.>.5896.7< $2$ +0./$027 611$11,$-2.-$5$4$+./,$-2                           "! #"  0.5 0#.3-27 2                     (27.% *+ -# 0* 2                    2'$0             $8<*5$*@7,:.6.7<8>.:                           #%")"$"!$("&%(#$#$$" '$         0.5 0#.3-27 2                                     (27.% *+ -# 0*                                       2'$0            7,:.6.7<*577=*5$*@8>.: "                                     $%+$"21.-$2(,$(-"0$ 1$2.0./$02711$11,$-23/.-".,/+$2(.-.% /(2 +,/0.4$,$-20.)$"21(- .% 8<.; !&  ! ! & !!!!&!%#"$!! !&     ! "! "! #!#& "!!!!!&!! !! "! &#!!! "!  !$!!  !!! &    "!!"!#$ ! !!#$! !&  ! ! "!!  $ "!&&! !&!"  "!!&! !&   $ "!& 2<A8/ *45*7-!*:4" $*+5. ;<26*<.8/".*5!:89.:<A$*@".>.7=.:8?<1 @2;<270*7-!:83.,<.-.?.>.5896.7< <8 ?2<1*92<*569:8>.6.7<!:83.,<; 2<A8/ *45*7-!*:4 .,,3-(27$#$4$+./,$-20$ + - (- +$"$,!$0  City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 115 B. PROJECT FINANCING Committed Funds The CRA has three potential sources of financing: City tax increment financing, County tax increment financing, or the County’s Redevelopment Capital Program (RCP). City and County tax increments generated within the district may be used to secure bonds for public improvements or expended directly on CRA Projects. The tax increment is that portion of tax revenue based upon increased property values from CRA inception (base year) that has increased from the year the CRA was established. Approximately, $32 million of tax increment is expected to be collected in the first ten years. All improvements funded by CRA revenues must be located within the CRA Area district. Broward County’s Redevelopment Capital Program has $36 million available for redevelopment projects. The Capital budget provides additional funding through 2010. The County will consider funding for projects based upon value added to the tax base and the need for public improvements. The City and Community Redevelopment Agency should create a trust fund for any tax increment financing received and other funding including those from the RCP. The trust fund must be created by a City ordinance. Optional Funding Sources Optional Funding Sources for the Community Redevelopment Area include grants and other funding sources from the federal government, State of Florida, Broward County, a the City of Oakland Park and Oakland Park Main Street. Federal funds: Federal funding sources include: The Department of Housing and Urban Development offers Community Development Block Grant funds, which may be utilized for infrastructure improvements in redevelopment areas and west of the FEC tracks. The HOME program, also administered by the Department of Housing and Urban Development, provides formula grants local governments to fund a wide range of activities that build, buy, and/or rehabilitate affordable housing for rent or homeownership or provide direct rental assistance to low-income people. State of Florida: The State of Florida has various funding sources for improvements in the CRA Area, including: Funding through FDOT may be allocated towards some transportation improvements within the CRA. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 116 The State Housing Initiatives Partnership (SHIP) Program is a multifaceted program intended to increase affordable housing construction and homeownership including a Multi-Family Development Program, a Homeowner Rehabilitation Program and a Down Payment Assistance Program. The Secretary of State maintains a grant program for local parks and recreation improvements, which may be utilized in the CRA Area for improvements to the park areas and greenway connections. Urban and community forestry grants for special landscape improvements, which may include improvements within the CRA Area. The State Division of Historical Resources offers grant programs for rehabilitating historic structures, which may be a resource for restoring select commercial and/or civic structures in the CRA Area. Florida Inland Navigation District provides funds for waterway improvements. These funds may be used in the CRA Area to create and expand marina facilities, for dredging, and to create or improve docking facilities. Broward County: In addition to the RCP, the County has other funding sources that may be valuable to the CRA such as: County capital improvements fund, including roads and public facilities. Broward Cultural Council provides funds for art in public places, such as the entry features being recommended for the CRA Area. The Metropolitan Planning Organization allocates funds for road and mass transit improvements. These funds may be a potential source of funding for bus lanes, bus shelters/kiosks, transit route improvements, and other transit-related traffic circulation improvements. City of Oakland Park: City funding sources include: •Special assessments may be utilized to fund improvements through taxes levied on benefiting properties in the CRA Area. •General fund reserves may be used on a loan basis to initially fund the CRA. •Capital Improvement Funds including the following revenue sources may be used: -Neighborhood and Citywide Capital Improvement Fund -Recreation and Culture Capital Improvement Fund City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 117 -City Facility Capital Improvement Fund -Public Utilities Capital Improvement Fund -Stormwater Capital Improvement Fund -Community Redevelopment Agency Capital Improvement Fund •City bond issues can be utilized for capital improvements in the CRA Area, including streetscaping, parking, and related improvements. •Gas tax funds may be used for transportation improvements. •Developers producing buildings in the Downtown Mixed Use District over three stories must provide public amenities equal in value to 0.5% or more of the construction cost for each story above three stories. Construction cost is based upon $200.00 per square foot in 2004 dollars. •Impact fees. Three fees have been instituted to offset development impacts: Park and Open Space Charge. A park and open space charge of $1,500 for every dwelling unit developed or redeveloped within the Downtown Mixed Use District to offset the costs of increasing park and open space within this District. The Park and Open Space charge may be reviewed and adjusted on an annual basis by the City Commission. Park Land Acquisition Fee. A neighborhood park acquisition impact fee of $1,500 per new dwelling unit is required throughout the City of Oakland Park. The City may use the funds for expansion or improvement of existing parks. Local Transportation Fee. The City of Oakland Park shall collect a Local Transportation Fee of $526 for every dwelling unit and every 1000 gross square feet of commercial space developed or redeveloped within the area designated as the Downtown Mixed Use District to offset the costs of infrastructure improvements within the District or areas that are outside the District that are impacted by Downtown improvements. The Local Transportation Fee may be reviewed and adjusted on an annual basis by the City Commission. Oakland Park Main Street: Oakland Park Main Street, a non-profit corporation, can provide promotion and marketing of the downtown area including banners and signage, coordinate special events (such as Oktoberfest), and manage façade improvement programs. Oakland Park Main Street also maintains an Arts Committee and Economic Development Committee, which can provide assistance as well. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 118 Revenue/Cost Balance The 10-year revenue and cost projections for the CRA reveal a significant revenue shortfall of approximately $60 million by the year 2015. The City and Community Redevelopment Agency will consider several options to address this estimated funding gap including bonding, aggressive pursuit of optional funding sources, and extension of project implementation schedules (if necessary). City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 119 C. PROJECT PHASING CRA Plan project will be done in phases. Phase I will have five year duration and Phase II will have a ten year duration. This section details cost for each project in both phases. PHASE 1 Capital Improvement Projects Downtown Infrastructure Improvements $5,425,000.00 NE 34th Court Improvements $6,400,000.00 Downtown Park Gateway $3,238,000.00 Carter G. Woodson Park Improvements and Expansion $590,000.00 Commercial Boulevard and Dixie Highway Gateway $957,000.00 South Dixie Highway Gateway $1,453,000.00 Buffer Prospect Gardens Neighborhood from I-95 $2,650,000.00 Traffic Improvements to Kimberly Lakes Neighborhood $100,000.00 Oakland Park Elementary School Pedestrian Improvements $665,000.00 Lloyd Estates Elementary School Pedestrian Improvements $769,000.00 TOTAL CIP $22,247,000.00 Public Private Partnerships Park Place $6,000,000.00 Dixie Mixed Use (East) Development $3,000,000.00 Dixie Mixed Use (West) Development $1,000,000.00 Watts Estate Housing Development $1,620,000.00 TOTAL PPP $11,620,000.00 Policies and Programs (5 year program) East Harlem McBride Land Use Change $0.00 Oakland Festival Center Land Use Change $0.00 H and S Subdivision Land Use Change $0.00 NE 12th Terrace Land Use Change $0.00 Central Park Industrial Center Land Use Change $0.00 Kmart Site Land Use Cha nge $0.00 Future Prospect Gardens Pocket Park Land Use Change $0.00 Attainable Housing $63,000.00 Community Appearance Program $285,000.00 City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 120 Condominium Conversion Program $88,000.00 Public Art Program $314,000.00 Commercial Façade Program $1,250,000.00 TOTAL PP $2,000,000.00 CRA Administration $2,050,000.00 TOTAL PHASE 1 $37,917,000.00 PHASE 2 Capital Improvement Projects Floranada Industrial District Improvements $1,484,000.00 Improvements to Prospect Road $4,024,000.00 Improvements to Andrews Avenue $4,408,000.00 Improvements to NE 38th Street $5,539,000.00 Improvements to NW/NE 41st Street $2,459,000.00 Improvements to NE 6th Avenue $4,192,000.00 Improvements to NE 5th Avenue $3,414,000.00 Improvements to NE 8th Avenue $1,775,000.00 Wimberly Athletic Complex Parking $6,659,000.00 Prospect Road and I-95 Gateway $843,000.00 Improvements to Guisti Park $443,000.00 Expansion of the Public Boat Ramp along the MR $559,000.00 Reconstruction of NE 13th Avenue (NE 38th Street to NE 32nd Street) $3,000,000.00 Train Whistle Quieting $4,000,000.00 Major Intersection Improvements $6,562,500.00 Minor Intersection Improvements $2,187,500.00 TOTAL CIP $51,549,000.00 Public Private Partnerships n/a $0.00 City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 121 TOTAL PPP $0.00 Policies and Programs (10 year period) Waterfront Promenade along the Middle River $250,000.00 Floranada Design District $227,000.00 Midtown Commercial Regulations $161,000.00 Historic Oakland Park $440,000.00 Green Building Program $126,000.00 Arts District $54,000.00 Retail Market Analysis $50,000.00 Commercial Facade Program $1,250,000.00 Adjacent Land Use/Buffer Study $24,000.00 Community Policing Program To be determined. TOTAL PP $2,582,000.00 CRA Administration To be determined. TOTAL PHASE 2 $54,131,000 Figure B show just Phase I projects. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 122 Figure B: Phase I Projects, Redevelopment Concept Plan City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 123 D. FINANCIAL STRATEGY Elements of the $35.8 million Phase I (which is net of any administrative cost in the CRA) and $54 million Phase II capital programs are likely to be funded through a variety of sources. However, because the City is currently investing more than $22.89 million in City ($12.6 million), FEMA ($5.0 million), County ($2.3 million), CDBG ($1.4 million), FDOT ($0.95 million) and other sources of grant funding to complete over twenty major projects in the CRA, the ability of turning to such sources for future investment is going to be quite limited. Therefore, given the scale of investment outlined in this plan and the fact that the investments delineated as part of the plan are targeted to yield direct returns through enhanced property tax benefit, the principal sources of funding for the Phase I and Phase II program improvements will likely need to be some combination of tax increment financing (TIF) or Broward County redevelopment funds. As a result, this section details a preliminary indication of how the proposed capital program might be funded assuming that a large majority of funding could not be sourced from city, block grant, state, transportation, or other federal, county and state grant/lending programs. Further delineation of the funding strategy will have to come out of more specific discussions with Broward County as well as through any underwriting process that may be associated with a debt instrument. However, in this section the basic parameters of a funding program with particular emphasis on the Phase I capital improvements are discussed. There are several general elements that guide recommendations as it relates to funding capital improvements within the CRA. These include: o Given the nature of how the capital markets view tax increment in today’s environment, the plan assumes that any financing instrument that utilizes tax increment as the source of repayment is going to be secured by reasonable proven/certain sources of tax increment revenue and will be financed without long term secondary guarantee of tax revenue. As a result, and given the scale of likely tax revenue growth in the district over the next several years, the plan focuses recommendations on how the City could fund the $35.8 million Phase I capital program (which is net of $2.05 million in CRA administration costs). Phase II efforts (assuming a secondary pledge or guarantee is not available) will need to be scheduled once enough tax revenue growth exists to further support the debt service associated with a financing instrument that funds the second round of investment in the district. o As will be shown below, to fully fund Phase I and II will require the commitment of Broward County to the redevelopment effort in the Oakland Park CRA over a long time period through the establishment of a “95% tax increment district” and a firm commitment of redevelopment fund monies over time. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 124 o For the purposes of increment estimates, the strategy assumes that the current valuation of existing properties in the district grow at 9 percent per year which is below the level of growth (approximately 10 percent annually) seen during the past several years. Additionally, because there is likely to be a relatively short time gap between the time when the Phase I financing is sourced (which we assume to be January 1, 2007) and when new tax increment producing projects including Oakland Park Station (314 units), New Scattered Townhome Development (76 units), and Pointe at Middle River (102 units) now in design and development are complete in the next few years, there is going to be a need for some form of secondary guarantee or interest reserve during this “bridge” period. Given current tax rates, by 2010 it is estimated that there will be $1.13 million in “likely” annual City tax increment and $1.35 million of “likely” annual County tax increment produced in the Oakland Park CRA district, for a total of approximately $2.48 million. “Likely” increment comes from two sources: growth in taxable value of existing properties in the district and the estimated taxable value of the three projects noted above now in planning and development. For purposes of this funding strategy, we have not included any estimated increment from new development or “bumps” in existing property values that are certain to occur as capital improvements to the district are made but are not now part of a clearly delineated and specific development project. The capital markets generally demand (in today’s lending environment) proven increment to size a financial instrument if no long term secondary guarantee exists. In fact, this plan recommends against the City providing long term secondary guarantees given the potential negative impact on the City’s bond ratings and broader investment efforts the City may be contemplating. For the preliminary funding analysis that will have to be confirmed through specific structuring and underwriting, the plan assumes that a 30-year bond can be issued carrying a 6 percent coupon, with a required 1.20 debt service coverage. Furthermore, for the purposes of the funding strategy, this plan has assumed that fees associated with the issuance will be two (2) percent of the total value of the face amount, that the bonds will be interest only for the first two years, and that the purchaser will require a interest reserve consistent with shortfalls in increment during the first several years (which shortfalls in the end might trigger a staggered release of funds to get beyond the 2007 to 2009 bridge period) and a capital reserve equivalent to 18 months of principal and interest. Finally, the plan assumes that the City will loan the CRA operating costs of for up to two years (or as needed and dependent on the sizing of the bond instrument) so the full increment can be utilized for debt service repayment and concurrently meet the debt service requirements. After the two year period is up, and based exclusively on the “likely” increment the CRA will be self-funding and be able to begin to repay the City for the operating loan. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 125 It should be stressed that the structure detailed herein is very preliminary and will require significant refinement through the underwriting process, which answers many more questions. For example, is it reasonable to assume that interest only can obtained for a two-year period or that the interest reserve only covers direct shortfalls and not broader shortfalls that would meet the coverage requirements? Likewise, there are a number of ways to handle the shortfall period that may leave more revenue for improvements including the staggered release of funding. All of which will have to be worked out during underwriting. The table below indicates estimated total funding available for CRA plan projects based upon the 2010 increment estimate and the assumptions noted above. Overall, with both City and County property tax rates being included in the increment calculation, we estimate the City would be able to net $23.75 million in capital funding which would pay for more than 66 percent of the Phase I improvement program. Table 12: Total Funding Available for CRA Plan Projects Funding Potential 2010 Expected Increment (Rd) $2,500,000 Debt Service Coverage 1.20 Bond Term (Years) 30 Interest Rate (Annual) 6.00% Supportable Debt $28,805,000 Fees (2%) ($576,000) Shortfall Reserve ($1,345,000) Bond Reserve Fund (1.5 years) ($3,123,000) Net Funds Available (1/1/07) $23,753,000 The challenges in the funding strategy detailed above are twofold. First, the net proceeds from the initial bond supported from likely increment will pay only 66 percent of the Phase I capital need meaning that there is another source that is going to have to be tapped to fund $12.1 million of the Phase I program that cannot be raised in the initial years through the bond. Second, there is a gap of 36 months between the time the funds are estimated to be needed and when the tax increment revenue would meet the debt service coverage requirement based upon the schedule for completion of new projects now in planning and development. Therefore, this plan proposes several options to address these challenges. First, as it relates to the gap of $12.1 million in need to complete Phase I and what can be supported by a bond instrument, this plan proposes that this gap will be sourced primarily from some mix of Broward County redevelopment funds and the gap should be able to be reduced to some degree because the City is likely to spread the implementation of Phase I over a number of years with bond fund releases be able to be staggered as increment beyond the “likely” or confirmed increment begins to be collected. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 126 As it relates to the challenge of the time gap between the issuance of the bond instrument and the increment being available to repay the bonds at the required coverages, there are several initial options that the plan proposes for dealing with this issue: o The bond holders may agree to a deferral of principal for several years to allow the increment to reach a level that allows the principal to be paid at the agreed upon debt service coverage requirement. This option still requires the bondholders to be almost certain that the future increment is eminent. o A short term secondary pledge from Broward County’s Redevelopment Fund or some City source of revenue can be used to support that portion of the bond that will rely on increment from the projects due to come on the tax rolls over the three year period. o A structure that staggers the release of bond funds based upon increment becoming available and the coverage ratios being met also helps with regard to the short-term gap as well. One caveat is that while a staggered release strategy is quite attractive, it may more costly in the long run if the structure requires interest to accrue or be paid on the unused portion or if fees were required to be paid at every release. With regard to Phase II and because the Phase II efforts are critical to the long term revitalization of the Oakland Park CRA, this plan strongly recommends that any interlocal agreement between the City of Oakland Park and Broward County include provision for the release of funding for the second phase of investment once certain milestones are met. These milestones might include the successful completion of the Phase I investment efforts and a clear indication of increment available to support a significant majority of the Phase II investment efforts in the future but should not be subject to the changing priorities over time given the importance of continuity of long term investment to achieve the goals of the CRA. Overall, there is reasonably clear understanding of where targeted funding for the Phase I investment effort may come from given growth in values of existing properties in the CRA today and projects well along the development and planning continuum. The exact source of Phase II funding is less clear only because the specific development projects and efforts that the capital markets demand to be essentially on-line before they forward fund increment have not yet come to fruition and are somewhat dependent upon the improved development climate created by the Phase I investments. Therefore, it is critical that the City under any financing method (i.e. traditional tax increment financing utilizing City and County tax increment, utilization of County redevelopment funds, etc.) have a structure and foundation for tapping into future investment funding as the market allows. This is particularly important given that the broader redevelopment of the Oakland Park CRA will be based upon the promotion of the momentum that currently exists and will be further driven by the Phase I capital investment program. As the CRA City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 127 Plan is revised, financing for Phase II projects can be more accurately determined based upon successful financing and completion of Phase I projects. E. CONCLUSION AND PLAN IMPLEMENTATION In order for the Community Redevelopment Agency to achieve its aspirations of redeveloping Downtown, improving connections to Downtown, strengthening neighborhoods, increasing green space, and increase attainable housing options, a number of steps must be taken. First, the Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan must be adopted by the Community Redevelopment Agency and City Commission and approved by the Broward County Commission. A trust fund ordinance must be pursued immediately after approval by the City in order for Community Redevelopment Agency to receive funding for projects. The Community Redevelopment Agency must obtain funding needed for Phase I by establishing a 95% tax increment district for which the City and County will contribute millage for 40 years. Gap funding for Phase I should be obtained through the Broward County Redevelopment Capital Program. An interlocal agreement which allows for long-term funding for Phase I projects should be agreed upon with Broward County. Finally, the Community Redevelopment Agency should identify the first projects to be completed in Phase I. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 128 VI. OPERATIONAL PROCEDURES A. CRA TERM The term of the Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) Plan will be forty (40) years from the date of Agency creation. This length of operational term is absolutely necessary to provide the best opportunity for the CRA to successfully complete the redevelopment process within the redevelopment area and ensure the greatest potential property value enhancement resulting from initial public-sponsored projects and programs. This does not mean the entire CRA Area will be redeveloped within that timeframe, but rather that the major principles and associated improvements envisioned in the Redevelopment Plan, as amended and updated in the future, will be fully implemented and private development will be well on the way toward helping the City of Oakland Park attain its vision for a “small town with big city opportunities.” Although the initial capital improvements process is estimated over a ten-year period, the Plan will be updated periodically over the forty-year CRA term to reflect changing financial and development conditions in Oakland Park. In addition, the CRA may engage in bond financing after three to five years of operation in order to provide an up-front infusion of dollars for public improvements with repayment from enhanced tax increment proceeds over an extended period, typically twenty to twenty-five years. Obviously, bond underwriters will require that the term of the CRA extend through and beyond the final payoff of any bonds they sponsor. It is also not unusual for successful CRAs to implement multiple bond issues over the forty-year redevelopment period, and second and third issues would also need long-term payback periods to keep interest rates within reason for the Agency. Another area of Plan implementation where the forty-year term is crucial is in the development of public/private partnerships. CRAs have been appropriately referred to as “developers in the public interest”, and this aspect of the CRA role is very important to realize the tax base enhancements expected from publicly funded improvements. Expedited approval of development consistent with the Redevelopment plan may be the difference between a high or low growth of tax base in the redevelopment area. In addition, successful CRAs often enter into long-term agreements with developers to address issues such as parking. These issues typically extend far into the future. B. ANNUAL REPORTING The Oakland Park CRA will prepare an annual budget for consideration and approval prior to October 1st of the fiscal year in which the budget will be implemented. In addition, an annual report will also be prepared, which will outline progress made toward City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C 129 achieving Plan goals, objectives and policies. This report will also include a comparison of current-year tax base in contrast to the base year value. In addition, financial statements will be prepared according to Florida Statutes. The annual report and financial statements will be provided to Broward County on or before March 31 following the end of the fiscal year. C. PLAN UPDATE AND AMENDMENTS The Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Plan will be updated and revised to reflect changing conditions every five years. The standard updating process will involve the following steps: 1. Updated data and analysis; 2. Revised capital improvements program and other redevelopment strategy recommendations; 3. Review by Local Planning Agency; and 4. Consideration by CRA Board and City Commission. In addition the County Commission shall either approve or disapprove any changes to the plan involving the following: •CRA boundary changes •Extensions to the original term of the Plan and/or CRA beyond the forty-year period specified herein; or •A change to the plan of such magnitude as would require a county or municipal land use plan amendment. City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C APPENDIX A. SLUM AND BLIGHT STUDY City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C APPENDIX B. DOWNTOWN MIXED USE DISTRICT REGULATIONS AND DESIGN GUIDELINES City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C APPENDIX C. COMMENTS AND QUESTIONS RECEIVED AT THE TOWN HALL MEETING (SEPTEMBER 14, 2005) City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C How did you hear % of total Meeting Informative % of total Location acceptable % of total Status % of total Newspaper 13 17.1% Posted Notice 4 5.3% Word of Mouth 22 28.9% Public TV 2 2.6% Sign board 4 5.3% Water Bill 2 2.6% Web Site 7 9.2% Other 22 28.9% Very 38 73.1% 47 88.7% Somewhat 10 19.2% 6 11.3% Not at all 4 7.7% Resident 34 45.9% Business Owner 68.1% Property Owner 25 33.8% Other 9 12.2% Total cards returned 57 CRA MEETING 9/14/05 - Responses and comments Good job! Better maps - something you can read!! Especially the handout! I think you did a great job. Please include all areas of Oakland Park. Even though you stated areas of slum and blight, we, too, in the Rock Island area need many of the same improvements. Have all the persons involved sit up front - not behind the residents who attend the meeting. Parking is a problem. The refreshments were great. Do it again. Better visuals. Perhaps more in print. Power point difficult to see unless in front rows. Listing of detailed agenda. Good forum, possibly have a written agenda. Chairs were not too comfy. Get to the point and tell us how it affects the people Tell details of plans and contacts for each phase with phone numbers Let the residents be informed of proposed improvements before deciding for them. You always have to find money for what residents want. Explain the costs of this project - where will the money come from Taxes on low-income property? How can they be made manageable? Ask participants to be quiet so that everyone can hear. Move forward! Great Job! Advertise in water bill the month before! More advertisement for a bigger Oakland Park input Ask people to go outside when talking on cell phones and business conversations It was very good and I appreciated excellent sound system Improve Floranada Road with landscape and sidewalks Display a model of downtown area instead of maps Will the steel fabrication business on Prospect Rd. and 4th Ave be replaced? They operate all night long and create noise for residents just north of that block! More definitive material Attach microphone to speakers rather than hand-held or static NOTE: Some questions have more than one response, while others where not answered; therefore the total number of answers does not match the total number of cards. Comments/suggestions Alternate location of meetings between east and west sides Neighborhood signs and plenty of them City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C CRA MEETING 9/14/05 QUESTIONS FROM THE RESIDENTS FINANCIAL How much and where is the money coming from for this ambitious project? Sounds like someone is going to make a lot of money. How can I get in on this? What a pipe dream. Where is the money? Do this within the current budget and no future tax increase in the future. Where is the money coming from? How much of our taxes will you be using for redevelopment of your vision? Does the CRA provide a way to fund some of these projects? What portion of residential property taxes fund the CRA and LAC. County, state and City? Was CRA or LAC funds used to fund the improvements on NE 38 St. East of NE 13 Ave.? A tiny number of people who do not like any change call developers greedy. Explain how developers contribute to the City financially with their projects. RELOCATION ASSISTANCE Are there any planned incentives for the residents affected by this? What is going to happen to the people in the homes where you want to redevelop? How will you plan to relocate the business to one district? Where would the industrial area be relocated? If I own W. Hooper and it is change residential, how are you handling the existing W. H.? ZONING How will the industrial property be acquired? If those who don’t want to sell, how will it be acquired? Why high density north of 38th east of Dixie? Will Hardy Junk yard and Rays be “out”? What will happen to the existing residential areas? Will they be converted to town homes? Why is the density 4/ac at the Watts Estate? SCHEDULE What is the time frame of these projects? What is the timetable for sewers and sidewalks on NE 5th Ave. off 46th St.? (south of City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C Commercial Blvd.) Why does it take so long? What can be done to expedite the redevelopment? Can we spark redevelopment? When 38 St will be finished. When 37 St be re-done. Why only dead end ½ block 40 St is being done. What happens to the rest? My driveway is “been path” in 2 or 3 places etc. Work very poor in 38 St. No new projects. Finish the one that is not yet done. EMINENT DOMAIN Will eminent domain come into play? What property do you have pinpointed for Eminent Domain? Will the CRA use eminent domain? If so, where and for what? There is major concern about eminent domain. How will the City deal with and explain this issue? APPEARANCE Cleanup, fix-up program – how will the City help homeowners who can’t afford to fix up their property either because of fixed income or low income? I strongly urge the City to REQUIRE FPL to underground electricals, or STANDARDIZE and raise the height of power poles to allow for tree canopy and uninterrupted power and better visuals. Code enforcement is a concern since in the past there has been a definite adversarial relationship between the City and home property owners. Will there be underground utilities on the 34th Ct. streetscape What are you going to do about the sod farm and other dilapidated building and properties (i.e. the taxi junkyard etc.)? What is the timeframe? OTHER NEIGHBORHOODS Why are you staring out your windows and looking past the majority of O.P.? Why not start on the outlying areas and bring it into a finish at City Hall? How about the exit off Commercial Blvd. when you talk about beauty? Decorative wall. Re-zone the Labor Agencies proliferating on Commercial. Bringing an undesirable element to a residential area. What is the east boundary of the City between Oakland Park Blvd. and NE 38 St., and what are the plans along this boundary? O.P. exit off I95 is no pretty site. Why start at Andrews? I see your plans for improvement, but how does it affect or improve my area if monies are allocated for Oakland Park. My address is 2780 S. Oakland Forest Dr. Why does LAC stop at Oakland Park Blvd.? Would stretching LAC south of City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C Oakland Park Blvd. strengthen the entry of City? Can the CRA area be expanded? The ENTIRE NANA AREA is not addressed. NANA brought O.P. nearly 10,000 voters and 4,000 residential tax properties. Why are we invited to CRA meeting? As the paying stepchild who will pay 25% of the funding needed and not even get one of our streets included. From the presentation, it appears that much consideration was given to improved community development. However, I did not hear of any of these improvements mentioned for the Rock Island Community. When will the Rock Island Community be considered? What type of development is being planned for the newly annexed area of North Andrews Garden area? How can other neighborhoods not in the CRA adopt these changes (e.g. the Powerline Road corridor)? PARKS How much park space will you actually add? What is your current level of service standard for parks? Will Harlem McBride Park have bathrooms? 43 RD ST What type of improvement will be made on 43 St. area? What specific improvements are being considered for the Harlem-McBride area? How much input will the residents have on these improvements? How will the residents who reside near 43 St. be affected on the City’s plan concerning downtown renovations? WATTS Re WATTS: Harlem-McBride 5-acre parcel – I’ve read about developments where homes surround a common green space and cars are restricted to perimeter. Is this the sort of development you would consider? What small part of residential will be changed to commercial or industrial? Why not build townhouses in the area for low income vs. 20 homes? City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C WINN-DIXIE NE 39 Ct. connecting to Andrews Ave.? Traffic is bad as it is now through residential areas. Won’t that create more traffic? Also what about Winn Dixie – are there going to be 6-story condos along Dixie Hwy? How will this affect residents and their homes west of Dixie Hwy. and East of 10th Ave.? If parking was looked into and resolved first a lot of redevelopment would follow. If not, then a lot of good plans will go by the waste side. If/when Winn Dixie closes, what could be done to improve the character and shopping at that complex? PARKING LAC needs parking structure first. W & E of Dixie. It will allow progressive development faster without as much eminent domain claims. NE 34 Court west of Dixie Hwy. is not a parking lot for downtown. This is a residential street and needs to remain one. BIKEWAYS New connecting roads should have bike paths. I strongly urge bike lanes be adopted across the City and tie-in with the county bike lanes. N.E. 38th St. is conspicuously lacking this. STREETS Would you consider improving Floranada Road through the proposed design district to connect it to the residential neighborhood to the East? ADMINISTRATIVE Who is on the CRA committee and how did they get there? Why are all the people you introduced standing in the back and not visible? How can we get minutes of these meetings? How can I get involved? Have you considered a property for property trade as a displacement alternative? What are you guys smoking? Can I be on the “art in public places” committee? Renaissance Center? Ft. Lauderdale, Wilton Manors and Dania Beach are embracing redevelopment. Are there any downsides to improving Oakland Park? Do businesses that are interested in bidding on the upcoming projects have to be registered MBE’s or WMBE’s? During the street renovations, what can handicapped persons do to access their homes City of Oakland Park Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) Plan Final- December 2005 C if your car cannot be parked in your driveway? Will RV’s / boat trailers and motorcycles be allowed on driveways? Improving recycling to make mandatory recycling to all business because all businesses make a lot of trash all kind much to be recycled!  Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286  %'$$$% %  1 2 $ %'$$ % ) ). %##((%$ % ) ). %3 %!"$ &'! "%' #$$ &)'  % )4 %%%'$$(.(&"".')$')"5 -- $))" N%!"$ &'! %,$)%,$ #- *(6 ()')'*")%$(O(#%'&')*"'".()%')7 $ $,". ') ()%$(   )'%* $8 $"*$()%$  &'%+$%')')%$9 $,/%$$)%'.''')%()%,$)%,$10 #-*(()')()"($)&*'&%(%')11 ')%$%)%,$)%,$#-*(()')/%$$12 )%'. $*#')$ ) *)%'/ *(( ,)$13 ) %,$)%,$ #- *( /%$$ ()') &'%+$14 $)%$( &'%+$ %' -()$ $%$%$%'#$15 *(( ($)$ ) ')%$ % ) %!"$ &'!16 %,$)%,$ #- *( ()') ($ *"$(17 &'%+$ %' +"%&#$) '*")%$( ,)$ )18 %,$)%,$ #- *( ()') /%$$ )%'.19 $"*$ "$(&$ ((%'. ()'*)*'(20 &'%) ()'*)*'( *"$ ) %()21 '$ $ &'!$ ')$ ) %!"$ &'!22 &*" ') &'%'# ()"($  +"%&#$)23 '+,&'%*'$()'*)*'((%),)24 &'% )( ,)$ ) %!"$ &'! %,$)%,$ #-25 *( ()') &'%+$ %' %)%$ &'%+$26 %' %$") &'%+$ %' (+'"). &'%+$27 %'$)+) 28 29 WHEREAS,256D:8?492CC6EE6:? 56>@?DEC2E652?56DE23=:D965E92E30 4:E:K6?D@7E96:EJ@7%2<=2?5&2C<56D:C652C656G6=@A65@H?E@H?%2<=2?5&2C<31 H9:49H@F=5AC@G:567@C2?:>AC@G654:G:446?E6CA656DEC:2?2446DD:3:=:EJ2?5>@C632 EC6642?@AJ33 34 WHEREAS,2(=F>2?5=:89E(EF5J:?:E:2E653JE96:EJ2?54@>A=6E65:?35 6DE23=:D9654@?5:E:@?D@73=:89E:?DA64:7:4=@42E:@?DH:E9:?E96:EJ@7%2<=2?536 &2C<244@C5:?8E@=@C:52(E2E6(E2EFE6D92AE6C &2CE37 38 WHEREAS E96 (=F> 2?5 =:89E (EF5J AC@G:565 E96 32D:D 7@C E96 :EJ @739 %2<=2?5&2C<E@6DE23=:D92@>>F?:EJ'656G6=@A>6?EC62H9:4992D2AAC@G6540 3JE96C@H2C5@F?EJ@>>:DD:@?:?#2J 41 42 WHEREAS,E967FEFC6=2?5FD66=6>6?E@7E964@>AC696?D:G6A=2?@7E9643 :EJ@7%2<=2?5&2C<6?4@FC286D4@>A24E56G6=@A>6?EH9:49:?4=F56D2>:IEFC6@744 4@>>F?:EJ D6CG:?8 FD6D DF49 2D 4@>>6C4:2= @77:46 6>A=@J>6?E4:G:4 2?545  Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286  :?DE:EFE:@?2=C64C62E:@?2?5@A6?DA2462?5C6D:56?E:2=492C24E6C:K653J2?677:4:6?E1 :?7C2DECF4EFC6 4=@D6<?:E ?6:893@C9@@5 2?5 D6?D6 @7 4@>>F?:EJ AC6D6CG2E:@? @72 ?2EFC2=DJDE6>DAC@>@E:@?@7A656DEC:2?4:C4F=2E:@?2?54@?G6?:6?E2446DDE@>2DD3 EC2?D:E724:=:E:6DH:E9:?2"@42=4E:G:EJ6?E6C4 5 WHEREASE96C@H2C5@F?EJ"2?5*D6&=2?C6BF:C6DE92E2"@42=4E:G:EJ6 6?E6C56D:8?2E:@?:?4=F564C:E6C:27@C2446DDE@>2DDEC2?D:EFD6@77=6I@CC6D6CG67 F?:ED367@C6255:?856?D:EJ?@?6E=@DD@7A2C<=2?52>:I@7FD6D2?52?2C62  8 24C6D@C=6DD9 10 WHEREAS,@? F?6  E96C@H2C5@F?EJ@>>:DD:@?56D:8?2E65211 D64E:@?@7E96:EJ@7%2<=2?5&2C<2D2"@42=4E:G:EJ6?E6C@?E96@F?EJ=2?512 FD6A=2?2?5E96:EJ@>>:DD:@?2AAC@G65E96=2?5FD62>6?5>6?E@? F=J 13 14 15 WHEREAS C6=J:?8 @? 2 6IE6?D:G6 AF3=:4 A2CE:4:A2E:@? AC@46DD E96 :EJ16 @>>:DD:@?@7E96:EJ@7%2<=2?5&2C<92D56E6C>:?65E92E:EH:D96DE@4C62E6217 @H?E@H?%2<=2?5&2C<#:I65*D6:DEC:4E:?E9656D:8?2E65"@42=4E:G:EJ6?E6C18 19 WHEREAS,:E:DE96:?E6?E@7E96:EJ@>>:DD:@?E92EN@H?E@H?%2<=2?520 &2C<OH:==36E96:EJPDEC25:E:@?2=4@>>6C4:2=46?E6CH:E92F?:BF6=@C:52492C24E6C21 @776C:?82>:I@7C6E2:=2?5D6CG:463FD:?6DD@FE5@@C5:?:?82?54@>>F?:EJA2C<D22 2?5 @A6? DA246 :? 2? 26DE96E:42==J A=62D:?8 D276 2?5 7C:6?5=J 6?G:C@?>6?E 7@C23 C6D:56?ED@72==286D2?5G:D:E@CDE@E962C6224 25 NOW THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY COMMISSION OF THE CITY 26 OF OAKLAND PARK, FLORIDA THAT: 27 28 Section 1.)96:EJ@>>:DD:@?96C63JC2E:7:6D2?54@?7:C>DE96N,96C62DO29 4=2FD6DD6E7@CE923@G62D36:?8ECF62?54@CC64E2?5:D96C63J>2562DA64:7:4A2CE30 @7E9:D%C5:?2?46 31 32 Section 2.)96:EJ@>>:DD:@?@7E96:EJ@7%2<=2?5&2C<=@C:5296C63J33 2>6?5DE96@56@7%C5:?2?46DDA64:7:42==J92AE6C E@4C62E6CE:4=6--E@3634 6?E:E=65N%2<=2?5&2C<@H?E@H?#:I65*D6:DEC:4E'68F=2E:@?DO@7E96@56@735 %C5:?2?46DE@AC@G:562D7@==@HD36 37 Section 24-254. Title. 38 )96D6C68F=2E:@?DD92==36<?@H?2D4:E652D2?5C676CC65E@2DE96N%2<=2?5&2C<39 @H?E@H?#:I65*D6:DEC:4E'68F=2E:@?D O40 41 Section 24-255. Table of Contents. 42 (64E:@?   FE9@C:EJ 43  (64E:@?   @?7=:4EDH:E9@E96C92AE6CD2?5'68F=2E:@?D 44  Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286  (64E:@?   &FCA@D62?5?E6?E 1 (64E:@?   67:?:E:@?D 2 (64E:@?   C62@7@H?E@H?#:I65*D6:DEC:4E 3 (64E:@?   6G6=@A>6?E'68F=2E:@?D 4 (64E:@?   7764E:G62E6 5 (64E:@?   :DEC:4E(F32C62D 6  @F=6G2C5@>>6C4:2= 7  $@CE9?5*C32?'6D:56?E:2= 8 &2C<&=246 9 :G:4*D6 10 :I:6#:I65*D6 11 '6D:56?E:2=%77:46F776C 12 )96$6:893@C9@@5D 13 (64E:@?   *C32?6D:8? 14 (64E:@?   @H?E@H?#:I65*D6:DEC:4E*D6)23=6 15 (64E:@?   446DD@CJ(ECF4EFC6D 16 (64E:@?   $@?4@?7@C>:?8*D6D2?5(ECF4EFC6D 17 (64E:@?   "2?5D42A:?8 18 (64E:@?   55:E:@?2=F:=5:?86:89E&C@8C2> 19 (64E:@?   &2C<:?8 20 (64E:@?   66D 21 (64E:@?   6G6=@A>6?E'6G:6H&C@465FC6 22 (64E:@?   &C@9:3:E65(ECF4EFC6D 23 (64E:@?   %77D:E6C2:?286 24 (64E:@?   &F3=:4CE&C@8C2> 25 26 Section 24-256. Authority. 27 )96D6C68F=2E:@?D2C625@AE65AFCDF2?EE@92AE6C &2CE=@C:52(E2EFE6D 28 29 Sec. 24-257. Conflicts with other Chapters and Regulations. 30 ,96?4@?7=:4EDH:E9@E96C:EJ@7%2<=2?5&2C<=2?556G6=@A>6?E4@56C68F=2E:@?D31 @44FC E9:D CE:4=6 -- D92== E2<6 AC64656?46   @C DF3;64ED ?@E 4@?E2:?65 :? E9:D32 CE:4=6 E96 :EJ @7 %2<=2?5 &2C< =2?5 56G6=@A>6?E 4@56 D92== 36 FE:=:K65   ==33 56G6=@A>6?EH:E9:?E96@H?E@H?#:I65*D6:DEC:4ED92==364@?D:DE6?EH:E9E9634  Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286 "@42=4E:G:EJ6?E6C"2?5*D6&=2?)6IE>6?5>6?E2DC646CE:7:653JE96C@H2C51 @F?EJ&=2??:?8@F?4:=@?%4E@36C   2 3 Sec. 24-258. Purpose and Intent. 4 2 )96 AFCA@D6 @7 E96D6 C68F=2E:@?D :D E@ 4C62E6 2 DECF4EFC6 7@C E965 C656G6=@A>6?E@7N@H?E@H?%2<=2?5&2C<O2DD6E7@CE9:?E96@H?E@H?6 %2<=2?5&2C<#2DE6C&=2? )9C@F892A=2??:?8AC@46DD:EH2D56E6C>:?657 E92E E96 @H?E@H? #:I65 *D6 :DEC:4E H@F=5 36 C656G6=@A65 32D65@?28 4@>>F?:EJ G:D:@? 2==@H:?8 >:I65FD6 @AA@CEF?:E:6D 6?4@FC28:?8 56D:C23=69 5@H?E@H? C656G6=@A>6?E 7@DE6C:?8 D>2CE 8C@HE9 2?5 64@?@>:410 56G6=@A>6?E 2 7@4FD @? EC2?D:E 3:<6 2?5 A656DEC:2? @C:6?E2E:@? AF3=:411 A2C<:?8 2?5 4C62E:?8 =@42E:@?D 7@C AF3=:4 6G6?ED 2?5 24E:G:E:6D   )96D612 @H?E@H?#:I65*D6:DEC:4E'68F=2E:@?DD6E7@CE9E@42CCJ@FEE96@H?E@H?13 %2<=2?5 &2C< #2DE6C &=2? E9C@F89 :EJ 5:C64E:@? @7 3F:=5:?8 7@C>14 2C49:E64EFC6=2?5FD6D2?5255:E:@?@7AF3=:42>6?:E:6D 15 3 )96 :EJ @>>:DD:@? 566>D :E E96 :?E6C6DE @7 E96 AF3=:4 962=E9 D276EJ16 >@C2=D4@>7@CE2?586?6C2=H6=72C6@7E96:EJ2?5:EDC6D:56?EDE@6DE23=:D9217 86?6C2= A=2? 7@C E96 C656G6=@A>6?E @7 E96 :EJ 56D:8?2E65 2D E96 "@42=18 4E:G:EJ6?E6C 19 4 )96:EJ@>>:DD:@?@7E96:EJ@7%2<=2?5&2C<7:?5DE92EE966?24E>6?E@720 E9:D @C5:?2?46 D92== D6CG6 2?5 36EE6C E96 AF3=:4 H6=72C6 2?5 36?67:E E9621 4:E:K6?D 2?5 C6D:56?ED @7 E96 :EJ AC@G:5:?8 7@C 2 @C56C=J 2?5DECF4EFC6522 56G6=@A>6?EAC@46DD7@CE962C62@7E96:EJ56D:8?2E652DE96%2<=2?5&2C<23 @H?E@H?#:I65*D6:DEC:4E ?D6EE:?823@FEE@4C62E6E96@H?E@H?#:I6524 *D6 :DEC:4E E96 :EJ @>>:DD:@? E2<6D :?E@ 244@F?E E96 7:?5:?8D25 :?E6CAC6E2E:@?D2?5?2CC@H:?84@?DECF4E:@?D:?4@CA@C2E65:??F>6C@FD42D6D26 :?4=F5:?83FE?@E=:>:E65E@Louis vs. City of Atlantic Beach (@  5 27 =2 DE  The City of Miami Beach vs. Arlen King Cole 28 Condominium Association, Inc. (@  5C5 ); 3M National 29 Advertising Co. vs. City of Tampa Code Enforcement Code (@  5 30 =2 ?5 2?5Hobbes vs. Department of Transportation (@  531 =2E9 2?57:?5DE92E32 33  )966?24E>6?E@7E9:D@C5:?2?464C62E:?8E96@H?E@H?#:I65FD6:DEC:4EH:==34 D6CG6E@AC@>@E62?536?67:EE96H6=72C62?5D276EJ@7E96:EJ 35  )96 C656G6=@A>6?E @7 E96 2C62 25;246?E E@ E96 :I:6 :89H2J4@CC:5@C H9:4936 >2<6D FA E96 @H?E@H? #:I65 *D6 :DEC:4E H:== D6CG6 E96 AF3=:4H6=72C6 3J37 4C62E:?82?5AC@G:5:?87:?2?4:2=G:23:=:EJ7@CE96:EJ@7%2<=2?5&2C< 38   )96 4C62E:@? @7 E96 @H?E@H? #:I65 *D6 :DEC:4E H:== D6CG6 E@ AC@E64E 2?539 6?92?46 E96 C6D:56?E:2= 492C24E6C @7 E96 :EJ 2?5 AC@>@E6 E96 D6?D6 @740 4@>>F?:EJ 41   C62E:@?@7E96@H?E@H?#:I65*D6:DEC:4EH:==D6CG6E@4@?D6CG62?5AC@E64E42 AC@A6CEJ 2?5 AC@A6CEJ G2=F6D 2?5 H:== D64FC6 2? 2AAC@AC:2E6 FD6 @7 E96 =2?543  Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286 H:E9:?E96:DEC:4EE@:?DFC6E92EE96=@?8DE2?5:?8D6?D6@74@>>F?:EJ2?:?EC682=1 4@>A@?6?E@7E96:EJ@7%2<=2?5&2C<:DAC6D6CG65 2 3 Sec. 24-259. Definitions. 4 Alteration.?J492?86C62CC2?86>6?E6?=2C86>6?E6IE6?D:@?@CC65F4E:@?5 @72?JDECF4EFC6@C2?J492?86:?242E68@CJ@7@44FA2?4J@72DECF4EFC6 6 =E6C2E:@?:?4=F56D2?J@7E967@==@H:?87 2 92?86DE@E96724256@723F:=5:?88 3 92?86DE@E96:?E6C:@C@723F:=5:?89 4 ?4C62D6D@C564C62D6D:?7=@@C2C62@723F:=5:?810 5 92?86DE@@E96CDECF4EFC6D@?E96K@?:?8=@E@CE964@?DECF4E:@?@7211 ?6HDECF4EFC612 6  92?86DE@6IE6C:@C:>AC@G6>6?ED2?513 7  92?86:?FD6 14 15 Arcade.4@G6C65H2=<H2J=@42E65@?E968C@F?57=@@C@723F:=5:?8H9:49:D16 @A6? E@ E96 DEC66E 6I46AE 7@C DFAA@CE:?8 4@=F>?D @C A:6CD   C4256D 2C617 C64@>>6?5652=@?8:I:6:89H2J2?5$ E9G6?F6 )96J>2JC2?867C@>18  P:?56AE97C@>7246@74@=F>?E@7246@73F:=5:?8 19 20 Block.4@>3:?2E:@?@73F:=5:?8=@EDE96A6C:>6E6C@7H9:4923FEDDEC66ED 21 22 Buildings ?JDECF4EFC6E92E6?4=@D6D@C4@G6CDE96DA246FD67@CD96=E6C:?82?J23 @44FA2?4J 24 25 Canopy.23C:4 4@G6C:?8 A656DEC:2? A2E9 E@ AC@E64E A656DEC:2?D 7C@>26 6?G:C@?>6?E2=6=6>6?ED 27 28 Change of Use  @C AFCA@D6D @7 E9:D D64E:@? 2?J AC@A@D65 492?86 @7 FD629 C656G6=@A>6?E@C>@5:7:42E:@?@7E96492C24E6CEJA6@C:?E6?D:EJ@7FD6@72?30 6I:DE:?83F:=5:?8@CD:E6 31 32 Commercial.?J24E:G:EJ4@?5F4E65H:E9E96:?E6?E@7C62=:K:?82AC@7:E7C@>E9633 D2=6@78@@5D@CD6CG:46DE@@E96CD 34 35 Cornice. ?@C?2>6?E2=9@C:K@?E2=>@=5:?8E92EDA2?DE96E@A@723F:=5:?8PD36 DECF4EFC2=362> 4@C?:46:D2564@C2E:G6762EFC6E92E7C2>6D@C4C@H?D237 3F:=5:?8 38 39 Development.@?DECF4E:@?C64@?DECF4E:@?4@?G6CD:@?DECF4EFC2=2=E6C2E:@?40 C6=@42E:@?6?=2C86>6?E@C56>@=:E:@?@72DECF4EFC6 41 42 Frontage. )96AC@A6CEJ=:?6@C=:?6D@72=@EH9:494@:?4:56H:E92C@25H2JPD43 C:89E@7H2J 44  Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286 Habitable space.  DA246 56G@E65 E@ C6D:56?E:2= 4@>>6C4:2= @C @E96C FD6D1 A6C>:EE653JE96D6C68F=2E:@?D2?5?@E:?4=F5:?8A2C<:?8 2 3 Height.#62DFC6@7E96@G6C2==96:89E@723F:=5:?8@CDECF4EFC6>62DFC657C@>4 E96>:?:>F>7=@@C6=6G2E:@?2DA6C(64E:@?D   2?5  @7E96:EJ@75 %2<=2?5&2C<"2?56G6=@A>6?E@56E@E@A@7362>@7E96FAA6C>@DEDE@CJ 6 '@@7DECF4EFC6D2C6?@E:?4=F565:?E96@G6C2==96:89E@7E963F:=5:?89@H6G6C7 E96J >FDE ?@E 6I4665 2? 2G6C286 @7 P :? 96:89E H:E9 2 >2I:>F> @7 P8 2==@H2?467@C6=6G2E@CD927EDDE2:CH6==D2?5C@@7A:E49 9 10 Land Development Code )9@D6A@CE:@?D@7E96@56@7%C5:?2?46D@7E96:EJ11 @7 %2<=2?5 &2C< H9:49 C68F=2E6 E96 56G6=@A>6?E 2?5 @C FD6 @7 C62= AC@A6CEJ12 H:E9:? E96 :EJ 2?5 H9:49 2C6 4@?D:DE6?E H:E9 :? H9:49 :>A=6>6?E E9613 4@>AC696?D:G6A=2? 14 15 Loft.'6D:56?E:2=F?:EH:E9EH@7=@@CDH96C6E96FAA6C>@DE7=@@C:D@G6C=@@<:?816 E96AC:>2CJ=:G:?87=@@CH:E9:?E96F?:EPD32CC:6CH2==D )96=@7EC6D:56?E:2=F?:ED92==17 ?@E36=@42E652EE96DEC66E=6G6= 18 19 Mixed-use. 4@>3:?2E:@?@7C6D:56?E:2=FD6DH:E94@>>6C4:2=4:G:42?5 @C@77:4620 FD6DH:E9:?2D:?8=63F:=5:?8 21 22 Net area. )96 E@E2= 2C62 >62DFC65 E@ E96 AC@A6CEJ =:?6D @7 E96 A2C46= @C=@E23 6I4=F5:?8AF3=:4C:89E@7H2JD 24 25 Net density.)96?F>36C@7C6D:56?E:2=5H6==:?8F?:ED4@?DECF4E65@CAC@A@D65E@26 364@?DECF4E65H:E9:?2A2C46=@7=2?55:G:5653JE96?6E2C62@7E96A2C46=@727 =2?5 28 29 Open Space. ?@FE5@@C2E8C256DA246H9:49:D2446DD:3=6E@E96AF3=:42==@C30 >@DE @7 E96 E:>6 :?4=F5:?8 A2C<D DBF2C6D A2D6@D A656DEC:2? A2E9D 2?531 =2?5D42A652C62D '@@7E@A82C56?D2?5E6CC246D@A6?E@E96AF3=:44@F=52=D@32 364@?D:56C652D@A6?DA2462?57F=7:==2?J@A6?DA246C6BF:C6>6?EDH:E9:?233 56G6=@A>6?E 34 35 Paseo.4C@DD3=@4<AC:>2C:=JA656DEC:2?A2DD2864@??64E:?8@?6C:89E@7H2J36 @CD:>:=2CA2DD286E@2?@E96C 37 38 Pedestal.)963@EE@>A@CE:@?@723F:=5:?8E92E4C62E6DDEC66E7C@?E286 39 40 Pervious Area. "2?5D42A652?5 @C8C2DD652C62@72=@EH9:492==@HDH2E6C7=@H41 E@7=@H5:C64E=JE@E968C@F?5 42 43  Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286 Plaza.  ? @A6? DA246 H96C6 2 >2;@C:EJ @7 E96 DA246 :D A2G65   &=2K2D2C61 7C@?E65H:E93F:=5:?8DE92E4@?E:?F6E9625;246?EDEC66E7C@?E286C6BF:C6>6?ED2?52 FD6D 3 4 Private open space. )96@FE5@@C=:G:?82C625:C64E=J25;@:?:?825H6==:?8F?:E@C5 3F:=5:?8:?E6?5657@CE96AC:G2E66?;@J>6?E@7E96C6D:56?ED@C@44FA2?ED@7E966 5H6==:?8 F?:E @C 3F:=5:?8   &C:G2E6 @A6? DA246D >2J :?4=F56 A2E:@D 2?57 =2?5D42A652C62D3FE5@6D?@E:?4=F56@77DEC66EA2C<:?8>2?6FG6C:?8=@25:?88 @C56=:G6CJ2C62D 9 10 Public amenity.6DE96E:4@C@E96C492C24E6C@7256G6=@A>6?EE92E:?4C62D6:ED11 56D:C23:=:EJ E@ 2 4@>>F?:EJ @C :ED >2C<6E23:=:EJ E@ E96 AF3=:4 (F49AF3=:412 2>6?:E:6DH:==36A=2465:?AF3=:4=J2446DD:3=62C62D@C2C62DG:D:3=67C@>E9613 D:56H2=<@CC:89E@7H2J 14 15 Public Open Space.%A6?DA246>2:?E2:?657@CE96FD62?56?;@J>6?E@7E9616 86?6C2=AF3=:4 &F3=:4@A6?DA246:?4=F56D2C62DH9:492C62446DD:3=6E@E9617 AF3=:42==@C>@DE@7E96E:>6:?4=F5:?8A2C<DDBF2C6DA2D6@DA656DEC:2?A2E9D18 2?5=2?5D42A652C62D '@@7E@A82C56?D2?5E6CC246D@A6?E@E96AF3=:44@F=519 2=D@364@?D:56C652D@A6?DA2462?57F=7:==2?J@A6?DA246C6BF:C6>6?EDH:E9:?20 256G6=@A>6?E 21 22 Residential '68F=2C=JFD653J:ED@44FA2?ED2D2A6C>2?6?EA=246@723@56 23 24 Retail Use. )96D6==:?8@78@@5DH2C6D@C>6C492?5:D65:C64E=JE@E96F=E:>2E625 4@?DF>6C@CA6CD@?DH:E9@FE2C6D2=6=:46?D6 26 27 Setback.ҏ)96 >:?:>F> 5:DE2?46 3J H9:49 2?J 3F:=5:?8 @C DECF4EFC6 >FDE 3628 D6A2C2E657C@>2AC@A6CEJ=:?6 )9:D5:DE2?46H:==36>62DFC657C@>E96AC@A6CEJ29 =:?6E@E963F:=5:?8@CDECF4EFC6H2==32D6 30 31 Shared parking.&2C<:?8FD653J>@C6E92?@?6FD6@C@?63F:=5:?8 (92C6532 A2C<:?842?36FD65E@>66EA2C<:?8C6BF:C6>6?EDDF3;64EE@E962AAC@G2=@7E9633 :EJ 34 35 Story. 923:E23=6DA246:?23F:=5:?836EH66?E96DFC7246@72?J7=@@C2?5E9636 DFC7246 @7 E96 ?6IE 7=@@C 23@G6 @C :7 E96C6 :D ?@ 7=@@C 23@G6 E96? E96 DA24637 36EH66? DF49 7=@@C 2?5 E96 C@@7 362> 23@G6  )@ 36 4@?D:56C65 2DE@CJ E9638 923:E23=6DA246>FDE6I4665 @7E967=@@C2C62A6CDE@CJ 39 40 Street.E9@C@F8972C6E@724:=:E2E6E96>@G6>6?E@7A656DEC:2?D2?5 @CG69:4=6D 41 42 Sub-area./@?:?842E68@CJ56A:4E:?8C68F=2E:@?D@G6C256D:8?2E652C62 43 44 Townhome.?E6CC6=2E65D:?8=672>:=J5H6==:?8F?:EDH9:492C6;@:?65E@@?645 2?@E96C D:56E@D:56 3J 2 4@>>@? A2CEJ H2== @C 82C286 2?5 @C H:E946  Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286 4@??64E:?8 A6C>2?6?E 2?5 2C49:E64EFC2==J F?:7:65 DECF4EFC6D DF49 2D1 3C66K6H2JD42CA@CED@CH2==DH9:49DECF4EFC6D4@?E:?F6E9656D:8?A2EE6C?2 2?5 @C>2E6C:2=D@7E967242567C@>@?65H6==:?8F?:EE@2?@E96C @??64E:?83 DECF4EFC6D2?5@FE5@@C=:G:?8DA246>2J36D@56D:8?652DE@AC@G:562446DD4 36EH66?7C@?E2?5C62CJ2C5D 249F?:ED92==92G6:ED@H?@FED:566?EC2?465 2?5 ?@E 36 @44FA:65 3J >@C6 E92? @?6 72>:=J   %H?6CD9:A @7 :?5:G:5F2=6 5H6==:?8F?:ED2?5=2?5:D766D:>A=6 7 8 Sec. 24-260. Area of Downtown Mixed Use District. 9 )96D6C68F=2E:@?D2AA=JE@E962C62567:?65:?E96:EJ@7%2<=2?5&2C<FEFC6"2?510 *D6>2A56D:8?2E65N"@42=4E:G:EJ6?E6C O)9:D2C62H:==36C676CC65E@:?E9611 7@==@H:?8C68F=2E:@?D2DE96N@H?E@H?#:I65*D6:DEC:4E O12 13 Sec. 24-261. Development Regulations. 14 ?J 2=E6C2E:@? 56G6=@A>6?E @C C656G6=@A>6?E H:E9:? E96 @H?E@H? #:I65 *D615 :DEC:4ED92==4@?7@C>E@E96C68F=2E:@?DD6E7@CE9:?E9:D92AE6C CE:4=6-- 16 17 Sec. 24-262. Effective date.18 )9:D 92AE6C  CE:4=6 -- @H?E@H? #:I65 *D6 :DEC:4E '68F=2E:@?D D92== 3619 67764E:G62D@7E962AAC@G2=2?5A2DD2863JE96%2<=2?5&2C<:EJ@>>:DD:@? 20 21  Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286 Sec. 24-263. District Sub-areas. 1 )96C6D92==36D6G6?(F32C62D6I:DE:?8:?E96@H?E@H?#:I65*D6:DEC:4EH9@D62 =@42E:@?D2C656A:4E65@?E96>2A:?E9:D(64E:@? )96(F32C62D2D7@==@HD3  Boulevard Commercial.4  North End Urban Residential.5 Park Place6 Civic Use.7 Dixie Mixed Use.8 Residential Office Buffer.9 The Neighborhoods.10 11 12  Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286  (1) Boulevard Commercial Sub-area.1  Purpose.)96@F=6G2C5@>>6C4:2=DF32C62:D56D:8?2E652DE96D@FE96C?2 6?ECJH2J:?E@E96@H?E@H?#:I65*D6:DEC:4E &@E6?E:2=AF3=:42>6?:E:6D:?4=F5623 82E6H2J762EFC6 )96DF32C62H:==4@?E:?F6E@92G64@>>6C4:2=FD6DH:E93F:=5:?8D4 @C:6?E2E65E@%2<=2?5&2C<@F=6G2C5 5 6  Design Requirements.'676CE@(64E:@?   %2<=2?5&2C<@H?E@H?#:I657 *D6:DEC:4E6D:8?F:56=:?6D 8 9 Uses. '676CE@(64E:@?   @H?E@H?#:I65FD6:DEC:4E*D6)23=6 10 11  Sub-area boundaries.)96@F=6G2C5@>>6C4:2=DF32C62:D3@F?5653J2DE12 %2<=2?5&2C<@F=6G2C5E@E96D@FE9$ E9G6?F6E@E96H6DE$ ?5(EC66EE@13 E96?@CE92?5$ E9G6?F6E@E9662DE 14 15 )96>2A36=@H56D:8?2E6DE96@F=6G2C5@>>6C4:2=DF32C6216 17 18 19 20  Dimensional Requirements Table.21 22 Building Height )9C66 DE@C:6D H:E9 2 >2I:>F> 96:89E @7 E9:CEJD:I  766E   7 C6BF:C6>6?ED@7E9655:E:@?2=F:=5:?86:89E&C@8C2>(64    2C6>6ED:IDE@C:6DH:E92>2I:>F>96:89E@7D6G6?EJD:I766E D92==362==@H65  Parking (66(64    &2C<:?8  Front P>:?:>F> Side P>:?:>F> Setbacks (66 6D:8? F:56=:?6D 7@C 255:E:@?2=C6BF:C6>6?ED Rear P H:E9 3F776C:?8 E@ C6D:56?E:2= AC@A6CE:6D 2D C6BF:C65 :? E96 6D:8?F:56=:?6D  Minimum Pervious Area @7?6E2C62  23 24  Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286  (2) North End Urban Residential Sub-area.1  Purpose. )96 $@CE9 ?5 *C32? '6D:56?E:2= DF32C62 D92== 92G6 2 C6D:56?E:2=2 7@4FD H:E9 D@>6 ?6:893@C9@@5 D6CG:?8 3FD:?6DD6D   @>>6C4:2= FD6D D92== ?@E3 6I4665@7E96E@E2=3F:=5:?88C@DD7=@@C2C62@7E96DF32C62 )96$@CE9?54 *C32?'6D:56?E:2=DF32C622=D@AC@G:56D2?6?ECJH2JE@E96@H?E@H?:DEC:4E7@C5 EC277:42AAC@249:?87C@>E96?@CE9 6 7 Design Requirements.'676CE@(64E:@?   %2<=2?5&2C<@H?E@H?#:I658 *D6:DEC:4E6D:8?F:56=:?6D 9 10 Uses. '676CE@(64E:@?   @H?E@H?#:I65FD6:DEC:4E*D6)23=6 11 12  Sub-area boundaries.)96$@CE9?5*C32?'6D:56?E:2=DF32C62:D3@F?5653J13 E96?@CE9C:89E@7H2J=:?6@7$E9(EC66E2EE96D@FE9AC@A6CEJ=:?6@7%2<=2?514 (E2E:@?2?54C@DD:?8@G6CE96C:89E@7H2JE@E9662DEC:89E@7H2J=:?6@7:I:615 :89H2J2EE96?@CE962DE4@C?6C@7$(EC66E2?5:I:6:89H2J>@G:?8?@CE9E@16 $(EC66EE9662DED:56@7%2<=2?5&2C< ?555:E:@? =@4<"@ED 17 2?5 E96D@FE9D:56@7%2<=2?5&2C< ?555:E:@? =@4<"@ED  E9618 H6DED:56@7%2<=2?5&2C< ?555:E:@? =@4<"@ED 2?5 2?5$E919 (EC66E@?E96D@FE9$ E9G6?F6E96C62CAC@A6CEJ=:?6@7E96F?C64@C56520 24C6286AC@A6CEJ=@42E65@?E96H6DED:56@7:I:6:89H2J36EH66?$ 2?5$21  (EC66ED2?5?@CE92=@?8E96H6DEC:89E@7H2J=:?6@7:I:6:89H2J@?E96H6DE22 $ (EC66EE96?@CE9AC@A6CEJ=:?6@7E96:I:6"2?5>2C<&=2E 766E24C@DDE9623 '2:=C@252?5E96?@CE9AC@A6CEJ=:?6@7%2<=2?5(E2E:@?@?E96?@CE92?5E9624 62DEC:89E@7H2J=:?6@7E96'2:=C@252?5E9662DEAC@A6CEJ=:?6@7%2<=2?525 (E2E:@?@?E9662DE 26  Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286  )96>2A36=@H56D:8?2E6DE96$@CE9?5*C32?'6D:56?E:2=DF32C621 2 3 4 5  Dimensional Requirements Table. 6 7 Building Height )9C66 DE@C:6D H:E9 2 >2I:>F> 96:89E @7 E9:CEJD:I  766E   7 C6BF:C6>6?ED@7E9655:E:@?2=F:=5:?86:89E&C@8C2>(64   2C6>6ED:IDE@C:6DH:E92>2I:>F>96:89E@7D6G6?EJD:I 766ED92==362==@H65  Residential Unit Area  DBF2C6766E2G6C2868C@DD7=@@C2C62 #:?:>F> DBF2C6 7@@E8C@DD7=@@C2C62  Parking (66(64    &2C<:?8 Residential Density F?:EDA6C?6E24C6  Front P>:?:>F> Side P>:?:>F> Setbacks (66 6D:8? F:56=:?6D 7@C 255:E:@?2=C6BF:C6>6?ED Rear P>:?:>F> Minimum Pervious Area @7?6E2C62   Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286  (3) Park Place Sub-area.1  Purpose. &2C< &=246 :D 56D:8?2E65 2D E96 6A:46?E6C @7 E96 %2<=2?5 &2C<2 @H?E@H?:DEC:4E E:D:?E6?565E@364@>62=@42= 56DE:?2E:@?H:E92D:8?2EFC63 2C49:E64EFC2=56D:8?>:I65FD63F:=5:?8DH:E94@>>6C4:2=FD6D@?E967:CDE7=@@C2?54 AF3=:482E96C:?82C62D '6D:56?E:2=FD6D2C6AC@9:3:E65@?E968C@F?57=@@C@72==5 3F:=5:?8D56G6=@A65F?56CE96@H?E@H?#:I65*D6:DEC:4E'68F=2E:@?D 6 7 Design Requirements.'676CE@(64E:@?   %2<=2?5&2C<@H?E@H?#:I658 *D6:DEC:4E6D:8?F:56=:?6D 9 10 Uses. '676CE@(64E:@?   @H?E@H?#:I65FD6:DEC:4E*D6)23=611 12  Sub-area boundaries.)96&2C<&=246DF32C62:D3@F?5653J$E9(EC66E@?13 E96D@FE9E9662DE6C?D:56@7%2<=2?5&2C< ?555:E:@? =@4<"@ED 14 2?5 %2<=2?5&2C< ?555:E:@? =@4<"@ED 2?5 %2<=2?5&2C<15 ?555:E:@? =@4<"@ED 2?5 @?E96H6DE$E9(EC66E@?E9616 ?@CE9E96H6DE6C?D:56@7%2<=2?5&2C< DE55:E:@? =@4<"@ED 2?5 17 2?5$ )6CC246@?E9662DE 18 19  Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286  )96>2A36=@H56D:8?2E6DE96&2C<&=246DF32C621 2 3 4 5  Dimensional Requirements Table.6 7 Building Height )9C66 DE@C:6D H:E9 2 >2I:>F> 96:89E @7 E9:CEJD:I  766E   7 C6BF:C6>6?ED @7 E96 55:E:@?2= F:=5:?8 6:89E &C@8C2> (64   2C6>6ED:IDE@C:6DH:E92>2I:>F>96:89E@7?:?6EJ 766E D92==362==@H65  Residential Unit Area   DBF2C6 766E 2G6C286 8C@DD7=@@C 2C62  #:?:>F>  DBF2C6 7@@E8C@DD7=@@C2C62  Parking (66(64    &2C<:?8  Residential Density F?:EDA6C?6E24C6  Front :I:6:89H2J P>:?:>F> $ E9G6?F6 P Side P>:?:>F> Setbacks (66 6D:8? F:56=:?6D 7@C 255:E:@?2=C6BF:C6>6?ED  Rear P>:?:>F> Minimum Pervious Area @7?6E2C62  8  Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286  (4) Civic Use Sub-area.1 (A) Purpose. )96 :G:4 *D6 DF32C62 :D :?E6?565 E@ AC@G:56 DA246 7@C 4:G:42 8@G6C?>6?E 2?5 A@DE2= FD6D 2D H6== 2D 2C62D 7@C 4@>>F?:EJ 724:=:E:6D :?4=F5:?83 =:3C2C:6D2?5>FD6F>D 4 5 Design Requirements.'676CE@(64E:@?   %2<=2?5&2C<@H?E@H?#:I656 *D6:DEC:4E6D:8?F:56=:?6D 7 8 Uses. '676CE@(64E:@?   @H?E@H?#:I65FD6:DEC:4E*D6)23=6 9 10  Sub-area boundaries.)96:G:4*D6DF32C6292DEH@D64E:@?D  )9:DD64E:@?11 :D3@F?5653J$E9(EC66EE@E96D@FE9$ E9G6?F6E@E96H6DE$E912 (EC66EE@E96?@CE92?5$ E9G6?F6E@E9662DE  )9:DD64E:@?:D3@F?5653J13 $C5(EC66EE@E96D@FE9$ E9G6?F6E@E96H6DE$E9(EC66EE@E96?@CE914 2?5$ E9G6?F6E@E9662DE 15 16  Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286  )96>2A36=@H56D:8?2E6DE96:G:4*D6DF32C621 2 3 4 5 :>6?D:@?2='6BF:C6>6?ED)23=6 6 7 Building Height )9C66 DE@C:6D H:E9 2 >2I:>F> 96:89E @7 E9:CEJD:I  766E   7 C6BF:C6>6?ED@7E9655:E:@?2=F:=5:?86:89E&C@8C2>(64   2C6>6E7:G6DE@C:6DH:E92>2I:>F>96:89E@7D:IEJ6:89E 766ED92==362==@H65  Parking (66(64    &2C<:?8  Front $@?6  Side P >:?:>F>  =@E =:?6 :? 2==@H23=6 E@H? 9@>6 56G6=@A>6?ED 2?5  =@E =:?6 D:?8=6 72>:=J =@ED H96C6 E96 25;246?ED:56:D2>:?:>F>@7 P7C@>=@E=:?62?5>:?:>:K65 H:?5@H2E =@E=:?6  Setbacks (66 6D:8? F:56=:?6D 7@C 255:E:@?2=C6BF:C6>6?ED  Rear P>:?:>F> Minimum Pervious Area @7?6E2C62   Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286  (5) Dixie Mixed Use Sub-area.1 (A) Purpose. )96 :I:6 #:I65 FD6 DF32C62 C68F=2E:@?D H:== 6?4@FC286 2 >:I@72 4@>>6C4:2= 2?5 C6D:56?E:2= FD6D   '6D:56?E:2= FD6D 2C6 AC@9:3:E65 @? E96 8C@F?53 7=@@C@72==3F:=5:?8D56G6=@A65F?56CE96@H?E@H?#:I65*D6:DEC:4E'68F=2E:@?D 4 5 Design Requirements.'676CE@(64E:@?   %2<=2?5&2C<@H?E@H?#:I656 *D6:DEC:4E6D:8?F:56=:?6D 7 8 Uses. '676CE@(64E:@?   @H?E@H?#:I65FD6:DEC:4E*D6)23=6 9 10  Sub-area boundaries.)96:I:6#:I65*D6DF32C6292DEH@D64E:@?D  )9:D11 D64E:@?:D3@F?5653J$ ?5(EC66EE@E96D@FE9$ E9G6?F6E@E96H6DE$12 E92?5$C5(EC66EDE@E96?@CE92?5E96H6DEC:89E@7H2J=:?6@7E9613 '2:=C@252?5E96H6DE6C?D:56@7%2<=2?5&2C< DE55:E:@? =@4< "@ED 14 2?5 @?E9662DE  )9:DD64E:@?:D3@F?5653J$E92?5E9(EC66ED@?E9615 D@FE9$ E9G6?F6E@E96H6DEE96H6DEC:89E@7H2J=:?6@7E96'2:=C@2516 E9662DEC:89E@7H2J=:?6@7:I:6:89H2J2?5E96H6DE6C?D:56@7%2<=2?5&2C< DE17 55:E:@? =@4< "@ED 2?5 @?E9662DE2?5$(EC66E@?E96?@CE9 18 19 20 21  Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286  )96>2A36=@H56D:8?2E6D:I:6#:I65*D6DF32C621 2 3 4  Dimensional Requirements Table.5 6 Building Height )9C66 DE@C:6D H:E9 2 >2I:>F> 96:89E @7 E9:CEJD:I  766E   7 C6BF:C6>6?ED@7E9655:E:@?2=F:=5:?86:89E&C@8C2>(64   2C6>6E7:G6DE@C:6DH:E92>2I:>F>96:89E@7D:IEJ6:89E 766ED92==362==@H65  Residential Unit Area  DBF2C6766E2G6C2868C@DD7=@@C2C62 #:?:>F> DBF2C6 7@@E8C@DD7=@@C2C62  Parking (66(64    &2C<:?8  Residential Density F?:EDA6C?6E24C6  Front :I:6:89H2J P>:?:>F> $ E9G6?F6 P Side P>:?:>F> Setbacks (66 6D:8? F:56=:?6D 7@C 255:E:@?2=C6BF:C6>6?ED Rear P>:?:>F>7C@>324<@74FC3 E@3F:=5:?87246 Minimum Pervious Area @7?6E2C62   Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286  (6) Residential Office Buffer Sub-area.1 (A) Purpose.)96'6D:56?E:2=%77:46F776CDF32C62:D2EC2?D:E:@?2==@H:?E6?D:EJ2 4@>>6C4:2=2C62E92EH:==3F776CE96AC:>2C:=JC6D:56?E:2=$@CE9?5*C32?'6D:56?E:2=3 2?5 )96 $6:893@C9@@5D DF32C62D   '6D:56?46 :? E96 7@C> @7 4@?5@>:?:F>D @C4 E@H?9@>6D42?363F:=E:?E9:DDF32C62 "@H:?E6?D:EJ@77:46D2?54@>>6C4:2=FD6D5 H:E9C6D:56?E:2==@@<2C622==@H65 &C@A6C3F776C:?8H96?25;246?EE@D:?8=672>:=J6 9@>6D:DC6BF:C65 7 F:=5:?8DH:==36@C:6?E65@?$ E9G6?F6:?E96H6DE6C?D64E:@?2?5@?$E98 (EC66E:?E9662DE6C?D64E:@? 9 10 Design Requirements.'676CE@(64E:@?   %2<=2?5&2C<@H?E@H?#:I6511 *D6:DEC:4E6D:8?F:56=:?6D 12 13 Uses. '676CE@(64E:@?   @H?E@H?#:I65FD6:DEC:4E*D6)23=6 14 15  Sub-area boundaries.  )96 '6D:56?E:2= %77:46 F776C DF32C62 92D E9C6616 D64E:@?D )9:DD64E:@?:D3@F?5653J$E9(EC66E@?E96(@FE9E96H6DE6C?17 D:56@7%2<=2?5&2C< ?555:E:@? =@4<"@ED 2?5 2?5E96H6DE6C?18 D:56@7%2<=2?5&2C< ?555:E:@? =@4<"@ED 2?5 @?E96H6DE$19 E9(EC66EE@E96?@CE92?5$ E9G6?F6@?E9662DE  )9:DD64E:@?:D3@F?56520 $ ?5(EC66E@?E96D@FE9E96H6DE6C?D:56@7%2<=2?5&2C< ?555:E:@? 21 =@4< "@ED 2?5 2?5E96H6DE6C?D:56@7%2<=2?5&2C< ?555:E:@? 22 =@4<"@ED 2?5 @?E96H6DE$E9(EC66E@?E96?@CE92?5$ E923 G6?F6@?E9662DE )9:DD64E:@?:D3@F?5653JE96D@FE9D:56@7%2<=2?5&2C<24 :CDE DE =@4< "@ED  @?E96D@FE9E96H6DED:56@7%2<=2?5&2C< DE25 55:E:@? =@4< "@E @?E96H6DE$E9(EC66E@?E96?@CE92?5$26 E9G6?F6E@E9662DE 27 28  Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286  )96>2A36=@H56D:8?2E6DE96'6D:56?E:2=%77:46F776C1 2 3 4  Dimensional Requirements Table.5 6 Building Height )9C66DE@C:6DH:E92>2I:>F>96:89E@7E9:CEJD:I766E  Residential Unit Area  DBF2C6766E2G6C2868C@DD7=@@C2C62 #:?:>F> DBF2C6 7@@E8C@DD7=@@C2C62  Parking (66(64    &2C<:?8  Residential Density F?:EDA6C?6E24C6  Front P>:?:>F> Side P >:?:>F>  =@E =:?6 :? 2==@H23=6 E@H?9@>6 56G6=@A>6?ED 2?5  =@E =:?6 D:?8=6 72>:=J =@ED H96C6 E96 25;246?ED:56:D>:?:>F>@7 P 7C@> =@E =:?6 2?5 >:?:>:K65 H:?5@H2E =@E=:?6  Setbacks (66 6D:8? F:56=:?6D 7@C 255:E:@?2=C6BF:C6>6?ED Rear P>:?:>F> Minimum Pervious Area @7?6E2C62  7  Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286  (7) The Neighborhoods Sub-area.1 (A) Purpose. )9:D DF32C62 H:== >2:?E2:? DEC@?8 C6D:56?E:2= 4@>>F?:EJ 766=:?8 2 @>6@H?6CD9:A:DE@366?4@FC2865:?7@C>@7D:?8=672>:=J2?5E@H?9@>6D 3 4 Design Requirements.'676CE@(64E:@?   %2<=2?5&2C<@H?E@H?#:I655 *D6:DEC:4E6D:8?F:56=:?6D 6 7 Uses. '676CE@(64E:@?   @H?E@H?#:I65FD6:DEC:4E*D6)23=6 8 9  Sub-area boundaries.)96$6:893@C9@@5DDF32C6292D7@FCD64E:@?D )9:D10 D64E:@?:D3@F?5653J$ (EC66EE@E96D@FE9$ E9G6?F6E@E96H6DE$11 E9(EC66EE@E96?@CE92?5E9662DE6C?D:56@7%2<=2?5&2C< ?555:E:@? 12 "@ED 2?5 @?=@4<DE9C@F89 @?E9662DE  )9:DD64E:@?:D3@F?5653J13 $ ?5DEC66EE@E96D@FE9E96H6DE6C?D:56@7%2<=2?5&2C< DE55:E:@? 14 =@4< "@ED 2?5 @?E96H6DE$C5(EC66E@?E96?@CE92?5$ E915 G6?F6@?E9662DE )9:DD64E:@?:D3@F?5653J$E9(EC66EE@E96D@FE9E9616 H6DE6C?D:56@7%2<=2?5&2C< DE55:E:@? =@4<"@ED  =@4<"@ED 17 2?5=@4<"@ED 2?5 @?E96H6DE$E9(EC66E@?E96?@CE92?5$18 E9G6?F6@?E96H6DE )9:DD64E:@?:D3@F?5653J$E9(EC66E@?E96D@FE919 E96H6DE6C?D:56@7%2<=2?5&2C< DE55:E:@? =@4< "@E @?E96H6DE20 E96?@CE96C?D:56@7%2<=2?5&2C< DE55:E:@? =@4< "@ED  @?E9621 ?@CE92?5$ E9G6?F6@?E9662DE 22 23 24  Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286  )96>2A36=@H=67E56D:8?2E6D)96$6:893@C9@@5DDF32C621 2 3 4 5 Dimensional Requirements Table.6 7 Building Height )9C66DE@C:6DH:E92>2I:>F>96:89E@7E9:CEJD:I766E  Residential Unit Area #:?:>F>  DBF2C67@@E8C@DD7=@@C2C62  Parking (66(64    &2C<:?8  Residential Density F?:EDA6C?6E24C6  Front P>:?:>F> Side P >:?:>F>  =@E =:?6 :? 2==@H23=6 E@H?9@>6 56G6=@A>6?ED 2?5  =@E =:?6 D:?8=6 72>:=J =@ED H96C6 E96 25;246?ED:56:?>:?:>F>@7 P 7C@> =@E =:?6 2?5 >:?:>:K65 H:?5@H2E =@E=:?6  Setbacks (66 6D:8? F:56=:?6D 7@C 255:E:@?2=C6BF:C6>6?ED Rear  P>:?:>F> Minimum Pervious Area @7?6E2C62   Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286  Sec. 24-264. Urban Design1  Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Design Guidelines ==56G6=@A>6?E2 :?4=F5:?83FE?@E=:>:E65E@3F:=5:?8D@A6?DA246D:8?2862?5DEC66ED42A:?82C63 DF3;64E E@ E96 4C:E6C:2 DE2E65 :? E96 %2<=2?5 &2C< @H?E@H? #:I65 *D6 :DEC:4E4 6D:8? F:56=:?6D   )96 :EJ @>>:DD:@? D92== 2AAC@G6 2== 56G6=@A>6?E :? E965 @H?E@H?#:I65*D6:DEC:4E:?244@C52?46H:E9E966D:8?F:56=:?6D2D25@AE656 3JE96:EJ@>>:DD:@?2?5E966G6=@A>6?E'6G:6H&C@465FC6:?(64E:@?  7 @7E9:DCE:4=6E@6?DFC68@@526DE96E:4D2?5=:G23:=:EJ )96%2<=2?5&2C<@H?E@H?8 #:I65 *D6 :DEC:4E 6D:8? F:56=:?6D H:== :?4=F56 4C:E6C:2 @? E96 7@==@H:?8 FC32?9 7@C>2C49:E64EFC2=56D:8?DEC66ED42A:?8=2?5D42A:?82?5D:8?286 )96%2<=2?510 &2C<@H?E@H?#:I65*D6:DEC:4E6D:8?F:56=:?6DH:==2=D@36C676CC65E@2DE9611 N6D:8?F:56=:?6DO:?E96@H?E@H?%2<=2?5&2C<#:I65*D6:DEC:4E'68F=2E:@?D 12 13  Approval and revision of Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Design 14 Guidelines.)96:EJ@>>:DD:@?>FDE2AAC@G6E96@H?E@H?%2<=2?5&2C<#:I6515 *D6 6D:8? F:56=:?6D 3J C6D@=FE:@? 2?5 >2J E:>6 E@ E:>6 C6G:D6E966D:8?16 F:56=:?6DH:E9E96C64@>>6?52E:@?@7:EJDE2772?52?FC32?56D:8?6C 17  Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286  1 Sec. 24-265. Downtown Mixed Use District Use Table.2 3 Downtown Mixed Use District Use Table (Y=Allowed, N= Not permitted, C=conditional) Business Listings Boulevard Commercial North End Urban Residential Park Place Civic Use Dixie Mixed Use Residential Office Buffer The Neighborhoods 5F=E 6?E6CE2:?>6?E 3@@< DE@C6D>@G:6E962E6CD$ $ $ $ $ $ $ >FD6>6?E 6?E6CAC:D6D 4@:?@A6C2E6582>6D. $ . $ . $ $ ?E:BF6D9@AC6E2:=. . . $ .  $ AA=:2?46DC6E2:=. $ . $ . $ $ CE82==6C:6DC6E2:=. . . $ . . $ CE:D2? 4C27ED>2?H@C<D9@A . . . $ .  $ CE:DEPDDEF5:@. . . $ . . $ DD6>3=J92==.   .  $ $ E9=6E:4 7:E?6DD 4=F3 FA E@  DBF2C6766E. $ . $ . $ $ F4E:@?D 2?E:BF6D 2?5 7:?6 2CED@?=J $  $  $ $ FE@3@5J76?56C2?5C6A2:C$ $ $ $ $ $ $ FE@ C6?E2= =62D:?8 @77:46 @?=J. . . $ . $ $ FE@E28286?4J. $ $ $ . $ $ FE@H2D9$ $ $ $ $ $ $ FE@>@E:G6 >2:?E6?2?46 2?5C6A2:CD6CG:46D$ $ $ $ $ $ $ FE@>@E:G6 A2CED ?6H 6I46AEE:C6D2?59F342AD.  $ $ $ $ $ FE@>@E:G6 D2=6D 2?5 C6=2E65FD6D$ $ $ $ $ $ $ 2:=3@?5D $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 2<6D9@ADC6E2:=. . . $ . $ $ 2?<D?@5C:G6E9CF2. . . $ . $ $ 2C36CD9@AD. . . $ . . $ 2CD ?:89E4=F3D. $ . $ . $ $ 62FEJA2C=@CD. . . $ . . $ 62FEJDFAA=JDE@C6C6E2:=. . . $ . $ $ 652?53C62<72DE:??D$ . . $ .   :4J4=6 DE@C6D 2?5 C6A2:C D9@A. . . $ . $ $ :?8@&2C=@CD$ $ $ $ $ $ $  Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286  1 Downtown Mixed Use District Use Table (Y=Allowed, N= Not permitted, C=conditional) Business Listings Boulevard Commercial North End Urban Residential Park Place Civic Use Dixie Mixed Use Residential Office Buffer The Neighborhoods @@<DE@C6. . . $ . $ $ @EE=6=F3D$ $ $ $ $ $ $ @H=:?82==6J.   $  $ $ C@2542DEDEF5:@D. . . $ . $ $ FD:?6DD>249:?6D. $ . $ . $ $ FE496CD9@A. . . $ . $ $ 2?5JDE@C6DC6E2:=. . . $ . $ $ 2CA6E CF8D 2?5 7=@@C 4@G6C:?8C6E2:=. . . $ . $ $ 9:=5 42C6 2?5 25F=E 52J 42C6   .    9:?24C@4<6CJ8=2DDH2C6 62CE96?H2C6C6E2:=. . . $ . $ $ :82CDE@C6C6E2:=. . . $ . $ $ :?6A=6I >@G:6 E962E6C 6I46AE5C:G6:?D. $ . $ $ $ $ =@E9:?8 DE@C6 6I46AE D64@?592?5. . . $ . $ $ =F3D4:G:4 7C2E6C?2= ?@? 4@>>6C4:2=.   .    @77669@FD6D. . . . . $ $ @>>F?:EJ 42C6 724:=:E:6D 2?5 4@>>F?:EJ C6D:56?E:2= 9@>6D$ $ $ $ $ $ $ @>>F?:EJ46?E6CD.   .  $ $ @?D:8?>6?ED9@A$ $ $ $ $ $ $ @?G6?:6?46DE@C6D  $ $  $ $ 6=:42E6DD6?C6E2:=. . . $ . $ $ 6G2=F2E:?8*D6D$ $ $ $ $ $ $ :??6CE962E6C. $  $  $ $ :D4@F?EDE@C6$ $ $ $ $ $ $ @C>:E@CJ C2E6C?:EJ 2?5 (@C@C:EJ@FD6D$ $ $ $ $ $ $ C:G6E9C@F89 H:?5@HD :? 4@??64E:@?H:E92?JFD6$ $ $ $ $ $ $ CJ=62?6C. . . $ . . $ CJ4=62?:?82?5AC6DD:?8L A:4<FA2?556=:G6CJ@?=J. . . $ . . $ 2  Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286  1 Downtown Mixed Use District Use Table (Y=Allowed, N= Not permitted, C=conditional) Business Listings Boulevard Commercial North End Urban Residential Park Place Civic Use Dixie Mixed Use Residential Office Buffer The Neighborhoods =64EC:42= 7:IEFC6D 2?5 DFAA=:6DC6E2:=. . . $ . $ $ 23C:4DDE@C6C6E2:=. . . $ . $ $ :?2?4:2=:?DE:EFE:@?D. . . $ . $ $ :D9C6E2:=. . . $ . $ $ =62>2C<6ED2?532K22CD$ $ $ $ $ $ $ =@C:DED. . . $ . $ $ @@542E6C6CD. $ . $ . $ $ CF:EDE@C6DC6E2:=. . . $ . $ $ 2C56?DFAA=:6D. $ $ $ $ $ $ 2D@=:?6D6CG:46DE2E:@?D $ $ $ $ $ $ :7ED9@AD?6HC6E2:=. . . $ . $ $ @G6C?>6?E@77:46D$ $ $ .  $ $ C66?>2C<6E. . . $ . . $ C@FA9@>6D$   $    F?DC6E2:=$ $ $ $ $ $ $ 2C5H2C6DE@C6. . . $ . $ $ @33JD9@AC6E2:=. . . $ . $ $ @>6@44FA2E:@?D$ . . $ . . . @DA:E2=D$ $ $ $ $ $ $ @E6=D2?5>@E6=D. $ . $ . $ $ 464C62>C6E2:=. . . $ . $ $ ?5FDEC:2=FD6D$ $ $ $ $ $ $ ?E6C:@C 564@C2E:@? D9@A :?4=F5:?82=E6C2E:@?D. . . $ . $ $ ?E6C?6E276. . . $ . $ $ 6H6=CJDE@C6H2E49C6A2:C. . . $ . $ $ !6JD9@A =@4<D>:E9. . . $ . $ $ "2F?5C:6D4@:?@A6C2E65$ $ $ $ $ $ $ 2  Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286  1 Downtown Mixed Use District Use Table (Y=Allowed, N= Not permitted, C=conditional) Business Listings Boulevard Commercial North End Urban Residential Park Place Civic Use Dixie Mixed Use Residential Office Buffer The Neighborhoods "23@C2E@C:6D$ $ $ $ $ $ $ "2H?42C66BF:A>6?E?6H .$ $ $ $ $$ "2F?5CJ6DE23=:D9>6?E$ $ $ $ $ $ $ "62E96C8@@5DDE@C6C6E2:=. . . $ . $ $ ":3C2CJ $ $ .  $ $ ":BF@CDE@C6D. . . $ . $ $ #2?F724EFC:?8FD6D$ $ $ $ $ $ $ #2C:?6DFAA=:6DC6E2:=. $ . $ . $ $ #2DD286A2C=@CD$ $ $ $ $ $ $ #2DD286DE2E6=:46?D65. . . $ . . $ #6>36CD9:A (E@C6D @C 724:=:E:6D@G6C  DBF2C6 766E$ $ $ $ $ $ $ #:?:2EFC68@=74@FCD6$ $ $ $ $ $ $ #F=E:72>:=J5H6==:?8F?:ED$ . . $ . . . #FD6F>D $  .  $ $ #FD:42?5C25:@DE@C6C6E2:=. . . $ . $ $ $6:893@C9@@5 @@5 (E@C6 FAE@  DBF2C6766E. $ $ $ . $ $ $6HDDE2?5. . . $ . $ $ %77:46 6BF:A>6?E 2?5 DFAA=:6D. $ . $ . $ $ %77:467FC?:EFC6DE@C6. $ . $ . $ $ %77:46D7@C5@4E@CD56?E:DED A@5:2EC:DED 2?5 C6=2E65 AC@76DD:@?D. $ . $ . . $ %AE:42=DE@C6. $ . $ . $ $ %FE5@@CDE@C286$ $ $ $ $ $ $ &2:?E H2==A2A6C DE@C6D C6E2:=@?=J. $ $ $ . $ $ &2C<:?882C2864@>>6C4:2= . $ . $ . $ $ &2C<:?8=@E4@>>6C4:2=. $ . $ . $ $ &2C<2?5@A6?DA246. . . . . . . &2H?D9@AD$ $ $ $ $ $ $ 2  Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286  1 Downtown Mixed Use District Use Table (Y=Allowed, N= Not permitted, C=conditional) Business Listings Boulevard Commercial North End Urban Residential Park Place Civic Use Dixie Mixed Use Residential Office Buffer The Neighborhoods &6E3@2C5:?8 <6??6=. $ $ $ $ $ $ &6E52J42C6724:=:E:6D     $ $ &6E8C@@>:?8. $ . $ . $ $ &6EDFAA=:6DC6E2:=. $ . $ . $ $ &92C>24J. . . $ . $ $ &9@E@8C2A9 82==6C:6D @C DEF5:@D. $ . $ . $ $ &9@E@8C2A96CD4@>>6C4:2= .$ . $ . $$ &9@E@8C2A9:4 6BF:A>6?E 2?5DFAA=:6D. $ . $ . $ $ &=246D@7H@CD9:A.   .  $ $ &@DE@77:46D $ $ .  $ $ &C:?E:?82?5AF3=:D9:?8.   $ . $ $ &C@76DD:@?2=@77:46D. . . $ . . $ &DJ49:4@?DF=E:?8$ $ $ $ $ $ $ '62=6DE2E6@77:46D. . . $ . . $ '6DE2FC2?ED 2?5 5:?:?8 C@@>D . . . $ . $ $ '6E2:=DE@C6D@CD9@AD@G6C  DBF2C6766E$ $ $ $ $ $ $ (49@@=2CED2?54C27ED. $ $ . . . $ (49@@=>2CE:2=2CED. $ $ . . $ $ (49@@=>@56=:?8. $ $ . . $ $ (49@@=D362FEJ. $ $ . . $ $ (49@@=D3FD:?6DD. $ $ . . $ $ (49@@=D52?4:?8. $ $ . . $ $ (49@@=D5C:G:?8. $ $ . . $ $ (49@@=D8J>?2DE:4D. $ $ . . $ $ (49@@=D>FD:4. $ $ . . . $ (49@@=DA9@E@8C2A9J. $ $ . . . $ (49@@=DAF3=:4AC:G2E62?5 492CE6C2==8C256D. $ $ . . $ $ (64@?592?5DE@C6$ $ $ $ $ $ $ (6=7DE@C286724:=:E:6D$ $ $ $ $ $ $ (9@6DE@C6D. . . $ . $ $ (:?8=672>:=J5H6==:?8F?:ED$ . . $ . . . (<2E:?8C:?<.     $ $ (>2== E@@= 2?5 2AA=:2?46 C6A2:C. . . . . $ $ (@FG6?:CDE@C6D. . . . . $ $ (A@CE:?88@@5DC6?E2=. . . . . $ $ (A@CE:?88@@5DC6E2:=. . . . . $ $ )2:=@C2?5D62>DEC6DDD9@A. . . . . . $  Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286  1 Downtown Mixed Use District Use Table (Y=Allowed, N= Not permitted, C=conditional) Business Listings Boulevard Commercial North End Urban Residential Park Place Civic Use Dixie Mixed Use Residential Office Buffer The Neighborhoods )2EE@@:?82?53@5JA:6C4:?8$ $ $ $ $ $ $ )66?46?E6C.     $ $ )962E6C D:?8=6 C@@> 6DE23=:D9>6?E     $ $ )9C:7EDE@C6$ $ $ $ $ $ $ )@H?9@>6$ . . $ . . . )C2:=6C &2C<D '64C62E:@?2= G69:4=6A2C<D$ $ $ $ $ $ $ )C2G6=3FC62F. . . $ . . $ )H@72>:=J5H6==:?8F?:ED$ $ . $ . . . +6E6C:?2CJ4=:?:4D   $    +:56@ +C6?E2=6I46AE7@C H92E:D6I4=F565F?56C25F=E 6?E6CE2:?>6?E. . . $ . $ $ ,2C69@FD6 DE@C286$ $ $ $ $ $ $ ,62C:?82AA2C6=DE@C6D. . . $ . $ $ ,9@=6D2=6D2=6D$ $ $ $ $ $ $ 2 (1) Conditional Uses:3 *D656E6C>:?65E@364@?5:E:@?2=H:E9:?E96@H?E@H?#:I65*D6:DEC:4E>FDE>66E4 46CE2:? 4C:E6C:2 E@ 36 2==@H65 H:E9:? E96 5:DEC:4E 2?5 C6BF:C62 AF3=:4 962C:?8 2?55 2AAC@G2= 3J E96 :EJ @>>:DD:@?   (F49 4C:E6C:2 :?4=F56 4@?D:56C2E:@? @7 26 2AAC@AC:2E6?6DD3EC277:4:>A24E4A2C<:?82?554@>A2E:3:=:EJH:E925;246?E7 AC@A6CE:6D @?5:E:@?2=FD6DD92==36DF3;64EE@(64E:@?  @7E96%2<=2?5&2C<8 "2?56G6=@A>6?E@56 9 10 11  Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286  Sec. 24-266. Accessory Structures. 1 (66 92AE6C  (64E:@?   2?5   7@C C676C6?46 E@ 2446DD@CJ2 DECF4EFC6D 3 4 Sec. 24-267. Non-conforming Uses and Structures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efinitions:38 2 Legal Non-Conforming Situations. =682=?@?4@?7@C>:?8D:EF2E:@?:D2?J39 =2?5 FD6 DECF4EFC6 =@E @7 C64@C5 @C @E96C D:EF2E:@? C6=2E65 E@ E96 FD6 @C40 56G6=@A>6?E@7=2?5E92EH2D=682==J6DE23=:D965AC:@CE@E9667764E:G652E6@7E9641 @C5:?2?4625@AE:?8E9:DD64E:@?@7E96@56@7%C5:?2?46D@7E96:EJ@7%2<=2?542  Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286  &2C<@C2?JDF3D6BF6?E2>6?5>6?EE96C6E@2?5E92E:E5@6D?@E?@H7F==J4@?7@C>1 E@E96C6BF:C6>6?ED@7E9:DD64E:@?2D2>6?565E@E962AA=:423=652E6 2 3 Non-Conforming Use ?@?4@?7@C>:?8FD6:D2FD6@7=2?53F:=5:?8D@C3 @E96CDECF4EFC6D@C2?J4@>3:?2E:@?E96C6@7E92E:D=682==J?@?4@?7@C>:?8F?56C4 DF3D64E:@?223@G6 5 4 Non-conforming Structure. A ?@?4@?7@C>:?8 DECF4EFC6 :D 2?J 3F:=5:?8 @C6 DECF4EFC6H9:495@6D?@E7F==J4@?7@C>H:E9E96DE2?52C5D:>A@D653JE96AC@G:D:@?D7 @7E9:DD64E:@?3FEH9:49:D=682==J?@?4@?7@C>:?8F?56CDF3D64E:@?223@G6 @C8 AFCA@D6D@7E9:DD64E:@??@?4@?7@C>:?8DECF4EFC6D92==364@?D:56C656:E96C>2;@C9 @C>:?@C2D567:?6596C6:?10 A major non-conforming structure is any non-residential building or structure located 11 on a lot, parcel, or track which at any point borders a residential use in which 12 exceeds the minimum density or intensity standards for the Downtown Mixed-Use 13 district.14 A minor non-conforming structure is any non-conforming building or structure which 15 is not a major non-conforming building or structure. 16 Other non-conforming situations include other aspects of an established land use or 17 development that does not fully conform with the requirements of this section or any 18 amendment thereto but which is legally non-conforming under subsection “A” above. 19 Such other non-conforming situations include, but are not limited to, requirements for 20 off street parking, landscaping requirements, and buffering requirements.21 (F) Non-Conforming Uses.22   Continuance permitted.  ?@?4@?7@C>:?8 FD6 >2J 4@?E:?F6 DF3;64E E@23 C6BF:C6>6?EDE@E9:DD64E:@? 24   Expansion prohibited.  ?@?4@?7@C>:?8 FD6 D92== ?@E 36 6?=2C865 @C25 6IA2?565 26  Change of use.  ?@?4@?7@C>:?8 FD6 >2J 36 492?865 @?=J E@ 2 FD627 4@?7@C>:?8E@E96C6BF:C6>6?ED@7E96@H?E@H?#:I65*D6:DEC:4E 28  Non-Conforming structures ?@?4@?7@C>:?8DECF4EFC6>2J36FD657@C29 2?JA6C>:EE65FD6:?E96@H?E@H?#:I*D65:DEC:4E@C7@C2?J2AA=:423=6=682==J30 ?@?4@?7@C>:?8FD6 31  Expansion prohibited. ?J6IA2?D:@?@72?@?4@?7@C>:?8DECF4EFC6H9:4932 D6CG6DE@6IA2?5E966IE6?E@7E96?@?4@?7@C>:EJFD6:DAC@9:3:E65 33  Moving prohibited. ?@?4@?7@C>:?8DECF4EFC6@CFD6D92==?@E36>@G65:?34 H9@=6@C:?A2CE7@C2?J5:DE2?46H92ED@6G6CE@2?J@E96C=@42E:@?@?E96D2>6@C35 2?J@E96CA2C46=H:E9:?E96%2<=2?5&2C<@H?E@H?#:I65*D65:DEC:4EF?=6DDE9636 6?E:C6DECF4EFC6D92==E96C627E6C4@?7@C>E@E96C68F=2E:@?D@7E96@H?E@H?#:I6537 *D6:DEC:4E 38  Maintenance, Repairs, and Remodeling. #2:?E6?2?462?5C6A2:CD@72?@?39 4@?7@C>:?8DECF4EFC62C6A6C>:EE65 '6>@56=:?8@7E96DECF4EFC6H:E9:?E966I:DE:?840  Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286  3F:=5:?87@@EAC:?E:DA6C>:EE65H:E9@FE2G2C:2?46AC@G:565E92EE96C6>@56=:?85@6D1 ?@E:?4C62D6E96568C66@7?@?4@?7@C>:EJ2?5E92E2AA=:423=63F:=5:?82?5=:76D276EJ2 4@56D2C64@>A=:65H:E9E967F==6DE6IE6?E 3 (8) Termination of Non-Conforming Situations.4 (a) Termination by abandonment. :D4@?E:?F2?46@72?@?4@?7@C>:?8FD6@C5 DECF4EFC6 7@C 2 A6C:@5 >@C6 E92? D:I >@?E9D D92== 36 56E6C>:?65 E@ 36 2?6 232?5@?>6?E ?E9642D6@7FD6DF49FD6D92==?@E36E96?C66DE23=:D965:?2?J7 DF3D6BF6?EFD62?5D92==4@?7@C>E@E96C6BF:C6>6?ED@7E96@H?E@H?#:I65*D68 :DEC:4E @CAFCA@D6D@7E9:DD64E:@?232?5@?>6?ED92==36567:?652?556E6C>:?659 E@@44FCH96?E96AC@A6CEJ@H?6C:?E6?E:@?2==J2?5G@=F?E2C:=J7@C8@6D7FCE96C?@?10 4@?7@C>:?8FD6@7E96AC@A6CEJ Hobes vs. The Department of Transportation 831 11 So. 2d 745 (Fla. 5th DCA 2002) and Louis vs. City of Atlantic Beach 467 So. 2d 751 12 (Fla. 1st DCA 1985).13 (b) Termination by Damage or Destruction.14 : ? E96 6G6?E E92E 2?J >:?@C ?@?4@?7@C>:?8 DECF4EFC6 @C FD6:D15 56DEC@J653J2?J>62?DE@E966IE6?E@7 @C2?J>2;@C?@?16 4@?7@C>:?8 DECF4EFC6 @C FD6 :D 56DEC@J65 3J 2?J >62?D E@ E9617 6IE6?E @7 >@C6 E92?  @7 E96 4@DE @C C6A=246>6?E @7 DF4918 DECF4EFC6@CFD6D2:5DECF4EFC6@CFD6D92==?@E36C63F:=EC6DE@C6519 C66DE23=:D965 @C C6@44FA:65 6I46AE :? 4@?7@C>2?46 H:E9 E9620 2AA=:423=6C6BF:C6>6?ED@7E9:DD64E:@?@7E964@56A6CE2:?:?8E@E9621 @H?E@H?#:I65*D6:DEC:4E 22 :: ,96?2?@?4@?7@C>:?8DECF4EFC6@CFD6:D52>2865@C56DEC@J6523 E@2=6DD6CA6C46?E286@7E96C6A=246>6?E4@DED2?5DA64:7:65:?24 DF3D64E:@?223@G6?@C6A2:CD@CC63F:=5:?8D92==36A6C>:EE6525 6I46AE :? 4@?7@C>:EJ H:E9 E96 D64E:@?D @7 E96 4@56 2?5 E9626 2AA=:423=6C6BF:C6>6?ED@7E9:DD64E:@?A6CE2:?:?8E@E96@H?E@H?27 #:I65*D6:DEC:4E 28 ::: E:DE966IAC6DD65:?E6?E:@?@7E96:EJ@>>:DD:@?E92EE96=682=29 C6BF:C6>6?E D6E 7@CE9 :? E96 @56 @7 %C5:?2?46D E92E 2== ?@?30 4@?7@C>:?8FD6D>FDE363C@F89E:?E@4@?7@C>:EJ3JE96J62C 31 D92== ?@E 2AA=J E@ ?@?4@?7@C>:?8 D:EF2E:@?D =@42E65 H:E9:? E9632 @H?E@H?#:I65*D6:DEC:4E 33 Violations, Penalties, and Enforcement. E :D E96 :?E6?E @7 E96 :EJ34 @>>:DD:@?E92EE96@56?7@C46>6?E:G:D:@?2?5E96F:=5:?86A2CE>6?ED92==35 D92C6C6DA@?D:3:=:E:6D7@C6?7@C4:?8E9:DD64E:@?@7E964@56E@E966IE6?EE92EDF4936 6?7@C46>6?E 72==D H:E9:? E96 D4@A6 @7 6249 @7 E96 56A2CE>6?EPD25>:?:DEC2E:G637 C6DA@?D:3:=:E:6D F?56C E9:D D64E:@?  '6DA@?D:3:=:EJ 7@C 3C:?:?8 6?7@C46>6?E 24E:@?D38 D92===:6H:E9E963F:=5:?8@77:4:2=D7@CG:@=2E:@?D:?G@=G:?83F:=5:?8DH:E9E964@5639 6?7@C46>6?E@77:46CD7@C2==@E96CG:@=2E:@?D2?53@E9@7E96>7@CG:@=2E:@?D:?G@=G:?840 3@E93F:=5:?8D2?5@E96C>2EE6CDF?56CE9:D4@56 41  Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286  Compliance Required ?J:?5:G:5F2=@C=682=6?E:EJFE:=:K:?8=2?5@C3F:=5:?81 @C@E96CDECF4EFC6@C2?J@E96C:?5:G:5F2=@C=682=6?E:EJDF35:G:5:?8=2?5@C2?J2 :?5:G:5F2= =682= 6?E:EJ FD:?8 @C 56G6=@A:?8 =2?5 @C 6?82865 :?2?J @E96C 24E:@?3 DF3;64EE@E96D4@A6@7E9:DD64E:@?@7E964@56H:E9:?>F?:4:A2=3@F?52C:6D@7E964 :EJ@7%2<=2?5&2C<D92==4@>A=JH:E92==C6BF:C6>6?ED@7E9:D4@56 5  Violations. ED92==362G:@=2E:@?@7E9:DD64E:@?E@5@2?J@7E967@==@H:?86 2 )@FD6E@2EE6>AEE@FD6=2?5@C3F:=5:?8D:?2?JH2J?@E4@?D:DE6?E7 H:E9C6BF:C6>6?ED@7E9:DD64E:@?8 3 )@6C64E@C2EE6>AEE@6C64E23F:=5:?8@C2?JDECF4EFC6:?2?JH2J?@E9 4@?D:DE6?EH:E9C6BF:C6>6?ED@7E9:DD64E:@?10 4 )@6?8286@C2EE6>AEE@6?8286:?E9656G6=@A>6?E@CDF35:G:D:@?@711 =2?5:?2?JH2J?@E4@?D:DE6?EH:E9C6BF:C6>6?ED@7E96C68F=2E:@?DD6E7@CE9:?E9:D12 D64E:@?@7E964@56@CE966D:8?F:56=:?6D 13 5 )@ :?DE2== @C FD6 2 D:8? :? 2?J H2J ?@E 4@?D:DE6?E H:E9 E9614 C6BF:C6>6?ED@7E9:DD64E:@? 15 6 )@6?8286:?23F:=5:?8@C=2?5E96FD6@C:?DE2==2E:@?@72D:8?E9616 DF35:G:D:@? @C 56G6=@A>6?E @7 =2?5 @C 2?J @E96C 24E:G:EJ C6BF:C:?8 @?6 @C >@C617 A6C>:ED @C 2AAC@G2=D F?56C E9:D D64E:@? H:E9@FE 7:CDE @3E2:?:?8 2== DF49 C6BF:C6518 A6C>:ED@C2AAC@G2=D 19 7 )@6?8286:?E96FD6@C23F:=5:?8@C=2?5E96FD6@C:?DE2==2E:@?@7220 D:8?DF35:G:D:@?@C56G6=@A>6?E@7=2?5@C2?J@E96C24E:G:EJC6BF:C:?8@?6@C>@C621 A6C>:EDF?56CE9:DD64E:@?:?2?JH2J:?4@?D:DE6?EH:E92?JDF49A6C>:E@C2AAC@G2=22 @C2?J4@?5:E:@?D:>A@D65E96C6@? 23 8 )@ G:@=2E6 E96 E6C>D @7 2?J A6C>:E @C 2AAC@G2= 8C2?E65 F?56C E9:D24 D64E:@?@C2?J4@?5:E:@?:>A@D65:?DF49A6C>:E@C2AAC@G2= 25 9 )@G:@=2E62?J=2H7F=@C56C:DDF653J2?JA6CD@?@C6?E:EJF?56CE9:D26 D64E:@? 27 : )@ 4@?E:?F6 2?J G:@=2E:@?D 2D 567:?65 23@G6 H:E9 6249 52J@728 4@?E:?F65 G:@=2E:@?D E@ 4@?D:56C 2 D6A2C2E6 G:@=2E:@? 7@C AFCA@D6D @7 4@>AFE:?829 4F>F=2E:G64:G:=@C4C:>:?2=A6?2=E:6D 30  Authorize Enforcement Action. )96:EJ3F:=5:?8@77:4:2=@CE96:EJPD4@5631 6?7@C46>6?E5:G:D:@?>2JE2<62?J@?6@C>@C6@7E967@==@H:?824E:@?DE@C6>65J232 G:@=2E:@?@7E9:DD64E:@?@7E964@5633 2,:E99@=53F:=5:?8@CK@?:?8A6C>:ED@C3@E934 3DDF6DE@AH@C<@C56CD282:?DE2?JH@C<F?56CE2<6?3J2?6?E:EJ?@E35 92G:?82AC@A6C3F:=5:?8@CK@?:?84@56@C3@E936 4'6G@<6A6C>:ED:DDF65F?56CE9:DD64E:@?37 5DDF6DE@A@C56CD282:?DE2?J24E:@?D@CG:@=2E:@?@7E9:DD64E:@?38  Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286 6(66<2FE9@C:K2E:@?7C@>E964:EJ4@>>:DD:@?E@92G6E964:EJ3C:?82?1 24E:@? 7@C 2? :?;F?4E:@? @C >2?52>FD :7 C6BF:C65 E@ AC6G6?E E962 G:@=2E:@? 2?5 @C AC6G6?E E96 @44FA2?4J @C FD6 @7 2?J 3F:=5:?8 @C3 DECF4EFC6:?G@=G65:?E96G:@=2E:@?4 7 &C@G:56 C64@>>6?52E:@?D E@ E96 :EJ @>>:DD:@? E92E :E 3C:?8 2?5 24E:@?7@C:?;F?4E:@?@C>2?52>FDE@232E62G:@=2E:@? 6   Enforcement Procedures.  @56 ?7@C46>6?E %77:46C @C F:=5:?87 %77:4:2= D92== C6=J FA@? 6I:DE:?8 4@56 AC@G:D:@?D @7 (E2E6 =2H7@C AFCA@D6D @78 DFDA6?5:?8@CC6G@<:?82K@?:?846CE:7:42E6@CA6C>:E7@C2?J@7E96G:@=2E:@?D=:DE659 23@G6 FCE96C>@C62@56?7@C46>6?E%77:46C@CF:=5:?8%77:4:2=>2J3C:?8E9610 >2EE6C367@C6E962AAC@AC:2E6@2C57@C2?:>>65:2E6C6G:6HD@2DE@6?DFC6E92E11 E96:?E68C:EJ@7E9:DD64E:@?@7E964@56:D>2:?E2:?65 12 13 Sec 24-268. Landscaping. 14 ==56G6=@A>6?E2?5C656G6=@A>6?E>FDE4@>A=JH:E9CE:4=6+(64E:@?  @715 E96 @56 @7 %C5:?2?46D 2D 2>6?565 7C@> E:>6 E@ E:>6 2?5 7@==@H 255:E:@?2=16 C6BF:C6>6?ED2DDE2E65:?E96Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Design 17 Guidelines  18 19 Sec. 24-269. Additional Building Height Program. 20 Building height   &C@A6CEJ @H?6CD >2J @3E2:? 2AAC@G2= E@ 4@?DECF4E 255:E:@?2=21 DE@C:6D AC@G:565 E96J 4@?EC:3FE6 E@H2C5 AF3=:4 2>6?:E:6D   ? E96 &2C< &=246 2?522 :I:6#:I65*D6DF32C62D@H?6CD>FDE2=D@>66EE96288C682E:@?C6BF:C6>6?ED:?23 (64E:@?   36=@HE@@3E2:?255:E:@?2=96:89E 24 25 Sub-area regulations.)9C66255:E:@?2=DE@C:6D>2J3625565:?E967@==@H:?826 DF32C62D27  $@CE9?5*C32?'6D:56?E:2=28  @F=6G2C5@>>6C4:2=29 &2C<&=24630 )H@255:E:@?2=DE@C:6D>2J3625565:?E967@==@H:?8DF32C62D31  :I:6#:I65*D632  :G:4*D66I46AEH:E9:? 766EH6DE@7$ E9G6?F633 Neighborhood compatibility requirement in North End Urban Residential sub-34 area. F:=5:?8D :? E96 $@CE9 ?5 *C32? '6D:56?E:2= (F32C62 4=@D6DE E@ E9635 A6C:>6E6C@7E96DF32C62F?=6DD25;246?EE@E96:I:6#:I65*D6(F3C62D92==36 ?@E6I4665E9C66DE@C:6DH:E92>2I:>F>@7E9:CEJD:I766E 37 Density Bonus. 56?D:EJ3@?FD>2J368C2?E653JE96:EJ@>>:DD:@?@7FAE@38 7:G6F?:EDA6C24C6:7D2:556?D:EJ3@?FD:D4@?D:DE6?EH:E939  E9625@AE658@2=D@3;64E:G6D2?5AC:@C:EJ:>AC@G6>6?EAC@;64ED@7E9640 :EJPD@>>F?:EJ'656G6=@A>6?E&=2?25@AE65AFCDF2?EE@(64E:@?41   @7E96=@C:52(E2E6(E2EFE6D2?542  Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286  E9625@AE65:EJ@7%2<=2?5&2C<@H?E@H?#:I65*D6:DEC:4E6D:8?1 F:56=:?6D2?52 (3)H96? 2 AC@A6CEJ @H?6C E6C>:?2E6D @C G@=F?E2C:=J 232?5@?D 23 ?@?4@?7@C>:?8FD6 4 Required aggregation in Park Place and Dixie Mixed Use sub-areas. &C@A6CEJ5 @H?6CD:?E96&2C<&=2462?5:I:6#:I65*D6DF32C62D>FDE2=D@2DD6>3=62==6 A2C46=DH:E9:?24:EJ3=@4<>62DFC657C@>C:89E@7H2JE@C:89E@7H2J2?5AC@G:567 D:E6 A=2?D 7@C E96 6?E:C6 2C62 H:E9:? E96 C:89E@7H2J 3=@4< E@ A2CE:4:A=6 :? E968 55:E:@?2=F:=5:?86:89E&C@8C2> &C@A6CEJ>2J2=D@362DD6>3=65E@:?4=F569 7@C>6CC:89E@7H2JDE@:?4C62D6AC@A6CEJD:K67@C56G6=@A>6?E@CE@4C62E62A=2K210 @C 6BF:G2=6?E 2C62 7@C AF3=:4 2DD6>3=J   ? E96 &2C< &=246 DF32C62 @H?6CD11 2DD6>3=:?8 6?E:C6 3=@4<D >FDE 2=D@ @3E2:? E96 $ E9 G6?F6 C:89E@7H2J12 255:E:@?2==2?5E@E96H6DE2?54C62E62?6HC@25H2J244@C5:?8E@E96%2<=2?513 &2C<@H?E@H?:DEC:4E#2DE6C&=2?2D2AAC@G65:? 3J:EJ@>>:DD:@?:?14 @C56CE@A2CE:4:A2E6:?E96255:E:@?2=96:89EAC@8C2> 15 16  Developer contribution for public amenities. 6G6=@A6CDD92==36C6BF:C65E@17 AC@G:56AF3=:42>6?:E:6D6BF2=:?G2=F6E@ @C>@C6@7E964@?DECF4E:@?4@DE7@C18 6249DE@CJ23@G6E9C66DE@C:6D @?DECF4E:@?4@DEH:==3642=4F=2E6532D65FA@?19  A6CDBF2C67@@E:? 5@==2CD7@C6249DE@CJ23@G6E9C66DE@C:6D )9620 >6E9@5@742=4F=2E:?84@?DECF4E:@?4@DE>2J36C6G:6H652?525;FDE65@?2?2??F2=21 32D:D3JE96:EJ@>>:DD:@? 22 23 Public amenities to be provided.&F3=:42>6?:E:6D:?4=F56E967@==@H:?824 255:E:@?2=&F3=:4%A6?(A246@C&F3=:4&2C<25 3,2E6C62EFC626 4@>>F?:EJ24:=:EJ: 6 >A9:E962E6C27 555:E:@?2=&F3=:4CE28 655:E:@?2=&656DEC:2?@??64E:@?62EFC6D29 7 C:E:42=?7C2DECF4EFC6?92?46>6?ED30 8(A64:2=@H?E@H??ECJ62EFC6D@F=6G2C5@>>6C4:2=2?5$@CE9?5*C32?31 '6D:56?E:2=DF32C62D@?=J32 9&F3=:4&2C<:?833 : @C2D56E6C>:?653JE96:EJ@>>:DD:@? 34 35  Additional Building Height Program procedure. 36  Funds for public amenity. 6G6=@A6CD D92== AC@G:56 E96 4:EJ H:E9 2?37 :CC6G@423=6=6EE6C@74C65:E@C3@?5H9:49:D2446AE23=6E@E96:EJ2?5H:==8F2C2?E6638 E9656G6=@A6CPD4@?DECF4E:@?@7E96AF3=:42>6?:EJ2D56D4C:365    39 40  Approval of public amenity by City Commission )9656G6=@A6C>FDEAC@G:5641 2AAC@AC:2E65C2H:?8D2?55@4F>6?E2E:@?C682C5:?8E964@DE@7E96AF3=:42>6?:EJ42 7C@> 2 46CE:7:65 6?8:?66C E@ :EJ DE277 7@C C6G:6H 3J E96 6G6=@A>6?E '6G:6H43 @>>:EE662?52?FC32?56D:8?6C :EJDE2772?52?FC32?56D:8?6CD92==DF3>:E244 C6A@CE7@C:EJ@>>:DD:@?2AAC@G2=@7E96AC@A@D65AF3=:42>6?:E:6D 45  Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286 1 )96AF3=:42>6?:EJ>FDE36:?DE2==65H:E9:?D:I>@?E9D@7E96:DDF2?46@7E962 46CE:7:42E6 @7 @44FA2?4J 2?5 C646:G6 7:?2= 2AAC@G2= 7C@> :EJ DE277 2?5 2? FC32?3 56D:8?6C 4 5 56G6=@A6C>2J2D<7@C2?6IE6?D:@?@7E96D:I>@?E9A6C:@5C676CC65E@:?(64 6  23@G67C@>E96:EJ@>>:DD:@? 7 8  ?E966G6?EE92EE9656G6=@A6C72:=DE@4@?DECF4EE96AF3=:42>6?:EJ2D9 2AAC@G653J:EJ@>>:DD:@?@C:7E96G2=F6@7E96AF3=:42>6?:EJ:D56E6C>:?653J10 E96:EJE@36=6DDE92?E96C6BF:C654@?EC:3FE:@?2DDE2E65:?   E96:EJ11 D92==366?E:E=65E@H:E95C2H7C@>E96=6EE6C@74C65:E@C3@?5DE2E65:?    12 7@CE964@DE@7E96AF3=:42>6?:E:6D )967F?5D7C@>2?JH:E95C2H2=D92==36FD653J13 E96:EJ6I4=FD:G6=J7@C42A:E2=:>AC@G6>6?ED:?E96@H?E@H?#:I65*D6:DEC:4E 14 15  ? E96 6G6?E E96 :EJ 5C2HD @? E96 =6EE6C @7 4C65:E @C 3@?5 :?16 244@C52?46 (64     E96 :EJ D92== 36 C6DA@?D:3=6 7@C E96 :EJPD17 C62D@?23=64@DE:?4FCC65:?5C2H:?8282:?DEE96D64FC:EJ 18 19 Sec. 24-270. Parking.20 General Provisions.==56G6=@A>6?E2?5C656G6=@A>6?EH:E9:?E96@H?E@H?21 #:I65*D6:DEC:4ED92==7@==@HE96A2C<:?8AC@G:D:@?DAC@G:565H:E9:?E9:DCE:4=6 22 23  %77DEC66E A2C<:?8 724:=:E:6D :?4=F5:?8 2446DD 2:D=6D 2?5 5C:G6H2JD D92== 3624 AC@G:565 H:E9 A2G6>6?E 92G:?8 2? 2DA92=E @C &@CE=2?5 46>6?E 3:?56C @C @E96C25 2AAC@G65A2G6C3C:4<D2?5DF3;64EE@2AAC@G2=3J:EJ?8:?66C 26 27  D@7E9667764E:G652E6@7E9:D2CE:4=6AC:G2E6@?D:E6324<@FEA2C<:?8724:=:E:6D28 2C6AC@9:3:E656I46AE7@C56E24965D:?8=672>:=J2?5C6D:56?E:2=E@H?9@>6D@C2D29 @E96CH:D64@?D:DE6?EH:E9>:?:>F>:EJ@7%2<=2?5&2C<DE2?52C5D2?5E96%2<=2?530 &2C<@H?E@H?#:I65*D6:DEC:4E6D:8?F:56=:?6D 31 32 #:?:>F>A2C<:?8=@E2:D=6H:5E9D2?5A2C<:?8DA2465:>6?D:@?DD92==362DD6E33 7@CE9:?(64E:@?  6I46AE9@H6G6CE96DE2==H:5E9@72A2C2==6=@?DEC66EA2C<:?834 DA246@E96CE92?E9@D6@?:I:6:89H2JD92==366:89E766E 35 36 &2C<:?8=@EDD92==AC@G:567@CA656DEC:2?2?5G69:4F=2C4C@DD2446DDE@6I:DE:?837 2?5AC@DA64E:G625;246?EA2C<:?8=@ED 38 39 &656DEC:2?6?EC:6DE@A2C<:?882C286DD92==365:C64E=J7C@>E9625;246?EDEC66E@C40 A2D6@2DH6==2D7C@>E964@?E:8F@FD3F:=5:?8 &656DEC:2?6?EC:6DE@82C286DD92==41 36=:?<65E@4C@DD3=@4<A2D6@DH96C6G6CA@DD:3=6 42 43 +69:4F=2C6?EC:6D2?56I:EDE@82C286DD92==362==@H65@?=J7C@>C:89ED@7H2J44 2?52==6JD +69:4F=2C6?EC:6DD92==92G62>:?:>F>H:5E9@7EH6?EJ7@FC 766EH:E945  Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286 2>:?:>F>D6A2C2E:@?@7D6G6?EJ 766E36EH66?6?EC:6D 1 2 &2C<:?8DE2==5:>6?D:@?D2?5DA246D7@CA6CD@?DH:E95:D23:=:E:6D2?5 @CDEC@==6CD3 D92==36:?244@C52?46H:E9E96>6C:42?DH:E9:D23:=:E:6D4E2?5CE:4=6+@7E9:D4 92AE6C 5 6 :4J4=6C24<DD92==36C6BF:C65@?2==D:E6D@G6C DBF2C6766E2?52==A2C<D 7 )963:4J4=6C24<2?556D:8?>FDE7@==@HE96@H?E@H?%2<=2?5&2C<#:I65*D68 6D:8?F:56=:?6C6BF:C6>6?ED 9  Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286 $F>36C@7(A246D'6BF:C65L(:?8=6*D6&C@A6CE:6D I46AE2D6=D6H96C6D6E1 7@CE9:?E9:D(64E:@?@?D:E6A2C<:?87@CD:?8=6FD6AC@A6CE:6DD92==36AC@G:5652DD6E2 7@CE9:?E967@==@H:?8E23=63 4 Use Parking Requirement Spaces '6D:56?E:2=FD6 A6C5H6==:?8F?:E @E6=3652?53C62<72DE:??A6CC@@>DA=FD@7C6BF:C65DA2467@C C6DE2FC2?ED6E4  @>>F?:EJ42C6724:=:E:6D4@>>F?:EJ C6D:56?E:2=9@>6D8C@FA9@>6 A6C 365C@@>DA=FD 7@C62496>A=@J66 :?6A=6IE962E6CD A6CD62ED @>>F?:EJ 46?E6C =:3C2CJ 82==6CJ @C >FD6F> 7:E?6DD 4=F3 D<2E:?8 C:?< E66?46?E6C A6C 8C@DDDB 7E  DD6>3=J92== A6C 8C@DDDB 7E  &=246D@7H@CD9:A A6C  DB 7E 2F5:E@C:F>2C62 '6DE2FC2?E4@77669@FD6 A6C DB 7E @74FDE@>6C2C62 '6DE2FC2?E32C A6C DB 7E @78C@DD7=@@C56D:8?2E652D C6DE2FC2?E32C2C62 2C?:89E4=F3 A6C 8C@DDDB 7E  %77:46 >65:42= @77:46 C6E2:= DE@C6D A6CD@?2=D6CG:46:?4=F5:?825F=E49:=5 2?5 A6E 42C6 724:=:E:6D 2?5 :?E6C?6E 4276 2CE:D2? 4C27ED>2? H@C<D9@A 2CE:DEDEF5:@2F4E:@?D32?<7:?2?4:2= :?DE:EFE:@? 3C@2542DE DEF5:@ 4@?G6?:6?46 DE@C6 <6J D9@A =@4<D>:E9 =23@C2E@CJ ?6:893@C9@@5 8C@46CJ DE@C6 AC:?E:?8 @C AF3=:D9:?8 6DE23=:D9>6?E C6A2:C D9@ADC6?E2=D9@AD *AE@  DB 7E 8C@DD7=@@C2C62 A6C  DB 7E 8C@DD7=@@C2C62  #@C6E92?  DB 7E 8C@DD7=@@C2C62 A6C  DB 7E 8C@DD7=@@C2C62  (49@@= A6C4=2DDC@@>A=FD A6C2F5:E@C:F>D62ED @H=:?8==6J A6C2==6J 5  Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286 Number of Spaces Required – Mixed Use Parcels or Lots. I46AE2D6=D6H96C61 D6E7@CE9:?E9:D(64E:@?E96?F>36C@7C6BF:C65@?D:E6A2C<:?87@C>:I65FD6A2C46=D2 @C=@EDD92==3642=4F=2E652D7@==@HD3 4 6E6C>:?6E96>:?:>F>2>@F?E@7A2C<:?8C6BF:C657@C6249=2?5FD62DE9@F89:E5 H6C62D6A2C2E6FD66 7 #F=E:A=J62492>@F?E3JE964@CC6DA@?5:?8A6C46?E2862DD9@H?:?E967@==@H:?88 N&2C<:?8C65:E(4965F=6O7@C6249@7E967:G6E:>6A6C:@5D9 10 2=4F=2E6E964@=F>?E@E2=7@C6249E:>6A6C:@511 12 )96 4@=F>? E@E2= E92E 86?6C2E6D E96 9:896DE ?F>36C @7 A2C<:?8 DA246D E96?13 364@>6DE96A2C<:?8C6BF:C6>6?E 14 Parking Credit Schedule 15 Weekday Weekend Nighttime  Daytime (6 a.m. – 6 p.m.) Evening 6 p.m. – midnight) Daytime (6 a.m. – 6 p.m.) Evening 6 p.m. – midnight) (Midnight – 6 a.m.) %77:46>65:42=@77:46 A6CD@?2=D6CG:46 :?4=F5:?825F=E49:=5 2?5A6E42C6 724:=:E:6D 2CE:D2? 4C27ED>2? H@C<D9@A2CE:DE DEF5:@2F4E:@?D 32?<7:?2?4:2= :?DE:EFE:@?<6J D9@A =@4<D>:E9 =23@C2E@CJAC:?E:?8@C AF3=:D9:?8 6DE23=:D9>6?EC6A2:C D9@ADC6?E2=D9@AD      '6E2:=        @E6=3652?5 3C62<72DE:??      '6DE2FC2?E  '6DE2FC2?E2C       @>>F?:EJ46?E6C =:3C2CJ82==6CJ@C >FD6F>7:E?6DD4=F3 D<2E:?8C:?<E66? 46?E6CA=246D@7 H@CD9:A       ==%E96C*D6D       Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286  1 Example for calculating Mixed-Use (shared) parking requirement 2 (E@CJ3F:=5:?8=@42E65@?2@H?E@H?#2:?(EC66E9@FD6DE967@==@H:?8FD6D3 DE(E@CJM DB 7E @7C6DE2FC2?E2?5 DB 7E @7C6E2:=4 ?5(E@CJM  DB 7E @7@77:46D5 C5(E@CJM5H6==:?8F?:ED6 7 )96A2C<:?8C6BF:C657@CE9:D9JA@E96E:42=AC@A6CEJH@F=53642=4F=2E653JFD:?88 E967@FCDE6AD:?A2C28C2A94 E9C@F8923@G62D7@==@HD9 10  6E6C>:?6E96A2C<:?8C6BF:C657@C6249FD62DE9@F89:EH6C62D6A2C2E611 FD612 '6DE2FC2?E DB 7E @74FDE@>6C2C62  DA246D13  DB 7E '6E2:= DA246D14  DB 7E %77:46  DA246D15 5H6==:?8F?:ED DA246D16 E@E2=@7 A2C<:?8DA246DH@F=536C6BF:C65:7FD6DH6C617 D6A2C2E618 19  #F=E:A=J62492>@F?E2DD9@H?:?E96&2C<:?8C65:E(4965F=67@C6249@7E9620 7:G6E:>6A6C:@5DE96C6DF=ED2C6D9@H?:?E96E23=636=@H 21 22 Weekday Weekend Nighttime  2JE:>6 G6?:?8 2JE:>6 G6?:?8 %77:46      '6E2:=      @E6=??      '6DE2FC2?E         )962E6C      H6==:?8*?:ED      %E96C    )@E2=        2=4F=2E6E964@=F>?E@E2=7@C6249E:>6A6C:@5D9@H?:?C@H=236=65N)@E2=O23 :?E96E23=623@G6 24 25 )96 9:896DE 4@=F>? E@E2= 364@>6D E96 A2C<:?8 C6BF:C6>6?E 4:C4=65 23@G626 C@F?565FAE@E96?62C6DEH9@=6?F>36C:?E9:D6I2>A=6   27  Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286  The following conditions apply to any parking facility that is accessory to 1 mixed-use development and availing itself of the above Schedule:2 3  )96>:I65FD6AC@A6CEJ2?5:EDA2C<:?8724:=:EJD92==36@H?653JE96D2>64 A2CEJ@C36F?56C2;@:?EFD628C66>6?E &2C<:?8D92==36=@42E65@?D:E6@C5 H:E9:?2 7@@EH2=<:?85:DE2?46@7E966?EC2?46E@E966DE23=:D9>6?EDD6CG65 6 ?J A2C<:?8 2CC2?86>6?E F?56C 2 ;@:?E FD6 28C66>6?E D92== >66EE967 C6BF:C6>6?ED@7CE:4=6+@7E9:D92AE6C 8 9  (92C65A2C<:?8DA246D>2J?@E36C6D6CG65 10 11 )96 :EJ H:== 56E6C>:?6 2E E96 E:>6 @7 E96 A2C<:?8 724:=:EJPD A=2? 2AAC@G2=12 H9:49 D92C65 A2C<:?8 :D A@DD:3=6 2?5 2AAC@AC:2E6 2E E96 =@42E:@? AC@A@D65 13 &2CE:4F=2C2EE6?E:@?:D?66565E@2DDFC6E92EDF77:4:6?E2?54@?G6?:6?ED9@CEE6C>14 A2C<:?8 H:== 36 2G2:=23=6 E@ 4@>>6C4:2= 6DE23=:D9>6?ED 5FC:?8 E96 H66<52J15 52JE:>6A6C:@5 )96D92C65A2C<:?8DA246D:DC6BF:C65E@36=@42E65:?E96>@DE16 4@?G6?:6?E2?5G:D:3=62C62@7E96A2C<:?8724:=:EJ?62C6DEE966DE23=:D9>6?E36:?817 D6CG65 18 19 DF3D6BF6?E492?86:?FD6D92==C6BF:C62?6HFD62?5@44FA2?4JA6C>:E20 2?5AC@@7E92EDF77:4:6?EA2C<:?8H:==362G2:=23=6 21 22 Payment-In-Lieu of On-Site Parking. C@>E9667764E:G652E6@7E96@C5:?2?4623 E@%4E@36C  E9:D4FCC6?E4@DED92==36  7@C6G6CJA2C<:?8DA24624 C6BF:C65 3FE ?@E AC@G:565   )96 :EJ @>>:DD:@? D92== 2??F2==J C6G:6H E9625 2>@F?E@7E96?":6F662?5E9625>:?:DEC2E:G6AC@465FC63JH9:49:ED92==3626 A2:5 27 28  )96766E@36A2:5E96N?":6F66OD92==362@?6E:>6766A6CDA2467@C29 6249A2C<:?8DA246C6BF:C65 30 31  )96?":6F66D92==36A2:5:?244@C52?46H:E9E9625>:?:DEC2E:G6AC@465FC632 6DE23=:D9657C@>E:>6E@E:>63JE96:EJ@>>:DD:@? 33 34 ==?":6F66D4@==64E653JE96:EJ2?52==:?E6C6DE62C?65E96C6@?D92==3635 A=2465:?2DA64:2=7F?56DE23=:D9653JE96:EJ@>>:DD:@?2?5D92==36FD6536 D@=6=J7@CE9624BF:D:E:@?@7=2?57@C56G6=@A>6?E@72?5>2:?E6?2?46@7AF3=:437 A2C<:?8724:=:E:6D:?2?5 @C5:C64E=JD6CG:?8E96:DEC:4E 38 39  $@EH:E9DE2?5:?8 E96 AC@G:D:@?D @7 E9:D DF3A2C28C2A9 ?@E >@C6 E92? 7:7EJ40  A6C46?E@7E96C6BF:C65@?D:E6A2C<:?87@C?@?C6D:56?E:2=FD6DD92==3641 D2E:D7:65 3J A2J>6?E @7 E96 ?":6F 66  == A2C<:?8 DA246D C6BF:C65 7@C42 C6D:56?E:2=FD6D>FDE36AC@G:565@?D:E6 43  Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286  1 Sec. 24-271. Fees. 2 Cost Recovery Fee.  )@ @77D6E E96 4@DED @7 A=2??:?8 E96 %2<=2?5 &2C<3 @H?E@H? #:I65 *D6 :DEC:4E 2 @DE '64@G6CJ 66 D92== 36 A2:5367@C64 :DDF2?46@723F:=5:?8A6C>:E7@C2?J56G6=@A>6?E@CC656G6=@A>6?EH:E9:?E965 #:I65*D6:DEC:4E 766@7 D92==36A2:57@C6G6CJ5H6==:?8F?:E2?56G6CJ6 8C@DDDBF2C6766E@74@>>6C4:2=DA24656G6=@A65@CC656G6=@A65H:E9:?7 E962C6256D:8?2E652DE96@H?E@H?#:I65*D6:DEC:4E 8 9 Park and Open Space Charge.A2C<2?5@A6?DA246492C86@7  7@C10 6G6CJ 5H6==:?8 F?:E D92== 36 A2:5 367@C6 :DDF2?46 @7 2 3F:=5:?8 A6C>:E 7@C11 56G6=@A>6?E 2?5 C656G6=@A>6?E H:E9:? E96 @H?E@H? #:I65 *D6 :DEC:4E E@12 @77D6EE964@DED@7:?4C62D:?8A2C<2?5@A6?DA246H:E9:?E9:D:DEC:4E )96&2C<13 2?5%A6?(A246492C86>2J36C6G:6H652?525;FDE65@?2?2??F2=32D:D3J14 E96:EJ@>>:DD:@? 15 16  Student Station Fee. C@H2C5@F?EJD92==4@==64E2DEF56?EDE2E:@?7662D17 56E6C>:?653JE96(49@@=@2C5@7C@H2C5@F?EJ )962>@F?E@7E96766H:==18 3656E6C>:?65E9C@F892?:?E6C=@42=28C66>6?E36EH66?E96:EJ@7%2<=2?5&2C<19 2?5E96(49@@=@2C5@7C@H2C5@F?EJ 20 21 Local Transportation Fee.  )96 :EJ @7 %2<=2?5 &2C< D92== 4@==64E 2 "@42=22 )C2?DA@CE2E:@?66@7 7@C6G6CJ5H6==:?8F?:E2?56G6CJ 8C@DDDBF2C623 766E@74@>>6C4:2=DA24656G6=@A65@CC656G6=@A65H:E9:?E962C6256D:8?2E6524 2DE96@H?E@H?#:I65*D6:DEC:4E367@C6:DDF2?46@723F:=5:?8A6C>:E7C@>25 56G6=@A>6?E2?5C656G6=@A>6?EH:E9:?E96%2<=2?5&2C<@H?E@H?#:I65*D626 :DEC:4EE@@77D6EE964@DED@7:?7C2DECF4EFC6:>AC@G6>6?EDH:E9:?E96:DEC:4E@C27 2C62DE92E2C6@FED:56E96:DEC:4EE92E2C6:>A24E653J@H?E@H?:>AC@G6>6?ED 28 )96:EJ@>>:DD:@?H:==D6EE9676627E6CC6G:6H2?5DEF5J3J:EJDE277 )9629 "@42=)C2?DA@CE2E:@?66>2J36C6G:6H652?525;FDE65@?2?2??F2=32D:D3J30 E96:EJ@>>:DD:@? 31 32 Development Review Fee.  )96 :EJ @7 %2<=2?5 &2C< :?E6?5D E@ 4@==64E 233 6G6=@A>6?E'6G:6H667@CC6G:6H@72AA=:42E:@?D7@C56G6=@A>6?EH:E9:?E9634 %2<=2?5&2C<@H?E@H?#:I65*D6:DEC:4E 766@7 H:==36492C86535 7@C3F:=5:?8DE9C66DE@C:6D2?5=@H6C2?52766@7  H:==36492C8657@C36 3F:=5:?8D7@FCDE@C:6D2?59:896C %?692=7@7E966G6=@A>6?E'6G:6H766>FDE37 36 A2:5 E@ E96 :EJ 367@C6 E96 AC62AA=:42E:@? >66E:?8 H:E9 E96 6G6=@A>6?E38 '6G:6H@>>:EE66 %?692=7>FDE36A2:5E@E96:EJ367@C67@C>2=C6G:6H@739 4@>A=6E65D:E6A=2?D3JE966G6=@A>6?E'6G:6H@>>:EE66 )966G6=@A>6?E40 '6G:6H 66 >2J 36 C6G:6H65 2?5 25;FDE65 @? 2? 2??F2= 32D:D 3J E96 :EJ41 @>>:DD:@?E@56E6C>:?6E964@DE2?52AA=:423:=:EJ 42 43  Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286 249766D6E7@CE996C6:?D92==36A=2465:?2D6A2C2E6244@F?E2?5D92==361 6IA6?565 @?=J 7@C E96 AFCA@D6 @7 :ED 4@==64E:@?   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Development Review Procedure. 5 )966G6=@A>6?E'6G:6H@>>:EE66H9:49D92==:?4=F562?FC32?56D:8?6C2?56 2?J @E96C 56D:8?66D 2DD:8?65 E@ E96 @>>:EE66 3J E96 :EJ H:== C6G:6H 2==7 56G6=@A>6?E 2AA=:42E:@?D A6CE2:?:?8 E@ 2?J AC@A6CEJ =@42E65 :?E96 @H?E@H?8 #:I65*D6:DEC:4E7@C4@>A=:2?46H:E9E96AC@G:D:@?D@7E9:DCE:4=6--2?5:ED9 4@>A2?:@?%2<=2?5&2C<@H?E@H?#:I65*D6:DEC:4E6D:8?F:56=:?6D )9610 AFCA@D6@7E96C6G:6H:DE@6?DFC6E92EE96C6BF6DE65>@5:7:42E:@?:D4@>A2E:3=611 H:E9E9656D:C65492C24E6C@7E96@H?E@H?#:I65*D6:DEC:4E2?5:D4@?D:DE6?E12 H:E9E96AC@G:D:@?D@7E9:DCE:4=62?5E96%2<=2?5&2C<@H?E@H?#:I65*D613 :DEC:4E6D:8?F:56=:?6D 14 15  Process for development approval. 16  Pre-application meeting.  56G6=@A6C @C AC@A6CEJ @H?6C D92== DF3>:E 217 56G6=@A>6?E 2AA=:42E:@? 2E =62DE EH@ H66<D 367@C6 2 D4965F=65 6G6=@A>6?E18 '6G:6H@>>:EE66>66E:?8E@36D4965F=657@C2AC62AA=:42E:@?>66E:?8@?E92E19 52E6  )96 6G6=@A>6?E '6G:6H @>>:EE66 >2J AC@G:56 @C2= @C HC:EE6?20 4@>>6?ED@?A=2?D2EE96AC62AA=:42E:@?>66E:?8 21 22  Formal Development Review Committee Meeting. 56G6=@A6C@CAC@A6CEJ23 @H?6C D92== DF3>:E E96 4@>A=6E6 56G6=@A>6?E 2AA=:42E:@? 2E =62DE EH@ H66<D24 367@C62D4965F=656G6=@A>6?E'6G:6H@>>:EE66>66E:?8E@36D4965F=657@C25 27@C>2=56G6=@A>6?EC6G:6H4@>>:EE66>66E:?8@?E92E52E6  )966G6=@A>6?E26 '6G:6H@>>:EE66'D92==AC@G:56HC:EE6?4@>>6?ED@?E9656G6=@A>6?E27 2AA=:42E:@?2EE96D4965F=65>66E:?8 28 29 Required developer response.  )96 56G6=@A6C @C AC@A6CEJ @H?6C D92==30 C6DA@?5E@E966G6=@A>6?E'6G:6H@>>:EE66PD4@>>6?EDH:E9:?E9:CEJ52JD@731 E967@C>2=6G6=@A>6?E'6G:6H@>>:EE66#66E:?8 )966G6=@A>6?E'6G:6H32 92D 2 C:89E E@ E23=6 56G6=@A>6?E 2AA=:42E:@?D 5F6 E@ =24< @7 C6DA@?D6 @C33 :?4@>A=6E6C6DA@?D63J256G6=@A6C@CAC@A6CEJ@H?6C ?2AA=:42E:@?>2J3634 C64@?D:56C65 H:E9 2 ?6H 56G6=@A>6?E C6G:6H 766 H:E9 2 HC:EE6? C6BF6DE 27E6C35 E9C66>@?E9D@7:?24E:G:EJ 36 37 Staff discretion. :EJDE27792DE96D@=65:D4C6E:@?E@9@=52D64@?57@C>2=38 6G6=@A>6?E'6G:6H@>>:EE66>66E:?8H:E9E9656G6=@A6CH:E9:?EH@H66<D@739 C646:AE @7 E96 56G6=@A6CPD >@5:7:42E:@?D :7 E96 56G6=@A6C :D 566>65 ?@?40 C6DA@?D:G6 E@ E96 6G6=@A>6?E '6G:6H @>>:EE66PD 4@>>6?ED 2?5 @C E9641 DF3>:EE2=:?4=F56D>2;@C2>6?5>6?ED42 43  Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286 Revisions to approved site plan.1 2 Minor amendment: )966G6=@A>6?E'6G:6H@>>:EE6627E6CC646:G:?8DE2772 C64@>>6?52E:@?D >2J 2AAC@G6 >:?@C 492?86D 2?5 56G:2E:@?D 7C@> E963 2AAC@G65D:E6A=2?H9:492C6:?4@>A=:2?46H:E9E96AC@G:D:@?D2?5:?E6?E@7E9:D4 2CE:4=62?5H9:495@?@E56A2CE7C@>E96AC:?4:A2=4@?46AE@7E962AAC@G65D:E65 A=2? ==@E96CC6BF6DE65492?86D2?556G:2E:@?DD92==36C676CC65E@E96:EJ6 @>>:DD:@? 7 8 3 Major amendment: )96 :EJ @>>:DD:@? >2J C6G:6H 2?5 56E6C>:?6 E92E9 C6BF6DE65 492?86D 2?5 56G:2E:@?D 7C@> 2? 2AAC@G65 D:E6 A=2? 4@?DE:EFE6 210 DF3DE2?E:2=2=E6C2E:@?E@E96492C24E6C@7E9656G6=@A>6?E2?5E9FDC6BF:C6E92E11 E96C6BF6DE65492?86D36DF3;64EE@E96D2>6AC@465FC62DC6BF:C657@C?6H12 2AA=:42E:@?  (F3DE2?E:2= 492?86D H@F=5 :?4=F56 2=E6C2E:@? @7 E96 :?E6?D:E:6D13 56?D:EJ56D:8?AF3=:42>6?:E:6D@C>@5:7:42E:@?DE@>:?:>F>4@56C6BF:C6>6?ED14 2?52AAC@G654@?5:E:@?D 15 16 Final approval.:EJDE277D92==C6A@CEE@E96&=2??:?82?5/@?:?8@2C52?517 :EJ@>>:DD:@?@?D:E6A=2?DC6G:6H653JE966G6=@A>6?E'6G:6H@>>:EE6618 DF3>:EE65 7@C 56G6=@A>6?E 2?5 C656G6=@A>6?E :? E96 @H?E@H? #:I65 *D619 :DEC:4E 20 21 2Planning and Zoning Board Consideration.  :EJ DE277 D92== C6A@CE @? E9622 6G6=@A>6?E'6G:6H@>>:EE66PD4@>>6?ED2EE967:CDEA@DD:3=6&=2??:?82?523 /@?:?8@2C5>66E:?8 )96&=2??:?82?5/@?:?8@2C5H:==56E6C>:?6:7E96D:E624 A=2? >66ED E96 DE2?52C5D 2?5 C6BF:C6>6?ED @7 E96 %2<=2?5 &2C< "2?525 6G6=@A>6?E @56   )96 &=2??:?8 2?5 /@?:?8 @2C5 H:== 7@CH2C5 :ED26 C64@>>6?52E:@?E@E96:EJ@>>:DD:@? 27 28 3 City Commission Consideration.)96:EJ@>>:DD:@?C6D6CG6DE96C:89EE@29 D4965F=62?5E@9@=527@C>2=962C:?8H:E9:?52JD@7E96&=2??:?82?5/@?:?830 @2C5PDC6G:6H@7E966G6=@A>6?E'6G:6H@>>:EE66PD4@>>6?ED 7?@7@C>2=31 962C:?8:DD4965F=65H:E9:?E9652JD56G6=@A>6?E>2JAC@46652D2AAC@G6532 3JE966G6=@A>6?E'6G:6H@>>:EE66 33 34 ) Development Applications.AA=:42E:@?DD92==36244@>A2?:653JD:E6A=2?D35 2?5 6I9:3:ED 2D 2AAC@AC:2E6 7@C E96 A6C>:E C6BF6DE65 AC6A2C65 3J 56D:8?36 AC@76DD:@?2=D6 8 2C49:E64ED=2?5D42A62C49:E64ED6?8:?66CD6E4 E92E:?4=F5637 2E>:?:>F>E967@==@H:?8A=FD2?J255:E:@?2=>2E6C:2=C6BF:C653JE96%2<=2?538 &2C<@H?E@H?#:I65*D6:DEC:4E6D:8?F:56=:?6D39  "@E=:?6D2?5D6E324<D40  C@DD2?5?6E24C6286 41 )@E2=DBF2C67@@E286@72===2?5FD6D 42  Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286 )@E2=?F>36C@75H6==:?8F?:ED 1 "@42E:@? D92A6 D:K6 2?5 96:89E @7 6I:DE:?8 2?5 AC@A@D653F:=5:?82 4@?DECF4E:@?2?5=2?5D42A:?8 3 >@F?E @7 3F:=5:?8 4@G6C286 2E 8C@F?5 =6G6= :? DBF2C6 766E2?52D24 A6C46?E286@7E96E@E2=D:E6 5 )JA:42= 7=@@C A=2?D 2?5 6=6G2E:@?D @7 2== DECF4EFC6D :?4=F5:?8 E@E2= 8C@DD6 DBF2C67@@E2C62@762497=@@C2?52==5:>6?D:@?DC6=2E:?8E@E96C6BF:C6>6?ED@77 E9:DCE:4=6 8 "@42E:@?D:K62?5E@E2=2>@F?E@7@A6?DA246:72AA=:423=6 9 )@E2=2>@F?E@7A2G652C62:?DBF2C6766E2?5A6C46?E286@76?E:C6D:E6 10   "@42E:@? @7 @?DEC66E 2?5 @77DEC66E A2C<:?8 =@25:?8 724:=:E:6D 2?5 2==11 FE:=:E:6D 12   "@42E:@? 2?5 5:>6?D:@?D @7 AC@A@D65 A2C<:?8 2?5 D6CG:46 2C62D13 :?4=F5:?8EJA:42=A2C<:?8DA2465:>6?D:@?D2?5 @C?2CC2E:G6C682C5:?8A2J>6?E@714 ?":6F667@C&2C<:?8 15   &C@A@D65 >62?D @7 G69:4F=2C 2?5 A656DEC:2? 2446DD 7C@> E96 D:E6D16 H:E9:?E9656G6=@A>6?EE@25;246?EDEC66ED2?5 @C2==6JDD9@H:?82==AC@A@D65@C17 6I:DE:?84FC34FED2?5D:56H2=<D 18   5;246?EC@25H2JH:5E9DA2G65C:89E@7H2J:?4=F5:?86=6G2E:@?@7C@2519 A=FD2?J565:42E:@?DC6BF:C653JE96:EJ@7%2<=2?5&2C< 20   "@42E:@?D92A62?5D:K6@7D:8?286 21   ?5:42E:@?@72?JD:E6@C3F:=5:?856D:8?>6E9@5DFD65E@4@?D6CG66?6C8J22 2?5 @CH2E6C 23   ?5:42E:@?@72?JD:E6@C3F:=5:?856D:8?>6E9@5DFD65E@:?4@CA@C2E6E9624 AC:?4:A2=D@7C:>6&C6G6?E:@?2?5&F3=:4(276EJ)9C@F89?G:C@?>6?E2=6D:8?25 N&&()O2DD6E7@CE9:?:EJ'6D@=FE:@?$@ ' 26   "@42E:@?2?5>6E9@5@7D4C66?:?8@7C67FD6DE2E:@?DDE@C2862C62D2?527 @77DEC66E =@25:?8 2C62D  '67FD6 4@==64E:@? 2C62D 5F>ADE6CD 2?5 C64J4=:?828 4@?E2:?6CDD92==36A=2465@?2EH6=G67@@E3JEH6=G67@@E4@?4C6E6A25H:E9229 EH6=G63JD:I7@@E2AC@?@7E9C66E9@FD2?5 &(4@?4C6E6 ==4@?E2:?6CD30 >FDE366?4=@D652DAC6D4C:365:?(64E:@?   @7E96%2<=2?5&2C<31 "2?56G6=@A>6?E@56 32   @?46AEF2= =2?5D42A6 A=2?D :?4=F5:?8 EC66D A2=> >2DD:?8=2?5D42A633 2C62D2?5A2C<:?8=2?5D42A6EC62E>6?E 34   "@42E:@? 2?5 >6E9@5 @7 3F776C:?8 7C@> 25;246?E C6D:56?E:2= K@?:?835 5:DEC:4ED 36  Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286   &C@A@D65@C6I:DE:?8FE:=:EJ62D6>6?ED@C7:C69J5C2?ED2?55:DE2?46E@1 DECF4EFC6D 2   "@42E:@?2?5>6E9@5@7DE@C>H2E6CC6E6?E:@?@C56E6?E:@? 3   (496>2E:46?8:?66C:?85C2H:?8H9:49:?4=F5652?@FE=:?6@7E96A=2?E@4 AC@G:56H2E6CD6H6CC@25D2?55C2:?2867@CE96AC@A@D65AC@;64E )9:DA=2?5 D92== 36 2 AC6=:>:?2CJ 4@?46AEF2= 56D:8? D:8?65 2?5 D62=65 3J 2 C68:DE6C656 6?8:?66C 2EE6DE:?8 E92E E96 AF3=:4 :?7C2DECF4EFC6 A=2??65 H:==36 :? 244@C52?467 H:E9 2== 7656C2= DE2E6 2?5 =@42= C68F=2E:@?D   E >:?:>F> E96 5C2H:?8 D92==8 4@?E2:? E96 7@==@H:?8 *E:=:EJ A:A6 D:K6D  =6?8E9D >2E6C:2= 2?5 AC6=:>:?2CJ9 =@42E:@?DC@25H2J4C@DDD64E:@?H:5E956AE9@732D62?5DF38C256EJA:42=10 D64E:@?D24C@DDAC@A6CEJ=:?6D2?5@77D:E6FE:=:EJ2?5C@25H2JAF3=:4:?7C2DECF4EFC611 ?646DD2CJ E@ D6CG6 E96 D:E6   )96 :?7@C>2E:@? 4@?E2:?65 @? E96 D496>2E:412 6?8:?66C:?8 5C2H:?8 >FDE 36 C6G:6H65 2?5 2AAC@G65 3J E96 AF3=:4 H@C<D13 56A2CE>6?E 14   #6E9@5@7>2:?E2:?:?82?J4@>>@?@C;@:?EFD62C62 15   6D:8?52E22D>2J36?66565E@6G2=F2E6E96AC@;64EDF492D16 2F:=5:?86=6G2E:@?17 3(2>A=6D @7 >2E6C:2=D :?4=F5:?8 C@@7:?8 E:=6D A2G6CD 6IE6C:@C A2:?E @C18 6IE6C:@C>2E6C:2=D19 4C2H:?8@C:>286D@7DEC66E7FC?:EFC620 56E2:=655C2H:?8D@7D:8?2862?5H2J7:?5:?821   7 3F:=5:?8D :? E96 AC@A@D65 56G6=@A>6?E 2C6 @G6C E9C66 DE@C:6D D:E622 A=2?D2AAC@AC:2E66I9:3:ED2?5?2CC2E:G6C682C5:?8A2CE:4:A2E:@?:?E96F:=5:?823 6:89E?46?E:G6&C@8C2>D92==36AC@G:565 24   )96:EJ>2J2D<7@C255:E:@?2=5@4F>6?E2E:@?2?5DEF5:6D2D?646DD2CJ 25 )964@DED@7DF495@4F>6?E2?5DEF5:6DD92==363@C?3JE96AC@A6CEJ@H?6C 26 27 Sec. 24-273. Prohibited Structures. 28 )6=64@>>F?:42E:@?E@H6CDF?=6DDE96J>66EE96%2<=2?5&2C<@H?E@H?#:I6529 *D6:DEC:4E6D:8?F:56=:?6D2C6AC@9:3:E65 30 31 Sec. 24-274. Offsite Drainage. 32 )96:EJD92==>2:?E2:?2?:?G6?E@CJ@7AF3=:4DE@C>H2E6C5C2:?286724:=:E:6D33 D6CG:?8E96@H?E@H?#:I65*D6:DEC:4E7@CE96AFCA@D6@72==@42E:?842A24:EJE@34 @?69F?5C65 A6C46?E@7E96C6BF:C655C2:?2867@CA6C>:EE65@H?E@H?35 #:I65*D6:DEC:4E56G6=@A>6?ED@CFD6D 36 &F3=:45C2:?28642A24:EJH:==36C6D6CG653JE96:EJ7@C624956G6=@A>6?E37 H:E9:?E96:DEC:4E 38  Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286 249AC@A6CEJH:E9:?E96:DEC:4ED92==92G6E96@AE:@?E@4@??64E5:C64E@C1 @E96CH:D66?DFC6E92EFAE@@?69F?5C65 A6C46?E@7@?D:E6DE@C>H2E6C2 CF?@77:D4@?G6J65E@E96AF3=:4DE@C>H2E6CDJDE6> )96>2??6C@74@??64E:@?3 D92==362DA6C>:EE653JE96:EJ?8:?66C 4   @?6E:>6 A6C AC@A6CEJ 4@??64E:@? 766 2D AC@G:565 :? E96@>>F?:EJ5 6G6=@A>6?E6A2CE>6?E766D4965F=6D92==36492C865E@4@G6CE964@DE@76 DE@C>H2E6C D6CG:46 2?5 4@??64E:@?  )96 766 D92== 36 492C865 E@2?J :DEC:4E7 AC@A6CEJ C6BF:C:?8 2 C@H2C5 @F?EJ 6A2CE>6?E @7 ?G:C@?>6?E2= &C@E64E:@?8 A6C>:E )96766D92==36A2:5AC:@CE@:EJ3F:=5:?8A6C>:E:DDF2?46 9 10 Sec. 24-275. Public Art Program. 11 )9:D2CE:4=64C62E6DE96N%2<=2?5&2C<&F3=:4CE&C@8C2>O2?52==@HD7@CE9612 25>:?:DEC2E:@?@7DF49AC@8C2> )96:EJE9C@F89E96&F3=:4CE&C@8C2>>2J13 4@==64E2766@?56G6=@A>6?E2?5C656G6=@A>6?E:?E96@H?E@H?#:I65*D614 :DEC:4E7@CA=246>6?E@7AF3=:42CEH@C<D:?AF3=:4=J2446DD:3=62C62D )96&F3=:415 CE&C@8C2>H:==C6BF:C6E967@C>2E:@?@72&F3=:4CE@>>:EE662AA@:?E653JE9616 :EJ @>>:DD:@? 2?5 &F3=:4 CE F:56=:?6D H9:49 C68F=2E6 E96 @>>:EE6617 4@>>:DD:@?:?8@7AF3=:42CE4C:E6C:27@C2CEH@C<D6=64E:@? 18 19 Section 3.72?J4=2FD6D64E:@?@C@E96CA2CE@7E9:D%C5:?2?46D92==3696=53J20 2?J @FCE @7 4@>A6E6?E ;FC:D5:4E:@? E@ 36 F?4@?DE:EFE:@?2= @C :?G2=:5 DF4921 F?4@?DE:EFE:@?2=@C:?G2=:5A2CED92==364@?D:56C652D6=:>:?2E652?5:??@H2J22 27764E:?8E96G2=:5:EJ@7E96@E96CAC@G:D:@?D@7E9:D%C5:?2?46 23 24 Section 4. ==%C5:?2?46D@CA2CED@7%C5:?2?46D:?4@?7=:4E96C6H:E92C696C63J25 C6A62=65E@E966IE6?E@7DF494@?7=:4ED 26 27 Section 5.E:DE96:?E6?E:@?@7E96:EJ@>>:DD:@?@7E96:EJ@7%2<=2?5&2C<28 E92EE96AC@G:D:@?D@7E9:D%C5:?2?46D92==364@>62?536>2562A2CE@7E9629 @56@7%C5:?2?46D@7E96:EJ@7%2<=2?5&2C<=@C:522?5E92EE96(64E:@?D@730 E9:D@C5:?2?46>2J36C6?F>36C65C6=6EE6C652?5E96H@C5N%C5:?2?46O>2J3631 492?865E@N(64E:@?ONCE:4=6O@CDF49H@C5@CA9C2D6:?@C56CE@244@>A=:D932 DF49:?E6?E:@? 33 34 Section 6. )9:D%C5:?2?46D92==3667764E:G6FA@?:EDA2DD2862?525@AE:@?3J35 E96:EJ@>>:DD:@?@7E96:EJ@7%2<=2?5&2C< 36 37 38 39 40 41  Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286 PASSES BY THE CITY COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF OAKLAND PARK, 1 FLORIDA, ON FIRST READING THIS ___ DAY OF NOVEMBER 2004. 2 3  #*'&. 111 4 5 ( '$()1116 7 " ''1118 9  #"%'11110 11 " ,""(11112 13 PASSED AND ADOPTED BY THE CITY COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF 14 OAKLAND PARK, FLORIDA, ON SECOND AND FINAL READING, THIS 15 ______ DAY OF __________, 2004. 16 17 ).%%!"$&'!"%'18 19 20 .111111111111111111111111111121 ".$"")),""(#.%'22 23  #*'&.11111124 25 ( '$()11111126 27 " ''11111128 29  #"%'11111130 31 " ,""(11111132 33 34 ))()35 36 111111111111111111111111137 $$.'$""#38 )."'!39 40 41 42 43  Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Regulations &286 ""$%)1 96C63J46CE:7JE92E92G62 2AAC@G65E967@C>@7E9:D%C5:?2?46 3 4 111111111111111111111111115 %$" %%.6 ).))%'$.7 8 9 10 11  >62 12 00 1(0"''.0 0  %&0%' 0#*"$$*#'(   "$%&. 5@413 14 Oakland Park Downtown Mixed Use District Design Guidelines O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s T a b l e o f C o n t e n t s x Table of Contents I n t r o d u c t i o n 1 Image of Downtown Oakland Park 1 Statement of Intent 2 Overview 3 U r b a n D e s i g n : A r c h i t e c t u r a l M a s s i n g G u i d e l i n e s 5 Introduction 5 Overall Building Height 5 Cornice Height 5 Vertical Plane Moderation 6 Setbacks 7 Façade Treatments 7 Arcades 7 Canopies 8 Rooftop Guidelines 9 Overstreet Connections 9 U r b a n D e s i g n : S t r e e t L e v e l G u i d e l i n e s 10 Introduction 10 Active Use 10 Structured Parking 10 Plazas 11 Architectural Fenestration 11 Fences & Walls 12 Water Features 12 Public Art 13 Special Paving 13 Intersection Treatments 14 O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s T a b l e o f C o n t e n t s xi Barrier Free Design 14 Trash/Loading Facilities 15 Sidewalks 16 Bikeways 17 L a n d s c a p e P l a n t i n g 18 Introduction 18 General Requirements 19 Streetscape Plantings 19 Signature Trees 20 Open Space Plantings 21 Screening Plantings 22 Perimeter Landscaping 24 Parking Lot Landscaping 24 Irrigation 24 Residential Landscaping 25 S i g n a g e & G r a p h i c s 26 Introduction 26 Private Sector Signage 26 Building/Business Identification 26 Entry Monuments 27 Public Sector Signage 28 Informational Identification 28 Street Identification 28 Directional Signage 29 Traffic Regulatory 29 Specialty Signage/Banners 30 O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s T a b l e o f C o n t e n t s xii S i t e F u r n i s h i n g s 31 Introduction 31 Recommended Materials 31 Bike Racks 31 Bollards 32 Flagpoles 32 Benches 33 Tree Grates 33 Planters 34 Trash Receptacles 34 Drinking Fountains 35 Parking Meters 35 S i t e L i g h t i n g 36 Introduction 36 Streetscape Lighting 37 Pedestrian Lighting 38 Landscape Lighting 38 T r a f f i c , P a r k i n g & C i r c u l a t i o n 39 Introduction 39 Traffic Oreinted Development 39 Traffic Circulation 39 NE 12th Avenue (between NE 34th Street and NE 36th Street) 40 NE 12th Terrace (between NE 34th Street and NE 36th Street) 40 NE 37th Street (between NE 12th Avenue and NE 13th Street) 40 Turning Movements off Dixie Highway onto NE 38th Street 40 NE 12th Avenue Parking 41 O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s T a b l e o f C o n t e n t s xiii A p p e n d i x Illustrative Plan A1 Section A: NE 12th Avenue in Park Place A2 Section B: NE 12th Avenue in Dixie Mixed Use A3 Section C: NE 12th Terrace in Park Place A4 Section D: Dixie Highway in Park Place A5 Section E: Dixie Highway in Dixie Mixed Use A6 Section F: NE 11th Avenue in Park Place A7 Section G: NE 34th Court in Park Place A8 Circulation Plan A9 O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s I n t r o d u c t i o n 1 Oakland Park is a quaint small town tucked into the sub-tropical urban environment of Broward County. The downtown district of Oakland Park is located along two of the area's major arterial corridors, Oakland Park Boulevard and Dixie Highway, therefore making it an accessible destination from many locations. The area is also less than two miles from world-famous South Florida beaches, schools, shopping centers and employment centers, making it attractive for both the homebuyer and the visitor. Downtown Oakland Park is surrounded by a number of established neighborhoods which are accessible by both pedestrains and vehicles. The downtown district is intended to be a vibrant and compact urban area that will foster smart growth and stimulate economic development. Emphasis on new urbanism will be encouraged with a mixed-use city center that will have spacious pedestrian walkways and arcades, beautiful parks and open spaces and aesthetically-pleasing facades. Characteristics and components of the revitalized downtown will also include mixed-use development, enhanced housing opportunities, historic preservation and improved transportation facilities that will further the objective and policies applicable to the Local Activity Center Land Use Designation. Image of Downtown Oakland Park Introduction Oakland Park Downtown Illustrative Plan O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s I n t r o d u c t i o n 2 These guidelines are adopted as a companion document to Article XX, Downtown District Regulations, of Chapter 24, Land Development Code of the City of Oakland Park, Florida. The following guidelines are designed to facilitate the development of a livable, walkable, workable and enjoyable downtown in the City of Oakland Park. The area of the Downtown includes all properties, corridors and areas north of Oakland Park Boulevard, east of NE 10th Avenue, west of NE 13th Avenue and south of NE 42nd Street. The guidelines are organized in the following sections; Urban Design: Architectural Massing Guidelines, Urban Design: Street-level Guidelines, Landscape Planting, Signage & Graphics, Site Furnishings, and Site Lighting. The purpose of these guidelines is to enhance the existing Oakland Park Code, not to supercede the ordinance currently enacted by the City of Oakland Park. Statement of Intent O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s I n t r o d u c t i o n 3 These guidelines are divided into seven (7) sections including an introductory section and six (6) sections governing different site development issues. Each of the areas addressed in these design guidelines must be addressed and adhered to through the redevelopment process. These sections may be summarized as follows: Section 1: Introduction A review of Downtown Oakland Park's unique characteristics and image is accompanied by a statement of intent. Also included is a brief overview of the design guidelines, herein. Section 2: Urban Design: Architectural Massing Guidelines The architectural massing guidelines govern the aesthetic quality of the architecture within the downtown area. More specifically, the guidelines address architectural massing such as overall building height, cornice height, vertical plane moderation, setbacks, façade treatments, arcades, canopies, rooftop elements and overstreet connections. Section 3: Urban Design: Street Level Guidelines The street level guidelines govern all functional and aesthetic quality of elements along streets and corridors. Street level elements such as active use, structured parking, plazas, architectural fenestration, fences/walls, water features, public art, special paving, intersection treatments, barrier free design, trash loading facilities, sidewalks and bikeways are addressed. Section 4: Landscape Plantings The landscape plantings guidelines pertain to all landscaping within the downtown district. These landscape planting guidelines enhance the existing Oakland Park regulations and include landscape elements such as streetscape plantings, signature trees, open space plantings, screening plantings, perimeter landscaping, parking lot landscaping, irrigation and residential landscaping. Section 5: Signage and Graphics The signage and graphics guidelines govern all signage with the downtown district. Signage and graphics relating to both the private sector and public sector are addressed. Section 6: Site Furnishings The site furnishings guidelines govern the specific function and visual characteristics of the actual site furnishings within the downtown area. Site furnishings, such as; bike racks, bollards, flagpoles. benches, tree grates, planters, trash receptacles, drinking fountains Overview O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s I n t r o d u c t i o n 4 and parking meters are addressed and in several cases, specific products to be utilized are included. Section 7: Site Lighting The site lighting guidelines govern the functional and visual quality of the lighting within the downtown district. Lighting typology addressed includes streetscape lighting, pedestrian lighting and landscape lighting. O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s U r b a n D e s i g n : A r c h i t e c t u r a l M a s s i n g G u i d e l i n e s 5 Urban Design: Architectural Massing Guidelines Introduction The Architectural Massing Guidelines are intended to offer guidelines towards the massing of the architecture, not the style of the building. Variation in architectural style is desired within the Oakland Park Downtown, with restrictions guiding setbacks, step backs, arcades, canopies and other urban design elements. Overall Building Height Building height refers to the overall height of a building mass from the finished floor elevation (FFE) to the uppermost part of space that can be occupied (top of beam). Maximum building heights and definations are specified within the Oakland Park Downtown Mixed-Use District Zoning Ordinance. Infrastructure supporting roof activity, such as an elevator tower, stair tower, trellis, mechanical equipment or architectural fenestration, does not reflect in the overall building height, but must not exceed twelve (12') in height above top of beam of uppermost story or cover over 10% of the roof area. Tennis court lighting and plant material are exempt from this height restriction. Cornice Height All buildings which front either Dixie Highway or NE 12th Avenue in the Park Place sub-area, Dixie Mixed Use sub-area or Civic Use sub-areas are encouraged to display a uniform cornice height of thirty-five (35') feet measured from sidewalk grade. This cornice may take varying architectural forms to fit the individual style of the building. Cornice heights in other zoning sub-areas do not apply. Cornice height is measured from the ground plane to the top of facade cornice 35’ O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s U r b a n D e s i g n : A r c h i t e c t u r a l M a s s i n g G u i d e l i n e s 6 Vertical Plane Moderation Buildings exceeding 35' in height are required to maintain no more than three stories without horizontal moderation in the vertical surface plane. A step back is required above the third floor, which may serve as a balcony or outdoor living space for residential or office uses. Such step backs should occur on a minimum of two building faces: the building side facing a major corridor (Dixie Highway and NE 12th Avenue) and the side facing the residential neighborhoods on both the east and west side of the Florida East Coast (FEC) tracks (See Sections A, B, C, D, E and F in the Appendix). The step back must be between 8' to 12' in depth from building face to edge of step back. Where step backs create outdoor residential livable spaces, a number of items are not permitted in these areas, including grills, clothes lines, clothes drying racks and bicycles. Storage of any kind is not permitted. Potted plants and patio furniture are desired. The City reserves the right to determine what is permitted or not permitted in these areas. Vertical plane moderation shown between the third and fourth stories O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s U r b a n D e s i g n : A r c h i t e c t u r a l M a s s i n g G u i d e l i n e s 7 Setbacks Setbacks are required in all zoning sub-areas within the Oakland Park Downtown district and must be consistent with the requirements identified in the Oakland Park Downtown Mixed-Use District Zoning Ordinance. Setbacks are measured from the property line. Areas set back along Dixie Highway and NE 12th Avenue are opportunities for streetscape plantings, site elements, sidewalks and gathering spaces. Other areas within the downtown will provide for streetscape plantings, signage, drainage swales and green space. Setback requirements are specified in the Oakland Park Downtown Mixed-Use District Zoning Ordinance. Façade Treatments The first thirty five (35') of exterior façade vertical plane must enhance the pedestrian environment by incorporating appropriate architectural features. These features must include cornice detailing, ornamentation, moldings, changes in materials and colors, and other sculpting of the architectural surface which add special interest and appeal at the ground level. These features will complement the design integrity of the Oakland Park Downtown. Arcades Arcades are required within the Park Place sub-area along the frontages of the major thoroughfares (Dixie Highway and NE 12th Avenue). Pedestrain flow and outdoor dining will take place within the arcade area. Arcades are recommended within the Dixie Mixed Use sub-area and the Civic Use sub-areas along the frontages of Dixie Highway and NE 12th Avenue (See Sections A, B, D and E in the Appndix). The architectural features of the arcade may vary, but the required minimum width of 12' clear is mandatory in Park Place. If introduced in the Mixed-Use sub-areas, a minimum width of 10’ clear is required. Arcades provide protection from the elements and comfort for pedestrians O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s U r b a n D e s i g n : A r c h i t e c t u r a l M a s s i n g G u i d e l i n e s 8 Canopies Canopies are required where arcades are not included along Dixie Highway and NE 12th Avenue to provide pedestrians comfort and facilitate movement along the frontages. Continuous architectural canopies should reflect the design integrity of the structure. Either flexible or rigid materials are acceptable, providing they are compatible with site elements. Canopies may incorporate retractable elements, and may be permitted to intrude within the setback zone pending specific approval by variance or the Design Review Committee (DRC) process. Canopies should in no way interfere with street light fixtures or with the growth and maintenance of street trees, signature trees and landscape materials. All state and local building regulations shall apply to the construction and installation of canopies. Canopies are desired within the step backed areas of buildings exceeding 35' in overall height. If canopies are used in both the step backed areas and at the street level, then they should be cordinated in color and design. Canopies provide protection from the elements and interest along sunny streets Canopies located on the ground plane and stepbacked areas must coordinate O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s U r b a n D e s i g n : A r c h i t e c t u r a l M a s s i n g G u i d e l i n e s 9 Rooftop Guidelines Where possible, rooftops must be designed to maximize various forms of activities in the private sector. Activities could include sun decks, roof gardens, tennis courts, outdoor cafes, pool decks, parking and much more. In instances where rooftops are utilized for parking, the perimeter of the lot should include a trellis, canopies and/or landscape to mitigate views. Roof surfaces not allocated to activity should be finished with a material which reflects the architectural integrity of the building and creates interest from surrounding buildings. All rooftop mechanical equipment, stair and elevator towers shall be designed as an integral part of the building, which will not count in the overall building height, but must not exceed 12' from the rooftop floor elevation to the uppermost element of the rooftop. All infrastructure within a rooftop should be designed as an integral part of the building volume. All unsightly elements must be screened from both users of the rooftop and neighboring buildings. Overstreet Connections Connections between buildings which pass over a public right-of-way may be permitted providing those connections have secured legitimate air rights over the public corridor and meet all applicable codes. A connection over Dixie Highway, the Florida East Coast (FEC) tracks and NE 12th Avenue is desired north of NE 34th Court to safely transport pedestrians over Dixie Highway and the Florida East Coast (FEC) tracks within the Park Place sub-area, as well as, set in motion the infrastructure needs of a future Florida East Coast (FEC) commuter station (See Illustrative Plan in the Appendix). The pedestrian bridge at NE 34th Court should be of exceptional design to enhance the corridor and serve as a statement of the Oakland Park Downtown. Other over-street connections may be permitted only in the Dixie Mixed Use sub-area and the Civic Use sub-area, as well as the Park Place. A pedestrian bridge will transport pedestrians safely over Dixie Highway and the FEC Railway tracks and serve as a iconographic element of the Oakland Park Downtown O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s U r b a n D e s i g n : S t r e e t L e v e l G u i d e l i n e s 10 Urban Design: Street Level Guidelines Introduction The Street-level Guidelines are intended to create an attractive urban environment welcoming a host of activities, store fronts, residential units, restaurants, businesses, offices and open spaces. Active Use The first floors of all buildings facing Dixie Highway and NE 12th Avenue in the Park Place sub-area, Dixie Mixed Use sub-area and Civic Use sub-areas must be designed to encourage pedestrian activity along these major corridors. Retail uses such as restaurants, shops, galleries, cafes and other active uses must be located at the ground level, providing direct and visual access to pedestrian areas. Buildings which are situated along major roadways (Dixie Highway and NE 12th Avenue) intersecting NE 34th Court within the Park Place sub-area, are required to include a public gathering space at the corner of the intersecting streets to achieve a unique urban space (See Illustrative Plan in Appendix). Building frontages are to be setback at the corners to create a plaza with a minimum outdoor area of 1,500 square feet (see Plazas) and should incorporate landscape materials that offers shade and enhances the aesthetic quality. All displays, furnishings and other outdoor elements associated with these outdoor spaces should be designed and maintained to enhance the visual and functional quality of the downtown. To be considered, specific design of these public spaces should be submitted for approval through the Design Review Committee (DRC) process. Structured Parking Structured parking facilities are strongly desired along Dixie Highway and NE 12th Avenue. These parking facilities must be designed with ground level frontage (or liner buildings) situated on Dixie Highway and NE 12th Avenue in the Park Place sub-area, Dixie Mixed Use sub-area and the Civic Use sub-area. In addition to retail frontages, all exposed parking must be designed with architectural screening and landscape planting. Vehicular access to structured parking facilities cannot occur along Dixie Highway and NE 12th Avenue. Access must be located on an east/west connector (i.e. NE 34th Street, NE 37th Street, etc.) or NE 11th Avenue (behind frontages on Dixie Highway) and NE 12th Terrace (behind frontages on NE 12th Avenue). O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s U r b a n D e s i g n : S t r e e t L e v e l G u i d e l i n e s 11 Plazas Open plazas for public congregation should be encouraged to the extent that these spaces do not interfere with pedestrian and vehicular flow, as well as activities occurring at the building edge. Open plaza spaces of a minimum area of 1,500 square feet are required within the Park Place sub-area along the intersection of NE 34th Court and NE 12th Avenue and the intersection of NE 34th Court and Dixie Highway. The streetscape edge should be maintained by architectural features (arcades and canopies), site furnishings and landscape that offer shade. Special paving is required in these areas. Architectural Fenestration To complement pedestrian scale activity on NE 12th Avenue and Dixie Highway, a majority of the ground floor façades facing these streets should include transparent windows and doors to attract activity along the corridors. Transparent windows must make up a minimum of 65% of the building face at the gound level, therefore limiting expanses of solid walls along streets with pedestrian activity. Reflective surfaces are not permitted so pedestrians may view the interior activities. Architectural detailing is highly desired and recommended. Plazas are required along major intersections within the downtown to host street level activities O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s U r b a n D e s i g n : S t r e e t L e v e l G u i d e l i n e s 12 Fences & Walls Fences and walls within the downtown district may be useful to create views, as well as, provide screening, separate uses, and establish physical barriers between different land uses or spaces. Walls for screening should not be obtrusive. Height and proximity of the wall to the use area should not be imposing; therefore walls cannot exceed six feet (6') in height. Walls which face pedestrian spaces must introduce a two foot (2') wide minimum strip of landscape between the wall and the pedestrian space to soften the appearance. This landscape strip must be planted with groundcover or shrubs, sod is not acceptable. environment that is integral to the enjoyment of the sub-tropical South Florida climate. They can mask noise, direct attention, cool a small area and create positive images. Water features should avoid interference with circulation. Participatory fountains are encouraged within the Park Place sub-area to invite interaction and recreation. Nighttime lighting is strongly recommended near water features to add visual Water Features The use of water in a variety of forms is highly encouraged within the downtown district. Fountains add valuable accents to the setting and provide a sense of relaxation to the urban appeal and added security. Visual aesthetic should be carefully considered in the design of the fountain. A variety of effects are encouraged, such as bubbles, sprays, falls, mists, pools, basins and water interaction. Durable, solid materials should be used for containment. Water feature mechanical equipment should be remote and completely unobtrusive to the pedestrian areas. Exposed motors, piping, and electrical panels are not permitted. All water features must comply with all local codes and regulations. Screening undesirable areas from pedestrians is required. Water features add visual interest and soothing sounds O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s U r b a n D e s i g n : S t r e e t L e v e l G u i d e l i n e s 13 Public Art Public art is strongly recommended throughout the downtown area to establish space and identity, as well as, celebrate the local art community within Oakland Park. Any public art piece introduced to the downtown must be durable and free of sharp or obtrusive objects. Any public art recommended within the public realm of the downtown, must be reviewed by a public art committee (established and assigned by the City Commission) and the City for approval. Special Paving Paving becomes an important element within the urban environment in creating space on the ground plane and establishing identity within the downtown district. It is strongly recommended that special paving be utilized at major intersections (NE 38th Street and Dixie Highway, NE 34th Court and Dixie Highway, Oakland Park Boulevard and Dixie Highway, etc.), pedestrian crosswalks, sidewalks, plazas and bus stops. Additionally, special paving is required along NE 12th Avenue between NE 36th Street and NE 34th Street so that this area can be used as a flexible plaza for special and civic events. Paving materials at streetscape intersections and sidewalks should reflect the intensity of pedestrian traffic, and create identifiable ground plane links throughout the downtown area. Well marked pedestrian routes marked with special paving will also aid in the circulation system along the downtown district. Pedestrian paving can define uses along the streetscapes. By varying the appearance of the surface materials, distinctions can be made between public sidewalks and private outdoor areas (i.e. outdoor eating patio, etc.). It is recommended that all special paving in heavily used areas (i.e. bus stops, cross walks, etc.) be a tropical blend of colors and shaped in the deco style to match existing paving established along the Florida East Coast (FEC) corridor and NE 38th Street improvements. Special paving must be incorporated into crosswalks and sidewalks O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s U r b a n D e s i g n : S t r e e t L e v e l G u i d e l i n e s 14 Intersection Treatments Intersections within the downtown must accommodate pedestrian, bicycle and vehicular traffic traveling in a variety of directions with a variety of purposes. Intersection treatments within the downtown are opportunities for accent plantings, special paving, street furnishings and iconographic elements. Extreme care must be taken in the coordination of these elements with the necessary functions of the intersection in a way that maximizes safety, functions and aesthetics. Special care must be given to the intersections along both Dixie Highway and NE 12th Avenue, as they are the major visual corridors within the downtown. Barrier Free Design Barrier free design should be implemented through the downtown. Where pedestrian circulation crosses vehicular traffic, appropriate drop curbs and ramps should be provided. Drop curbs should be located in all directions pedestrian circulation is directed. Ramps should also be provided at buildings entrances and along stairs. Ramps should be an integral part of the streetscape and building design. A public elevator must be incorporated into the pedestrian bridge to ensure safe mobility. Intersection treatments are opportunities for special paving Barrier free ramps should be located along every intersection O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s U r b a n D e s i g n : S t r e e t L e v e l G u i d e l i n e s 15 Trash/Loading Facilities All building facilities for loading, trash and service should be incorporated within the building volume and screened with either a decorative wall, fence or landscaping (see Landscape Planting, Screening Plantings). These areas must not be visible from the street or pedestrian areas. Where buildings are of inadequate volume to accommodate these facilities, trash/loading facilities should be architecturally treated as a part of the building mass, and must be screened. Where trash/ loading area entrance is visible from pedestrian circulation, they are to be gated with solid panels. All trash/loading facilities must allow for access by garbage maintenance vehicles. Trash loading facilities must be properly screened from public areas Trash loading facilities with dumpsters must have solid panels separating the area from pedestrians Permitted Not Permitted O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s U r b a n D e s i g n : S t r e e t L e v e l G u i d e l i n e s 16 Sidewalks Pedestrian circulation is one of the most important aspects of the downtown. Sidewalks within the downtown area should connect major points of interest within the downtown, as well as connect with the future Broward Greenways project. The pedestrian pavement system of the streetscape will function to direct circulation and movement, as well as, serve as a place to implement site elements (benches, trash receptacles, water features, etc.) within the downtown. The pavement should be easily negotiated by all sidewalk users. It should not present any unnecessary obstructions and should not be composed of a material that will be dangerous or uncomfortable under any conditions. Special paving is required on the sidewalks along Dixie Highway and NE 12th Avenue, or in the Park Place sub-area, Dixie Mixed Use sub-area and the Civic Use sub-area to provide for pedestrian connectivity. Sidewalk dimensions in these areas shall range between 5' to 12' in width to accommodate a large number of pedestrians (See Sections A, B, C, D, E, F and G in Appendix). Sidewalks on all neighboring areas should be a minimum of 5' in width and should be introduced along all roadways in the downtown. Sidewalks should connect the neighborhoods to the downtown district O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s U r b a n D e s i g n : S t r e e t L e v e l G u i d e l i n e s 17 Bikeways Roadway surfaces must be designed to accommodate bicyclists and should connect to the surrounding bicycle systems and link the downtown to parks, open spaces, schools, libraries, civic buildings and neighborhoods within the area. Bike lanes shall meet all local transportation and state regulations. Bikeway lanes shall be properly located along neighborhood streets into the downtown district. Accommodations for bicyclists should be primarily for the recreational or leisure cyclist. Traveling at relatively slow speeds, the cyclists will likely make frequent stops along the downtown district. Therefore bike racks should be located at various locations throughout the downtown to provide safe and convenient temporary storage. Areas that are designated for bicyclists should use paving materials that are smooth and free of obstruction. There must be a clearly designated separation between bicycle zones and vehicular areas. This separation can visually be established by using varying colors or materials, where possible. Bikeways should be located along neighborhood streets into the downtown district O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s L a n d s c a p e P l a n t i n g 18 Landscape Planting Introduction To establish a strong image for the Oakland Park Downtown, the landscape treatments must be bold, layered and consistent. Plantings should provide a common framework and be governed by both the aesthetic qualities of the varying materials, and the functional concerns of the downtown. Landscape plantings must be of the highest caliber. Landscape plantings will provide important spatial definitions to the downtown area. They will aid in establishing a strong identity for the downtown while visually unifying its streets, sidewalks, medians, open spaces and yards. Full and healthy landscape plantings will also help mitigate the South Florida climate and create year round habitable outdoor spaces, as well as, screen unsightly views of exposed utility areas, loading zones and parking garages. Proper use of landscape plantings will also aid in directing pedestrian traffic throughout the downtown area. Landscape plantings will add character to the downtown district O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s L a n d s c a p e P l a n t i n g 19 General Requirements All plant material must be Florida #1 or better, in accordance with "Grades and Standards of Nursery Plants," published by the Division of Plant Industry, Florida Department of Agriculture. The minimum overall height of a shade tree must be eighteen feet (18') at the time of installation. The minimum height of a palm used as a street tree must be twelve feet (12') of gray wood or clear trunk at the time of installation. Shrubs and groundcover must be full in size and true to form. The minimum height for all required hedge material must be twenty four (24") inches at the time of installation and the plants must be spaced twenty-four (24") inches on center to form a hedge. Streetscape Plantings Streetscape plantings will serve two major purposes in the Oakland Park Downtown; first, it will provide much needed shade along sidewalks and streets; and second, it will be an important visual element in creating the overall character in the downtown (See Sections A, B, C, D, E, F and G in the Appendix). Trees and palms should be planted along major roadways, sidewalks and medians in a consistent distance from one another to create an organized and green urban environment. Trees and/or palms located along streets, adjacent to retail, must be single trunk. Multi-trunk species are not allowed in these areas. Streetscape planting must be Florida #1, in accordance with "Grades and Standards of Nursery Plants," published by the Division of Plant Industry, Florida Department of Agriculture. Below is a partial list of allowable shade trees. Please note, minimum height standards are eighteen (18') overall height with eight (8') to the lowest branch. SHADE TREES Bursera simaruba Gumbo Limbo Persea borbonia Redbay Swietenia mahagoni Mahogany Quercus laurifolia Laural Oak Quercus virginiana Live Oak Street trees will unify the area and offer shade to pedestrians O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s L a n d s c a p e P l a n t i n g 20 Signature Trees To establish a strong statement in the Park Place sub-area, signature trees are required as the standard street tree. The signature tree will take the place of streetscape plantings along roadways, sidewalks and medians (See Secions A, D, F and G in the Appendix). The signature tree is required to be a Florida Royal Palm, planted at a minimum height of twelve (12') of gray wood. It is important that these signature trees are matched, therefore consistent in form and stature throughout the Park Place sub-area to make a strong statement and to create identity. It is recommended that these trees be spaced tightly on center along all roadways, sidewalks and medians. Other Palm species, such as Date Palms are allowable within the Park Place sub-area in public gathering spaces, such as plazas, parks and open spaces. Signature trees must be Florida #1, in accordance with "Grades and Standards of Nursery Plants," published by the Division of Plant Industry, Florida Department of Agriculture. SIGNATURE TREES Roystonia elata Florida Royal Palm Phoenix dactylifera 'Medjool' Date Palm The Florida Royal Palm is the Park Place sub-area signature tree O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s L a n d s c a p e P l a n t i n g 21 Open Space Plantings Open Space Plantings must be lush and layered with a variety of plant material. All reasonable efforts shall be to use native landscape material. When available, it is recommended that all open space plantings include, at a minimum, 35% of native plant materials. The following is a partial list of native plant materials which can be used: NATIVE PLANT MATERIAL PALMS Acoelorrhaphe wrightii Paurotis Palm Coccothrinax argentata Silver Palm Pseudophoenix sergentii Buccaneer Palm Rhapidophyllum hystrix Needle Palm Roystonia elata Florida Royal Palm Sabal minor Dwarf Palmetto Sabal palmetto Sabal Palm Thrinax radiata Florida Thatch Palm TREES Acer rubrum Red Maple Bursera simaruba Gumbo Limbo Conocarpus erectus Buttonwood Lysiloma latisiliqua Wild Tamarind Pinus elliottii Slash Pine Quercus laurifolia Laural Oak Quercus virginiana Live Oak Swietenia mahagoni Mahogany Taxodium distichum Bald Cypress SHRUBS/GROUNDCOVER Chrysobalanus icaco Cocopulm Hamelia patens Firebush Lantana involucrate Lantana/Wild Sage Lyonia ferrruginea Rusty Lyonia Zamia pumila Coontie Plant diversity is strongly recommended in open space planting areas. A palette of plant material will create interest and offer a strong aesthetic quality to the area. O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s L a n d s c a p e P l a n t i n g 22 Screening Plantings Dense plantings along parking structures, the Florida East Coast (FEC) Railroad and busy streets can soften edges and buffer noise from habitable areas (i.e. residential neighborhoods, open spaces, schools, etc.). Proper placement of under story plantings, coupled with climbing vines, medium shrubs, palms and trees are strongly desired to minimize unsightly views (See Sections C and G in the Appendix). Any proposed screening plantings adjacent to the Florida East Coast (FEC) corridor's right-of-way needs to be coordinated with Florida East Coast (FEC) Railway. Planting along the Florida East Coast (FEC) corridor should continue the design character of the existing plantings located between Oakland Park Boulevard and NE 38th Street along the Florida East Coast (FEC) tracks. The following is a list of plant materials considered acceptable for screening purposes: PALMS Acoelorraphe wrightii Paurotis Palm Caryota mitis Fishtail Palm Cocos nucifera Coconut Palm Sabal palmetto Sabal Palm TREES Ligustrum japonicum Wax Privet ORNAMENTAL TREES Cassia surattensis Glaucous Cassia Lagerstroemia indica Crepe Myrtle Plumeria acuminate Plumeria Tabebuia heterophylla Pink Tabebuia TALL/MEDIUM SHRUBS Chrysobalanus icaco Cocopulm Ixora coccinea Red Ixora Jasminum multiflorum Star Jasmine Murraya paniculata Orange Jasmine Philodendron selloum Philodendron Plumbago auriculata Plumbago Varying landscape material screens a structured parking garage in the downtown district O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s L a n d s c a p e P l a n t i n g 23 Raphiolepis indica 'Magestic Beauty' Indian Hawthorn Tripsacum dactyloides Fakahatchee Grass Zamia furfuracea Scurfy Zamia UNDERSTORY SHRUBS/GROUNDCOVER Gamolepis chrysanthemoides African Bush Daisy Nephrolepis exaltata Sword Fern Polypodium phymatodes Wart Fern Rhoeo discolor Oyster Plant CLIMBING VINES Allamanda cathartica Golden Trumpet Bougainvillea sp. Bougainvillea Senecio confuses Mexican Flame Vine Trachelosperma jasminiodes Confederate Jasmine O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s L a n d s c a p e P l a n t i n g 24 Perimeter Landscaping Perimeter landscaping, or buffer landscaping, should be used to separate different land uses from one another (i.e. residential and commercial, etc.) and/or screen unsightly areas and utility zones. Perimeter strips, at a minimum of five (5') in width, must be introduced between the abutting property line and any off-street parking areas. Two (2) trees and a hedge, or other durable landscape material, must be planted for each thirty (30) linear feet within this strip between a nonresidential district is adjacent to a residestial lot. Irrigation All planted areas will require irrigation systems providing 100% coverage with “head to head” or 50% overlap throughout the Downtown. Irrigation systems should be capable of distributing 1 ½" of water per week during a maximum eight (8) hour watering cycle. All irrigation systems must be entirely automatic, with the ability to switch to manual operation in emergency situations. In high pedestrian areas, bubblers or drip irrigation is encouraged. Due to the intense pedestrian activity within the downtown zone, irrigation systems should be designed to avoid over spray into public and pedestrian areas. All irrigation systems should be equipped with automatic rain sensors for water conservation. Planting areas with native Parking Lot Landscaping Landscaping is required both within the interior area of a surface parking lot, as well as, along the perimeter of a surface parking lot to soften and screen the parking facility. A shade tree (see shade tree list) at a minimum height of twelve (12') must be planted in a planting bed island nine (9) feet in width, between every ten (10) parking spaces in a surface parking lot. Parking lot plantings are not required within a structured parking facility. One (1) tree and eight (8) shrubs must be planted in every parking island bed. plant materials and xeriscape planting practices are encouraged. A planted island is required between every ten parking spaces O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s L a n d s c a p e P l a n t i n g 25 Residential Landscaping Landscaping within the Neighborhoods zoning sub-area is intended to improve the appearance of certain yard areas. In the Neighborhoods, where properties are solely used for residential purposes, it is required that all lots under 6,000 square feet have a minimum of three (3) trees (overall heights over twelve [12']). In lots between 6,000 to 7,499 square feet, properties are required to have a minimum of four (4) trees (overall heights over 12'). In lots between 7,500 and 9,999 square feet, properties are required to have a minimum of five (5) trees (overall heights over 12'). Lastly, in lots exceeding 10,000 square feet in area, properties are required to have a minimum of six (6) trees (overall heights over 12'); or two (2) trees per unit, whichever is greater. In the North End Urban Residential area where single family or town homes are platted and introduced, landscape requirements shall be consistent with those described above. Where multifamily units are introduced in a condominium, or loft style, residential landscaping shall apply to off-street parking facilities, open space, entrance yards and buffer areas (see Perimeter Landscape). For every dwelling unit within a building structure, two trees and three shrubs must be introduced in the areas specified herein. O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s S i g n a g e & G r a p h i c s 26 Signage & Graphics Introduction Signage and graphics should functionally communicate information while fitting aesthetically into the Downtown. The signage graphics system should be a simple and coordinated signage system, and contribute to the overall design unity and identity of the area. This section is divided into private sector signage and public sector signage. It is pertinent that signage compliments other streetscape elements to direct the public to their destinations within the downtown area. Private Sector Signage The guidelines below are intended to regulate signage that is developed in the private sector. Building/Business Identification Building and business identification signs should state the name and address number of the building/business. Each building/business is allowed to display one sign on the building face, except in the case where a business is located at the corner of the building. In that case, one sign is permitted on two (2) sides of the building face fronting the establishment. Signs must offer design integrity and individuality, but must not impede on the overall quality of the downtown district. Signs within the Park Place sub-area should follow a similar style. Signage painted directly on the building face is strictly prohibited within the entire downtown. Neon is permitted upon special approval. The sizes of the building/ business identification signage should not exceed twelve inches (12") in letter or number height. No signage shall exceed twenty (20) square feet in area. Logos are preferred over lettering in identifying buildings and/or businesses. The type of identification signage may vary from a plaque mounted on a wall to a sign hanging perpendicular to the building face over an entrance. All building/business identification signage typology must go through approval by an urban designer of the City's Development Review Committee (DRC) at the City of Oakland Park and shall meet applicable City land development codes. Building/business identification signage examples O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s S i g n a g e & G r a p h i c s 27 Entry Monuments Entry monument signage shall be supported by a solid structure containing a sign face which is supported solely by its own ground-mounted base which is not affixed to a building. Entry monument signs shall be used as entry statements into neighborhoods, parks and future projects. They must be readable from the vehicles, but not overbearing. Entry signage shall not exceed thirty-two (32) square feet in size. Letters shall not exceed 16" in height. All entry monument signage must offer design integrity and individality, but must not impede on the overall quality of the downtown area. O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s S i g n a g e & G r a p h i c s 28 Public Sector Signage The guidelines below are intended to regulate signage that is developed in the public sector, by the City of Oakland Park. It is recommended that a way-finding sign program be established and followed for all signage within the public sector; including, Informational Identification Signage, Street Identification Signage, Directional Signage and Traffic Regulatory. Informational Identification Signage This type of signage will provide important information to the Downtown District to identify key places, focal areas or entries. Other types of informational identification signage may include: - Entry Signs into the downtown district - Public transit stops (Bus and future FEC commuter) - Public facilities - Parks, Oakland Park Library, City Hall, Post Office, etc. Street Identification Signage Street identification signage should be adopted in the downtown to unify the area and create a strong sense of place. Street identification signage will be combined with other categories of signage, such as traffic regulatory and directional signs to minimize the number of individual streetscape elements. Whenever possible, street identification signs within the downtown should incorporate custom posts and frames around a standard sign blade. In some cases, such as in major intersections, the street identification sign should be incorporated within the structure that supports the traffic signals and regulatory signage. The typeface or font of these signs should remain consistent with the City's overall Consistent character should be implemented into Street Identification signage style and graphic system. The addition of a simple icon or City logo can be included in the signage border or post to help distinguish this area as a special district. O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s S i g n a g e & G r a p h i c s 29 Directional Signage Directional signage shall identify major destination points or circulation routes within and near the Downtown District. To emphasize the character of the downtown, a series of signs directing vehicles and pedestrians through the area is recommended. The redirection of traffic northbound from NE 12th Avenue to NE 12th Terrace for three blocks (between NE 34th Street and NE 36th Street) in the Park Place (east) sub-area will slightly change the roadway circulation for northbound cars. Directional signs should be used to identify how businesses can be best accessed. There are two (2) major types of users for directional signs: vehicles and pedestrians/cyclists. In many cases, messages for both could be combined. Directional signs should only be separated when the areas for each group are located far from one another. Traffic Regulatory This category includes signs and traffic signals that direct and regulate the flow of vehicular traffic. All traffic regulatory systems should be replaced with mast arms designated to incorporate signal lights, street identification signage, and regulatory information. They shall also follow any state or federal regulations and be clear of obstructions. Mast arms better organize traffic regulatory signage and graphics O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s S i g n a g e & G r a p h i c s 30 Specialty Signage/Banners Specialty banners are highly recommended on light fixtures located along Dixie Highway and NE 12th Avenue. Banners are intended to advertise special events throughout the city, celebrate holidays, and add color during off times. They are intended to sustain a sense of excitement and change within the downtown. They are designed to be changeable, as opposed to disposable. Due to the strength and intensity of the South Florida sun, it is recommended that all banner fabrics be made from marine canvas and/or vinyl fabrics. These types of fabrics will withstand prolonged exposure to the sun and will allow air movement through the banner and discourage damage by strong winds. Vent slots and spring loaded arms help make banners durable Banners create interest along streets O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s S i t e F u r n i s h i n g s 31 Site Furnishings Introduction Site furnishings play an important role in the overall character of Downtown Oakland Park. Careful consideration must be given to the selection of site furnishings, such as those listed below. Coordination of materials and colors, functionality, durability and handicap accessibility are paramount to the selection and implementation of furnishings. Recommended Materials - Aluminum/Cast Aluminum - Stainless Steel - Concrete - Specialty hardwoods - Cast iron (with epoxy based paint) The image below depicts the specified bike rack to be used within the downtown district: Manufacturer: Urban Accessories Model: D, Bike Rack Color: Pioneer Sq. Green Bike racks offer visitors a safe and secure place to temporarily store bicycles Bike Racks Bike Racks will provide a safe and secure place for residents and visitors to locks bicycles and participate in retail and civic activities. The placement of bike racks should be out of way of pedestrian traffic at the sides of buildings and sidewalks, but also within sight, or under a light fixture, for security purposes. Racks might be architecturally treated as significant items or minimized for their visual impact. Bike racks may be integrated with light standards or other site elements to reduce their visual impact. O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s S i t e F u r n i s h i n g s 32 Bollards Bollards should be designed to be both functional and aesthetically pleasing. The main function of the bollard is to discourage vehicular intrusion into pedestrian dominated spaces. Bollard design, location and durability, however, must consider emergency and maintenance vehicles. Design should respond to the architectural style of the downtown area and streetscape elements. Flagpoles Flagpoles should be located in groups of three or five (3 or 5) to create focal points at portals and major statement areas. It is recommended that flags and banners be changed during various times of the year to add visual quality to the downtown area. Up-lighting on flagpoles is encouraged for nighttime interest. Flagpoles announce major statement areas Bollards separate areas within the groundplane and ass character to the downtown district O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s S i t e F u r n i s h i n g s 33 Benches Seating within the downtown will be used for social interaction, people watching, waiting and resting. Seating must occur along streetscapes, plazas and open spaces, and shall be consistent with site furnishings implemented throughout the downtown. Commercial advertisements on benches are not permitted. Benches should be placed outside of the main pedestrian flow, but within close proximity to pedestrian zones. Seating should be placed in shaded open spaces; plazas, parks and bus stops; to invite longer stays. Special attention should be taken in the selection and placement of benches within the Oakland Park downtown. The image below depicts the specified bench to be used in the downtown district: Manufacturer: Landscape Forms Model: Scarborough 72” backed bench with no center arm, woven metal Color: Ivy powdercoat Tree Grates Tree grates must be provided for trees planted in paved areas. Tree grates shall be designated with small openings to be walkable, yet porous and moveable for maintenance purposes. Tree grates must be accessible per local American with Disabilities (ADA) codes and regulations. The style of the trees grates should be consitent with the style of other site furnishings selected within the Oakland Park downtown. The image below depicts the specified tree grate to be used within the downtown district: Manufacturer: Urban Accessories Model: Kiva 5’ Sq. Cast Aluminum ASTM B26 Benches provide seating in the downtown Tree grates protect tree roots and adds walkable area to the sidewalk O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s S i t e F u r n i s h i n g s 34 Planters As special site elements, planters and flower pots can visually enhance a space and provide areas for landscape relief, as well as reduce or accent an architectural mass. Planters should be designed with consideration to both the physical form of the planters, as well as the plants used within each planter. providing trash receptacles is their location. Trash receptacles must be located on each city block facing both Dixie Highway and NE 12th Avenue so they are accessible and well located for pedestrian. They should also be located at portals, pedestrian nodes, intersections and seating areas, but not to impede views or expel unpleasant odors. Trash receptacles should not interfere with pedestrian traffic and therefore should be located within planting beds near or along curbs for easy maintenance access. The below image depicts the specified trash receptacle to used in the downtown district: Manufacturer: Landscape Forms Model: Scarborough receptacle side opening, vertical strap side panel Color: Ivy powdercoat Planters help decorate the streetscape environment Trash receptacles to used in the downtown Trash Receptacles Trash receptacles must be consistent in terms of color, materials and style with other streetscape elements. They shall compliment other furnishings and help to unify the image of downtown. The major consideration when O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s S i t e F u r n i s h i n g s 35 Drinking Fountains Drinking fountains offer refreshment to downtown users. When located under shade and near seating, they help to create a refreshing oasis in the hot South Florida sun. Drinking fountains can be freestanding or attached to a wall or building surface. They should compliment other site furnishings within the downtown by incorporating similar materials. Fountains must also provide for handicap use and must have self closing controls to minimize inefficient or improper water usage. Parking Meters Parking meters shall be provided for public parking spaces. Parking meters must clearly designate the time of operation and cost. Meters shall be uniform in color, material and style to ensure continuity within Downtown Oakland Park. Where possible, individual meters per space are discouraged and modern electronic group meters are encouraged. The City or parking authority shall designate a parking fee collection and equipment, once the downtown is established. However, individual parking meters per space are prohibited within the downtown. Drinking fountains offer refreshment to the visitors of the downtown district Modern electronic group parking meters are encouraged to better organize parking lots O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s S i t e L i g h t i n g 36 Site Lighting Introduction A well coordinated lighting system is a very effective way of establishing a sense of security and unity throughout the Oakland Park downtown. Although the primary function of site lighting is to provide nighttime orientation and security, light fixtures become very visible site elements in creating a downtown image. Light fixtures should be cohesive within the downtown district with thematic variations consistent between streetscape lighting, pedestrian lighting and any added decorative fixtures. Light fixtures must be metal halide with "master color" bulbs for truest color rendition. Careful consideration must be given to the proper relation between the scale of a light fixture and the scale of the areas where it is to be located. In general, the larger the scale of the area, the higher the mounting height should of the luminaire. The size of the light fixture shall also be in proportion to the height of its pole to avoid awkward proportions. Fixtures should be economical, durable and aesthetically pleasing. The selection of the fixtures throughout the downtown should be based on the following: - Quality of fixture in terms of materials, lens, constructions, etc. - Longevity - Ease of maintenance - Aesthetics and style - Initial costs versus long term cost O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s S i t e L i g h t i n g 37 Streetscape Lighting The main objective of the streetscape lighting is to provide sufficient illumination for vehicular and pedestrian safety and to elevate the aesthetic quality of the downtown streets, in daylight and in nighttime darkness. Lighting should be hierarchal varying in intensity between major thoroughfares and side streets. All poles should be located a minimum of 4' from the curb face and maintained plumb and secure. The placement of poles should not create undesirable obstructions in pedestrian thoroughfares and all lighting fixtures shall meet all regulatory requirements. It is recommended that light poles along Dixie Highway and NE 12th Avenue be outfitted for specialty banners. The specified streetscape light of the downtown district is a Sternberg Vintage fixture: Manufacturer: Sternberg Vintage Lighting Top Fixture: Cambridge A783 Metal Halide 175 watt Medallions: City logo Color: Park Green Ornamental Pole: Barrington 5214-TFP6 Fluted 6” shaft, 14’ pole Color: Park Green Light fixture examples of the Cambridge acorn light with dark green Barrington fluted poles O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s S i t e L i g h t i n g 38 Pedestrian Lighting Pedestrian lighting within the Oakland Park Downtown District must serve a variety of functions. This lighting must establish a safe and secure atmosphere for nighttime use and provide a distinct ambiance, which differentiates pedestrian areas from adjacent vehicular areas. The fixtures, poles and bollards must have a human scale and offer visual appeal, which compliments the other streetscape elements in creating a unique image for the Oakland Park Downtown. Landscape Lighting Landscape lighting, or up lighting, is an efficient way to achieve pleasant accent effects throughout the downtown district. Accent light fixtures directed upwards into a tree or palm foliage provides low intensity but often dramatic illumination of nearby pedestrian zones. Landscape up-lighting adds interest to the landscaping during nighttime hours O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s T r a f f i c , P a r k i n g & C i r c u l a t i o n 39 Traffic, Parking & Circulation Introduction Creating a vibrant, exciting urban environment where pedestrians feel safe and comfortable directly relates to how vehicular circulation and parking works within the urban environment. The City of Oakland Park's Downtown area has all the typical issues associated with an urban environment related to traffic calming, shortage of parking, as well as both Dixie Highway and the FEC corridor bisecting the Downtown area. As previously discussed in the Downtown Mixed- Use District Zoning Ordinance, the proposed center of Downtown is Park Place. Park Place is generally bounded by NE 11th Avenue to the west and NE 12th Terrace to the east, and NE 36th Street to the north, and NE 34th Street to the south. Transit Oriented Development As well as being centrally located within the Downtown, the Park Place sub area is bisected by Dixie Highway and the FEC corridor. Although bisected by these major transportation corridors, this presents a unique opportunity for the City of Oakland Park to promote the principles of Transit Oriented Development and Design. As described and defined by Peter Calthorpe in "The Next American Metropolis," Transit Oriented Development (TOD) is a "mixed-use community within an average 2,000 feet walking distance of a transit stop and core commercial center. TOD's mix residential, retail, office, open space, and public uses in a walkable environment, making it convenient for residents and employees to travel by transit, bicycle, foot or car." The City of Oakland Park's Park Place sub area includes retail, office, and residential, which is consistent with the mix of uses included in a TOD. Currently, the FEC in conjunction with the Florida Department of Transportation, the South Florida Regional Transit Authority and the Metropolitan Planning Organizations of several South Florida counties are commissioning a study to examine potential commuter traffic on the FEC corridor. The City of Oakland Park has a unique opportunity to position the Downtown for a possible commuter station located within Park Place. The proposed mix of uses, structured parking and pedestrian circulation is consistent with Transit Oriented Development. Traffic Circulation Traffic circulation and parking are key components to the Downtown Master Plan. In most cases, the existing street grid is respected, however, traffic flow is modified in several areas to facilitate the redevelopment of the downtown, specifically, Park Place. This new circulation is illustrated below in the diagram and is described on the following page. O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s T r a f f i c , P a r k i n g & C i r c u l a t i o n 40 NE 12th Avenue (between NE 34th Street and NE 36th Street) Northbound traffic on NE 12th Avenue will be redirected to NE 12th Terrace via NE 34th Street, therefore making NE 12th Terrace a two- lane one way street for three (3) blocks. NE 34th Street will become a one way street with traffic moving east between NE 12th Avenue and NE 13th Avenue. NE 12th Terrace will have stop signs at NE 34th Court, NE 35th Street and NE 36th Street. At NE 36th Street, one way northbound traffic on NE 12th Terrace will have the opportunity to turn either left (westward) or right (eastward). NE 36th Street will remain a two-way corridor. NE 12th Terrace (between NE 34th Street and NE 36th Street) Southbound traffic on NE 12th Avenue will become a one way south thoroughfare for three (3) blocks between NE 36th Street and NE 34th Street. At the intersection of NE 12th Avenue and NE 34th Court, a stop sign will be added to allow traffic moving in the east/west direction on NE 34th Court to safely cross the intersection and the FEC tracks. There will be a right turn lane for cars on NE 12th Avenue to safely turn right across the tracks in the westerly direction. NE 37th Street (between NE 12th Avenue and NE 13th Avenue) The existing one way eastbound traffic on NE 37th Street will be converted to two way traffic both eastbound and westbound. Turning Movements off Dixie Highway onto NE 38th Street Southbound traffic on Dixie Highway will no longer be able to turn left onto NE 38th Street. An s-curve exit will occur before the light on 11th Avenue, vehicles will safely exit of Dixie Highway, turn left at the four way stop on NE 38th Street and continue across Dixie Highway and NE 12th Avenue to the east. NE 39th Street will no longer connect to Dixie Highway, instead a cul-de-sac and one way alley south to Circulation around Park Place NE 36th Street NE 34th Court NE 35th Street NE 34th StreetDixie HighwayNE 12th TerraceNE 12th Avenue O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s T r a f f i c , P a r k i n g & C i r c u l a t i o n 41 NE 38th Street will safely separate these traffic movements. NE 12th Avenue Parking In addition to the traffic circulation in Park Place, parking remains an important issue. Although the ultimate cross section of NE 12th Avenue illustrates both one way and two way circulation with parallel parking, there is a need for developing an interim solution for the businesses that currently exist in the Downtown with respect to parking. Currently, the Oakland Park Downtown has a need for parking. Therefore, as an interim step to the ultimate cross section of NE 12th Avenue, the City can implement a portion of the NE 12th Avenue improvements as an incentive to spark redevelopment in the Downtown. The interim step in the implementation includes reconstructing NE 12th Avenue with storm drainage and utility improvements as well reconfiguring circulation and parking. The interim step will examine the possibilities of including angled parking on both the east and west sides of NE 12th Avenue, where possible, as well as sidewalks and swale areas to improve drainage problems. In some places, parallel parking may be included due to drainage and roadway building elevations issues. The reconstruction of NE 12th Avenue in the interim solution will have a negative impact on the parking, however, less than previously considered plans. The City is considering alternative solutions to the parking which include the construction of surface parking lots on City owned lands, parking lease agreements with neighbors within the Downtown area, and public private partnerships in the development of parking garages within the Downtown redevelopment area. O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s A p p e n d i x A1 Illustrative Plan Legend 1 - Park Place 2 - Downtown Park 3 - Civic Campus: City Hall Library Proposed Spiher Community Center 4 - Post Office 5 - Future FEC Commuter Station 6 - Future Neighborhood Park NORTH NOT TO SCALE 3 4 1 5 2 6 O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s A p p e n d i x A2 Section A NE 12th Avenue in Park Place O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s A p p e n d i x A3 Section B NE 12th Avenue in Dixie Mixed Use O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s A p p e n d i x A4 Section C NE 12th Terrace in Park Place O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s A p p e n d i x A5 Section D Dixie Highway in Park Place O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s A p p e n d i x A6 Section E Dixie Highway in Dixie Mixed Use O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s A p p e n d i x A7 Section F NE 11th Avenue in Park Place O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s A p p e n d i x A8 Section G NE 34th Court in Park Place O a k l a n d P a r k D o w n t o w n M i x e d U s e D i s t r i c t D e s i g n G u i d e l i n e s A p p e n d i x A9 Circulation Plan Legend 1 - Park Place NORTH NOT TO SCALE 1